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Full text of "The San Francisco directory for the year .."

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1223 04590 4480 



a D v e K t . Q£HEKAL K ftEMiiiMCE !ii 




til 


STATE 



lESTIITAIIMIECD. 



FIRE AND MARIN 



Are now prepared to issue Policies on all kinds of FIBST CLASS 
Hisks, both Fire and Marine. 



PEINCIPAL OFFICE, NO. -409 CALIFORNIA STREET 

Opposite the Bank of California. 



OFFICERS- 
TYLEE CUKTIS, President, PETER DONAHUE, Vice President, 

CHAS. H. CUSHING, Secretary, T. N. CAZNE&U, Marine Director. 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS. 



Tyler Curtis, A. J. Bryant, 

A. H. Kutherford, John Kosenfield, 
E. Burke, J. W. Nye, 



C. D. O. Sullivan, 
Jolin J. Marks, 
Hugh Whittell, 



John H. Saunders, 
Frank M. Pixley, 
Alexander Austin, 



John Middleton, 
Peier Donahue, 
Thos. N. Cazneau. 



THE LOSSES PAID 

On the Pacific Coast under the Massachusetts Law by the ~N"FAV ENGLA.ND 
"jVTTTTTT A T i Life Insurance Company, of Boston, amount to 

OVER SIX TY THOUSAND DOLLARS. 

THE MAIN POINTS OF THE LAW UNDER WHICH THESE CLAIMS 

WERE PAID. 



flj^WNo Insurance on Life shall be forfeited by non payment of premium. 

The net value of the Policy shall be ascertained at the time of the lapse of premium, and be 
considered a net single premium of temporary insurance. 

If the death of the party occurs within the term of temporary insurance, the Company shall be 
bound to pay the whole Policy, the same as if there had been no lapse of premium ; provided the 
Company shall have the right to deduct from the face of the Policy the amount of premium due, 
with interest, at the date of death. 



THE HEW ENGLAND MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY 



Was Incorporated in 1835. It has accumulated 






Assets of 



,000,000.00. 



This Company charges no more for Premiums on its insurance, than those companies that have 
the unjust clause "pay promptly or forfeit," embodied in their policies. 



fieaerol Amm%< 



Office, N. E. Corner California and Sansom Sts., 



San Francisco. 



iv SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



MERCHANTS' MUTUAL 
MARINE 

INSURANCE COMPANY 

Of San Francisco. 



ORGANIZED APRIL 2, 186S 



OFFICE, 

No. 406 CALIFORNIA ST 

SA.2ST FEANCISCO. 



laplfal Fail lp f ■ wt 

LOSSES PAID PROMPTLY IN U. S. GOLD COIN. 



-*♦.-♦-.■•.»- 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS, 

C. L. TAYLOR, JABEZ HOWES, 

F. ROEDING, A. L. TUBBS, 

ISAAC E. DAVIS, C. ADOLPHE LOW, 

J. B. SCOTCHLER, W. J. ADAMS, 

A. M. SIMPSON, R. E. RAIMOND, 

JAMES IRVINE, JAMES P. FLINT, 
WILLIAM SCHOLLE. 

J. B. SCOTCHLER, JABEZ HOWE! 

President. Vice-President. 

E. W. BOTJB.2TB, 

Secretary. 



This Company is engaged exclusively in Marine Insurant 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



PACIFIC OIL & LEAD WOiK 



t »*m > 



Capital Stock, - - - $600,000. 



< ■».— > 



Established for the manufacture of Linseed, Castor and other Oils, and of 
White Lead, Zinc and other Paints. Works are now in operation, and prepared 
to furnish Oils of first quality, and quantity sufficient for the supply of the Pacific 
Coast. Also, Oil Cakes and Meal in quantities required. 

Highest price paid for Flax Seed, delivered at the Company's Works, King 
Street, near Third. 

OFFICE— 3 and 5 Front Street, San Francisco, CaL 

Orders addressed to " Pacific Oil and Lead Works," will have immediate 
attention. 

OFFICERS : 

President, JOHN BENSLEY, 

Vice President, - - L. B. BENOHLEY, 

Superintendent, - - - B. P. BRUNER, 

Secretary, - SAM'L I. O. SWEZEY. 



PACIFIC ROLLING MILL CO. 

0APITAL STOCK, (1,000,000. 

Established for the manufacture of Railroad and Merchant Iron. Every 
variety of Shafting, including all sizes of Steamboat Shafts, Cranks, Pistons, 
Connecting Rods, &c. Car and Locomotive Axles and Frames, and Ham- 
mered Iron of every description and size. 

OFFICE : 
3 AND 5 FRONT STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Orders addressed to PACIFIC ROLLING MILL CO. will have immediate attention. 

HIGHEST PRICE PAID FOR SCRAP IRON. 

PRESIDENT, WM.ALYORD, 

VICE PRESIDENT, - L. B. BENCHLEY, 

SUPERINTENDENT, - - - B. P. BRUNER, 

SECRETARY ------ SAM'L I. C. SWEZEY. 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



Pacific Mail Steamship Co, 

. ■ m m ^ — 

NEW YORK LINE, VIA PANAMA. 

Leave New York loth and 30th. — Steamers Henry Chauncey, Ocean 
Queen and Rising Star (3,000 tons each). 

Leave San Francisco 3d and 17th. — Steamers Montana, Sacramento and 
Arizona (3,000 tons each), Constitution (3,500 tons). 

Steamer of 3d calls at San Jose de Guatemala, Acajutla and Punta Arenas 
Steamer of 17th at Mazatlan, Manzanillo and Acapulco, and connecting Atlantic 
Steamer at Kingston, Jamaica. 



CHINA LIN1. 



Leave San Francisco for Yokohama and Japan on the 1st of every month 
until May, 1872, beginning in May, 1872, on the 1st and 16th. — Steamers Amer 
ica, Japan, Great Republic, China, Colorado and Alaska (4,500 tons each) 



Shanghae Branch. 

Leave Yokohama four times a month for SHANGHAE, via Hiogo and Nag 
asaki. — Steamers Golden Age, Oeegonian, New York and Costa Rica 
(2,500 tons each). 

Hakodate Branch. 

Steamer Ariel, 1,700 tons, leaves Yokohama for Hakodate on the first o 
every month. 

fjgf When the sailing date falls on Sunday, the steamer will leave the preceding 
Saturday. All steamers leave San Francisco punctually at 12 o'clock, noon. 



New York to Aspinwall, 1,980 miles 

San Francisco to Panama, 3,250 " 

San Francisco to Yokohama, 4,800 " 

San Francisco to Hong Kong, ------- 6,400 " 

Yokohama to Shanghae, 1,200 " 

Yokohama to Hakodate, 540" 

Office of the Company in San Francisco, 

AT THEIK WHAEF, C0ENEE FIEST AND BEANNAN STEEETS 

ELDRIDGE & IRWIN, Agents. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 



Vll 



®W§W FACE 





Ben. JMlaiay, President = = San Francisco. 
William Morris, Yice President = " 

€. J. BremtoiQL, Secretary = " 

HMlaiay <& Brennani, General Agents " 

DISPATCH STEAMERS TO THE FOLLOWING PLACES : 

NORTHERN ROUTES. 

Portland (Oregon), Sitka (Alaska), Eureka, Crescent City, 
Port Oxford, Coos Bay and Vmpqua River* 



SOUTHERN ROUTE. 

Monterey, San Simeon, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, 
Los Angeles, Anaheim and San Diego, 



MEXICAN ROUTE. 

STEAMER EVERY FORTY DAYS. 

Cape St. Lucas, Mazatlan, San Bias, Guaymas, and La Paz, 



OFF-ICE, 217 S^NSOM STEEET, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



VU1 SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 




EXPRESS AND EXCHANGE GO, 



< »»» > 



CAPITAL, - - $5,000,000 



< mm» > 



TOI3STOII s -A.Ij OPPICES: 

No, 84 Broadway, - - - New York 

N. W. cor. California and Montgomery Sts., San Francisco 



EXPRESS LINES 

TO ALL PARTS OF CALIFORNIA, NEVADA, UTAH, COLORADO, MONTANA, 

NEBRASKA, KANSAS, OREGON, WASHINGTON AND IDAHO TERRITORIES, 

BRITISH COLUMBIA, LOWER CALIFORNIA AND MEXICAN 

PORTS, NEW YORK, ATLANTIC STATES, EUROPE. 



BILLS OF EXCHANGE AND TELEGEAPH TEANSFEES 

On New York, Boston and Philadelphia, payable in the principal cities of the United States 

a"nd Canada. Also, Bills on London, Dublin and Paris. Letters of Credit 

issued on our New York House, exchangeable for Circular 

Letter, payable in all parts of Europe. 



4 »■— » 



COLLECTIONS AND COMMISSIONS 

Of all kinds executed, and General Express Business attended to promptly in all parts of the 
United States, Europe and Canada. Orders for Passage furnished from Queens- 
town, London, Liverpool, Hamburg and Havre to New York. Also 
from New York to San Francisco — Overland or by Steamer. 



W. G. FARGO, President 
LLOYD TEVIS, Vice President, 
THEO. P. WOOD, Secretary, 
CALVIN GODDARD, Treasurer. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE: 

LLOYD TEVIS, ) « r 

_ > ban rrancisco. 

D. O. MDLLS, j 

CHAS. E. McLANE, Supt. Bank, San Francisco. 

J. J. VALENTINE, Gen'l Supt. Express, 



New York. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. IX 



THE 



Bank of California, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



QA&WAM* • » $5,®®®, 



i ■»»— » 



D. O. MILLS, - - - President. 

W. C. RALSTON, - - . Cashier. 

AGKEJSTTS : 

In New York Messrs. LEES & WALLER. 

In Boston TREMONT NATIONAL BANK. 

In London . - - ORIENTAL BANK CORPORATION. 



< -»m» > 



The Bank has Agencies at Virginia City, Gold Hill, White Pine, and 
Correspondents at all the principal Mining Districts and Interior Towns of the 
Pacific Coast. 



LETTERS OF CREDIT ISSUED, 

Available for the purchase of Merchandise throughout the United States, Europe, 
India, China, Japan and Australia. 



HICHAM M SALE ON THE ATLANTIC CITIES. 



DRAW DIRECT ON 

LONDON, LEIPSIC, 

D UBLIN, FRANKFORT- ON -MAIN, 

PARIS, AUCKLAND, 

ST. PETERSBURG, MELBOURNE, 

AMSTERDAM, YOKOHAMA, 

HAMB UR G, SHANGHAE, 

BREMEN, HONGKONG, 

VIENNA, SYDNEY. 



X 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



Jmttom anfo ^u Jfranrisor $an&, limited, 

(INCORPORATED UNDER THE JOINT STOCK COMPANIES' ACTS OP 1862 AND 1867— GREAT BRITAIN; 
WITH WHICH HAS BEEN CONSOLIDATED THE BUSINESS OF 

ihtmrft §: fctmpmtg, Ifattlttrs, §aw jrrmrosar. 



Capital, 



$5,000,000, Gold 



Of which $3,000,000 is fully paid up. 



HEAD OFFICE, 22 OLD BROAD STREET, LONDON. 

DIRECTORS: 
FREDERICK RODEWALD, London, Chairman. 

£ ¥ £, E £ EN - (of Russe11 & Sturgis, Manila,) London, Deputy Chairman. 
H. L. BISCHOFFSHEIM, (of Bischoffsheim & Goldschmidt,) London. 
J. F. FLEMMICH, (of Fred. Huth & Co.,) London. 
JULIUS MAY, (late of San Francisco,) Frankfort-on-the-Main, 
J. S. MORGAN, (of J. S. Morgan & Co.,) London. 

£ C J?,£xT P £ R ?°H?, (of the late flrm of Parrott & Co., Bankers,) San Francisco. 

BARON H. de STERN, (of Stern Brothers,) London. 

RUDOLPH SULZBACH, (of Sulzbach Brothers,) Frankfort-on-the-Main. 



Manager, M. D. PEEBLES. Secretary, JAMES M. STREETEN. 

London Bankers, - - - LONDON JOINT STOCK BANK. 

San Francisco Branch, 423 California St. 

. MILTON S. LATHAM, President 
CAMILO MARTIN, Asst. Manager. 
Cashier, ARTHUR SCRIVENER. Accountant, ALFRED BANNISTER. 

This Bank is ^^^^^^^ovC^vt^XM.^ in any part of the world : to transact every description 
01 wanking and EXCHANGE Business, and to negotiate California and 
Tl „ ,„,,„ . , . _ other American Securities in Europe. 

The following are Agents and Correspondents, on any of whom, as alsS on the Head Office of the Bank 
Letters of Credit will be granted, and Drafts Drawn. ""«-*•«» me J"im, 

New York, Drexel, Morgan & Co. 

Boston Third National Bank. 



Philadelphia Drexel <fc Co. 

London London Joint Stock Bank. 

Bischoffsheim & Goldschmidt. 

Friihling & Goshen. 

Fred. Huth & Co. 

J. S. Morgan & Co. 

Stern Brothers, 

Ireland Provincial Bank of Ireland. 

Paris Bischoffsheim, Goldschmidt & Co. 

A. J. Stern <fc Co. 

Drexel. Harjes & Co. 

Frankfort-on-the-Main.. Gebruder Sulzbach. 

Berlin Deutsche Bank Actien Gesellschaft 

Hamburg John Berenberg Gossler & Co. 



Germany Bank of Saxe Meiningen. 

Dresden Robert Thode <& Co. 

Amsterdam La Banque de Credit et de Depot 

(l6S PflVS-BtlS. 

Antwerp Nottebohm Brothers. 

>aples and Florence ..Anglo-Italian Bank. 

Genoa Dapples & Co. 

Kome Plowden & Co. 

Valparaiso and Lima.. Fred. Huth, Gruning & Co. 

China and Japan Hong Kong and Shanghai Bank- 

„ ing Corporation. 

„ ., LeComptoird'Escomptede Paris. 

Manila Russell «fe Sturgis. 

Australia and ) /Union Bank of Australia. 

New Zealand/ iBank of New South Wales. 



The undermentioned are Correspondents of the Bank : 



Bowles Bros. & Co., Paris. 

English Bank of Rio de Janeiro, Limited, Rio de Janeiro 

Dualde Alzuyeta <fc Co., Acapulco, Mexico. 

Southern Bank, New Orleans. 



Geo. C. Smith <fc Bro., Chicago. 
Gilmore, D-.mlap & Co., Cincinnati. 
Barlholow, Lewis & Co.. St. Louis. 



San Francisco, Cal., 1st January, 1872. 



MIL TON S. LATHAM, 

President. 



, 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



XI 



The Bank of British Columbia, 

FAZD X7F CAPITAL, - - $1,490,000 

In 14,900 Shares, of $100 Each, 

WITH POWER TO INCREASE TO $10,000,000. 

LONDON OFFICE, 5 EAST INDIA AVENUE, LEADENHALL STREET. 



CHAIRMAN. 

T. W. L. 91ACKEAN, Esq., London, (late of the firm of Turner & Co., China.) 

DEPUTY CHAIRMAN. 

ROBERT GILLESPIE, Esq., (Messrs. Gillespie, Moffatt & Co., Loudon.) 

COURT OF DIRECTORS IN LONDON. 

JAS. ANDERSON, Esq., (Messrs. Anderson, Anderson & Co., Londou.) 

EDEN COLVILLE, Esq., Fenchureh Buildings, Loudon. 

MARTIN RIDLEY SMITH, Esq., 1, Lombard Street, London, (of Messrs' 

Smith, Payne & Smiths, Bankers.) 
II. D. HARRISON, Esq., (Messrs. Falkner, Bell & Co., San Francisco.) 



< »■» » 



BRANCHES s 

PORTLAND, OREGON ; VANCOUVER ISLAND, AND BRITISH COLUMBIA. 



AGB1TS s 

New York, AOENCY BASK OP MOXTREAL. 

Canada and British STorth American Provinces, BANK OF HOXTREAL. 

Mexico and South America, LONHON BANK OF MEXICO & SOI I II AMERICA. 

Australia and the Fast, ORIESTAI. It ASK CORPORATIOS. 

England, BTATIOSAL PROVINCIAL BANK OF USGLAXD. 

England KORTH «fe SOUTH WALES BANK OF LIVERPOOL. 

Scotland, BRITISH LISTEN COMPANY'S BANK. 

Ireland, BANK. OF IRELAND. 






This Bank is prepared to receive Deposits on Current Account ; to buy and sell Exchange and 
Bullion ; collect Bills ; discount Approved Paper ; make advances on good Collateral Securities ; 
grant Credits, and transact a general Banking Business. 

SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE: 

I, E. COR. CALIFORNIA ANG 5AN5QM STREETS* 
WILLIAM H. TILLINGHAST, Manager. 



Xll 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



Hj I Iv 



m 



: \jik® 



INSURANCE COMPANY 

OF BAM FHAHCISCEh 

(The * California Lloyds,' established in 1861.) 

Nos. 416 and 418 CALIFORNIA STREET. 



< ».» > 



Cask Capital ■ if 50*000 Gold* 
Assets exceed 1*000,000 Coin* 



< »«— > 



i®^ Fair Rates. 
Prompt Settlement of Losses. 
f^r* Solid. Security. 



DIRECTORS: 



J. Mora Moss, 
James Otis, 
Moses Heller, 
N. J. Dana, 
M. J. O'Connor, 
W. W. Montague, 
Daniel Meyer, 



Adam Grant, 
William Scholle, 
Charles Kohler, 
Joseph Seller, 
W. C. Ralston, 
I. Lawreuce Pool, 
A. Weill, 



N. G. Kittle, 
Jabez Howes, 
Nicholas Luning, 
John Parrott. 
Milton S. Latham, 
L. Sachs, 
M. D. Sweeney, 



Edward Cadwalader, 



SACRAMENTO. 

J. F. Houghton, 



Jos. Brandenstein, 
Gustave Touchard, 
Nicholas Larco, 
Geo. C. Hickox, 
Morton Cheesman, 
Geo. C. Johnson, 
T. E. Lindenberger. 



L. A. Booth. 



MARYSVILLE. 
L. Cunningham, Peter Decker. 

«♦* 



J. G. Kittle, 



NEW YORK. 

Benjamin Brewster, 

*♦_♦,♦► 



PORTLAND, O. 

Henry Failing. 



James Phelan, 



GUSTAVE TOUCHARD, President. N. G. KITTLE, Vice President. 

CHARLES D. HAVEN, Secretary. GEO. T. BOHEN, Surveyor. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. X iH 



THOS. H. SELBY & CO. 

Nos. 116 AND 118 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, 

IMPORTERS OF 

Bar and Plate Iron, 

Slieet Copper, S&irto, 

AND ALL KINDS OF 

PLUMBING GOODS, 

AND MANUFACTURE AT THE 

Cor. of Howard and First Streets, San Franciseo, 



Sheet Lead, Drop Shot, &c, 

ALSO, PROPRIETORS OF THE 

SELBY LEAD AND SILVER SMELTING WORKS, 

S-A.U FRANCISCO. 



CRUDE LEAD AND SILVER BARS 

PURCHASED. 



MAIN OFFICE, 116 AND 118 CALIFORNIA STREET. 



XIV 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



THE PACIFIC IRON WORKS 




ESTABLISHED 

EMBRACING 



I1ST 1850. 



MACHINE, BOILER, FORGING AND SMITHING, 

PATTERN AND WOOD WORK DEPARTMENTS, DRAWING AND LIBRARY ROOMS, &c. 



IRA P. RANKIN. 



CEORCE W. FOCC, Superintendent. 

ALBERT P. BRAYTON. 

These works have now been in successful operation for the past twenty years. From a comparatively small 
beginning in the year 1850, its increasing patronage has each year demanded enlarged facilities, until nur establishment, 
in all its appointments, will compare favorably with that of any similar one in the country. 

Our patterns, in variety and extent, are unsurpassed : embracing the latest improvements in all classes of ma- 
chinery, adapted to use on this coast. Our several departments are well equipped with skillful workmen, and efficient 
tools; enabling us to execute all orders entrusted to us promptly, and in the most workmanlike manner. With ample 
facilities for doing work, as also for procuring our supplies from first hands, we are enabled to give our customers first 
class machinery at. prices frequently paid for inferior work. The most skillful designing and engineering talent, apply- 
ing to the various branches of mechanical work, constantly at the service of our customers. 

Orders for all classes of Machinery, Castings or Boiler Work, promptly executed at the most reasonable rates. 
Sole Agents for Huntoon's Patent Goveknok, the best Engine Eegulator'in use. 

Particular attention given to Steamboat and Steamship Work. Alining and Hoisting Machinery of the most 
approved construction. Depot for the Hansbrow Pimps. 

We have fitted up a Foundry for tho exclusive manufacture of Cast Iron GAS AND WATER PIPE by Farrar's 
patent process. This pipe is superior to any of Eastern or European manufacture. The leading sizes kept constantly 
on hand. 

First and Fremont Sts., between Mission and Howard, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 



XV 



GEORGE HOWES. 



JABEZ HOWES. 



GEORGE HOWES & CO. 




A. 3ST ID 



COMMISSION MERCHANTS 

302 CALIFORNIA STREET, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 
HT" •\7VA.TLmTLm 

XT E "W YOEK. 



DISPATCH LINE 

CLIPPER SHIPS FOR NEW YORK. 



AGENTS FOR SUTTON & CO'S 



Clipper Ships from New York 



t o 



SAIST FRANCISCO. 



XVI 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



PHCENIX IRON WORKS 



■ i ^ 1 1 » 



JONATHAN KITTREDGE, 



MANUFACTURER OF 



Iron Doors, Shutters, 



Wrought 

Iron 
Girders, 




Prison 
Cells. 



AND ALL KINDS OF HOUSE SMITH WORK. 



Fire and Burglar-Proof Safes 

Constantly on hand and made to order at the shortest notice. 



< 
ffl 



CO 

h 

< 
> 




> 

03 



o 

H 
O 



Nos. 18 and 20 Fremont St., near Market, San Francisco. 



Welded Steel and Wrought-Iron Safes. Forging and Machine Work. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



VAN WINKLE & DAVENPORT, 



IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 



Iron. Steel 




K'Ca 



f AS NPB All IHf f !Il_ 

Cumberland Coal, 
AXLES, SPRINGS, BLACKSMITH'S TOOLS, ETC. 

XTos. 413 and 415 Market Street, 
SAX FRANCISCO, CAL. 

I. S. VAN WINKLE. C. W. DAVENPORT. 






GLASS WORKS 



I NEWMAN <& DUVAL, 

OFFICE AND WORKS, 
FOOT OF 1 FOURTH STREET 

MANUFACTURE ALL VARIETIES OF 

GREEN AND BLACK HOLLOW WARE GLASS 

PRIVATE MOULDS FOR ALL KINDS OF BOTTLES 



Furnished at from Ten to Thirty Dollars. 



2 



XV111 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



SAN FRANCISCO 

SAVINGS UNION, 



O F F I O E z 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



GUARANTEE CAPITAL AND RESERVE FUND 
Paid in ? $ 203,500. 

Amount Deposits held, $ 4,101,428. 1 4 < 



President, 
Vice President, 



o o 
OFFICERS: 

JAMES de FREMERY. 
- C. ADOLPHE LOW. 

DIRECTORS : 

JOHN ARCHBALD, CHARLES BAUM, 

GEORGE C. POTTER, WASHINGTON BARTLETT, 

CHARLES PACE, ROBERT B. SWAIN, 

ALEX. CAMPBELL, Sex. 
Cashier and Secretary, - LOVELL WHITE. 
See General Review for a Notice of the operations of this Institution. 



LOGAN & CO. 

11.19 Montpury Street, 107 and 109 Sitter Street, 



IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 




«HL MsMbb.Mi 











9 



msun iEFH¥m ' w@@&i 



EMBROIDERIES, PATTERNS, CANVAS, 

EMBEOIDERING FLOSS AND TWIST, 
And all other articles for Needle work, at Wholesale and Retail. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 



XIX 



MASONIC 

wmm in mm nw 



Guaranteed Capital, 



$150,000, 



OFFICE, NO. 6K)8TST., MASONIC TEMPLE 

i»ri:si«e.\t, VICE PRESI1>EVX AWI> CA8HI 

LE0NED1S 1. PKATT. WILLIAM H. CULTEE* 

ROARO OF DIRECTORS 

LEONIDAS E. PRATT, H. ROSEKRANS 

GEORGE ROBINS, 
FRANCIS SMITH, 



M. R. ROBERTS, 
CALEB S. HOBBS, 
C. H. WETHERBEE, 



WM. H. CULVER, 

SECRETARY, 

©EOIfcGE IflBIIS. 



JOHN F. SNOW 
HIRAM T. GRAVES, 
JONATHAN KITTREDGE 
W. T. GARRATT 
FRANK EASTMAN. 



nels may be sent, the Bank not being accountable for their sSted^ver? 'TtoS^SSL J^T 1 Ch ^ m 
should accompany his first deposit A nass-honlr will ho <i»ilJ!.«S +ZzZ y ' ;. "^nature of the depositor 
or sent by mafl i/desired. D P epoIit 8 ^ ageUt ^ whom thc ^^ *™*». 



McCAIN, FLOOD & McCLURE 

IMPORTERS AND JOBBERS OF 

[ FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC 

Clotlimg, (Semtlemeia's Fraraisliig Ooois, 

HOSIERY, WHITE COODS, BLANKETS, ETC. 




Between Front and Battery, 






XX SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 

SAVINGS & LOAN SOCIETY. 

«♦.♦.♦► 

UKTOOIRT'OIt-A-TEID 12TH -A.miL, 1859. 
« ^ » » » 

N, E. COR. MONTGOMERY AND MARKET STREETS, 

S-A.3ST FRANCISO. 

+~+ 

The objects for which this Association is formed, are, that by its operations, the members 
thereof may be enabled to find a 

Secure and Profitable Investment for Small Savings, 

and may have an opportunity of obtaining from it the use of a moderate capital, on giving 
good and sufficient security for the use of the same. 

OFFICERS: 

PRESIDENT M. D. SWEENY. 

VICE-PRESIDENT C. D. 0. SULLIVAN. 

TREASURER EDWARD MARTIN. 

ATTORNEY RICHARD TOBIN. 

Any person can become a member of this Society on paying an entrance Fee of TWO DOLLARS, and 

subscribing to the By-Laws. 

Deposits can be made of any sum from TWO DOLLARS and FIFTY CENTS to any amount. 

Sap* LOANS MADE ON SECURITY OF REAL ESTATE WITHIN THE CITY AND COUNTY. «^J 

JAMES OTIS. W. A. MACONDRAY. F. W. MACONDRAY. 

MAGONDRAY & CO. 

SHIPPING 

AND 






MERCHANTS, 
No. 206 SANSOM STREET, 

S A. 3ST F H .A. 3ST O I S O O . 



AGENTS FOR THE 

YANG-TZE INSURANCE ASSOCIATION, SHANGHAE, 

AND 

HONG KONG LINE OP SAILING PACKETS. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. xxi 



First Premium awarded wherever exhibited— Fair of Mechanics Institute, 1865 & ?— State Fair 1868. 

ESTABLISHED 1856. 



STEAM COFFEE AND SPICE MILLS, 

CHARLES BERNARD, 



MANUFACTURER AND DEALER IN 



FAMILY CHARTRES COFFEE. 

ALWAYS ON HAND 

. EO AST All iBilll COFFEE, 

AND SPICES OF ALL KINDS. 
Also, Saleratus. Carbonate of Soda, Cream of Tartar & Baking Powder 

NO. 707 SANS03I STREET, CORNER OF GOLD, 

Between Jackson and Pacific Streets, SAN FRANCISCO, Cal. 



Geo. 0. Whitney, Chas. M. Kimball, James G. Whitney. 

GEO. O. WHITNEY & CO. 



IMPORTERS k 




Nos. 315, 317, 319, and 321 PINE ST,, (South Side,) 

Between Montgomery and Sansom. 



PIONEER FURNITURE WAREROOMS. 



FMii'HF©* wjMavkmwwym m9Uiri»«Mu»9 c»v«t 



Particular attention paid to Drapery and Decorating. 



XXII SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



HENRY B. WILLIAMS. HENRY P. BLANCHARD. CHARLES B. MORGAN. 

WILLIAMS, BLANCHARD & GO. 

Shipping & Commission 

MERCHANTS, 

No. 218 California Street, 
San Francisco. 



f HI HIEClAlf I f KUt-IIl 

INSURANCE COMPANY, 

OF LONDON. 

Chief Office, 1 Royal Exchange, London. 



CAPITAL, .... $5,000,000. 

FIRST ISSUE, - - - $2,500,000. 



MACFARLANE, BLAIR & CO., Agents, 

302 CALIFORNIA STREET. 

This Company accepts risks on Specie and Cargo at Current Rates. 
» ».» » 

Note. — By the Company's Articles of Association, it is provided that after payment to the 
Stockholders of a dividend of 10 percent, per annum, one fourth of the residue of profits will be 
rateably divided amongst those insurers out of whose business profits have been made during the 
year. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT, 



XX111 



4 ^*> <^^e3b^»£-U« «K) ^^$) 

SHIPPING AND COMMISSION 

MERCHANTS 

AND 

AUCTIONEERS. 

•-•-• 

AGENTS OF THE 

Regular Dispatch Line of Honolulu Packets. 



-« — «,.-» — ►_ 



Particular attention paid to the Sale of Merchandise ; Purchase and Shipment of California and 

Oregon Produce ; Chartering of Vessels ; Effecting Insurance, etc., etc. 

Liberal Advances made oh Consignments. 



HTos. 204 and 206 California Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



PLATT & NEWTON, 









M &2 






MERCHANTS, 



AND 



NEW YORK. 



XXIV 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



1 



IiLOM ft 00. 



IMPORTERS AND JOBBERS OF 



American, English and German 




r± 





i 



Agricultural 



IMPLEMENTS 



AND 



MINING 



TOOLS. 




General Agents on the Pa- 
cific Coast for the 

World Mower 

AND 
AND 

TORNADO 

THRESHER. 



Nos. 3 c£ 5 Front St. 

Near Market. SAN FRANCISCO. 



WSr STRICTLY WHOLESALE. Orders respectfully solicited. 





W® 



ran, Nielsen 

& COMMISSION 

And Commercial Agents of the 

(SIAWT PQWDEH COSSPJL 

OFFICE, 210 FRONT STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 



XXV 



*8 



wim 

41T BATTERY STREET, COR. MERCHANT, 



Late of Cox & Nichols — San Francisco. 



COMMISSION MERCHANTS, AND DEALERS IN 

HIDES, TALLOW, PELTS, OIL, 

LIATII B 




gfe 



OF ALL KINDS, INCLUDING FRENCH, EASTERN AND CALIFORNIA, 



Importers of Tanners' Tools and Materials. Also, Agents 
for Jas. S. Mason & Co's Blacking. 

PAY THE HIGHEST CASH MARKET PRICES FOR HIDES, TALLOW AND PELTS. 
MARK CONSIGNMENTS-A. C. N. & CO., SAN FRANCISCO. 



E»ni'\D JOXE8, 
JOSEPH BOSTOJV 



■J 



Santa Cruz. 



SAMl'EL C. OKAY, 

San Francisco. 



GRAY, JONES <te CO. 

DEPOT OF THE 

Sllf A §111 f Mil 



TRADE 



5^™°*^ 



E. JONES&C9 



MARK. 



NO. 418 BATTERY STREET, 

Manufacturers exclusively of the best quality of 

; OAK SOItB H1HH« 

BOSTON, JONES & CO., SANTA CRUZ. 



XXVI SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



fill 0KHfKHB, 

No. 108 BATTERY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, 

AGENT FOR 

DUPONT'S CANNON, MUSKET, BLASTING AND SPORTING 

owDsa. 



Lake Superior and Pacific Fuse Company's 

NEVER-FAILING 



"W7"^A.m^wA.3srTEr>. 



WINCHESTER REPEATING ARMS COS 

RIFLES, CARBINES, MUSKETS AND FIXED AMMUNITION, 



E. Raas, San Francisco. C. Raas, Paris 

C. & E» RAAS & GO. 



IMPORTERS OF 



9SS, ®&®®@S, ©411111111, 

ITALIAN CLOTHS AND TAILORS' TRIMMINGS, 
ISTo. 616 S-A-G^l-A.3SJ:ElSrTO STREET, 



Above Montgomery, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



M. ULLMANN & CO. 

« 

IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 

Beaver, Broaflcli, Cassimere, mil Tailors' Trimmings, 

628 & 630 SACRAMENTO STREET, 

Between Montgomery and Kearny, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 



XXVU 




NORTHERN 



Iftl 



OF LONDON AND ABERDEEN. 




Subscribed Capital, * * 810,090,000. 
Accumulated Funds -, s « 5, 00 0,0 00* 

Annual Fir© Pieminm, ■ * 050,000* 

LOSSES PROMPTLY PAID IN U. S. GOLD COIN. 

1 m > 

W. L. BOOSER, - - - Agent, 

319 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

The Policies of this Company are not only guaranteed by the Capital, but also by the unlimited 
personal responsibility of nearly one thousand shareholders. 



ROYAL MAIL STEAM PACKET CO. 



No. 319 CALIFORNIA STREET. 

Notice is hereby given mat arrangements nave Deen entered into between tie 
ROYAL MAIL STEAM PACKET COMPANY 

AND THE 

PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPACT, 

FOR the forwarding of treasure to the Bank of England, and to the Bank 
of France, in Havre, by the steamships of the two companies, by means 
of through bills of lading, to be granted bv the Commanders of the Ships 
of the Pacific Mail Steamship Company, for "delivery to C. A. HEXDERSOX, 
Agent of the Royal Mail Steam Packet Company, to be sent across the 
Isthmus, and embarked on the Ships of the R. M. S. P. Co. For particulars 
as to through rate of freight, applv to the undersigned. 

Arrangements can be made for the shipment of Gold and Silver Ores from Aspinwall by the 
Companv's Steamers on favorable terms. 

The Steamships of the R. M. S. P. Co. leave Aspinwall for Plymouth, calling at St. Thomas, on 
the 6th (7th when there are 30 days in the previous month) and 22d of each month. 

Passages, at reduced rates, can be secured on application to the undersigned, who will give any 
further particulars that may be required about the Company's business. 

W. L. BOOKER. 




XXV111 SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



Helbixg & Straus, 



IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 



CROCKER T, 

Class and China Ware, Cutlery, Lamps, 

SILVER-PLATED AND BRITANNIA WARE,] 

LOOKING CLASSES, ETC. 
102 AND 104 BATTERY STREET, COR. OF PINE, 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



C. VEXTARD, 



625 AND 627 FRONT ST. 



MANUFACTORY OF THE 



ORIGINAL CHARTRES COFFEE, 

First introduced into this country in June, 1851. 



All kinds of Green, Roasted and Ground Coffees. 

ALSO, SPIOES AND CALIFORNIA MUSTARD. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 



XXIX 



MAIN & WINCHESTER, 

■ABBUBY WABBH0U81 



MANUFACTURERS AND IMPORTERS OF 

Harness, Bridles, Saddles, Whips, 

COLLARS, SADOLEWARE, ETC. 

AND 

LEATHEE ®f ITJEEY DESCRIPTION, 



Sole Agents for the Pacific Coast for 

HILL'S CONCORD HARNESS AND COLLARS. 



-«♦-»- ♦» 



Nos. 214 and 216 Battery St., San Francisco. 



W. F. RUSSELL, 

SPECIAL AOENT FOR 



m 11 



run 



OF HONG KONG, 



J\.1VI> 



HONG KONG DISTILLERY CO. 

[LIMITED.] 

®fil#©$ %M Mmnmomm Bt® 9 tap st®iwm$) 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



XXX 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



SULLIVAN, KELLY & CO 

(Successors to Kelly, Walsh §r Co.) 
IMPORTERS AND WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 



H Ik I 






9 








GLASS, &e. 

101, 103 k 105 Front St., & 110 Pine Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 






Sole Agents for the Pacific Coast, for the sale of Chance's 21 oz. and 26 oz. C. 
S. Glass. Also, Agents for the London and Manchester Co's White Plate Glass- 

JAMES R. KELLY. C. D. 0. SULLIVAN. 



SAN FRANCISCO 




94C$ 



AGTOHY. 



Constantly on hand,*a Large and Complete Assortment of 



tea 



WHALE LINE, BALE ROPE, TARRED MANILA ROPE, ETC. 

MANUFACTURED FROM 

PURE MANILA HEMP. 



Office at TUBBS & CO., 611 and 613 Front Street. 

MANUFACTORY AT THE POTRERO. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 



XXXI 



STOCK COMPANY. 



PITAL STOOK, - i800 9 6 

Number of Shares, 3,000. $100 per Share. 



« — »» » 



I^COR^OH^TED APRIL 3, 1867. 



r» 



llBlS t President ft Hanacer 
SPBEC 






< — »— > 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 

C. SPRECKELS, GEORGE H. EGGERS, C. H. VOIGT, 
H. HORSTMANN, F. HAGEMANN. 

COMMERCIAL AGENTS. 



210 CALIFORNIA STREET. 



Works, S. W. cor. Eighth and Brannan Sts. 



< ■»»»> 



This Refinery, having recently trebled its capacity, is 

better prepared to supply the great demand for 

its various kinds of 

SUGARS AND SYRUPS. 



XXX11 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



THOMAS THOMPSON. 



THORNTON THOMPSON. 



THOMPSON BROTHERS, 






if 1 





In 




129 & 131 BEALE STREET, BETWEEN MISSION & HOWARD. 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



I »» m I 



Light and Heavy Castings of every description 

Manufactured. 



ALBAHY BREWERY 

C. SPRECKLES & CO., Proprietors. 



I 



to 



< 

CO 




GO 



SAN F RANCISCO , CAL. 

This Establishment has been enlarged for the third time during the past season, and now 
possesses facilities unsurpassed by any competition for the production of 

SUPERIOR CREAM ALE, 

To supply the increasing demands of the public. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. xxxiii 



ESTABLISHED IN 1853 



li & DAIiEaA 



i 

Importers, Manufacturers and Jobbers 



WOOD AND WILLOW WARE 

Twines^ Baskets, Brushes, Paper Bags, etc. 

Direct Importers of Baskets from leading German and French Manu- 
facturers. 



«■».»> 



Agents for the Sale of 

San Francisco Percussion Match Go's Matches, 
American Net and Twine Co's Twines, 
Boston Flax Mills Twines, 

J. C. Oonroy & Co's Fishing Tackle, 

Hollingsworth & Whitney's Paper Bags, 
Sherman's Improved Clothes Wringers, 
0. E, Griswold & Co's Feather Dusters, 
F. McLaughlin's Brushes, 

Parke's Magic Chum, (call and examine it,) 
AMD PROPRIETORS OF 
ARMES' STAIR, EXTIRA. BROOM. 



Our Stock is the largest on the Pacific Coast, and our facilities 
for importing and manufacturing enable us to sell goods at the 
lowest market price. Send for a catalogue. 



SALESROOM AND WAREHOUSE AT 

XTos. 215 <& 217 Sacramento St 

SAJNT FRANCISCO. 



XXX VI 



AN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



3 rattislt (Simmttml §nmmtt $0. 

HEAD OFFICE, - - GLASGOW. 



-4<**-+^^-*— 



Capital, 



$5,000,000 



..»..<>.»_ 



ACCEPTS RISKS IDNT 



California, Nevada, Oregon and Washington Territory, 

And all Premiums earned on the Pacific Coast are invested in California State Securities. 



A@!AEIa4» ®£4iK $§ ©< 



l 9 e2>«hil£^«k S5& ^^5>© 

302 CALIFORNIA ST. SAN FRANCISCO. 



THEODORE BOGEL. 



JOHN ABRAMS. 



JAMES E. CARROLL. 



H 



WHOLESALE 









IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 



DRUGS, MEDICINES, PROPRIETARY ARTICLES, 

Finery GOODS, 
Druggists' Sundries, Perfumery, etc., etc. 



Near California, 



San Francisco. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. XXXVli 



THE PACIFIC 

PNEUMATIC CAS CO. 

IS THE 

OLDEST ESTABLISHED 

AND THE 

mWMY SUCCESSFUL C J &MPAN1 

Which makes a business of erecting 

lonsv i§ §as wins 

ON THIS COAST. 



HO ACCIDENT TO PROPERTY, LIMB OR LIFE 

HAS EVER BEEN CAUSED BY THE WORKS OF THE 

Pacific Pneumatic Gas Company. 

In none of its town-works has the consumer ever been 
left without gas after dark. 



-* »»— > 



THE PACIFIC PNEUMATIC GAS COMPANY 

Absolutely guarantees tie success of all its i oris. 



-* ■»-■> > 



J. W. STOW, - - - President. 

A. D. BELL, - Secretary. 

F. P. HOWABJD, - Special Agent. 



OFFICE : 
304 Pine Sreet, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



XXXV111 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



JOHN TAYLOR & GO. 

512 A1STD 514= WASHINGTON STREET, 

IMPORTERS OF AXIt DEALERS 1HT 



.AND SUNDRIES, 

The latest styles of Glassware and Fixtures for first-class Drug Stores, 

With Glass Labels, Counter and Prescription Scales, Druggists' 

Sundries, Perfumery and Liquor Labels in good variety. 



ASSAYERS' MATERIALS AND CHEMICALS. 



Bullion and Assay Balances, 

Humid Assay Apparatus, 
Cupelling Furnaces, 



French and Sand Crucibles, 

Dixon's Celebrated Black Lead Crucibles, 

And everything required in an Assay Office. 



PHOTOGRAPHIC GOODS. 

We have purchased Mr. Wm. Shew's Entire Stock of Photographic Materials and Chemicals, and 
have now the most complete and desirable stock of goods in this line in the city, which we are sell- 
ing at low prices. 

Agents of PACIFIC GLASS WORKS 

All Orders w ill have prompt and careful attention. 




GARDEN SEEDS FOR 1872. 







C. L. KELLOGG, 

427 SANSOM ST., near Clay, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



IlVriPOIEtTIEiR, .A-HNTID DEALER IN 



GARDEN, 

FIELD, 

JIT, 




MESQUIT GRASS. PURE CALIFORNIA ALFALFA. 

Seeds will be packed in the best manner, to go any distance, and forwarded as desired. Light kinds of seeds can 
be forwarded through the mail, postage paid. All orders, by mail or otherwise, (with remittances) will be attended to 
with care and dispatch. The greatest care will be taken to have all Seeds sold bv me pure, reliable and the very best 
and choicest of their kind. A Liberal Discount made to the Trade. The Agents of Wells Fargo it Go's Express 
and Postmasters generally, »re requested to act as agents for receiving orders lor seeds. Boxes of Seeds containing 
100 Papers, or more, put up for the Country Trade, in such assortments as desired. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. XXXIX 



SPRING VALLEV 



flf 1. * 




Wilis, 



1 



Incorporated under Act of the Legislature, April 8, 1858. 



< — .» > 



CAPITAL STOCK, - - - $8,000,000. 

Divided into 80,000 Shares of $100 Each. 



RESERVOIRS: 

San Andres, Capacity 4,650,000,000 Gallons. 

Pilarcitos, " 1,045,000,000 " 

Lake Honda, " 34,000,000 " 

College Hill, • " 14,000,000 " 

Francisco Street, " 7,000,000 " 

Russian Hill, " 4,000,000 

Buchanan Street, " 2,000,000 ' 

Brannan Street, " 500,000 



OFFICERS: 

President, W. F. BABCOCK. 

Vice President, - JAMES D. WALKER. 
Secretary, E. M. MILES- 

TRUSTEES: 

JOHN PARROTT, W. F. BABCOCK, 

LLOYD TEVIS, JAS. D. WALKER, 

N. LUNING. LEWIS CUNNINGHAM. 

CHAS. E. McLANE. 



OFFICE OF THE WORZS, 

516 CALIFORNIA STREET, 



xl 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



WAMMT* ©ATI 



CELEBRATED 







WM. G. BADGER, Sole Agent, 



No. 7 SANSOM STREET. 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



a 



OFFICIALS 



This will certify, that the Hallet, Davis & Co's Pianos, exhibited by Wm. 
G. Badger, at the Eighth Industrial Fair of the Mechanics' Institute, held at San 
Francisco, 1871, received the FIRST PREMIUM and the only Medal awarded 
for Eastern-made Pianos. 

A. S. HALLIDIE, Pres. Board of Managers. 

W. H. WILLIAMS, Sec'y " " 



HETHEMANN c£ GO. 

IMPORTERS AND JOBBERS OF 

M4 



DRY GO ODS AND C ARPETS. 

©OLE AGENTS FOR. 

Veuve Xavier, Jouvin & Co's Paris Kid Gloves, and Dachez Shawls. 






ORDERS RECEIVED FOR A\T DESCRIPTION OF 

BLANKETS, FLMHELS MB CASSISEBES 

Manufactured by the San Francisco Pioneer Woolen Factory. 
HIDES AND WOOL BOUCHT AT HIGHEST MARKET RATES. 

EXCHANGE ON ENGLAND, FEANOE, GEEMANY AND NEW YOEK. 

No. I SAWBtM Iflllf, 

ADJOINING COSMOPOLITAN HOTEL, SAN FRANCISCO. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



xli 







DIRECTED BY THE FATHERS OF THE SOCIETY OF JESOS. 

m i§n, nrooBFo&ATED in 1 

WITH A FULL STAFF OF 

PROFESSORS AND TUTORS, 

AND A 

THOROUGH SYSTEM OF INSTRUCTION 

IN 

LATIN, MATHEMATICS, HISTORY, 

GREEK, NATURAL SCIENCES, GEOGRAPHY, 

ENGLISH, ARITHMETIC, USE OF THE GLOBES, 

MENTAL PHILOSOPHY, BOOK-KEEPING, PENMANSHIP, 



lyj 



FRENCH, SPANISH, ITALIAN, GERMAN, 

AMI MSWMJ™™"" 



m.m 



usie 



w$ 



A2TD DRAWING, 

DIVIDED INTO TWO REGULAR COURSES : 



BESIDES A 

raEPARATOEY DEPARTMENT. 



^ 



TERMS : 

Board and Lodging, Tuition in either Classical or Commercial Department, Washing and 

Mending, Stationery, Medical Attendance and Medicines; Fuel, Baths, per week $8 00 

Total per Session, of ten months, $350, payable half-yearly in advance. 

N. B.— If more than two brothers enter the College, each additional one pays only £200 per Session. 



For further information, or for Catalogue of the College, apply to Rev. A. Varsi, President of 
Santa Clara College, Santa Clara County, or to St. Ignatius College, 841 Market Street, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 



Xlii SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 

STENCIL PLATES 



CUT B"5T 



it THUWOEf HT 8 

318 TFiroxit Street, 

S-A-OSr FRANCISCO, CA.X.- 



STENCIL PLATES, when handsomely executed, present the cheapest and best mode of advertising that 
can be adopted. This is the experience of all who use them. 

STENCIL PLATES OF EVERY PATTERN cut at this establishment in a style unequaled by any 
other workmen in California. 

Merchants and others are invited to call and examine specimens in proof of the above assertion. 

Orders from abroad, as well as those given in person, promptly executed and forwarded. Parties sending 
orders by letter are particularly requested to white plainly and give the exact space they wish the 

LETTERS TO OCCUPY. 

By close application and superior execution of work during an experience of thirteen years, Mr. TRU- 
WORTHY has extended his business to its present proportions. His present facilities for rapid and tasteful 
execution of all work in his line are far superior to those of any other in this State or in the Union. 

Having purchased all the late John Halt's Stencil Tools, Plates and Impressions, and everything pertaining 
to his business, I am prepared to furnish his customers with fac-similes of his work. 

BRUSHES, INK AND MARKING POTS FOR SALE. 

REMEMBER THE PLACE, 

F- Ik-dC TRUWORTHY'S, 
318 FRONT STREET, comer Commercial, (Up Stairs) San Francisco, California. 



S. ETTINOER, 

MANUFACTURER OF 

FRINGES, GIMPS, CORDS, TASSELS, 

BUTTONS, and all kinds of 

LADIES' BB.ESS TRIMMIIGS, 

UPHOLSTERY AND MILITARY TRIMMINGS, ETC., ETC. 

105 Post Street, op p. tbe White House, 

Neat Work, moderate charges. saitst Francisco. 






ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. x Jiii 




u<§ 




FRENCH 

BOARDING m DAT 

FOR TOTJaTG LADIES. 

Conducted by /VLada/vie L. Forster. 

French, German and English Systematically Taught. 

For terms apply at the Academy, 

912 SUTTEE STREET, NEAR LEAVENWORTH, SAN FRANCISCO. 



Private Lessons given in French.. 



< — »» > 



COURSE OF STUDY: 

French, German, and as complete an English Course as is taught in our best Seminaries. 
Those who choose can take a Select Course. 

SESSIONS: 

The year is divided into two sessions of twenty-four weeks each, or four quarters of twelve 
weeks each. 

Pupils will be received at any time, but it is earnestly desired that all be present at the 
opening of the term. 

No deduction for absence, except in case of protracted sickness will be made. 

EXPENSES: 

Per quarter of twelve weeks, payable invariably in advance. 
Kindergarten for children under six years - 

Elementary Department - - - - - - - 18 00 

Intermediate --------- 

Higher 30 00 

Stationery ....----- 3 00 

Board and Washing -------- 96 00 



xliv 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



Imp@f*tikti@n ®ii*@©t! 



® 



ill. 



i 



Comtnereial Street, cor. Zieidesdorff, 

Has just received, by Steamer Constitution, the finest assortment of 

fiir.GtEiXSH ^@@®S, 

Ever Imported to this Market, Comprising 

Mixed Coatings, 
Fancy Cheviots, 
Blue Diagonals, 
Worsted Coatings, 
Black Super. Broadcloths, 
Fancy Stripes, 
Grey Checks, 
Black Doeskins, 
Bedfords, 
Blue Pilots, 
Blue Beavers, 
Black Beavers, 

Brown Beavers, &c. 

THIS IS THE ONLY PLACE IN THE CITY WHERE THE GENUINE 
ENGLISH GOODS CAN BE HAD. 




Remember our Prices to Order are: 

JPANTS, $6 00 

BUSINESS SUITS, - 25 00 

BEAVER SUITS, 35 00 

ML SHORT, 527 Commercial Street. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 




.Vb'VWttC&'.A.&feVlW. 



Nos,2l3, 215, 217 and 219 MARKET STREET, 9 and II BEALE ST. 

SAN FKANCISCO. 

HOBBS, GILMORE & CO. 

Mfiirufaoturers or 

JfcLfl © a 



ALSO, 



satwhstg- -A.isrr) iPTaJ^isrTisrcz- miilil,. 



;co 



The Pioneer Expressman of Forty-Nine, 

AND FOR THE PAST TWENTY YEARS 



ISSION MEHCHASfT 

And Dealer in all kinds of 

HAY, GRAIN AND PRODUCE, 

OFFICE AX 

TODD'S GRAIN DEPOT, 

200 33A."\7"XJS JS'JL'JHLUEIET, 3XT. 33. oox*. Sacramento, 

Warehouse, 118 & 130 Sacramento, and 119 Commercial Sts., San Francisco. 



John P. Clabrough. 



Joseph Clabrough. 



CLABROUGH ^ BROS. 

630 Montgomery St., 2d door South of Washington, San Francisco, 

And No. 89 BATH STREET, Birmingham, (England) 

GUN, PISTOL & RIFLE MANUFACTURERS, 




Importers of every description of 

FIRE ARMS AND CUN MATERIALS, 

Colt's, Smith and "Wesson's, Sharp's, Henry's and Spencer's RIFLES AND PISTOLS, 

Dixon's Powder Flasks, Shot Pouches, etc., Wostenholm's Pocket Cutlery, Eley's Caps, Wads and all kinds of 

Breech-Loading Ammunition. Sole agents for Stanton's Patent Rebounding Gun i-.ock. 

New work made to order. Repairing done in the best manner, and warranted to give satisfaction. 



xlvi SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



U 



ENTERPRISE" SAWfflQ AND PLANING MILL. 

D. A. Macdonald, > „..»., JJ- H - Macdonald, 

Joseph McUill, 5 IH. Chapman. 

D. A. MACDONALD <& CO. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



DMrs, Sm§l®% Blinds and Molding! 

217 to 225 Spear St., and 218 to 226 Steuart St., 

Between Howard and Folsom, San Francisco. 

« ^ i 

FINISHING WORK for Buildings constantly on hand and got up to Order. 



S. Herrmann, C. H. Young. 1'hil. Neis. 

HERRMANN, NEIS & CO. 

(Successors to Casimir Winter <fc Co.) 

IMPORTERS OF 

wWmp wWmWkw JUM mmmWmmw diUl 
Agency of the South Park Malt House, 

NO. 313 SACRAMENTO STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 



Orders from any part of the Pacific Coast Promptly Attended to. 



' 



WXXXULSf KHGI.AOTBR, 

PACIFIC FRINGE FACTORY! 

NO. 751 MARKET STREET, bet. 3rd and 4th Sts. 



Fringes ! Fringes ! Fringes ! 

Ladies \ be careful, and save your money, by purchasing your Dress Trimmings at then 

PACIFIC FRINGE FACTORY, No. 751 MARKET STREET. I 

Having on hand the largest assortment of silk in the State, I am prepared to manufacture] 
goods to order, and sell for cash lower than any other house in the State. FRINGE, GIMH 
BUTTONS and all Trimmings made in the best manner and of the finest material, and satisfaction 
guaranteed. Give me a call and judge for yourselves. DON'T FORGET THE PLACE. 

751 MARKET STREET, 

PACIFIC FRIHGE FACTORY. I 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 



xlvii 



II 






FQOTDBY 



J^ND 






mum 






9 



ANQKLL, PALMER & 00., Proprietors, 
Nos. 247 to 259 FIRST STREET, 

S^lDST FRANCISCO. 



Th.is Establishment is new Manufacturing 

MACHINERY AND CASTINGS 

Of all kinds at lower rates than ever before. We can turn out work to better ad- 
vantage and at less prices than any other shop on this coast or elsewhere. 



FARMERS' & MECHANICS' BANK 

OF SAVINGS, 

225 SAHSOM ST., SAH FRANCISCO. 

Guarantee Capital, - $150,000. 



-««•►♦■♦• 



H. DUTTON, President. 



G. M. CONDEE, Cashier. 






N. C. FASSETT, 
I. E. DAVIS, 
C. CLAYTON, 



DIRECTORS. 

JAS. LAIDLEY, 
ABNER DOBLE, 
B. H. FREEMAN, 



G. W. SWAN, 
H. DUTTON, 
G. M. CONDEE. 



-4 ♦ <-*--•. »- 



No charge for entrance fee or Bank Book. Deposits received in sums from one dollar upwards. 
Dividends declared the first Monday in July and January. Loans made on real estate and Collateral 
Securities. 



xlviii 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



P. 

BILLIARD TABLE 



MANUFACTURER. 





571 Market St., below Second; 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



Sole Agent for PHELAN AND COLLENDER'S PATENT BEVELED 
BILLIARD TABLES, Patented June 6, 1871 ; and new, improved EUREKA 
WIRE CUSHIONS, Patented May 2, 1871. 



G. W. SWAN & GO'S 

UNION BOX FACTORY 



Hos. Ill and 116 Spear Street, 



Between Mission and Howard, 



SAN FBA»CiHCO* 



DOVE-TAILED BY MACHINERY 

WITH PROMPTNESS -A.DNTD DISPATCH. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. X Hx 



IT. GRATT A CO. 

UNDERTAKERS, 

641 Sacramento Street, 

Corner of Webb, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



THE TRADE SUPPLIED WITH 

COFFINS, AND EVERY ARTICLE IN THE LINE 

ON LIBERAL TERMS. 




Sole Agents for Barstow's Patent Metallic 

Burial Cases and Caskets. 



J. H. RICHARDSON. C. S. WRIGHT. D. D. HOLLAND. 



RICHARDSON, HOLLAND & CO. 

| CORNER BEALE AND MISSION STS. 

(Office, 304 Mission St.) SAN FRANCISCO. 



Moldings, Brackets, Frames, Sash, Blinds, Boors, and 
all descriptions of Wood- Work Finish. 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



«3T©Hlf E4NW 

MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO. 

BOSTON, ^C-A.SS. 
■•-»♦ 

GEORGE P. SAWYER, President. GEO. B. AGER, Secretary. 

ELIZUR WRIGHT, Actuary. 



Organized as the Exponent of the Non-Forfeiture Law of Massachusetts. 

•-•-• 

This Laiv effectually prevents the gross injustice practiced by Com- 
panies of other States, of forfeiting moneys paid on policies in case of 
failure to pay the premium when due. The JOHN HANCOCK is the 
Company which has the honor of the first practical compliance with 
the above Statute. It is the only established Company which makes 
all its policies Non-Forfeitable after one payment. Dividends declared 
Annually- 

v CAIJFOBMA Kit A \« II, SAX FBANCISCO, 

410 KEARNY STREET, BET. CALIFORNIA AND PINE. 

H. F. W. HOFFMAN, General Agent, 
RELIABLE AGENTS WANTED. 



S. L. STANLEY. JOHN SPRUANCE. C. C. CHAPMAN. 

SPRUANCE, STANLEY & CO. 

Successors to H. Webster & Co. and J. & J. Spruance, 

IMPORTERS AND WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 

Willi All ITODORS 

No. 410 FRONT ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 



EDWARD MAKXIHT. 



». V. B. IIEHfAKIE. 



E. MARTIN & GO. 



WHOLESALE DEALEKS IN 






*^ 



408 FB.02TT STREET, 

ShU FBANCI5CG* 



Gannon's Cigar Store. 

— <«.».» — . 

PETER T. GANNON, 

RETAIL DEALER IN THE 

raieit Brands Hayana Clears, 

MEERSCHAUM PIPES 9 ETC. 

Corners of Montgomery, Post and Market Streets, 

8AN fRANCISCO. 



B. L. SOLOMON <& SONS, 

IMPORTERS OF 

Curtain Materials, Furniture Coverings, 



AND 



UPHOLSTERY GOODS OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 
JOHIT S. KEMP, Agent, 

4,06 Market Street, SAN FRANCISCO. 



■111! ©I1II $ 

DEAJLER IN 

touts fW|*t*» Mmnk 



iff* 

&A<£> 



The production of his own Vineyard, at Vina, Tehama County, 

Depot, 418 & 420 Market Street, corner Sutter, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



lii 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY, 



B. H. FEEEMAN, 
XTos. 413 and 415 Mission Street, 



Adjoining Mechanics' Mill. > 
Between First and Fremont Streets. JT 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



— « —••»•• — ►- 



SCROLL SAWING AN D TUENING. 



-« .».«. » 



MAHOGANY, BLACK WALNUT AND CEDAR FOR SALE. 

Constantly on hand anil made to order, Stair Rails, Posts, Balusters, Etc., Etc. 



©RATIO XT. COOK, 



lbat: 



DEALER IN 



um 



08E AID BELTING 



FIRE CAPS AND BELTS, 

■U6TI0N HOSB 4KB Pill BUCEBTO, 

Agency for the Douglass Artificial Limbs, 

8oi Battery Street, SAN FRANCISCO. 

» 14*<— « ■ 

■BELT LEATHER EOE, SALE. 
> 



<3A 



III 



ip 



,r 



mn 



^ 



HOIiliADATr A BEENHAM, Agents. 



Manufacture and offer to the Trade the above SUPERIOR SALT, for Table, 
Dairy and Packing Purposes, in assorted bags. Also, constantly on hand the 
best brands of LP7ERP00L SALT, in large and small bags. 

MILL, 249 STEUART STREET. 

OFFICE, 42S FRONT STREET, SAJV FRANCISCO. 



E. C. BOOB AE <& CO. 

WM^^Wwt^wm til Ctomteasicws 

WHARVES BUILT, 

WATER LOTS PILED AND CAPPED. j 
Foundations for Brick Buildings Piled and Capped, Piles and Square Timber 

OlST HAKTID AUXTID FOR SA.LE. 

OFFICE-S. W. Cor. Steuart and Howard Streets. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. \[\\ 



LEOPOLD KUH, 



(Formerly of the U. S. Branch Mint, S. F.) 




& 





No. 611 Commercial Street, 

(OPPOSITE TUB TJ. S. BlELAlXraiEa: HULTUXTT,) 



A. W. VON SCHMIDT, 

ifrl liglMeer ft Surveyor, 

OFFICE, PIONEER BUILDING, 

808 MONTGOMERY STREET, NEAR JACKSON, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



MEEKER, JAMES «fc GO. 

Importers, Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

WA&OI AID CARRIA&E 



Corner California and Davis Streets, 

©AJV FRANCISCO. 



GEO. M. WOOD & CO. 

Engravers, Die Sinkers, Stencil Cutters and Manufacturers and Wholesale Dealers in Stencil Tools 
a°nd Stock, Key Check Dies, and Stock & Lion's Head Seal Presses, Copper Plate Ink, Card 
Plates, Stencil Alphabets and Figures, and a splendid assortment of superior hand plated Doo 
Plates constantly on hand and 'for sale cheap, 312 Bush Street, (at Chas. Otto & Co's hardware store) 
Russ House Block, between Montgomery and Kearny Streets, San Francisco, Cal. 



mO ORDER. Cards elegantly Printed, Written and Engraved. Fine Stencil Name Plates cut in 
|_ Roman, German Text, Old English ; also, engraved in Writing Style. Steel Name Stamps, Brass 
and Electrotype Stamps, Burning Brands, Raised Brass Work, etc., etc. 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



Pacific Barrel and Keg Factory. 

LOCATION, S. S. BEANNAN ST,, BEtTsEVENTH AND EIGHTH, 



Have on hand Coopers' Stock of all descriptions, and ate fully prepared 
to manufacture to order packages of all kinds and sizes. 



FLINT, PEABODY & CO., Agents. 




N. P. LANGLAND, 

STAIR BUILDER 

AND 

Wood Turner, 

485 AND 487 BRAMAN ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



fpiiiitiif^ iiipii f 

Paper, Oil Cloth, Window Shades and Furniture Warehouse. 

American Flags and Regimental Banners constantly on hand and Made to Order. 

Removed from Clay Street and Corner Sansom and California Streets 
opposite New Bank of California, to 

514 Market and 21 Sutter Streets, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 




JESSE HEALY. 



M. C. JEWELL. 



AVERILL CHEMICAL PAINT 



MANUPACTl'RED BY 



CALIFORNIA CHEMICAL PAINT CO. 

OFFICE, COR. FOURTH AND TOWNSEND STS. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



HEALY «fc JEWELL, 



-Agents. 



Mixed ready for Application, and sold only by the Gallon. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



lv 



HATS AND HAT MATERIAL 

AT WHOLESALE, 

N. E. Cor. Montgomery and Bush Streets, 

SA.3ST FRANCISCO. 



< — ■»— ► 



J, C, leussdorffer & Brother, 



IMPORTERS OF AND WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 



If M Wf^ 



§WP 







3 



Hatters' Flushes, 




1 

And everything requisite for the manufacture of Hats. 






Our long experience in San Francisco, and extensive connections in Europe 
and the East, enable us to be in constant receipt of the choicest qualities and 

l3.t6St StVlGS» 

Our stock is the largest and most select, and our facilities superior to any other 

House on this Coast. . . , 

Dealers who buy on short time, or for cash, will find it greatly to their advan- 
tage to favor us with a call at 

JST. B. cor. Montgomery and Bush Sts., San Francisco. 



RETAIL STORES : 
Nos. 200 and 202 Montgomery Street, corner Bush, 
Nos. 635 and 637 Commercial Street, . 
No. 647 "Washington Street, - - - - - 

No. 105 J Street, 

Corner Front and Morrison Streets. - - - - 



San Francisco 

San Francisco 

San Francisco 

Sacramento 

Portland, O 



Ivi SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



MARIUE AXTD FIRE. 



< — « — > 



THE 

California insurance Co* 

OFFICE, No. 318 CALIFORNIA STREET, 

One Door East from Sansom Street, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



~«—^»» » 



Guarantee Capital Paid up (in Gold) $300,000. 
Assets, .... $400,000. 



« — «— » 



C. T. HOPKINS, Prest. H. B. TICHENOR, Vice Prest. 
Z. CROWE LL, Secretary. 



« »»» > 



THE ONLY MUTUAL! 

4 ^mm — fr 

All Insurance profits divided annually among the holders 
of participating policies. 



IMPERIAL 

FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

OF LOJSTDON. 

Established 1803. 

Capital Stock Subscribed, - - - $8,000,000.00. 

do do Paid up in Cash, - - 3,500,000.00. 

Assets, December. 31, 1870, - - 5,716,015.08. 

« m I 

Insures Buildings and Merchandise in them, on the most moderate terms ; also Frame 
Buildings and Merchandise or Furniture contained in same. 



LOSSES PAID HERE IN CASH IMMEDIATELY ON ADJUSTMENT, 

I3ST XT- S. G-OILID COIHST. 



FALH1TER, BELL <& CO. 

ISTo. 430 CALIFORNIA STREET 
AGENTS FOR CALIFORNIA. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. lvii 



II. CASEBOLT. DAVID KERR. 

OASBBGIA A KK It .11 . 

COACH AND CAR BUILDERS, 

IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 

^^„ CARRIAGES, BUGGIES, WAGONS, 




AND ALL KINDS OF 



Carriage and Wagon Stock, Trimmings, etc. 



Corner Market and Fifth, Streets, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



Wagons and Carriages of every description Made to Order, Stored and Sold on Commission ; also, 
Bought and Exchanged, and General Jobbing done with Neatness and Dispatch. 

Parties wishing Carriages of any description, can have them ordered through us from the leading 
Coach Builders in the Atlantic cities. 



ORDERS FROM THE COUITBT PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO. 



PIONEER PAPER MILL, 

TAYLORVILLE, MARIN CO., CAL. 

S. F. TAYLOR & CO., - - - - Proprietors. 

Manufacturers and Importers of all kinds of 

PAPER AND PAPER BAGS, TWtNE t ETC. 

PAPER WAREHOUSE, NO. 416 CLAY STREET, 

S-A.N" PRA.NOISOO. 



WILLIAM PATTERSON, 



MANUFACTURER AND ENGRAVER OF 



METALLIC SIGNS, AND SIGN PAINTER 

No. 430 Kearny Street,S. E. cor. California and Kearny, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



Up Stairs, 



DOOR PLATES AND OFFICE SICNS MADE TO ORDER. 






lviii 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



mMLimM 



m 



w m 






•Gpft 



COMPANY. 



*&• — »-f 4«~«H 



mwm 




wot fa 



KSidiSaJa^a 



$%JM 



COMPANY. 



►♦► — -*••' 



MORRIS SPEYER «£ GO. 



General A 



eneral Agents, 



No. 13 Merchants' Exchange. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. H x 



H. M. NEWHALL. § J. O. ELDRIDGE. G. PALACHE 

H. M. NEWHALL & CO. 

AUCTIONEERS 

AND 

COMMISSION MERCHANTS. 



FIRE-PROOF BRICK, 

309, 311, 313 Sansom Street. 

REGULAR SALE DAYS, 

MONDAY and THURSDAY- Catalogue Sale of Boots, 

Shoes, Clothing, Hardware, Fancy Goods, etc. 
WEDNESDAY-Catalogue Sale of Dry Goods, Silks, Em- 
broideries, French Goods, etc. 

Cash Advances on AATexroliA.3a.c3.ise for Snlo. 



H. F. WILLIAMS. ROB'T C. PAGE. 

HENRY F. WILLIAMS & CO. 

REAL ESTATE AGENTS, 

Room No. 20, Stevenson's Building, 
S. E. corner Montgomery and California Streets, 

S-A.3ST FBANCISCO. 






Prompt attention given to all matters pertaining to Real Estate, such as Buying 
and Selling on Commission, Negotiating Loans, Investing Capital, 



and Managing Estates. 



lx 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 



.afiaiti duplis 



II 



W® 



OFFICE, 513-AFTER MAY 18, 1872, 

526 CALIFORNIA STREET. 



Office Hours, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. 
Extra hours on Saturdays from 7 to 8 p.m., for receiving of Deposits only. 
Loans made on Real Estate and other Collateral Securities, at current rates 
of interest. 

CEOSGE LETTE, L. GOTTIG, 

SECRETARY. PRESIDENT. 

See General Review for a notice of the operations of this Institution. 



II. I,. NIHO\, A. WEILI,, «fc E. Ait\sn:i\, s. avi:i I.I„ 

San Francisco. New York. 



ar 



WEMSm SDION 



ii. w. vn:i\, 

l'aris. 



'• 



IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 



BROADCLOTHS AND CASSIMERES 

Vestings, Tailors' Trimmings, Billiard Cloths, 

Ladies' Cloakings and Gentlemen's Furnishing Goods, 

JYos. 632 and 634 Sacramento Street, 
And 631 and 633 Commercial Street, SAN FRANCISCO. 



AGENCY FOR THE CLOTHS, CASSIMERES, TWEEDS, &c. 

Manufactured by the Mission Woolen Mills. 

4 m > — 

J^Orders for EUROPEAN AND AMERICAN GOODS promptly and carefully filled, for a 
reasonable commission, by our Houses — 28 Rue de L'Echiquier, Paris, and 155 Chambers Street, 
New York. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 



lxi 



&E0. C, SIREVE & CO. 



IMPORTERS OF 




I 



'« 



HO Montgomery Street, 



Make a Specialty of the 





I 







STERLING SILVER WA 



Particular attention is requested to the many attractive 
designs now being produced by this celebrated Company. 
With works projected on a scale unparalleled for magnitude 
in the World, together with the best talent for designing, the 
most skilled workmen, the best labor-saving machinery, and 
the immense amount of goods produced, they are enabled 
to offer the best made and most artistic articles at the lowest 
possible price. 

The standard of Silver used is British Sterling. 



lxii 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



5?y ec bs es €j» cs> ^ ^w c?bh ws' ^s> ^ 

IMPORTERS OF 

IBVIHID 




I Hi 




siefciii 




Straw and Fancy Goods, 

XTo. 13 SA2TSOM STREET, 

Between Bush and Sutter, next to Cosmopolitan Hotel, 



\AX 






JVb. 32 Hue du Faubourg-JPoissonniere, — PARIS. 



PIOIEER WOOLEN FACTORY, 

LOCATED -A.T 

Black Point, San Francisco, Cal. 



MANUFACTORY OF ALL CLASSES OF 







BLANKETS, CASSIMERES, TWEEDS, FLANNELS, OVERSHIRTS, 

TEAMSTERS' SHIRTS, FIREMEN'S SHIRTS, UNDERSHLRTS 

AND DRAWERS, SLUICE BLANKETS, &c. 

Depot and Office— Ho. 115 Battery Street. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 



lxiii 



LAKE, BOBBINS & it. 



IMPORTERS AND JOBBERS OF 



BOOK, JEWS, WEITIIG 



AND 




Paper Bags 1 Straw and Binders' Boards, 

Black and Colored Inks, 

No. 516 SACRAMENTO & 519 COMMERCIAL STREETS, 

BETWEEN 8AN8OM .AJND MONTGOMERY, 



FRANCIS BLAKE, ) 

JAMES MOFFITT, S San Francisco. 

CHAS. F. BOBBINS,) 

JAMES W. TOWNE, New York. 



San Francisco. 



b. Mcquillan, 



IMPORTER AND MANUFACTURER OF 



WAL 



0» 



AND 










'9 
LOOKING GLASSES, 

Engravings, Chromos, Lithographs, Etc. 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL, 

Nos. 209 & 211 Leidesdorff St. 



Between Commercial and Sacramento, 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



Pictures, Diplomas and Business Cards Framed on the most reason- 
able terms. RE-GILDING done in the best style. 



lxiV SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



L. FELDMANN. H. CORDES. 



• ■ * u - >, Lli KXL V7#( 



IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 



WOOD AND WILLOW WARE 

Twines, Lines, Children's Gigs, Bird-Cages, 

TOYS AND FANCY GOODS, Etc. 



AND AGENTS 



SAN FRAHCISCO BRUSH FACTORY, 

MANUFACTURERS OF ALL KINDS OF 

MACHINE BRUSHES, 

315 and 317 Sacramento St., San Francisco. 

253 Washington Street, - - - NEW YORK. 



MICHELS, FRIEDLAHDER & CO. 

IMPORTERS AND JOBBERS OP 

LADIES' AND GENTS' FURNISHING GOODS, 

French, English and German Fancy Goods, 

"WHITE GOODS and HOSIERY, with a general assortment of BOYS' and 

YOUTHS' FURNISHING GOODS. Manufacturers and Importers of 

the IMPROVED YOKE AMERICAN SHIRT. 

7 and 9 Battery Street, Oriental Block, San Francisco. 
JOS1T W. MOFFITT <& CO. 

Ilpmirjitoto a&d Apof h®#art©i 



413 KEAR1STY STREET, 

Between California and Pine, SAN FRANCISCO. 

4^.~*^-+.* 

Physicians' Prescriptions Carefully Compounded. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT, 



lxv 



HIHT, P1AB0DT M CO. 

SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 

No. 408 CALIFOB.1TIA STREET, 

S-A.3ST FRANCISCO, 
And 41 India Wharf, - - BOSTON MASS. 



MORRIS SPEYER & CO. 
No. 13 Merchants' Exchange, 

Draiv on New York, London, Paris, Hamburg, Bremen, 
Berlin, Frankfort, Vienna, 

AJJSTJD OTHER CITIES IUST EUROPE. 



ffiOINTAIM 



•■» 



DEALERS IN 



CARPETS, OIL CLOTHS, PAPER HANGINGS, 

WINDOW SHADES AND CURTAIN MATERIALS 

A COMPLETE ASSORTMENT, 

ITo. 718 Market Street, 

A few doors west of Kearny, S &N) PRAMCrsc©, 



MURPHY, GRANT «fc CO. 

(SUCCESSORS TO EUGENE KELLY & CO.) 
IMPORTERS OF 




Corner Sansom and Bush. Streets, 



lxvi 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



No. 4 Post Street, Masonic Temple, San Francisco. 






FEAOS, BANNERS, ETC. 

Ladies' Dress Trimmings, Under Linen, Hosiery, Zephyr, 

— AND — 

FURNISHING EMPORIUM, NO. 4 POST STREET. 



HENRY WIMMER, 

(Successor to Ed. Neumann & Co.) 

illMISf All APif HO 

SOI KEAENT STREET, 

N. W. Comer or Sutter, SAN FRANCISCO. 



ESTABLISHED IN 1853. 



LAFATETTE 



11IWI1 



723, 725, 727 GREEN STREET, 




Between Powell and Mason, 



FAT7LX1T HTTA1TT, 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



- Proprietor. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 



lxvii 



SOLOMON GUMP. 



GUSTAVE GUMP. 



S. <& G. GUMP, 

IMPORTERS AND MANUFACTURERS OF 




LOOKING GLASSES, LOOKING GLASS PLATES, 
PICTURES, PICTURE FRAMES, PHOTO- 
GRAPH OVALS, MOLDINGS, Etc. 

117 and 119 SANSOM STREET, 

Between Bush and Pine, SAN FRANCISCO. 



< «»«— » 



FACTORY— Market Street, bet. Seventh and Eighth. 



H. M. BLACK & CO. 




CARRIAGE MAKERS 



Between Fifth and Sixth, SAN FRANCISCO. 

(Running through the Block to Nos. 19 and 21 Turk Street.) 






Carriage and Coach Work of every description executed with neatness and dispatch Genuine 
imported Concord, Manchester, Dorchester and Portland Wagons constantly on hand and for sale. 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 




mm 



IIH iff WE. 

First Premium and Medal of Mechanics' Institute, 1871. 
First Premium and Medal of Mechanics" Insuiute, 1869. 
First Premium and Medal of Mechanics' Institute, 1868. 

First Premium of Mechanics' Institute in 1865. 

First Premium of Mechanics' Institute In 1864. 

First Premium of Mechanics' Institute in 1860. 

First Premium of the Hay District Society in 1860. 
First Premium in New Orleans, 1870. 

M . PRICE. 

FOR HO]ME-]M[A.l>E cutlery 

4 IS Kearny Street, bet. Pine and California, San Francisco. 

[J^Razors, Knives, Shears, etc., Made to Order and Warranted. Particular attention paid to Jobbing. 
Damaged cutlery polished equal to new. Country orders promptly attended to. 



JOHN HOEY, 



IPIili 



AND MANUFACTURER AND DEALER IN 



FURNITURE AND BEDDING, 

No. 729 MARKET STREET, 



Bet. Third and Fourth., 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



1849. 



187S. 



PIONEER lit 




a t 

XTos. 225 and 227 BSALE STREET, 

Between Howard ako Foisou, SAN FRANCISCO. 






CHARLES H. LEAVITT, 



3^-A.TSTTTP , -A.O TTJRBR 

Wrought Iron 

GIRDERS, 

Bussey's Patent 

Combination Burglar Proof 

BANK VAULT 

AKD 

SAFE LOCKS, 

Containing millions of changes. 

DETACHABLE KNOBS, NO KEY. A LARGE ASSORTMENT OF COMBINATION AND 

KEY LOCKS ON HAND. 

Latest Improved Shears, Punches, Dies, etc , for Cold Iron Works. 

CONSTANTLY ON HAND, A LARGE ASS0RT3IENT OF FIRE 

PROOF DOORS AND SHUTTERS. 



Steel Lined 

BANK VAULTS, 

BURGLAR,FIRE-PROOF 

And Silverware Safes, 

PRISON CELLS r 

FIRE-PROOF 

DOORS, 




ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 



Ixu 




PIAIO 



Celebrated Piano Fortes-Established in 1833. Their reputation has been a constantly growing one for nearly 
40 years. Above 18,000 of these unrivalled instruments are now in use in this country and Europe 

G-EOIRO-I'S PIANOS, 

A first-class, fine toned, elegantly finished instrument 

3^co^.3^]M:oisr 3 s ^i^isros, 

(Formerly known as the celebrated BOAKDMAN & GRAY Pianos.) Superior low priced instruments of 
great durability. The Factory is 30 years old. 

I/amSTATT'S TJFZEtlOOEIT FTJ^TSTOS, 

A thoroughly well-made German instrument; sweet-toned and low-priced. 

CABINET ORGANS. 

GEO. A. PRINCE & CO'S ORGANS AND MEL0DE0NS. 

These noble instruments combine purity of tone with great power. Over 48.000 of them are in use in 
various parts of tbe world. The prices range from J60 to $450. 

JBFTS 3 EXCELSIOR ORGANS, 

Took the First Premium at the Michigan State Fair, in September, 1871. 

The above specialties, together with Sheet Music, Music Books, Violins, Guitars, etc., are for sale in the new 

Music Department 

A. L. BANCROFT £ CO. 

721 IVCAJRIKET ST , S-A.3XT FRANCISCO. 
WM. HENRY KNIGHT, Manager. 




41© Montgomery St., Room 1. 

On hand, Large Stock of Breech- Loading Rifles, 
Carbines and Pistols, of the latest improvements. 
Also for Powder and Ball, at Manufacturers' Prices 

to the Tirade. 






ALBERT E. CRANE, 

Sole Agent for Pacific Coast. 



lxxii SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



H. A. CRANE. W. H. BRIGHAM. R. A. SANFORD. 

CRANE <& BRIGHAM, 

WHOLESALE 



&2Sf?CC$ 






IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 



DRUGS, MEDICINES, PROPRIETARY ARTICLES, 

FANCY GOODS, 

Druggists' Sundries, Perfumery, etc., etc. 

322, 324 and 326 FRONT STREET, 

Corner of Clay, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



JOSEPH ROTH. HENRY VIDEAU. 

Importers and "Wholesale Dealers in 

FINE WINES, LIQUORS 

Brandies and Whiskies, 

SOLE AGENTS OF THE CELEBRATED BENEDICTINE. 
809 MONTGOMERY STREET 

Between Jackson and Pacific, 

Opposite the Pioneers' Hall, SASJ IF2Bil&!r©nS(P(§)o 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. lxxiti 



SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY 

iMorporated Mmlw %M 9 ISIf • 

Office, No. 619 CLAY STREET, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

< m > 

o:f:f:ioe:rs = 

E W. BURR, President, CYRUS W. CARMANY, Cashier, 

JAMES O. DEAN, Auditor, BENJ. O. DEVOE, Surveyor. 

bo-a^rjd or DIEECTORS: 

F W BURR WM. BOSWORTH, J. W. CUDWORTH, J. M. SHOTWELL, 

BENJ DEVOE, R. J. TIFFANY, T. L. RUTHERFORD, E. F. NORTHAM, 

ISAAC HYDE, ANNIS MERRILL, H. L. KING. 

_ 1 ■ » » 

Deposits, $8,50 0,000. Reserve F rnid, $290,000. 
Deposits received from two and one half dollars up to any amount. 

Dividends declared semi-annually-in Januar y and July of each year. 



o. n. hall, 

MANUFACTURER OF 

PIANO FORTES, STOOLS, ETC. 

XTos. 14 and 16 Tyler Street, 

S-A.HST FBANCISOO. 
Pianos Tnned and Repaired in the best Manner. 



GEORGE O. McMULLIN. 



JAMES O. ROUNTREE. 



WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 



flrveertoi ui PiwtoltM, 

No. 323 FRONT STREET, 

Between Clay and Commercial, SU.M a «mu" 



lxxiv 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



WM. SCHMOLZ 

MATHEMATICAL 




Transits, 
Theodolites, 
Solar Compasses, 
Y Leveling Instruments, 
Leveling Staves, 
Compasses, 
Mountain Barometers. 
Distance Rods, 
Chains, 
Meridian Transits, 
Bullion Balances, 
Assaying Scales, 
Etc., Etc. 



REPAIRS EXECUTED IN THE BEST MANNER. 



< — »— > 



WM. SCHMOLZ, 

No. 420 Montgomery Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. l xxv 



642 Sd 64:4: WASHINGTON STEEET, 

MANUFACTURER OF 

FLAGS, BANNERS, SCARFS AND ROSETTES, 

ALSO, IMPORTER OF 

FANCY GOODS, TOYS AND REGALIAS, 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 



nLAROISIJO 

PIONEER VARNISH WORKS 

G. HTTETER, 

(Between Sansom and Battery) 

) M | 

Varnishes of every description constantly on hand and manufactured to order. A select stock of 
Extra Varnish Brushes, Chisel Bristle, Badger, Fitch, Sable, etc. Importer Artists' 
and Gilders' Materials. 



A. MORELOS <& CO. 

LA FLOE DE LA MAEIPOSA 

And la Flor de Corona 

CIGARITOS 11ANMCT0E 

613 PA.CIFIC STRJEET, SAN FRANCISCO. 




Hare constantly on hand a lot of yellow and white paper Cigaritos of the best quality at the lowest 
rates. Cigaritos of La Viuda de Garcia, La Honrradez, Cabanas, Figaro, etc. 



Orders from, the Interior Promptly Attended to. 



PACIFIC? LAMP MANUFACTORY. 

< » > 

PATENT REFLECTOR LAMPS. 

Best in the market for lighting Halls, Mills, Mines, Warehouses, Railroad Stations, Stables, etc. 



PATENT ADVERTISING LAMPS. 

Being the most attractive sign by day and night for Hotels, Restaurants, Bar-rooms, Lodging 

Houses, etc. 
These Lamps were awarded the only Diploma for lamps at the late Mechanics' Fair. 

EMIL BCESCH, PATENTEE AND MANUFACTURER, 

1003 Kearny, and 606 Pacific Streets, N. W. Corner, San Francisco. 



lxxvi SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



W. W. WALMSLEY, 

[BIB AND iA§ f If 1 1 



mm® 

IMPORTER AND DEALER IN 

Chandeliers, Gas Fixtures, Show Window Reflectors 
PNEUMATIC GAS MACHINES, 

Iron Pipe and Fittings, Copper Boilers and Bath Tubs, 

Light and Heavy Sheet Iron Work, Artesian and 

Deep Well Pumps, all sizes Made to Order. 

918 Market Street, 

Opposite St. Ignatius College, fS^S? 2 J XB.&ES , ©nf§(S@o 



HYDRAULIC PIPES 

MANUFACTURED IN THE BEST MANNER AND AT LOWEST MARKET RATES. 



L. SCHUMANN, 

PIONEER 

MEERSCHAUM PIPE MANUFACTURER 

Mm® Ml Kmmwmy Ste©®i^ 

Bet. Bush and Pine, SAN FRANCISCO. 




< — »— > 



Meerschaum pipes boiled and repaired, Amber mouth-pieces fitted. Meerschaum 

pipes mounted with Silver. 



NEWBAUER & CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

METROPOLITAN MATCHES. 

» ■ m 

Our Matches are Sure, and are Warranted to withstand Dampness of every 
Climate, and be good for any length of time. 



FACTORY, POTRERO. 
OFFICE, 107 SANSOM STREET, Bet. FINE and B USH. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



lxxvii 




lxxviii 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



® 



#■ DA .£4 111 



»m 



# 



IMPORTERS OF 



OLOIHIIG 



A.]VI> 



GENTS' FURNISHING GOODS, 

NOS. 3 and 5 BATTERY STREET, 

ORIENTAL BLOCK, 

S A. N~ FRANCISCO. 



< »»» » 



84; Thomas Street, New York. 



THURNAUER & ZINN, 

IMPORTERS OF 

FRENCH AND OERMAN 



fAIIf 



IT 




Market. Clothes, Traveling, Work, Knife, 

Fruit and Flower Baskets. 

Willow Cradles and Wagons, Children's Willow 

Chairs, Table Mats and Flasks, 

Twines of all kinds, 

Feather Dusters, Wooden Ware, Violin Strings, 

Music Boxes, Musical Instruments, Brushes, 
China ^etts, Marbles, Bird Cages, Faint Boxes, 

Beads, Base and India Rubber Balls, 

Writing Desks, Ladies' Work Boxes, Necessaries, 

Ornaments, Dolls, Drums, Toys, Games, &c. 



Eilisl aiifl American Willow Ware, 



J anci) foods and Ijanltec \ otions 

Cane and Willow Chairs, Ladies' Work- 
Stands, "Wooden Ware, Feather 
Dusters, Brushes, Etc. 

119 BATTERY STREET, 



Near California, 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. lxxix 



ESTABLISHED 1850. 



J. W. SULLIVAN'S NEWS AGENCY 

Glaeap Publication Depot, 

JOHH H. STILL, SUPERINTENDENT, 



WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN 



Books, Stationery, Newspapers and Magazines. 
Publishers' Agents to supply the Trade. 



9 

Three doors below Montgomery, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Special attention paid to filling miscellaneous orders, and satisfaction in all cases 
guaranteed. 

q^= Subscriptions received for any Newspaper or Magazine published, at the 
lowest prices, and promptly delivered free of charge, or mailed to any part of the 
country. Send for a Subscription List. 

0BBOT0PBBB ABBSffBONS, Am@A 



SICK, 



i> 



MANUFACTURERS OF THE 



Celebrated Family Coffee 

WHICH TOOK THE 

FIRST PREMIUM 

—AT THE— 

GREAT MECHANICS' FAIRS OF 1868,1869 AND 1871, 



ALSO, MANUFACTURERS OF ALL KINDS OF 

SPICES ANQ HERBS OF A SUPERIOR QUALITY, 

WHICH CAN BE FOUND IN QUANTITIES TO SUIT AT 

gli §A©S4MITO @ ifUlf 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



lxxx 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



J. K. PRIOR, 



Importer and Dealer in all kinds of 




US 



LKm\&u 




5?sa» 




^ih 



^ k^ 




hM n 






1MJ 



All Plimilig Haterlals f 

730 Montgomery Street, 

NEAR JACKSON ST., OPP. METROPOLITAN THEATER, 

Si^LST FRANCISCO. 



FANCY AND PLAIN WASH BASINS, 



Silver-Plated Cocks, Bath Tubs, Sheet Zinc, 

SHEET LEAD, LEAD PIPE, 

GALVANIZED AND PLAIN IRON PIPE, 

ALL SIZES!, FOR- 

Gas, Steam and Water, 

In lots to suit, together with Elbows, Tees, Return Bends, Stop Cocks, Plugs, 
Bushings, Nipples, etc. ; Rubber Hose, Hose Bibbs, Hose Pipes, etc. 



CAST IRON RIPE, 

COPPEE BOILEHS, ETC. 
Gas and Steam Fitting and Plumbing in all its Branches. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 



W. K. DIETRICH, 

FORK PACKER 

517 and 519 Washington St. 

AND STALLS NOS. 54 AND 55 WASHINGTON MARKET. 



EXTRA SUGAR-CURED HAMS, SMOKED BEEF AND TONGUES. 






Breakfast Bacon, Clear Pork, Lard, etc. 



All Meats Packed and Delivered direct from the Smoke-House. 



SOUSED PIGS' FEET IN FIFTY POUND PACKAGES. 



Dietrich's Eagle Brand of Hams, put up in Canvas, are equal to Eastern, 
Best Brand of Eastern Hams in lots to su.it. 



N. SWEENY, 

MERCHANT TAILOR, 

Opposite Jessie St. SAN FRANCISCO. 






Constantly on hand a choice assortment of Cloths, Cassimeres, Doeskins, Beavers and Vestings, 
which will be made to order on reasonable terms. Particular attention given to Military Uniforms. 



a* 



flHEITMZ ' 



HYDRAULIC AND CIVIL ENGINEER 

Consulting Engineer Spring Valley Water Worts, 

OFFICE, 516 CALIFORNIA STREET. 
Residence, 244 Taylor Street. 



lxxxii SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



Plilf 10 Sf §11 OOIFANT 



For which the Commissioners of the International Exhibition of 1 862 

awarded the Prize Medal. 
A Gold Medal was awarded by the Mechanics' Institute of San Francisco, 1871. 

NATURE OF THE MATERIAL. 

This remarkable material, which is essentially different from any other which has yet been sub- 
mitted to the public, and which can be produced in blocks or forms of any dimensions, is suitable 
not only for the construction of solid masonry, but also for the manufacture of the most elaborate 
and delicate architectural embellishments. 

It is a hard, durable and beautiful sand stone, which so closely resembles the best descriptions of 
our natural stones that it is not easy to distinguish between them. 

It can be produced of various colors. 

The stone is composed of clean siliceous sand, or other suitable substance, firmly aggregated 
into a solid and hard mass by the means of silicate of lime, or of other insoluble silicates. 
PROCESS OF MANUFACTURE. 

The process of manufacture is simple, although based upon the most scientific principles. The: 
sand, silica, or other mineral substance, is intimately mixed with its proper proportion of a solution 
of silicate of soda. This is effected in an ordinary pug mill, and the mixture which is thus rendered 
of a plastic consistence, is either pressed or rammed into blocks or moulds, or it can be rolled into 
slabs or forms, as may be desired, and is afterward saturated with a solution of chloride of calcium, 
when a double decomposition of the two solutions employed (viz, of the silicate of soda and the 
calcium) immediately takes place. The silica combines with the calcium, and at once forms an 
insoluble Silicate of Lime, firmly enveloping together all the particles of sand, or other minerals- 
of which the stone is composed, whilst at the same time the chlorine combines with the soda, and 
forms chloride of sodium, or common salt, which is removed by subsequent washing. 

COST OF PRODUCTION. 

The cost of production for mouldings or other ornamental work is much less than that at which 
natural stone can be procured. The principal item of expense in such work is the preparation of 
the moulds ; but when a repetition of the same articles to any extent is required, or when they are 
made out of our stock moulds, the proportionate cost of the mould chargeable upon each article would 
be inappreciable. 

GENERAL ADVANTAGES. 

The Ransome Stone, while exhibiting the characteristics and appearances of the best natural 
freestone, is more durable and can be produced of any desired tone of color. 

It can be moulded into any form, or made in masses of any dimensions. 

It requires no artificial drying or burning. 

The cost for moulded and ornamental work is much less than that of natural stone. 

The stones can be made hollow as readily as solid, thus lessening the cost of carriage, and giving 
great advantages in overhanging cornices and in the decoration of wooden structures. 

That whilst most of our natural building stones are rapidly acted upon by acid vapors and the 
atmosphere, particularly in populous towns, to such an extent as to produce disfiguration and decay in a 
comparatively short period, the "Ransome Stone" is not only unaffected by such influences, but gradu- 
ally increases in hardness with the lapse of time ; and the opinion expressed by some of our most emi- 
nent cbemists and geologists is, " that Mr. Ransome has invented a material which, with the exception of 
the granite*, is better capable of giving permanency to external architectural decorations than any stone 
hitherto used." 

t'.th. In point of strength, the " Patent Concrete Stone " has been proven to be far superior to 
Portland Stone, or in fact, to any of the natural stones with which it has been tested. 

Manufactory, corner Greenwich and Octavia Sts. 

Business Office, Junction Market and Bush Sts. 

JAMES A. HAYWARI), President. 
LEWIS A. SAGE, Secretary. 

ERNEST L. RANS03IE, Superintendent 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



lxxxiii 



BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO. 

wnnwioN niinif s 

308 SANSOM STREET, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



Balfour, Williamson & Co, 
Williamson, Balfour & Co. - 



Liverpool, England. 
Valparaiso, Chile. 



Give special attention to the execution of orders for all descriptions of 
Foreign Merchandise. 

They are prepared to make liberal advances on Wheat, Barley, Flour, and 
other descriptions of produce, consigned for sale to their friends in England, Chile 
and other countries. 




D. SAMUELS, 

American and Foreign 

GOOD'S 



Importer of American and Foreign 




REAL LACES, SILKS, VELVETS, ETC. MANUFACTURER OF THE PIONEER 
KID GLOVES, MEDAL AWARDED AT THE LAST FAIR. 

42, 44 and 46 THIRD STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 



JOHN A. MAGEE, Jr. 

MACEE <& MOORE, 



ARTHUR W. MOORE. 



IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 



gBH Iff 4 W'TTP I /WTTP FP Q ? P ft ft Tl Q 

oil W JM HAH II 1 MM m m nib Jfto fe U U V E* 
418 MARKET STREET, 

Between Sansom and Battery, SAN FRANCISCO. 



lxxxiv SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



1ISTADA ICJH ©#* 



CAPITAL STOCS, - - - $200,000 

PRESIDEST, 8ECKETART, 

Claries Kent. CMiies Manrslk 

DIRECTORS: 

Chas. Marsh, T. E. Mills, J. S. Thompson, H. Hale, 

I. H. Thompson, Chas. Kent, John Cashin. 

CH.\i:RAI, SUFERIflTXEIKRElBT, 

slii. 



LOCATION OF WORKS AND ICE HOUSES, 

Mountain Lake and Truckee River, at the Summit, on the 
Central Pacific Railroad, and Nevada City, 



The Nevada Ice Company have in store THIRTY THOUSAND TONS of the Purest and Best Ice 

on the Coast. 

Large and Small Orders Promptly Filled. 

OFFICE, 110 AND 112 WASHINGTON ST. 

S.A3ST FRANCISCO. 

I. H. THOMPSON, Agent. 



A. J. SMITH, 




And Sole Proprietor and Manufacturer of the 

CELEBRATED HUDSON FORCE PUMP) 

Smith's Copper-Lined Pumps, Plumbers' Force Pumps, 

Air and Submerged Pomps, Beer and Hot Liquor Pumps, 

ALSO, PATENT WATEH CLOSETS. 

XTo. 226 FREMONT STREET, 

8A.N PEANCISCO. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 



lxxxv 



JLA u 



S. HALLIDIE 

Importer, Dealer and Manufacturer of 







AND 



mm @w 4&& Eii@i, 



ESTABLISHED 1857. 



Office and Depot, No. 519 Front St. 

SOLE PROPRIETOR OF THE 

PATENT ENDLESS KOPEWAY, 

[Wire Tramway,] for transporting Ores, etc., over mountainous places. 
-» .» ♦ .. »■ - 

Agent for Pacific Wire & W. E. Manufacturing Co,, of California, 

AND OF 

Rich'd Johnson & Nephew, Wire Manufacturers, of Manchester, Eng. 
MINING COMPANIES, FERRYMEN AND SHIPMASTERS 

Are informed that Wire Rope can be furnished them considerably under the cost of Hemp or Manila, of 
equal strength. 

Wire Rope does not stretch or shrink by change of weather. It weighs 40 per cent, less than hemp. Is 
less than one-half the diameter; is easily spliced under all circumstances; is as pliable for equal strength ; 
and is from four to five times as durable as the best Hemp or Manila Rope. 

FOR HOISTING FROM DEEP MINES, the economy of its application is immense. 

The Wire from which my Hopes are made is manufactured i?i San Francisco by the Pacific Wire 
Manufacturing Company, from the very best of stock. 

Note.— STEEL WIRE ROPE weighs about 6-10th of Iron Rope, or } of Hemp of equal strength. Its 
extreme lightness saves largely in freight to remote places, and its great durability recommends it for hoisting 
purposes, etc. See table of comparative weights, strengths and sizes of 



Steel Wire Rope. 


Iron Wire Rope. 


Hemp Rope. 


Working load 


Circumference. [Weight per UO ft. 


Circumference. 


Weight per 190 ft. 


Circumference. 


Weight per 100 ft. 




'i inch. 

91., •' 


60 Lbs. 
100 '• 


2)4 inch. 
8« " 


100 Lbs. 
180 " 


6>£ inch. 

8'., " 


166 Lbs. 
284 " 


8,300 Lbs. 
7,000 " 



ENDLESS WIRE ROPEWAY, 

[ Wire Tramway.] secured by numerous Patents. 

By means of the Ropeway, ores, rock and other material can be transported over mountainous and diffi- 
cult places, where it would be impossible or exceedingly expensive to build a road. It can deliver from 5 to 
■ A) tons per hour, according to capacity; and being carried upon posts above snow and other obstructions, can 
be used when other modes of transportati »n would be impossible. 



A. S. HALLIDIE, 519 Front Street. 



Circulars sent on application. 



lxxxvi 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



WHITE & BAUER, 



FUBMSHEM8 9 AGEITS, 



4 IB WmMimgiem Mt„ ®pp.JPmi &M§B f 



S-A.IST FRANCISCO 



Supply all the Eastern and European 



NEWSPAPERS AND PERIODICALS 



AT THE LOWEST RATES, 



IN ADVANCE OF THOSE SUBSCRIBING DIRECT. 



Overland Monthly 

Harper's Magazine 

Every Saturday 

Atlantic Monthly 

Seribner's Monthly 

The Galaxy 

Lippincott's Magazine. . . . 

Catholic World 

Phrenological Journal. . . , 

Applet on's Journal 

Chambers' Journal 

Chambers' Miscellany. . . , 
North American Review. , 
Young Folk's Magazine.. 
Godey's Lady's Book. .. . 
Leslie's Lady's Magazine. 

Demorest's 

Peterson's Magazine 

Eclectic Magazine 

Le Bon Ton 

London Society 

London Belgravian 

All the Year Round 

London Art Journal 

London Illustrated News. 
London Graphic 



Per 



Year. 

$4 00 



. 5 00 
.12 00 
.13 00 
.13 00 



London Dispatch 

London Punch 

Harper's Weekly , 

Harper's Bazar 

Leslie's Pictorial 

Leslie's Chimney Corner , 

New York Police Gazette 

New York Clipper 

New York Ledger 

New York Weekly , 

New York Tribune 

New York Times 

New York Herald 

Scientific American 

Banner of Light 

New York Nation 

A. and N. Journal 

Wilkes' Spirit 

The four Reviews and Blackwood. 

Weekly Sacramento Union 

Weekly S. F. Bulletin 

Weekly S. F. Alta 

Weekly Examiner 

Weeklv S. F. Golden Era 

Weekly S. F. Mining Press 

Weekly Commercial Herald 



Per 



Year. 

$5 00 
8 00 



. 6 00 

.16 00 

, 5 00 

, 5 00 

, 5 00 

5 00 

5 00 

5 00 

9 00 



^'Complete Price Lists furnished Free on Application. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. lxxwii 



[ BMITIBM AWB F0MEIGN 

MARINE INSURANCE CO. 

OF LIVERPOOL. 

< » > 

Capital, ■ ■ - $5,000,000 

Premiums Received in 1870, $1,470,000 



AGENTS, BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO. 
No. 308 SANSOM STREET, 

SA.3ST PEANCISCO. 



IQKEIBBOfllKBB 



LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY, 

OF NEW YORK. 
ERASTUS LYMAN, GEORGE F. SNIFFEN, 

PRESIDENT. SECRETARY- 

ASSETS, OVER - $8,500,000 

CLAIMS PAID TO WIDOWS and ORPHANS, 2,000,000 
DIVIDENDS PAID POLICY-HOLDERS, 1,538,000 
INCOME FOR 1871, OVER - - - 6,000,000 



Good Agents Wanted.— Apply to or address, 

DANIEL NORCROSS, Gen'l Agent, 

No. 15 Stevenson Building, S. W. Cor. Montgomery and California Streets. 



The business of the Company being Mutual, the surplus is annually divided among the Policy- 
Holders. THE POLICIES ARE NON-FORFEITABLE, by their own terms. 

A loan of one-third of the Premiums will be allowed to the assured, if desired, on all fo 
policies. Army and Navy Officers, as well as Railroad Conductors and Express Messengers, insured 
without extra charge. All desirable forms of Policies issued at this Office. 



lxxxviii 



SAN" FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 




PHILADELPHIA 






Corner of Second and Folsom Streets. 
1AI rXLOTCIBCO. 



I take the present opportunity of thanking my Friends and Customers for the 
liberal support heretofore extended to the 

PHILADELPHIA BREWERY, 

And notify them that I have added to my Establishment 

NEW AND EXTENSIVE BUILDINGS 

By which I hope, through the greatly increased facilities now possessed by me, 

to furnish, as usual, a 

Superior Article of XXX Ale and Lager Beer 

That shall not only equal that previously furnished by me, but 
convince them that I am determined to merit their continued patronage and support. 

JOHN WIELAND. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. lxxxix 



1MOTEMJJL 

@@IifiH©iI@H CO, 

FACTORY AND SALESROOM. 

No. 134 SUTTER STREET, san francisco. 

MANUFACTURERS AND DEALERS 

EH ALL KIXDS OF 

Telegraph and Electrical Machinery & Supplies. 

WIRE INSULATORS AND POLES, 

Hotel Annunciators, Blasting Machines and Fuses, Burglar 

Alarms, Signalling Apparatus, etc. 

CONTRACTORS for the Construction and Maintenance of 

Commercial and Private Telegraph Lines. Submarine Telegraph 

Cables. Fire Alarm Telegraphs, etc. 

IIVI .A. IK E TO O R, ID E K, , 

WORKING MODELS, EXPERIMENTAL APPARATUS.. AM) FINE WORK IN BRASS AND STEEL. 
GEO. S. LADD, President, 

[P. O. Box 1558.] No. 522 CALIFORNIA STREET. 



WM. SHERMAN <fc CO. 

CLOTHIERS, MERCHANT TAILORS 



A>~D DEALERS IX 



MEN'S TOEIISHIN6 GOODS* 

TKUNKS, TRAVELING BAGS, VALISES, ETC, 
Wo. G08 MONTGOMERY ST. 

East side, north of Clay, SAX FRANCISCO. 



g|r Our Merchant Tailoring department is complete, and all orders from the 
country will receive prompt attention. Stylish and perfect fitting garments always 

guaranteed. _ _ _ 

S WM. SHERMAN & CO. 



XC SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



MISSION AND PACIFIC 



W #ol©m Mill 



OFFICE AND WAREHOUSE, 

ill & Sit Hmrttt 81, wmm Wtmt 



FACTORY, FOLSOM ST., BET. 15th and 16th STS., SAN FRANCISCO. 

MANUFACTURE EYESY &TJV¥> OE 

Blankets, Flannels, Cassimeres, 

Knit Goods, Flannel Clothing, Lap Mobes, &c. 

8. JL. 8IMON, Sec'y. MNALD McIjEIMN, Manager. 



LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY 

OF NEW YORK. 
G. HILTON SCRIBNER, President. SIDNEY N. CROFUT, Secretary. 



< » ■» > 



THE UNPARALLELED SUCCESS OF THE EMPIRE 

MAY BE SEEN FROM THE OFFICIAL STATISTICS. 

Policies Non-Forfeitable. No Restrictions on Travel. 



O. F. VON RHEIN & CO. 

105 Montgomery Street, opposite Occidental Hotel, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Managers for the Pacific Coast. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. xci 



TOLAND MEDICAL COLLEGE, 

SAN FRANCISCO, C A L . 

The regular Course of Lectures of this Institution commences on the first Monday in June, and terminates 
on the 31st day of October. A preliminary course will also be given, commencing on the second Monday in 
January, and continuing up to the commencement of the regular term. During this course, two lectures will 
be given in the College building, from 10 A. m. to 12 m., on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. On the alter- 
nate days, viz: Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays, public clinics will be held in College from 10 a. m. to 12 m. 

During the entire year, the students will have an opportunity of visiting the various hospitals of the city, 
under circumstances which will enable them to observe medical and surgical treatment. The Faculty desire to 
call attention to the following local advantage : 

The singular characteristics of our climate are such, that every branch of Medical Study can be prose- 
cuted during the entire year. In winter or summer, dissections can be made without detriment to the health 
of the student. 

Fees and. Regulations. 

The aggregate Fees of the Professors for a full term $130 00 

The Matriculation Fee (this fee is paid but once) 5 00 

The Graduation Fee 40 00 

The Demonstrator's Ticket 10 00 

Requirements for Grraduation. 

1st. The candidate must be twenty-one years of age. 

2d. He must have attended two full Courses of Medical Lectures, one of which must have been de- 
livered in this Institution. 

3d. He must have attended a Course of Practical Anatomy in the dissecting room. 

4th. The candidate must have studied Medicine for three years (the terms of attending Lectures in- 
cluded), under the direction of a respectable medical practitioner. 

5th. He must write a Medical Thesis, and submit the same to the Faculty two weeks prior to the 
commencement. 

Graduates from other Medical Colleges, in good standing, are required to Matriculate only. 

Boarding. 

Students can obtain good Board in the city, at prices varying from five to ten dollars per week. 
Application for further information may be addressed to the Dean. 

Medical Faculty. 

H. H. TOLAND, M. D., Professor of Principles and Practice of Surgery. 

R. BEVERLY COLE, M. D., Professor of Obstetrics and Clinical Diseases of Women. 

GEO. HEWSTON, M. D., Professor of Principles and Practice of Medicine. 

W. T. FISH, M. D., Professor of Physiology. 

L. FALKENAU, Professor of Chemistry. 

C. T. DEANE, M. D., Professor of Diseases of Women and Children, and Clinical 

Obstetrics. 
C. M. BATES, M. D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

E. TRENOR, M. D., Professor of Medical Jurisprudence, and Mental Diseases. 
A. A. O'NEIL, M. D., Professor of Anatomy. 

W. T. BRADBURY, M. D., Professor of Materia Medica and Pharmacy. 
W. F. SMITH, M. D., Professor of Opthalmogy and Otology. 
W. H. JOHNSON, M. D„ Adjunct to the Chair of Obstetrics and Clinical Diseases ot 

Women. 
CHAS. TOLAND, M. D., Prosector to the Chair of Surgery. 
WM. H. JOHNSON, M. D., Curator of the Museum. 

R. BEVERLY COLE, M. D., Dean of the Faculty, 

Office, No. 16 Geary Street, above Kearny. 



XC11 SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



Tosemlto Apt ©alto^y 

22 AND 26 MONTGOMERY STREET, 

OPPOSITE THE LICK HOUSE EN TRANCE. 



-4 m -» -»- 



Portrait and Landscape Photographs. 



Work of the finest quality only will be sent from this Gallery. Pictures colored 
in Crayon, Water or Oil by the best artists. 

OUR COLLECTION OF 

PHOTOGRAPHIC ▼BWB| 

Comprising Large and Medium, 

For Portfolios, Framing and Stereoscopes, is the largest and best in the United 
States, if not in the world, securing for us the 

OlTliY MEDAL 

Awarded by the Paris Exposition' for Landscape Photographs in California. 
We cordially invite all to spend a leisure hour or two in examining our collec- 
tion, and thereby visiting the wonders and beauties of 

Yossmite, ths Mammoth Groves, 
GEYSERS, PACIFIC! RAILROAD, 

COLUMBIA. RIVER, 
And all other places of interest on the Pacific Coast. 



Stereoscopic Views, ... $1.50 per dozen. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT, 



XC111 



WAT I1IOTSI a LESTEB, 

IMPORTERS OF 



I 



Hard Wood Lumber, 

-A. TST ID -A. L H, KIND S OF 




COACH, CARRIAGE & WAGON 

MATERIALS, 

. 122 & 124 Market St., & 19 HI 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



< ■»»— ► 



17 f IS a 11 Seventh St* bet. I .and I* 

sacramento. 



NEW YORK OFFICE, 
121 AND 123 FRONT STREET, NEW YORK, 

H. A. WATERHOUSE, AGENT. 



XC1V SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



JN Oft JL Mm JDfLJL JL 2.S A 

MERCANTILE 




SURANCE COMPAQ 



BSVABIilBBlBIl II 



Capital (which is intact), .... $10,000,000 

Fire Reserve, after Paying* Chicago Loss, - - - 2,800,000 

Life Department, ..... 11,000,000 



$33,800,000 
Securities Deposited in the United States (which are intact), - $1,300,000 



BAIT FRAXTCXSCO BANEEHS, 

MBgSBS® 141MI1 * INK 



Branch Office, S. E. cor. Sansom and California Sis., San Francisco, Cal. 



Insurances effected on the most favorable terms on Buildings of both BRICK 
and WOOD throughout the Pacific States and Territories, whether occupied as 
DWELLINGS, STORES OR WAREHOUSES, together with their contents. 
VESSELS IN PORT, with or without Cargoes, also insured. 

LOSSES PAID HERE IN GOLD COIN. 



TILLINGHAST BROTHERS, 

General Agents for the Pacific States and Territories. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 



XCV 



L. L. TRKAD^^ELL, 

J. F. Place, } San Francisco. 

W. 0. M. Berry, 



H. W. BOAKIIMAN, 

New York. 



TREADWELL <fc CO. 

Agricultural Warehouse and General 




MACHINERY AND SUPPLY DEPOT, 

For Farmers, Miners, Millmen, etc. 



Importers and Wholesale Dealers in 

HARDWARE, PORTABLE ENGINES, MILLS, 

AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS, 

Wood-working and Iron-working Machinery, Miners,' Engineers' 
and Mechanics' Tools, Mill Supplies, etc., at the old stand, 

Cor. MARKET and FREMONT STS. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



I.AWKINS 



DANTBELL, 



MACHINE WORKi 

Nos. 210 and 212 Beale Street, near Howard, San Francisco. 



Manufacturers of Steam Engines 

AND ALL KINDS OF MILL AND MINING MACHINERY. 

«♦» * »♦» 

INT. B.— Jobbing and Repairing done with dispatch. 



XCV1 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



J±. J. PLATE 



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E. H. GADSBY, 



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535 Market Street, near Second, 

S^lN FRA.NCISCO. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT, 



XCV11 



CRAY'S MUSIC STORES 



623 & 625' CLAY ST., and 101 FIEST STREET, 

SAN FRANCISCO. PORTLAND, OR. 



STEINWAY & SONS, 
Haines Bros., 
Ernst Gabler, 

Kranich & Bach, 

And the best Upright Pianos imported, made to 
any order by Carl Reonisch, in Dresden. Every 
Piano guaranteed for Five Years. 



ORGANS, 

THE BURDETT, 

National, 

Celeste and 

Combination Organs, 

Are pronounced by all who hear them to be the 
perfection of genius in reed instruments. They 
are fully warranted to stand every climate. 



Instruments SoM Payable if Installments* 



The attention of all interested is called to the fact of my having the largest and best 
selected stock of American and Foreign Sheet Music, Books and Musical Instruments 
of direct importation, for sale at lowest market prices, wholesale or retail. 



GEORGE MORROW, 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALER IN 

HAY, GRAIN AND FEED OF ALL KINDS 

39 Clay Street and 28 Commercial Street, 

Between Drumm and East Streets, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Consignments Solicited. Orders from the Country promptly attended to. 



COGHZLL, X-TTOXTS <& CO. 

WHOLESALE 

SroMK and OobubIssIob Hwtib%!tts» 

AND DEALERS IN 

OREGON PRODUCE, 

313 & 315 Front and 305 & 307 Commercial Streets, 
S-A-3S3" FRANOISOO. 



SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO CONSIGNMENTS OF WOOL. 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



CALIFORNIA CHEMICAL WORK 

SAN BRUNO ROAD, S. F. 
BET. TWENTY-SIXTH AND TWENTY-SEVENTH STREETS. 



liil llflil 



LJi 



i 

,7 



MANIKACTURER OF 



Oil of Vitriol, 

Muriatic and ETitric Acids, 

Blu s Stone, Copperas, Sal Soda, 
Prussian Blue, Glauber Salts, 
Reynolds' Fat. Sol. Fruss. of Potash, 
Reynolds' Fat. Chemical Soap, 

.A. 1ST ID O T IHI IE !R, OliE^EICA.nL.S. 



WALTER A. WOOD 

MOWING AND REAPING MACHINE CO. 

HOOSICK FALLS, RENSSELAER CO., N. Y. 

For tho sale of their Harvesting Machines, direct from the Manufacturer, Wholesale 

and Retail, 

112 and 114 Front Street, 
E. S. WHITCOMB, 

General jlgent Pacific Coast. 





ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. xcix 



KOOPMANSCHAP & CO. 



And Chinese Emigration Agents, 

S.W. CORNER CALIFORNIA AND DAVIS STS. 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



* Ju BOTWHIiii, 

BOOK BINDER, 



A1VD 



BLANK BOOK MANUFACTURER 

No. 509 CLAY STREET, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



W. B. SUMNER, 

DEALER IN 

HOBS ^ IiBATHMH 



515 FROITT STREET, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



WELCH & CO. 

Importers, Sliiii & Commissi 




BBtTTAN'S BU1LOIHG, 109 CALIFORNIA ST. 

SAINT FRANCISCO, CuA.Xj. 

AGENTS, MOODY'S SAW MILLS, BURRARD INLET, B. C. 



ANDREW WELCH & CO. WELCH, RITHET & CO. 

19 Tower Chambers, Liverpool, England. Victoria, British Columbia. 



FIRST NATIONAL GOLD BANK 

OF SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA. 
PAID UP CAPITAL $1,000,000 GOLD 

President - - - GEO. "F. HOOPER 

Vice President - - SAMUEL HORT. 
Cashier - - - ■ - N". K. MASTEN. 



DIRECTORS z 

GEO. F. HOOPER. PETER DONAHUE, 

SAM'L HORT, JAMES C. FLOOD, 

D. CALLAHAN, EDWARD MARTIN, 

C. G. HOOKER, JAMES MOFFITT, 

M. P. JONES. 



NEW YORK AGENTS - - - - JAY COOKE £ CO. 

LONDON AGENTS - - JAY COOKE, McCULLOCH <& CO. 



Exchange for sale on the Principal Cities of the United States, Great Britain and Ireland. 
This Bank is prepared to transact a general Banking business. 

Deposits in Gold, Silver and Currency received subject to check or on special deposit. 
Collections attended to and prompt returns made at the lowest market rate of Exchange 



A. S. ROSENBAUM & CO. 

i:M::po:FtTE:Fts of 

FINE HAVANA CIGARS, 

TOBACCO, ETC. 

And Sole Agents for the Celebrated Peach Cake Navy Tobacco, 

COR. CLAY AND BATTERY STS. 

162 \7TATER JSTM3ET, USTSSX^T YORK. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



ci 



'BAflKUN Plllf II 



m 




FRANK EASTMAN, 



BOOK, CARD AND FANCY 







mf 




Y 





9 



Near Sansom, 



SAN FBAHCJSCO. 



Every style of work required by Merchants, Mechanics, Law- 
yers, Insurance Companies, Banks, etc., correctly, tastefully, speed- 
ily and elegantly executed at this long established House. 

The proprietor has added every desirable improvement in 
PRINTING, TYPE AND MACHINERY that the business 
demands. Novelty and originality of design in the execution of 

Plata anil Fancy Job Printing 

Will receive his prompt attention, and he hopes, by fair dealing 
and low prices, to suit all who may favor him with their patronage. 



cii SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



Laurel Hill Cemetery, 

(FORMERLY LONE MOUNTAIN,) 

Office, at the Entrance of the Cemetery, Bush Street and Ceme- 
tery Avenue. 



« »»» » 



TRUSTEES: 

W..K. Van Alen, H. L. King, C. Adolphe Low, 

N. Luning, James Otis, N. Gray, 

H. M. Newhall, C. C. Butler, J. H. Redington. 

JAMES OTIS, President, 
W. C RALSTON, Treasurer, 

C. C. BUTLER, Secretary, 

C. H. CROWELL, Acting Sup't. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



cm 





GIT 



ving Company, 



OFFICE, S.W. COR. MONTCtOIERY AND COMMERCIAL STS. 
Mill, €m, &f F J Q>wHk and M§ffjMm, 

This Company contracts for Street Paving of every kind which is accepted by the City Authori- 
ties of Han Francisco, but makes a specialty of paving under the patent known as the "STOW 
FOUNDATION PATENT," which they claim as the best known wooden pavement. In proof of 
this assumption, they are prepared to exhibit certificates from the most celebrated engui 
several of the largest cities of the Union where this style of pavement has been introduced. 

The great superiority of this pavement over all others, lies in its mechanical construction, and 
not in the materials used. Experience has clearly demonstrated in this city, which material can be 
safely used, and which should be rejected. All objections which have vet been urged to the Stow 
Foundation Pavement attach to the quality of lumber used, and not to the construction of the 
work. The following extract from the report of the Committee on Pavements at the last Industrial 
Exhibition in this city, speaks for itself, to wit : 

"For general practical use and public benefit, we do not hesitate to pronounce the Stow 
Foundation Pavement, exhibited by the City Paving Company, together with the actual tests of its 
durability, as presented by the wear and tear in the streets of San Francisco, to be superior to all 
others, when taking into consideration the method of laying it, the time it has been laid, the form of 
its construction, and by an honest comparison with others which have been submitted to the same test. 
We award to it the First Premium. Signed, 

EDWIN A. SHERMAN, 
JOHN V. HUNTER, 

Committee. 

Certificates showing the superiority of the Stow Foundation Pavement over all others ever 
introduced into this city, were furnished to the City Paving Company by his Honor, Frank McCoppin, 
and the entire Board of Supervisors during his last term of office, and by his successor, the Hon. 
Thos. H. Sclby, and eleven out of twelve of the Supervisors during his term of office; and though 
some objections have latterly been urged to this Pavement, it is plainly manifest to any one who will 
investigate the subject, that the fault lies entirely with the quality of materials used, when ob- 
jections lie at all. To no sample of this pavement laid with " Black Heart Redwood," has there 
been a word of objection yet raised, and it is proposed to use this quality of lumber in future, unless 
the property-holders, by express petition, request otherwise. 

The fact is not generally known, but it is a truth nevertheless, that the objections so often 
urged to wooden block pavements, because of their swelling and bursting up in humps, apply to the 
pavement laid tinder the Nicolson Patent, all of which, however, would have been remedied by a 
moderate expenditure in sprinkling the streets during the long dry season ; the fact having been 
clearly demonstrated that no defects of this kind have shown themselves upon streets which have 
been sprinkled, as for example, Kearny Street and Montgomery Street. The damage does not arise 
from the swelling of the blocks themselves, but by the foreign substance which is held between tie- 
shrunken blocks when they swell to their original size. 

PHILIP CADUC, 

Gen'l Superintendent City Paving Company. 



CIV 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



« 



c*o 



S> 



#& **!* **^ 



IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 



French, English and Domestic 



_ _ GO 

36 MONTGOMERY STREET, COR. SUTTER, 
/ A SAisr fraistcisco. ^oH. • 



RODGERS, MEYER & CO. 



m 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



ROBERT RODGERS & CO 



lii ai Commissi Merchants 

GRAXXT SHIPPERS. 



Draw Exchange on Europe. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. CV 



Having been engaged in the construction and management of the Public Wbrkfl of the State of 
Ohio for twenty year's, and having had charge of the Public Surveys of the State of California for 



A REVOLUTION IN MEDICAL SCIENCE! 
DR. HADFIELD'S 



<§ 

The following cases cured by this new method, are only a few of the great number pronounced 
incurable. Rev. L. M. Solenberger, General Debility; Win. L. Fomun, Kidney Disease; W. Ewing, 
Constipation; Miss Lizzie Hawks, Debility and Obstructed Menstruation; Miss Barber, Chills and 
Fever and Nervous Debility; Chas. Murry, Seminal Weakness ; J. Summons, Inflammation of the 
Bladder; Geo. Draping, Chronic Rheumatism ; W. Peterson, Weak Back and Seminal Debility; Chas, 
Grear, Bushes of Blood to the Head; J. Hollom, Spermatorlica and Impotency: Reuben Houser, 
Liver Complaint ; J. Wilson, Chronic Headache ; M. Mitchel, Seminal Weakness; Charles Valentine, 
Ulceration of the Lungs ; S. Longenbough, Consumption ; Mrs. Everett, Congestion of the Lungs ; 
Thos. Cornwall, Lung Disease : Mrs. J. E. Hawks, Consumption, of nine years duration ; Mis. Booth, 
Cold Feet and Hands; Geo. Hamm, Gen'l Joe. Hooker, U. S. Army, E. J. Clishe, John Pollard, 
Miss Franky Holmes, of Paralysis; Clara Josselyn, Hip Disease; J. A. Forbes, Inflammation of the 
Lungs; R. T. Patten, Dr. R. P. Flinn, Mr. F. A. 'Massol, S. Lantsberry, J. Rothfield, of Rheumatism; 
Thos. Buckley, Chronic Chills and Fever; Mrs. F. A. Massol, J. L. Fulton, X. Harvey of Asthma ; R. 
S. Duncanson, Mrs. Aubery, Chas. Dilke, of Neuralgia ; C Thompson, Thos. Dunlef, ot Stiff Joints 
and Tumor ; J. Spaulding, James Connelly, Bilious Fever; David Smith, Bronchitis ; John Fitz- 
gerald, Dyspepsia ; Wm. Marion, Pleurisy ; L. C. Pelton, Cough, etc., etc. 

In all cases, Lost Power restored. All inflammatory action quickly removed. 
Circulation of the blood perfectly restored. CaU at or Address, 

DR. HADFIELD'S VACUUM CURE, 

3 r o. 331 Kearny Street, San Francisco. 



IVII* ENGINEER 

AND 

Practical Surveyor. 

Also, LATE STATE LOCATING AGENT FOR SCHOOL LANDS. 



-<♦.-♦-.• »■+- 



seven vears, and "the disposition of the School Lands of the State for ten years, and having provided 
his office with maps of all the Public Survevs of the State, as ivell as with the Land Taws, [nsl 
tions, Rules and Regulations of the State and the United States, he deems himself prepared to gm 



j tract- 



fey desired information relating to the lands of the State, or to transact any business appertaining 
to the entry, location, purchase or sale of the same. 

E^"Maps and Plats furnished when required. 

Field Notes of Intricate Surveys platted, and quantities calculated. 
Deeds with difficult descriptions carefully drawn. 
Field Work either Surveving or Leveling, executed promptly, and every other kind of business 
connected with Public Works or Lands attended to with dispatch. 

Office, No. 204 Montgomery Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



CV1 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 




K. G. BRUSH. 



A. M. I5URNS. 



A. M. E-TJB.1TS <& CO. 

AlSflil All SiMMIBilil BOUSB, 

N. B. COR. SAJVSOM AND HALLE CK STS. 
SALE DAY, Saturday, 11 A. M. SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 






REFERENCES;— C. Adolphe Low & Co., W. F. Babcock, of Parrott & Co., I. tYiedhmder 
Main & Winchester. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



cvii 





PARIS EXHIBITION, 1867. 



First Errand Prize! Highest Awarcl ! 

CROSS OF THE LEGION OP HONOR k GOLD MEDAL, 

TO 

CIIICKERING «fc SOIVS. 





MASON & HAMLIN ORGANS 

Cabinet Q pagans 

For Parlors, Drawing Rooms, Libraries, 
Churches, Sunday Schools, Lodges, &c. 

Occupying little space, 
elegant as furniture, 
not requiring tuning or 
liable to get out of or- 
der; suitable for SEC- 
ULAR and SACRED 
Music. 

FIFTY STYLES: $ 60, 
$63, $100, $125, $130, 
$160,$170,$175, $200, 
$223, $240, $260, 
$300 to $2,000 each. 
BUT" A warded 73 Gold op 
Silver Medals, or other 
highest premiums and 
medal at PARIS EXPO- 
SITION; recommend- 
?ed as the best by near- 
ly 1,000 musicians. 

NEW ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE, WITH NEW STYLES A!I3 
REDUCED PRICES, FREE. 

Mason & Hamlin Organ Co. 
KOHLER, CHASE & CO, 633 Clay St., S, F 

Agents fob the Pacific Coasx. 

KOHLER CB:ASE <& CO. Agents, 

683 AID 635 CILAT ST1EET, SAN F1ANCISO0. 




CVU I SAX FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 





_ 




(j^^^y Established 50 Yeais ago in Leipzig and New Tort. ^\0Tp 

^F m 

PUBLISHERS OF MUSIC 



DEALERS IN 



MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS, Etc. 



AND IMPORTERS OF 



EUROPEAN MUSIC, 

643 Clay Street, j 

Below Kearny, 5 AH FBAND5CEL 



LEIPZIG, ...... 2 FELIX STREET. 

NEW YORK, ...... 820 BROADWAY. 

Sole Agency for the Pacific States of 



MUSICAL CIRCULATING LIBRARY, 

Tewms, $6 per Hall ¥eai», Payable In Advance, 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. C 1X 



MAXIM GAS COMPANY 

OF CALIFORNIA. 






Office and Salesroom, No. 238 Montgomery St. 

ONE DOOR FROM PINE, 

S^TST FRANCISCO. 



The Maxim Gas Company especially invite the attention of the public and all Consumers of Gas 
to our new method of producing Gas by the Maxim Gas Machine. It is entirely new, different in its 
construction and operation from anything heretofore offered to the public. It is simple, compact 
:afe, reliable, automatic, and produces a superior quality of ILLUMINATING GAS, at a cost not to 
jxceed S2.50 per 1,000 feet. 

We arc prepared to furnish Machines for any number of lights desired, from 30 to 5 000 
Burners, or, will CONTRACT TO LIGHT Public Buildings, Hotels, Factories, Churches, Depots, 
Private Residences, Mines, etc., etc., etc., in city or country. 

We will verify all we promise, by putting up our machines at our expense — giving to parties the 
jption to purchase the machine after a fair trial, or have it removed at our expense. 

This Gas can be used in Ordinary Gas Pipes and Burners, and buildings thus lighted can be in- 
jured at the same rates as those using Coal Gas. 

REFERENCES. 

We refer those interested to the following gentlemen, who have been using the Maxim Gas 
Machine for months : 

James Gamble, Esq., Superintendent Western Telegraph Company ; J. H. Redington, Esq., 
President Home Mutual Insurance Company ; M. J. O'Connor, Esq., of Conroy & O'Counor ; George 
SValkington, Esq., Piedmont Springs; George H. Howard, Esq., San Mateo; H. A. BIoss, Esq., Dining 
lotel, Lathrop Station, W. P. R. R. ; Mills Seminary, Alameda County ; City Gas Works, San 
iafael. 

£§f~ For further particulars call at No. 238 Montgomery Street, see the machines in operation, 
nd judge for yourself, or send for Illustrated Pamphlet. 

JTA^MES H. CLARK, 

SUPERINTENDENT, 

MAXIM GAS COMPANY. 



ex 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 




© - 



P$ 



II 



. £ 



fe rt 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. CXI 



« ^ > 

RETAIL CARPET 

WALL PAPER WAREHOUSE. 

We keep constantly on hand the largest assortment 
on the Pacific Coast, of 

VELVET, BODY BRUSSELS, AXMINSTER, 

TAPESTRY BRUSSELS, BELGIQUE, THREE PLY INGRAIN, 

Hutch* Hemp and V©n©tl®m ff&ppe&h 

And a full and well selected Stock of 

CURTAINS AND UPHOLSTERY GOODS, 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION, 

ALSO, 

If ALL PAFHR AMW DICORATIOHS 

OF THE NEWEST STYLES AND PATTERNS. 

Call and see us before purchasing elsewhere. We will endeavor to suit you, both as to 
quality and price. 

Do not forget the store, as it is the only Carpet Store on Clay Street. 

FRANK G. EDWARDS, 

628, 630 AND 632 CLAY STREET, 

AND 

633 mmm #§I MBUCMAWT VnUHHf 

SA1S T FRANCISCO. . 



CX11 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



COMMERCIAL UNION 



FIRE 



Assumnci 



COMPAMTT. 



OF COBIHIMj, LONDOI. 



CAPITAL, 



$12,500,000. 



General Agent, and Attorney in Fact for Pacific Coast. 



All Losses paid Immediately upon Adjustment in U. S. Gold Coin. 



A first-class British Company, offering its patrons solid 

security. 

OFFICE, N.E. COR.CALIFORNIA AND SANS0M STS. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



i ».» > 



The business of the Occidental Insurance Company has 
been, by the Trustees of that Company, transferred to the Com- 
mercial Union. 



-GLNbRAL KbHKfcNl'l: [iLHAHIMLNI ■ 

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC LIBRARY, „_ 
CIVIC CENTER T 

mvmmo directory 

For the Year commencing March, 1872 : 

EMBRACING A 

GENERAL DIRECTORY OF RESIDENTS 

AND A 

BUSINESS DIRECTORY; 

ALSO, 

A DIRECTORY OF STREETS, PUBLIC OFFICES, ETC. 
AND A NEW MAP OF THE CITY : 



TOGETHER WITH 



The Consolidation Act and its Amendments ; Officers of the Municipal Government, 

Societies and other Organizations, and a great variety of Useful 

and Statistical Information, 



EXHIBITING AT A GLANCE 



W\xt sgxvqxtH and <&vt$tnt (£>on&itUn at Uit (Sity. 



THIRTEENTH YEAR OF PUBLICATION. 



COMPILED BY 

HENRY G. LANGLEY, 

EDITOR OF "PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY," "STATE REGISTER" AND "PACIFIC COAST ALMANAC.' 



DEPOTS FOR THE SALE OF THIS WORK : 

Office of the Directory, No. 612 Clay Street, up stairs ; A. Koman & Co., 11 Montgomery Street; 

Sumner Whitney, 613 Clay Street ; A. L. Bancroft & Co., 721 Market Street; White & Bauer, 

413 Washington Street, and W. E. Loomis, S.E. corner Washington and Sansom streets. 

TM1CE FIVE HOLLARS, GOLD COIN. 

GENERAL REFERENCE 

SAN FRANCISCO: 

HENRY G. LANGLEY, PUBLISHER, 613 CLAY STREET. 
Bacon & Company., Excelsior Steam Presses, 536 Clay Street. 

1872. 




fffli* 




THE TIME HAS COME WHEN 

WHEELER & WSLSON 

Have got their Family Sewing machine to 

PlEIIIIIfl 

And no mistake. This each and every woman in the land will admit 
when they see the 

NEW STYLE, SILENT, ADJUSTABLE, DRAW FEED MACHINE. 

Every little difficulty is entirely overcome. Drawing the work while sewing, they only require one 
hand and one foot to do any kind of work perfectly. 

BEWARE OF IMPOSTORS.— If y°" w *nt a Family Sewing Machine, 
buy the Wheeler & Wilson. Be sure you get a Wheeler & Wilson. Examine the stamp upon 
the cloth plate ; it should read : " Wheeler & Wilson Mf'g Co. — A. B. Wilson, Pat." Every Sewing 
Machine should be sold on its own merits. Parties endeavoring to palm off other Sewing Machines, 
under the great reputation of this machine, will be dealt with according to law. Buy no Eamily 
Sewing Machines of traveling agents unless they can show you a letter signed " W. M. STODDARD, 
Agent for the Pacific Coast," for said machines. 

W® B. STGDDABD, Ageat I« WmM® Ooasf. 

Office removed to the large, commodious building, three doors from the old stand, on the same block, 

427 MONTGOMERY STREET, 

N. B.— Also, the best Silent, Adjustable TUCK MARKER and BINDER, at Reduced Prices. 
H^F" For a Holiday Present, nothing is so desirable as a Wheeler & Wilson Sewing Machine, jgfl 



Entered according to Act of Congress, in the Year one thousand eight hundred and seventy-two, 

By HENRY G. LANGLET, 

In the Ollice of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington. 



A FEW MORE SETS ONLY REMAIN ON HAND. 




HCfOBY. 



FROM 1856 TO 1871, 
Fourteen Volumes Octavo, the whole Forming 

A COMPLETE AND RELIABLE HISTORY OF 



RB 






.AH 






:9 



From its first settlement to the present time. 



For Sale, 



Price, 25.00. 



BIS OHiJ^TY" STREET. 



PEEFATORY. 



In presenting this, the thirteenth volume of the San Francisco Directory to his patrons, 
the compiler would respectfully invite attention to a few of the prominent features contained therein, 
and the many evidences of the progress and permanent prosperity of the City to be found through- 
out its pages. 

The number of references contained in the present volume is over 92,000, as follows : Register 
of Names, 64,294 ; Business Directory, 17,238 ; Appendix, 11,000. The population of this City 
is estimated at 178,276— a gain since January, 1871, of 5,526. The data upon which these figures 
are based, with explanatory remarks, together with several valuable and interesting tables connect- 
ed therewith, will be found comprised in the article on Population, on page 11, to which attention 
is respectfully invited. 

The number of buildings erected from January, 1871, to March, 1872, is estimated at 920, at a 
valuation of over $2,500,000. The expenditures of the Department of Streets and Highways, 
for the year ending June 30th, 1871, amounted to $843,415. Among the buildings erected during 
the year are several valuable and extensive structures of a public character, and numerous elegant 
private residences. The total number of buildings in the City and County is 20,287. 

In the Appendix will be found a variety of information connected with our municipal organiza- 
tion, the Consolidation Act, with the Amendments adopted to March 1st, 1872, arranged tinder 
each appropriate head, and several Acts of the Legislature connected therewith, to which has been 
added an analytical index, which will facilitate reference thereto. There will be also found in this 
department of the work a large number of references to the different organizations in this City, 
embracing lists of the Federal, State and Municipal Officers, notices of local Societies and Associa- 
tions, Churches, Military Organizations, Incorporations, etc. Attention is invited to a new and 
corrected man of the City and County of San Francisco, and a revised Street Directory, including 
the correct system of numbering the buildings, both of which have been compiled from offk.al 
sources, and carefully compared with each street and locality named therein. 

The Introductory and General Review present a diary of the interesting local events of the year, 
brief notices of Schools, public and private, Benevolent Associations, Mining and other Incorpora- 
tions, and references to the different mechanical enterprises in operation at the present t.me in this 
City too-ether with other subjects worthy of special mention and historical data of present interest, 
well calculated to make the book a valuable work of reference to future generations. But the par- 
ticular features of this department of the work are a series of valuable Meteorological Observations 
of the climate of this City, from 1850 to 1871, contributed by Henry Gibbons, M. D., and articles 
on the Railroads of the Pacific Coast, and the progress of Improvements and Manufactures in this 
City during the past year ; also a review of the improvements made from January, 18, 1, to March, 
1872, and a statement of the number of buildings within the City limits. 

The compiler would respectfully tender his thanks for the prompt cooperation extended by the 
different public officers, and other gentlemen who have been applied to for information for the work. 
To those who have refused their names, or other items of information, he would refer them to the 
pages of the work; they will there find, arranged in its proper order, the desired data, obtained 
without their assistance. To his numerous patrons for their substantial evidences of good 
will, and to Messrs. Bacon & Company, to whom the typographical department was minuted, 
he would especially offer his thanks. The fourteenth volume of the San Francisco Director, 
will be issued in March, 1873. 

San Francisco, March 20th, 1872. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



PAGE. 

PROGRESS OF THE CITY 9 

Assessments and Kates of Taxation 9 

Municipal Expenditures 1865-1871 10 

Bonded Debt 10 

Annual Revenue 11 

Population San Francisco, 1871-72 11 

Federal Census San Francisco, 1870 12 

Current History 14 

Public Parks 17 

New Buildings, 1871-72 18 

Number of Buildings, City and County 18 

New Church Buildings 18 

California Tattersalls 20 

New Private Residences 20 

Montgomery Avenue 21 

South San Francisco 21 

City Gas Company 21 

Metropolitan Gas Company 22 

Maxim Gas Company 23 

California Silk. Manufacturing Co 23 

Pavements 24 

Insurance Companies 25 

RAILROADS PACIFIC COAST 26 

METEOROLOGICAL OBSERVATIONS 29 

REAL ESTATE, SAN' FRANCISCO 31 

DEPAR TMENT STREETS AND HIGHWAYS, S. F., 

1871 31 

MORTALITY OF SAN FRANCISCO, 1871 31 

CHRONOLOGICAL HISTORY 32 

GENERAL REVIEW 37 

Our Public Schools 37 

General Statistics, 1871 38 

Location of Schools and Average Attendance 39 

University of California 40 

Private Educational Institutions 40 

Santa Clara College 41 

Medical Colleges 41 

Heald's Business College 41 

Academic Parisienne 42 

BENEVOLENT AND SOCIAL SOCIETIES 42 

Young Men's Christian Association 43 

San Francisco Benevolent Association 43 

California Immigrant Union 44 

HOSPITA LS 44 

ASSOCIATIONS-PROTECTIVE, LITERARY, ETC 45 

LIBRARIES 45 

FIR E DE P A KM EXT 45 

LOCAL MANUFACTURES 45 

Iron Foundries— Rolling Mills 46 

Selby's Smelling Works and Shot Tower 47 

Assaying Establishments, Manufacturers in Wood 47 

Wire Ropes— Woolen Goods 47 

Cordage— Leather— Glass— Matches 48 

Canities— Soap-Glue— Oil 48 

Mai hie— Manufactured Stone 48 

Potteries— Water and Drain Pipe 48 

Boots and Shoes— Furniture— Vehicles 49 

Breweries— Cigars— Cigaritos 49 

Meat Packing— Preserved Fruits 49 

Wooden Ware— Brooms 49 

Flour Mills— Sugar Ketineries— Powder Works... 49 

Electrical Construction Co 49 

Diamond-Pointed Drills 49 

Brass and Bell Foundries 50 

WATER COM PAN 1 ES 50 

Spring Valley Water Works 50 

Lake Tahoe and San Francisco Water Works 50 

New Water Companies 50 

CHANGES AND REMOVALS 51 

REGISTER OF NAMES 63 

BUILDINGS. BLOCKS, HALLS, ETC 699 

Public Buildings 689 

Halls— Blocks— Rows— Wharves 700 

Places Of Amusement 701 

Prominent i' laces 701 

KEY TO PUBLIC OFFICES 7I>1 

701 



Sta 

Citv and County 

Federal 

CITY ORDINANCE— Hack and Cab Fares. 



PAGE. 

STREET DIRECTORY 703 

BUSINESS DIRECTORY", TRADES, ETC 719 

CONSOLIDATION ACT 797 

Municipal Elections 803 

Paid Fire Department 804 

Police Judge's Court 808 

Harbor Police Regulations 809 

Alms House and Hospital 840 

Personal Property Tax 846 

Delinquent Taxes 847 

Justices' Court 849 

Municipal Court 850 

Quarantine 852 

Analytical Index 855 

MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT 857 

Board of Supervisors 857 

Board of Education 857 

City and County Officers 858 

Election Districts 860 

State Congressional Districts 860 

Judicial Districts 860 

City and County Districts 860 

Police Department 861 

Fire Alarm and Police Telegraph 862 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 863 

Officers and Organization 863 

FEDERAL OFFICERS 864 

State Officers 866 

Custom House 866 

U nitcd States Treasury 867 

Branch Mint v 867 

Surveyor General 868 

Post Office 868 

COURTS 868 

CHURCHES 869 

Baptist 869 

Congregationalist 871 

Episcopal 871 

Evangelical Lutheran 873 

Hebrew 874 

Methodist 874 

Presbyterian 876 

Roman Catholic 878 

Swcdenborgian 880 

Unitarian 880 

Chinese Mission Houses 881 

Mariners' Church 881 

Disciples of Christ 881 

Reformed Church B88 

Independent German Congregation 882 

Russian Church 882 

Lyceum for Self Culture 882 

Baptist Chinese Mission School 882 

ASSOCIATIONS AND SOCIETIES 882 

Religious 882 

Benevolent 884 

Masonic Fraternity 896 

I. O. of Odd Fellows 9011 

Temperance 902 

Protective 902 

Li te tar v 907 

Historical 807 

Social 908 

MILITARY 912 

NEWSPAPERS 774 

PERIODICALS 774 

I N SURAN CE COMPANIES 757 

HOMESTEAD ASSOCIATIONS 754 

.MINING COMPANIES 773 

TELEGRAPH LINES 791 

RAI LEU A DS 782 

OCEAN STEAMERS 916 

STEAM BOATS 916 

STAGES 787 

EXPRESSES 744 

INCORPORATED COMPANIES 755 

CO NSULS 739 

HOSPITALS 754 

CEM ETE Kl ES 916 

ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 917 






ALPHABETICAL LIST OF ADVERTISERS. 



PAGE. | 

JEtna Ins. Co side line 

Amos & Davis 32 

Angell, Palmer & Co.. xlvii 

Aiiiies it Dallam xxxiii 

Arthur J. D. & Son 32 

Atwood & Bodwell. . .4 and 5 

Austin it Co civ 

Bacon it Company, reg. of 
names, 8 and front cover 

Badger W. G xl 

Balfour. Guthrie it Co., 

lxxxiii and lxxxvii 
Bancroft A. L. it Co — Ixix 
Bandmann, Nielsen & 

Co xxiv 

Bank British Columbia., xi 

Bank of California ix 

Bav Sugar Refinery 28 

Bell John C liv 

Ben nor George L 47 

Bernard Charles xxi 

Betts W.M. it Bro 32 

Black Henry M Ixvii 

Blake, Bobbins <fc Co...lxiii 
Boericke & Tafel, regis- 
ter of names 106 

Boesch Emil lxxv 

Bonnev 0. Jr 14 

BoobarE. C. & Co lii 

Boscmi Edward it Co., 
reg. of names. . .side line 

Bowen Bros 10 and back 

ot volume 

Bradbury W. B 35 

Bradlev &, Kulofson 30 

Bragg Robert 47 

Bravernian it Levy front 

cover 
British and Foreign Ma- 
rine Ins. Co lxxxvii 

Brittau, Holbrookifc Co., 

register id' names 788 

Brittun it Key, register 

of names 706 

Brooks W.H.J li 

Brooks <fc McGregor 30 

Bro well Jeremiah 3 

Bruce Donald back cover 

Bryant, Strahan it Co 31 

Bucknam E.T 3s 

Burnham J. W. it Co 17 

Burns A. M.it Co cvi 

Buswell A xcix 

Butler Warren C.cx and 24 

California Cracker Co 29 

California Ins. Co lvi 

California Jewelry Co., 

register of names 758 

California Sugar Kefin- 
ery xx v i 

Carmen Isl'd -lalt Works., lii 

Casebolt it Kerr lvii 

Central Pacific R. K. xxxiv 

and xxxv 

Charter Oak Life Ins. Co. .50 

ChielovichE. & Co 27 

City Paving Co ciii 

Clabrough & Bros xlv 

Clair Madame 41 

Clark <t Foote 49 

Code P. D. &, Co., regis- 
ter of names 769 

Coghill, Lyons it Co..xcvii 
Commercial Union Fire 

Assurance Co cxii 

Connecticut M. L. Ins. 
Co.. register of names . 729 

Cook C. Mrs 43 

Cook H.N lii 

Cooke ifc Smith 47 

Corin J 31 

Cor vi lie Emerson & Co., 

register of names 777 

Craine William -51 

Crane it Brigham lxxii 

Crane Albert E Ixix 

Crocker it Co front cover 

Crockard H 57 



PAGE. 

Culver J. H 33 

Cummings W. H 31 

Curry F. 1 12 

Curtis J.P 34 

Daniel John & Co 27 

Davidson J. W. & Co.. back 
cover 

Day Thomas front cover 

DepienesH. A. 50 

Dietrich W. K lxxxi 

Doane it Co.. 28 and reg. of 

names 776 

Dobrzensky M 43 

Dolliver .t Brother 27 

Dunn, Campbell it Co 29 

Eastman Frank ci 

Eclectic Life Ins. Co 55 

Edwards Frank G cxi 

Eitner Rudolf. lxxvii 

Electrical Const. Co.lxxxix 

Elleau it Badgley 21 

Empire M. L. Ins. Co xc 

Englander William xlvi 

Erlin G. & Co 44 

Ettinger S xlii 

Falkenau Louis 49 

Falkner, Bell it Co lvi 

Farmers' and Mechan- 
ics' Bank of Sav... xlvii 

Feldmann L. it Co lxiv 

Fireman's h und Ins. Go. 

front cover 

First Nat'l Gold Bank c 

Fisher it Co 51 

Flint. Peabody & Co lxv 

Forster L. Madame xliii 

Freeman B. H lii 

Fried .fc Besse 33 

Frodsham Charles M 23 

Frontier it Bellemere 35 

Cadsby K. H xevi 

Galpen R. H 50 

Gannon Peter T li 

Garratt it Co 12 

Gerke Henry li 

German S. it L. Society.. Ix 

Ghirardelli D 19 

Gillmor J. B 54 

Oilman it Mellon 53 

Glasgow Iron and Metal 

Importing Co 9 

Goddard it Co xiv 

G racier it Johnson 9 

Gray, Jones it Co xxv 

Gray M xcvii 

Gray N xlix 

Green W. S. & Co., reg. 

of names 286 

Griffith A. J 36 

Grosh & Rutherford 28 

Gump S. <t G Ixvii 

HadtieldDr cv 

Hagar&Co 13 

flagman J IT 

HallC. R Ixxiii 

Hall John it Son 33 

llallidie A. S lxxxv 

Hamburg Bremen Fire 

Insurance Co lviii 

Hanscom it Co 10 

Hartlord Fire Ins. Co. .back 

cover 

Hawkins it Cantrcll. . . .xcv 

Heald's Business College, 

register of names — 737 

Healy & Jewell liv 

Ileatlmeld, Bogel it Co., 

xxxvi and lxxi 

Helbingit Straus xxviii 

Hendv Joshua 21 

Heppner J. L 41 

Herrmann, Neis it Co..xlvi 

Heuck Herman 23 

Heverin M 46 

Hevnemamiit Co xl 

HiberniaS. & L. Society. .xx 
Hicks D. it Co., register 
of names 287 



PAGE. 

Higgins & Collins 20 

Hinckley &, Co 16 

Hinz Carl 37 

Hoaglaud Wm. C 36 

Hobos, Gilmore & Co xlv 

Hoev John lxviii 

Hoffman II. F. W 1 

Home Insurance Co., back 
of volume 

Horstmann H. & Co 26 

HouseworthThos. it Co. 

front covei 

Howes George it Co xv 

Howland B. F. & Co 41 

Huant l'aulin lxvi 

Hubbell S. T 18 

Hacks it Lambert S3 

Hueter Gustave lxxv 

Hunt 10. U 6 

Huntington, Hopkins <fe 

Co bottom line 

Hyde it Chester 41 

Imperial Fire Ins. Co lvi 

Iredale A. S 43 

Jesse it Drew 34 

John Hancock Mutual 

Life Ins. Co 1 

Johnson J. C. &. Co 18 

Johnson T. Rodgers, in- 
side back cover 
Jones, Pullman & Co., 
reg. names, bottom line 

Josselyn J. S cv 

Kaindler, Scellier.Lelie- 
vre it Co.. top edge 

of volume 

Kallenberg Theodore 35 

Keller Henry it Co., reg. 

of names 287 

Kellogg C. L xxxviii 

Kelly Patrick back cover 

Kitlredgo Jonathan xvi 

Knickerbocker Life Ins. 

Co lxxxvii 

Knowles George B 38 

Koehlcr & Rilter, regis- 
ter of names 378 

Kohler it Fronting . . . .front 
cover 

Kohler, Chase <fc Co cvii 

Kollmyer A '23 

Koopmanschap & Co.. xcix 
Korbel F. .t Brothers. . . . 23 

Kuh Leopold li ii 

Kuner A 25 

Langland N. P liv 

Langley H. G., register 
of names, 107, 794 and 796 

LarkinsitCo 57 

Laurel Hill Cemetery — cii 

Leavitt Charles H lxviii 

Lehman K. .t Co 46 

Leveque J 27 

Levison Brothers, regis- 
ter of names 758 

Libby it Swett, register 

of names 100 

Liesenfeld P xlviii 

Linforth, Kellogg & Co. 

xxiv 
Liverpool and London 

and Globe Ins. Co 1 

Locan & Co xviii 

Locke it Montague 12 

London and S. F. Bank — x 
Low C. Adolphe it Co. . . .20 
Lvl'ord L. D., register of 

names 769 

Lyon it Co., register of 

names 728 

Macdonald D. A. & Co.. xlvi 

Macken J ames 15 

Macondray it Co xx 

Magcc it .Moore lxxxiu 

Magill K. H., back of volume 
Main it Winchester.. ..xxix 

Makins A. 11. Mrs 37 

Mallon John 14 



PAGK. 

Manhattan Sewing Ma- 
chines 33 

Marden it Myrick lxxlx 

MarsJ. A....' 51 

MartellJohn 2 

Martin E. it Co li 

Masonic S. it L. Bank...xix 

Maxim (las Co cix 

.May A. (n 59 

Mayer Joseph 38 

McAfee, Spiers ifc Co 8 

McCain, Flood it 51c- 

Clurc xix 

McDowell William 37 

McGregor A. E 57 

McMillan it Kester 2 

McNulty C. A 19 

McQuillan P. Ixin 

Meeker, James A- Co liii 

Merchants' Marine Ins. 

Co xxii 

Merchants' Mutual Ma- 
rine Insurance Co iv 

Merrill J. C. it Co xxtii 

Merrill 1" 25 

Meussdorffer J. C. it Bro. .Iv 
and bottom edge of 

volume. 
Meussdorfl'er K ., register 

of names 784 

Michels, Friedlander <fc 

Co lxiv 

Mills it Evans 18 

Millers' Foundry xlvii 

Mission and l'aciflc Wool- 
en Mills xc 

Moffitt John W lxiv 

Moore H. II., register of 

names 789 

MorelosA lxxv 

Morgan i. Co., register 

ol names 776 

Morris Eveline 42 

Morrow George xcvii 

Mountain it Kaye lxv 

Movnihan it Aitkcn 8 

Murphy, (J rant & Co lxv 

Mutual Benefit Life Ins. 

Co ixx 

Mutual Life Ins. Co. of 

New York., back cover 
Myers L. R. it Co., reg. 

of names 768 

Nathan P.. it Co., regis- 
ter of names 784 

National Watch Co., reg. 

of names 759 

Nelson it Doble 53 

Nevada Ice Co lxxxiv 

New England M utu al 

Life Ins. Co Uj 

Newbauer it Co Ixxvi 

Newhall II. M.<t Co lix 

Newsom John J 29 

Nichols A. C.& Co xxv 

NileM. D -6 

Norcross.t Co lxvi 

North America Life In- 
surance Co *> 

North British and Mer- 
cantile Ins. Co xciv 

North Pacific Transpor- 
tation Co vll 

Northern Assurance Co. 

xxvii 
Northwestern Mut. Life 

Insurance Co 45 

O'Dav William 4b 

O'Donnell Cornelius 22 

Otto Charles* Co 4b 

Oulif, DntoA Co 34 

Pache & Co ......66 

Pacific Barrel and Keg 

l'actorv "\ 

Pacific Mail S. S. Co vi 

Pacific .News Co ■••25 

Pacific oil and Lead 
Works v 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



PAGE. 

Pacific Pneumatic Gas 

Co xxxvii 

Pacific Rolling Mill Co v 

Pacific Saw Manufac- 
turing Co 11 

Pacific Stone Co lxxxii 

Tacky Martin, register 

of names 515 

Pages J. F 35 

Palmer W. J. T. & Co., 

register of names 788 

Parker George F 40 

Pasquale E lxxv 

Patterson William lvii 

Paullin J. E 34 

Phoenix & Home Ins. Co. 

back of volume 
Pilsbury, Webb & Co., 

inside back cover 

Plate A.J xcvi 

Piatt & Newton xxiii 

Plum, Bell it Co. .back cover 

Pope it Talbot 57 

Pracy George T 39 

Trier- M lxviii 

Prior J. K lxxx 

Trinz John 36 

Tyat Felix 30 

Raas C. & E. & Co xxvi 

Ransom Leander cv 

Reynolds John xcviii 

Richards <fc Harrison 29 

Richardson, Holland & 

Co xlix 

Riotte it Luckhardt 39 

Kisdon I. & L. Works 9 

Rod gers, Meyer it Co... civ 
Roman A. <fc Co., back 

of volume 

Rosenbaum A. S. <fc Co c 

Roth it Videau Jxxii 

Rothschild & Ehrenpfort..l9 



TAGE. 

Rountreeit McMullin.lxxiii 
Royal Mail Steam Pack- 

et Co xxvii 

Russell W. F xxix 

Samuels D lxxxiii 

s. F. Cordage Manu- 

lactorv xxx 

S. F. Glas"s Works xvii 

S. F. Tioneer Woolen 

Factory lxii 

S. F. Savings Union xviii 

Santa Clara College xli 

Saulnier John it Co 17 

Savings and Loan Society 
lxxiii 

Schafer J. F. & H. H 26 

Schmolz William lxxiv 

Schn ilier Jacob 52 

Sehuberth & Co cviii 

Schumann L Ixxvi 

Schussler II lxxxi 

Scottisli Commercial In- 
surance Co xxxvi 

Seamans.lobM 37 

Security Life Ins. Co 56 

Security Savings Bank...;'* 

Seiberlich F. A 51 

Selby 'I homas H. it Co..xiii 

Sellers James C 30 

Severance A. J. & Co 49 

Sherman William & Co. 

lxxxix 

Sherwood Robert ii 

Short M xliv 

Shreve George C. & Co., 
edge of volume and. .1x1 

Sims John R 54 

Skinker John xxvi 

Smith A. J lxxxiv 

Smith Barlow J 48 

Smith C. W. M., register 
of names 378 



PAGE. 

Smith George J 56 

Snook G. & W 38 

Solomon B. L. <& Sons Ii 

Spaulding J. & Co 7 

Spaulding N. W 11 

Spcyer Morris & Co lxv 

Spreckels C. it Co xxxii 

Spring Valley Water 

Works xxxlx 

Spruance, Stanley & Co 1 

St. Louis Mut. Life Ins. Co. 55 
State Investment and In- 
surance Co iii 

Steele James G. & Co., 
register of names 698, 795 

Steiger A Roland 22 

Stein, Simon <fe Co lx 

Steinhart W. & I. & Co. 

lxxviii 

Stockman J. M 15 

Suable Jacob <fe Co 52 

Sullivan J. W Ixxix 

Sullivan. Kelly ct Co. . .xxx 

Sumner W.B xcix 

Swain R. A.<fe Co.. back cov 

Swan G. W. & Co xlviii 

Sweeny N lxxxi 

Tabcr I. \V., register of 

names 514 

Tavlor John it Cc.xxxviii 

TaylorS. T. <fe Co lvii 

Tehee Charles & Co lxii 

Tesmore Solomon 43 

Teubner it Hoffman 56 

Thompson Brothers., .xxxii 

Thomson '1 homas 30 

'I liurnauorct Zinn... lxxviii 

Todd A. H xlv 

Toland Medical College. xci 

Treadwell & Co xcv 

Truworthv F. M xlii 

Tustin W" 1 7 



PAGE. 

TJlImann M.& Co xxvi 

Union Ins. Co xii 

VanSchaaek C. T. <t Co., 

reg. of names, top line 
Van Winkle ct Daven- 
port xvii 

A'enard G xxviii 

Vice Martin 31 

Von Schmidt A. W liii 

Walmsley W. W Ixxvi 

Waterhouse it Lester.. xciii 
Watkins C. E., xcii, 58, 
and reg. names, top line 

Watt ct McLennan 51 

W. A. Wood M. & R. 

Machine Co xcviii 

Week L. E. it Co 26 

Weed it King well 15 

Weichhart, J 14 

Welch & Co c 

Wells, Fargo it Co viii 

Wells, Russell <fe Co 22 

Whalon John 50 

What Cheer Laundry 47 

Wheeler it Wilson S. M. 

Co 2 and 785 

White.it Bauer lxxxvi 

Whitney Goo. 0.& Co..xxi 
Whitney Sumner, regis- 
ter of names 514 

Widow and Orphan Fund 

Life Insurance Co 45 

Wieland John lxxxviii 

Wilder it Mitchell 50 

Williams Blanchard & 

Co xxii 

Williams H. F. & Co lix 

Wimmer Henry lxvi 

Wittmann George 25 

Women's Cooperative 

Printing Union 3 

Wood Geo. M. & Co liii 



CLASSIFIED LIST OF ADVERTISERS. 



Adjusters. 

McXulty C. A.,(Customs).19 
Agricultural luipl'ts. 

Arthur J. D. & Son 32 

Bonney O. Jr 14 

W.A.Wood Mowing and 

Reap'gMach'e Co. xcviii 
Amalgamating Ma- 
chines. 
Hendy J 21 

Apothecaries. 

Boericke it Tafel, regis- 
ter of names 1H6 

Mofhtt J. W. it Co lxiv 

Steele J. G. & Co., reg- 
ister of names. .698 it 795 

Wimmer H lxvi 

Architects. 

Craine William 51 

Hoagland W. C 36 

Newsom J. J 29 

Artesian Well Bor's. 

Thomson Thomas 30 

Artificial Stone. 

Tacific Stone Co lxxxii 

Assayers. 

Falkenau Louis 49 

Kuh Leopold liii 

Mars J. A 51 

Riotte it Luckhardt 39 

Astrologers. 

Clair Madame 41 

Auctioneers. 

Burns A. M. it Co cvi 

Cummings W. H 31 

Merrill .1. c it Co xxiii 

NewnaU H. M. ct Co lix 

Axle Grease. 

Hucks it Lambert 53 

Bakeries. 

California Cracker Co 29 

Clark it Foote 49 



Banks. 

Bank British Columbia... xi 

Bank California ix 

First Nat'J Gold Bank c 

London and S. F. Bank, . .x 
Wells, Fargo & Co viii 

Baths. 

S. F. Hygeian Home 48 

Beds and Bedding, 

Cooke it Smith 47 

Hoev John lxviii 

Shafer J. F. & H. II 26 

Schreiber Jacob 52 

Billiard Table Haa'f. 

Liesenfeld P xlviii 

Strahle Jacob it Co 52 

Bitters. 

McMillan it Kester 2 

Blacksmiths. 

Nelson it Doble 53 

Weichhart J 14 

Boat Builders. 

Benner George L 47 

Vice Martin 31 

Boiler Works. 

Curry F. 1 12 

McAfee, Spiers it Co 8 

Moj nihan it Aitken 8 

Kisdon Iron and Loco- 
motive Works 9 

Book Binders. 

Bosqui Edward it Co., 
register of names 

side line 

Buswell A xcix 

Hicks 1). & Co., register 
of names 2X7 

Books — Subscription 
Agents.. 

Keller Henry it Co., reg- 
ister of names 287 



Booksellers. 

Libby & Swett, register 
of names 106 

Moore H. H., register of 
names 789 

Roman A. it Co., back of 

volume 

Whitney Sumner, regis- 
ter of names 514 

Boot and Shoe Itfan'f. 

Kelly Patrick,, .back cover 

Seiberlich F. A 51 

Box Sinkers, 

Ilobbs, Gilmore it Co xlv 

Korbel F.it Bros 23 

Swan G. W. & Co xlviii 

Brass Foundries. 

Dobrzensky M 43 

Gamut it Co 12 

Weed it Kingwell 15 

Brewers. 

Iluant Paulin & Co lxvi 

Lyon i'c Co., register of 

names 728 

Spreckels C. it Co xxxii 

Wieland John lxxxviii 

Brewers' Materials. 

Herrmann, Xeis & Co..xlvi 

Carpenters and 

Builders. 

Browell Jeremiah 3 

Curtis John T 34 

Carpet Beating. 

Merrill T 25 

Spaulding J. it Co 7 

Carpets. 

Bell John C liv 

Burnham James W.& Co. 17 

Edwards Frank G cxi 

Heynenianii it Co xl 

Mountain it Rayo lxv 

l'luni, Bell it Co., back cover 



Carriage Depots. 

Arthur J. J). & Son 32 

Black Henry M lxvii 

Casebojt it Kerr lvii 

Larkins it Co 57 

Mills ct Evans 18 

Carriage Stock. 

Casebolt it Kerr lvii 

Meeker James it Co liii 

Waterhouse & Lester, .xciii 

Carvers and Gilders. 

Bryant, Strahan it Co 31 

Cement l*ipe. 

Tadcy Martin, register 
of names 515 

Cemeteries. 

Laurel Hill cii 

Chemicals. 
Reynolds John xcviii 

Cigaritos. 

Morelos A. & Co lxxv 

Cigars and Xobaeco. 

Gannon Teter T Ii 

Heuek Herman 23 

Rosenbaum A. S. & Co c 

Civil Engineers. 

Brooks & McGregor 36 

McGregor A. E 57 

Ransom Leander cv 

Schussler H lxxxi 

Von Schmidt A. W liii 

Clothing. 

McCain, Flood & Mc- 

Clure xix 

Sherman Wm. it Co.lxx.xiX 
Steinhart W. & 1. it 

Co lxxviii 

VanSchaaek c. P. it Co., 
register of names,top line 



CLASSIFIED LIST OF ADVERTISERS 



PAGE. 
Cloths. 

Heynemann & Co xl 

Raas C. .t K xxvi 

Stein, Simon &, Co lx 

Ullmann SI. & Co xxvi 

Coffee and Spices. 

Bernard Charles xxl 

Gliirardelli D 19 

Harden & Myrick lxxix 

Venard G xxviii 

Colleges. 
Heald's Business, regis- 
ter of names 737 

Santa Clara xli 

Toland Medical xci 

Com. Merchants. 

Balfour, Guthrie <fc Co., 

lxxxiii 
Bandmann, Nielsen & 

Co xxiv 

Flint, Peabody it Co lxv 

Howes George & Co xv 

Koopmanschap itCo..xeix 
Low C. Adolphe & Co.... 20 

Macondrav & Co xx 

Merrill J. C.&Co xxiii 

Phut it Newton xxiii 

Rodgers, Meyer & Co civ 

Speyer Morris it Co lxv 

Todd A. H xlv 

Welch&Co c 

Williams, Blanchard <t 

Co xxii 

Confectioners. 

Lehman R. & Co 46 

Rothschild & Ehrenpfort..l9 

Contractors. 

Boobar E. C. <fc Co lii 

Browell Jeremiah 3 

Hyde <fc Chester 41 

Coopers. 

Hubbell S. T 18 

Pacific Barrel and Keg 

Factory liv 

Coppersmith. 

Macken James 15 

Cordage. 
Hallidie A. S.,(wire)..lxxxv 
San Francisco Cordage 

Factory xxx 

Cordials, etc. 

McMillan & Kester 2 

Costumers. 

Paullin S. F. Mrs 34 

Crockery. 

Helbing & Straus xxviii 

Nathan B. & Co., regis- 
ter of names 784 

Swain 14. A. & Co., back 

cover 
Cutlers. 

Price Michael Ixviii 

Diamond Drill. 

Severance A. J. & Co 49 

Diamond Setters. 

Elleauit Badgley 21 

Frontier it Bellemere 35 

Koehler <t Ritter, regis- 
ter of names 378 

Distillers. 
Hong Kong Distillery 

Co xxix 

Doors, Sash, etc. 

Bradbury W. B 35 

Hall John & Son 33 

Macdonald D.A. & Co. .xlvi 
Mechanics' Mill and 

Manufacturing Co 22 

Richardson, Holland <fc 

Co xlix 

Draftsmen. 

Amos& Davis 32 

Druggists. 

Crane <fc Brigham lxxii 

Heathtleld, Bogcl & Co., 
xxxvi and lxxi 



PAGE. 

Dry Goods. 
Austin & Co civ 

Davidson J. W. it Co., 

back cover 

Heynemann A Co xl 

Kaindler, Scellier, Lelievre 
& Co., top edge of volume 
McCain, Flood & Mc- 

Clure xix 

Murphy, Grant & Co lxv 

Samuels D lxxxiii 

Electricians. 
Electrical Construction 

Co lxxxix 

Einbalmers. 

Gillmor J. B 54 

Lyford L. Dexter, regis- 
ter of names 769 

Engravers. 
Butler Warren C, ex and 24 

Eitner Rudolf lxxvii 

Kuner A 23 

Pages Jules F 35 

Wood Geo. M. & Co liii 

Expresses. 

Wells, Fargo it Co viii 

Fancy Goods. 
Jones, Pullman it Co., 
reg. names, bottom line 

Locan & Co xviii 

Michel s, Friedlander <fe 

Co lxiv 

Pasquale E lxxv 

Tence C. & Co lxii 

Thurnauer & Zinn xviii 

VanSchaack C.P.& Co., 

register of names 

top line 
Faucet makers. 

Glacier & Johnson 9 

Fire Arms. 
Remington Arms Co... .lxix 
Winchester Repeating 

Arms Co xxvi 

Fish. 

Griffith A. J 36 

Flags. 
Johnson T. Rodgers., in- 
side back cover 

Norcross it Co lxvi 

Pasquale E lxxv 

Flour Dealers. 

Grosh & Rutherford 28 

Foundries. 

Goddard & Co xiv 

Hanscomife Co 10 

Hinckley <t Co 16 

Miners 1 Foundry xlvii 

Steiger & Poland 22 

Thompson Bros xxxii 

Fringes and Tassels. 

England er William xlvi 

EttingerS xlii 

Furniture. 

Bell John C liv 

Erlin G. it Co 44 

Horstmann H. .t Co 26 

Palmer W. J. T. <fc Co., 

register of names 788 

Plum, Bell & Co..back cover 

Schafer J. F. it H. H 26 

Whitney George O. <fc 

Co xxi 

Furniture— School. 

Erlin G. & Co 44 

Libby & Swett, register 

of names 106 

Palmer W. J, T. it Co., 

register of names — 788 

Garden Seeds. 
Kellogg C. L xxxviii 

©as Fixtures. 
Day Thomas — front cover 

Prior J. K lxxx 

Gas Meter Manuf. 

Dobrzenskv M 43 

Maxim cix 



PAGE. 

Gas Works. 

Pacific Pneumatic. . .xxxvii 
Glass and Glassware. 

Taylor John & Co.. xxxviii 
Glass Stainers. 

Mallon John 14 

Glass Works. 

Newman it Duval xvii 

Groceries. 

Bowen Brothers 16 and 

back of volume 
Coghill, Lyons £ Co..xcvii 

Ric bards & Harrison 29 

Rountree & Mc.Mullin.lxxiii 
Gunsmiths. 

Clabrough it Bros xlv 

Plate A. J xevi 

Hair Jewelry. 

Cook C.Mrs 43 

Hardware. 
Glasgow I. and M. Im- 
porting Co 9 

Huntington, Hopkins ife 
Co., reg. of nanus, 

bottom line 
Linforth, Kellogg it Co. xxiv 
May<»Co.(Boston,Mass.)5!) 

Otto Charles & Co 46 

Pilsbury, Webb & Co., 

inside back cover 

Selby T. H. &Co xiii 

Treadwell it Co xcv 

Van Winkle & Daven- 
port xvii 

Harness, etc. 

Johnson J. C. & Co 18 

Main & Winchester xxix 

Harvesting Machines 
Walter A. Wood Mow- 
ing and Reaping Ma- 
chine Co xcviii 

Hats and Caps. 

Fisher & Co 51 

Meussdorffer J. C. <t Bro. .lv 
and bottom edge of vol. 
Meussdorffer K., regis- 
ter of names 784 

Hay and Grain. 

Morrow George xcvil 

Todd A. H xlv 

Hops and Corks. 

Herrmann, Neis <t Co.. xlvi 
Hose and Helting. 

CookH. N lii 

Ice. 

Nevada Ice Co lxxxiv 

Instrument Depots. 
Electrical Construction 
and Maintenance Co. 

lxxxix 
Houseworth Thomas <t 

Co front cover 

Schmolz W lxxiv 

Insurance Agents. 

Balfour, Guthrie & I !o., 

lxxxiii and lxxxvii 
Boardman Geo. C. reg- 
ister of names side line 

Booker W. L xxvii 

Clark it Fox 45 

Claussenius George 55 

Denison Charles H 50 

Diver It. A 55 

Everson Wallace iii 

Falkner, Bell it Co hi 

Forbes A. B back cover 

He vwoodifc Flint, back cover 

Hoffman H. F. W I 

Johnston W. B 1 

Low C. Adolphe & Co.... 20 
Macfarlane, Blair A Co., 

xxii and xxxvi 

Macondrav &■ Co xx 

Magill 14. H.back of volume 

Norcross D lxxxvii 

Roberts J. B., register of 

names 7-9 

Shepardson H. F 45 



PAGE. 

Speyer Morris & Co iviii 

Swain R. B, A Co lxx 

Taafle G O'Hara cxii 

Tillinzhasl Bros xciv 

Von Khein 0. F. ,v Co...xo 

Webb Watson 55 

Woolsey E. W 68 

Insurance Co's. Home. 

California lvl 

Fireman's Fund. front cover 
Mercb. Mutual Marine. ..iv 
State Investment and 

Insurance Co iii 

Union xii 

Iron and Steel. 

Glasgow Iron and Metal 
Co 9 

Huntington, Hopkins it 
Co., reg. of names, 

bottom line 

Selby T. H. it Co xiii 

Van Winkle A Daven- 
port xvii 

Iron Doors, etc. 

Kittredgc Jonathan xvi 

Leavitt Charles 11 Ixviii 

sims John 14 54 

Jewelers. Hunttf. 
Braverman&Levy. front cov 

( lalifomia Jewelry Co., 

register of names 75S 

Elleau & Badgley 21 

Frontier it Bellemere 35 

Koehler it Hitter, regis- 
ter of nanus 378 

Levison Bros., register 

of names 758 

Seamans Job M 37 

Sherwood Kobert ii 

Shreve Geo. C. it Co lxi 

and edge of volume 
Land Agents. 
Green W. S. it Co., reg- 
ister of names 286 

Ransom Leauder cv 

East Factories. 

Leveq ue J 27 

Laundries. 

What Cheer 47 

Leather Dealers. 
Cray, Jones it Co xxv 

Johnson J. C. & C 18 

Main & Winchester xxix 

Nichols A. C. it Co xxv 

Sumner W. B xcix 

Week L. E. it Co 26 

Liquor Dealers. 

Cbielovicb E. & Co 27 

.Martin E. it Co Ii 

McMillan & Kester 2 

Parker George F 4'i 

Prinz John m 

Richards it Harrison 29 

Both & Videau lxxii 

Saulnier John it Co 17 

Spina nee. Stanley it Co 1 

Lithographers. 
Britton it Key, register 

of names." 766 

Livery Stables. 

California Tattersalls cvi 

Locomotives. 
Kisdon Iron and Loco- 
motive Works 9 

Looking Glasses, 
Mirrors, etc. 

Gump s. & Q lxvii 

Kollmver W. A 2:: 

McQuillan li lxiii 

Nathan P. 4 Co., register 

Of names " s 4 

Nile M. D 26 

Lumber Dealers. 

Knowles George B 38 

Pope it Talbot 57 

Machine Shops. 
Hawkins it Cantrell....xcv 

Kallenherg Theodore 35 

Pracy George T 39 

Kisdon Iron and Loco- 
motive Works 9 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



PAGE. 

Machinery. 

Treadwell cfc Co xcv 

Marble Yards. 

Daniel John ,t Co 27 

Heverin M 46 

Myers Leon R. <fc Co., 
register of names 768 

match Mannfact'rs. 

Newbauer & Co lxxvi 

Heertchaum Pipes. 

Schumann Louis lxxvj 

Metallic Signs. 

Patterson William lvii 

Mill Furnishing. 

G racier & Johnson 9 

Treadwell it Co xcv 

Millwrights. 

Amos <t Davis 32 

Millinery Goods. 

Oulif, Dato.t Co 34 

Tence Chas. it Co lxii 

Model Makers. 

Culver J. H 33 

Kallenberg Theodore 35 

Stockman J. M 15 

Musical Instruments. 

Badger \V. G xl 

Bancroft A. L. & Co... .lxix 

Gray M xcvii 

Koliler, Chase & Co evil 

Schuberth & Co cviii 

STative Wines. 

Gerke II li 

Kohler & Frohling.front cov 

Prinz John 36 

STeckties. 

Making A. H. Mrs 37 

-Vews Agents. 

Pacific News Co 25 

Sullivan J. \V lxxix 

White it Bauer lxxxvi 

Oil Works. 
Pacific Oil and Lead 

Works v 

Opticians. 
Houseworth Thomas & 

Co front cover 

Organ Builder. 

Mayer Joseph 38 

Oysters. 
Corville Emerson & Co., 

register of names 777 

Doane <fc Co., 28, and 

register ot names 776 

Morgan it Co., register 

of names 776 

Tesmore Solomon 43 

Paints and Oils. 
Cal. Chemical Paint 

Co liv 

Sullivan, Kelly & Co. . .xxx 
Painters. 

Gadsby E. H xevi 

Oilman & Mellon 53 

Smith George J 56 

Paper Oealers. 
Blake, Bobbins <t Co. ..lxlii 
Taylor S. P. <t Co l\ii 

Patent Agents. 
Smith C. W. M., register 

of names 378 

Pavements. 
City Paving Co ciii 

Photographers. 

Bradley* Rulofson 30 

Howland B. F. .t Co 41 

Taber I. W., register of 

names 514 

Watkins C. E., adv.dept, 

p.xcii, 58, and regis- 
ter of names, top line. 



PAGE. 

Photo. Engravings. 

Houseworth T. it Co., 

front cover 
Watkins C. E., xcii and 58 

and reg. of names, 

top line 
Physicians, 
DepierresH. A 50 

Piano Makers. 

Hall C. R lxxiii 

Pickles and Pres'v's. 
Code P. D. <fc Co., regis- 
ter of names, 769 

Plumbers, etc. 

Bucknam E. T 38 

Day Thomas front cover 

Iredale A. S 43 

Prior J. K lxxx 

Smith A.J lxxxiv 

Snook G. & W 38 

Walmsley W. W lxxvi 

Powder Oealers. 

Giant Powder Co xxfv 

Skinker John xxvi 

Preserved Meats. 
Dietrich W. K lxxxi 

Printers. 

Bacon it Company, reg. of 
names 8 and front cover 
Bosqui E. & Co., register 

of names side line 

Bruce Donald back cover 

Crocker <fe Co.. front cover 

Eastman Frank ci 

Women's Co-operative 
Printing Union 3 

Publishers. 

Langley Henry G., reg. 

of names, 7*94, 796 and 107 
Whitney Sumner, reg. 

of names 514 

Pump Makers. 

Smith A. J lxxxiv 

Railroads. 

Central Pacific xxxiv 

and xxxv 

Real Estate Agents. 

Green W. S. & Co., reg. 

of names 286 

Williams H. F. & Co lix 

Reflectors. 

Boesch Emil lxxv 

Regalia. 

Johnson T. Rodgers. .inside 
back cover 

Norcrossit Co lxvi 

Pasquale E lxxv 

Restaurants. 

Wittmann George 25 

Rolling Mill. 

Pacific Rolling Mill v 

Safes. 

Dunn, Campbell <fc Co 29 

Kittredge Jonathan xvi 

Leavitt Charles lxviii 

Salt Oealers. 
Carmen Island Salt Co..lii 
Savings and Loan 
Societies. 
Farmers' and Mechan- 
ics' Bank xlvii 

German Savings and 

Loan Society lx 

Hibernia Savings and 

Loan Society xx 

Masonic. Savings and 

Loan Bank xix 

San Francisco Savings 

„ Union xviii 

Savings and Loan So- 

„ ciety lxxiii 

Security Savings Bank, 

opp inside back cover 



PAGE. 

Saw Makers. 

Bonney O. Jr 14 

Pacific Saw Manufactur- 
ing Co 11 

SpauldingN. W 11 

Saw Mills. 

Hobbs.Gilmore & Co....xlv 

Korbel F. & Bros 23 

Macdonald D A. <fc Co..xlvi 

Mechanics 1 ZM ill 22 

Richardson, Holland & 
Co xlix 

Schools. 

Forster L. Mine xliii 

Heald's Business Col- 
lege, reg. of names.. .737 

Searcher of Records. 

Bro ks W.H.J ii 

Sewing Machine 
Treadles. 

Wilder & Mitchell 50 

Sewing Machines. 

Manhattan 33 

Wheeler &, Wilson, reg- 
ister of names, 785, 
and page 2 

Shipsmiths. 

Crockard Hugh 57 

Shirts— Makers. 

Morris E. Mrs 42 

Shoe Findings. 

Dolliver <fc Brother 27 

Magee it Moore lxxxiii 

Week L. E. <fc Co 26 

Shot and Lead Pipe. 

S.F. Shot Tower xiii 

Show Card "Writers. 

McDowell William 37 

Show Case Makers. 
Teubner it Hoffman 56 

Silver Platers. 
Martell John 2 

Spring Makers. 
Betts William M.&Bro..32 

Stair Builders. 

Freeman B. H lii 

Jesse & Drew 34 

Langland L. P liv 

Stationers. 
Crocker it Confront cover. 
Roman A. & Co., back of 

volume 
Steamers. 
North Pacific Trans. Co. .vii 

Pacific Mail S. S. Co vi 

Royal Mail xxvii 

Steering Wheels. 
Bragg Robert 47 

Stencil Cutters. 

Truworthy F. M xlii 

Wood Geo. M. <t Co hii 

Stone Yards. 

Heverin M 46 

Pacific Stone Co lxxxii 

Stoves, etc. 
Brittan, Holbrook & Co., 

register of names 788 

Bucknam E. T 88 

Locke it Montague 12 

Snook G. it \V 38 

Sugar Refineries. 

Bav 28 

California xxxi 

China xxix 

Xailors. 

Hagman J 17 

Heppner J. L 41 

Short M xliv 

Sweeney N lxxxi 

Whalen J 50 

Tanners. 
O'Donnell Cornelius 22 



PAGE. 

Telegraphic Instru- 
ments. 

Electrical Construction 

Co lxxxix 

Tool Makers. 

HinzCarl E 37 

Weichhart J 14 

Trunk Mannfactu'rs. 

Corin Joseph 31 

Galpen R. H 50 

Turners. 

Bryant, Strahan & Co. . . .31 
Glacier it Johnson 9 

Type Founders. 

Hagarit Co 13 

Undertakers. 

Gray N xlix 

Upholsterers. 

Solomon B. L. it Sons li 

Vacuum Cure. 
Hadfleld's cv 

Varnishers. 

Cooke & Smith 47 

O'Day William 46 

Varnishes. 

Hueter Gustave lxxv 

Sullivan, Kelly it Co... xxx 

Vermouth. 

Pache &, Co 56 

Watch Manufact'rs. 

National Watch Co.,reg- 
ister of names 759 

Watches and Jew- 
elry. 

Braverman <fc Levy, 

front cover 

Frodsham CM 23 

Levison Bros., register 

of names 758 

Seamans Job M 37 

Sherwood Robert ii 

Shreve George C. it Co. .lxi 

and edge of volume 

Water Closets. 

Smith A. J lxxxi v 

Water Pipe. 

Browcll Jeremiah 3 

Padey Martin, register 

of names ...515 

"Water "Works. 

Spring Valley xxxix 

Whiteners. 

Sellers J. C 30 

"Wig Makers. 

Pyat Felix 30 

Willow Ware. 

Amies & Dallam xxxiii 

Feldmann L. <t Co lxiv 

Thurnaucr it Zinn. .lxxviii 

"Wind Mill Manuf. 
jXtwood & Bodwell. .4 and 5 

Hunt E. 6 

Tustin W.I 7 

Window Shades. 

Fried .fc Bcsse 33 

Mountain & Raye lxv 

"Wire "Workers. 

Hallidie A. S lxxxv 

Wood and Coal. 
Higgins «t Collins 20 

"Wooden "Ware. 

Armes it Dallam xxxiii 

Feldmann L. it Co lxiv 

Wool Oealers. 
Watt & McLennan 51 

Woolen Mills. 

Mission it Pacific xc 

San Francisco l'ioneer. .lxii 



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at same prices as to city customers. 



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SA1ST FRANCISCO, 



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Sm 









C P. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, P«per and Envelopes. 



PROGRESS OF THE CITY. 



1872. 



The City of San Francisco was, for the first 
time, incorporated by the Legislature in May, 
1850, the organization of the County having been 
effected in the month previous, by the election of 
a Sheriff and other officers, thus establishing tw,o 
distinct systems of government. The Consolida- 
tion Act took effect on the first day of July, 18.3G. 
Under its stringent provisions, our municipal affairs 
have been administered with energy and fidelity, 
and a thorough reform has resulted. The enor- 
mous outlay consequent on the dual system of 
government has been entirely abolished or seri- 
usly reduced, while the checks upon lavish expenditure were so well devised as to 
efy evasion, and the contraction of debts has been inhibited. The financial history 
f all this is sufficiently indicated in the exhibit* of the Aggregated Annual Expendi- 
ures of the City and County of San Francisco from 1850 to 1871 — since the first 
legislative organization of the government — exclusive of the sums paid in liquidation 
of the principal and interest of the bonded debts: 

Assessment and Rates of Taxation from 1850 to 1871. 




Fiscal Years. 



1850-51... 
1851-52.. 
1852-53. . 
1853-54. . . 
i 1854-55. . . 
1855-56... 
1856-57.:. 
1857-58. . . 
1858-59. . . 
1859-60. . . 
1860-61... 
1861-62... 
1862-63. . . 
1863-64. . . 
1864-65. . . 
1865-66... 
1866-67... 
1867-68. . . 
1868-69... 
1869-70... 
1870-71... 



Total 
Annual 
Rates. 



S2 00 



10 

41 J- 

88 i 

85 i 

855-6 

30 

30 

45 
3 169-10 
2 85 
2 87 
2 74» 
2 10 

2 98 

3 12 
3 10 
3 00 
3 05 
3 08 
2 84* 



Particular Class of Assessments. 



Eeal Estate. Improvements. Person'I Prop'ty 



$16,819,051 
11,141,463 
15,676,356 
17,889,850 
19,765,285 
18,607,S00 
17,827,617 
15,576,545 
13,554,565 
14,172,235 

' 25,283,685 
31,871,897 
37,016,102 
43,116,538 
47,292,903 
49,137,312 
53,485,421 
58,207,862 
63,631,721 
69,776,603 
75,145,717 



In Personal. 

In Personal. 

In Personal. 

$6,158,300 

9,159,935 

8,394,925 

8,345.667 

7,394.296 

5,946,585 

6,523,985 

In Real. 

In Real. 

In Real. 

In Real. 

In Real. 

In Real. 

In Real. 

In Real. 

In Real. 

In Real. 

In Real. 



$4,772, 160 

2,875,440 

2,805,381 

4,852,000 

5.837,607 

5,073,847 

4,194,970 

12,426,335 

11,224,800 

9,323,002 

10,683,814 

9,973,222 

29.540,554 

34,002,627 

33,443,262 

39,129,115 

43,214,976 

51,152,964 

42,782,308 

t44,982,908 

31,246,159 



Total 
Annual 

Assessments. 



$21,621,211 
14,016,903 
18,481,737 
28,900,150 
34,762,827 
32,076,572 
30,368,25 1 
35,397,176 
30,725,950 
30,019,222 
35,967,499 
41,815,11 9 
66,556,656 
77,119,105 
80,736,165 
88,266,457 
9ti,?00,397 
109.360,826 
106,414,029 
111.759,511 
106,391, S7G 



* For table of Municipal Expenditures from 1850 to 
t Exclusive of Mortgages, which amounted in lfc69 



1865, see San Francisco 
-70 to near $16,000,000, now 



Pirectokt for 1866, page 10. 
held to be exempt from taxation. 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sanaom Street, White Gk>oda. 

1 



W ATKINS' 5TO-SEMITE ART GALLERY, 26 Montg. St., opp. Lick House Entrance. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



The amount absolutely collected on is much less than the aggregate valuations 
for the last two years. For the year 1868-9, the delinquent list amounted to 
$429,709, on an assessed value of $13,500,000, in 1869-70 to $556,320, on $18,- 
062,340, and in 1870-71 to $170,603 on $5,996,584. The small amount of delin- 
quent taxes of 1870-71, compared with the two previous years, may be accounted 
for by the fact that moneys loaned on mortgages which amounted in the years 
named to an assessed aggregate of about $30,000,000, have been declared exempt 
from taxation. 

Municipal Expenditures from 1865 to 1871. 



Tears. 



Current 

Expenses. 



1865-6.. 
1866-7.. 
1867-8.. 

1868-9.. 
1369-70. 
1870-71. 



$916,934 45 
939,285 05 
1,215,925 00 
1,937,925 41 
2,098.610 00 
2,417,110 00 



Permanent 
Iinprov'm'ts. 



$90,995 90 
188,073 75 
165,559 24 



Interest. 



$256,198 38 
213.353 06 
200,644 07 
373,050 83 
221.198 00 
225,462 00 



Reduction 
of Debt. 



$154,055 00 
354,686 82 
206,457 76 
148,233 81 
361,625 00 
177,045 00 



Old 
Claims. 



$19,097 47 
71,166 66 



Total. 



$1,437,281 20 
1,766,565 34 
1,788,586 07 
2,459,210 05 
2,684,433 00 
2,819,617 00 



The amount expended by the Department of Streets during the year 1870-71 is 
$843,415 against. $1,248,130 in 1869-70, which, added to the sum included in the 
above table, $2,819,617, makes the total expenditures of the Municipal Govern- 
ment for 1870-71, $3,663,032. 

The special Fee Fund for 1870-71 aggregated $153,685, of which the Recorder 
paid $44,975, the County Clerk $41,028, the Sheriff' $20,552, the Tax Collector 
$19,244, and the Clerk of the Justice Court $9,867. 

For the year ending June 30, 1871, the following amounts were paid in support 
of the different departments of the Municipal Government: Salaries, $353,366 a 
Police Department, $157,218; Fire Department, $193,460; School Department, v 
8638,001 ; Street Lights, $200,583 ; Hospital, $108,621 ; Alms House, $75,571 ; 
Industrial School, §36,906; Redemption of Bonds, $177,045; Interest on Debt, 
$225,462. 

Bonded Debt June 30th, 1871. 



lssned in 



1851... 
1855... 
1858... 
1862-3. 



1863. 

1864. 
1864. 

is,;:, 

1866- 

1867. 

1870. 

1870. 



By tbe 



Payable 



City 

City 

City and County 

City and County for San 

Jo6<5 Railroad 

City and Co. City Slip.. 
City and Co. City Slip.. 
Central Pacific R. R. Co 
Western Pacific R.R. Co 

School Department 

Judgment 

School Department 

Park Improvement 



1871 
1875 
1888 

1877-8 

1883 

1884 

1894 

1895 

1881 

1887 

1890 

1890 



Annual Interest. 



Pr cent Payable in 



Annual 
Sinking 
Fund. 



Bonds in 
Circulation. 



10 
6 
6 

7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
6 



San Francisco . - '• None 

New York About $38,000 00. 

San Francisco.. j About 47,000 00. 



San Francisco.. 
San Francisco ) 
San Francisco \ 
San Francisco.. 
San Francisco.. 
San Francisco.. 
San Francisco . . 
San Francisco. . 
San Francisco.. 



About 23,750 00.. 

About 47,500 00.. 

Commences in 1 873 
Commences in 1873 
About 15,000 00.. 
About 14,000 00.. 
About 15,000 00.. 
None 



Totals i [About $200,750 00 



$206,200 00 
177, 500 00 
926,000 00 

18/2,000 00 

658,500 00 

23.000 00 

400 000 00 

250,000 00 

197,000 00 

304,000 00 

285,000 00 

15,000 00 



$3,624,200 00 



The amount of cash on hand for the payment of this debt is $394,351, which, 
deducted from the aggregate amount, leaves a balance of $3,229,849 as the actual 
debt. 

.atraTINGTOISr, HOPKINS & CO., Agents Jessop & Sons' Steel, Cor. Bush and Market. 



C P- VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street. Importer and Jobbers. 



PROGRESS OF THE CITY 



11 



February 24, 1872— Funded Debt, June 30, 1871, $3,624,200. Bonds issued 
since that date— Hospital 6 per cent., redeemable in 1891, $75,000; Park Im- 
provement 6 per cent., 1920, $60,000 — Total, $3,759,200. Bonds redeemed since 
June 30, 1871, $572,200; Funds outstanding, (Sinking Funds loaned) $193,000— 
Total amount applicable to the extinguishment of outstanding bonds, $765,200, 
which leaves, as the actual debt, $2,994,000. 

Annual Revenue from 1865 to 1871.* 



Years. 



1865-6.. 
1866-7 .. 
1867-8.. 
1868-9.. 
1869-70 . 
1870-71 . 



Taxes. 



$1,361,876 26 
1,482,476 31 

1,509,162 50 
1,786,129 43 
1,966,827 00 
1,935,902 00 



State and Co. 
Licenses. 



$89,253 25 
93,901 50 
99.484 74 
100,454 69 
110,353 12 
106,157 00 



Municipal 

Licenses. 



Sale of 
Bunds. 



|2S,799 25 

31,762 80 

38.895 90 

52,560 50 

41,646 50 

40,067 00 1 



$61,050 00 

125,965 38 

47,500 00 



Other 
Sources. 



Total. 



$83,429 30 
107,617 97 
271,263 78 
507,(140 67 
752,365 93 
716,263 001 



jl.624,408 06 

1,811.753 9f, 
1,966,306 92 
2.446, is:. 29 
2,871,192 55 
2,798,389 00 



Slat,'. 



$944,812 35 

987.105 77 
1,095,586 :i 
1,044.835 -.mi 
1,019,5115 09 

965,957 DO 



Population San Francisco, 1871—72. 

The following figures, compiled from reliable data and from careful investigations during the 
progress of the canvass for the San Francisco Directory for the present year, is published as an 
approximation to the present population of this city ; and in directing attention thereto, the com- 
piler feels assured that an intelligent and careful examination of the data upon which they tire 
based, will fully sustain the aggregates derived therefrom. 

White males over twenty-one 57,019 

" Females over eighteen, estimated 36.30C 

" Males under twenty -one, estimated 35,760 

" Females under eighteen, estimated 30.579 

" Males, names refused, and foreigners not taken in the canvass, estimated 2,100 

Chinese, male and female 10,018 

Colored, male and female 1,500 

Total permanent population 1/3,276 

To which should be added a large element of our population known as "floating," which 
consists of: 1st. Transient boarders, etc., at hotels, boarding-houses, etc. 2d. Soldiers at 
the fortifications in the harbor. 3d. Persons engaged in navigating the bay, who claim 
this city as their residence. 4th. Inmates of Alms House, Hospitals, and other charita- 
ble institutions, County Jail, etc. 5th. A large number of persons who have no perma- 
nent place of abode, together amounting to about 5,000 

Total population, March 1st, 1872.; 178,276 

The estimate of the males over 21 in the above table is based upon the list of names contained in 
the present volume, as follows :— The number of references in the register of names is 64,294, of 
which 55,819 are male residents of this city. These figures are exclusive of a numerous list of 
names included in the Business Directory and the Appendix, containing the names of ofli ere of 
Societies, Incorporations, etc., not obtained in the regular canvass, estimated at 1,200, making ■ 
total of 57,019. The two latter named departments of the Directory are compiled from informa- 
tion collected just previous to the publication of the work, and include many names not to be found 
in the regular list. 

The number of females is estimated at 36,300, upon the basis of the returns of the Federal Census 
of 1870. The number of females of all ages enumerated, as published in this city, amounts to 61,- 
577, of which 23,261 are under 15 y ears. According to the average of the Censu^ironghout^ 

* For table of Revenue collected iu San Francisco from 1850 to 1865, see Sas Fbakcisco P.b kctqby for 1««6. P- 10. 
JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street, Laces and Embroideries. 



None but the best Photographs are made by WATSIUS, 26 Montgomery St. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



United States, about sixteen per cent, of the number under 15 (3,721) should be added thereto to 
represent the element between 15 Ci nc l us ' ve ) and 18, which would give an aggregate as follows : 
Under 18, 26,982; 18 and over, 34,595. The difference between the last named figures (34.595) 
and those included in the table, (36,300), amounting to 1,705, will not be considered an overestimate 
for the increase since August, 1870. 

The estimates of the males under 21 and the females under 18 are obtained by adding to the 
returns of the Federal Census the increase since that work was completed, August, 1870, a period 
of twenty months. According to the School Census of 1870, the annual increase of children of 
all ages under 15, is about ten per cent. On this basis the annual increase of males of all ages 
under 21 may be estimated at about seven per cent., and the females under 18 at eight per cent. 
This will produce the following aggregates: Males under 15, (Census) 23,722, add thirty-live per 
cent., the average of the Census throughout the United States, for those between 15 (inclusive) and 
21,8,302. Total August, 1870, 32,024; increase, March, 1872,3,736. Total, 35,760. Females 
under 18, returns of Census 1870, ("see second paragraph) 26,982 ; increase March, 1872, 3,597. 
Total, 30,579. 

The remainder of the data in our estimate explains itself, and to those who are acquainted with 
the different elements referred to therein, the figures relating thereto will not be considered overesti- 
mated. 

The estimate of the present year, (178,276) as compared with that of last year, (172,750) exhibits 
again since January, 1871, of 5,526, or about three and one-fifth per ct.; this compared with the annual 
increase since I860, on the basis of the returns of the Federal Census, which is about ten per cent., 
shows an increase much less than that of former years. An analysis of the figures contained in 
our table for the present year, shows that while the males and females under 21 and 18, respectively, 
have increased, the adults have decreased ; a result not entirely unexpected, and owing princi- 
pally to the depressed condition of almost every department of human industry during the past 
season, inducing many persons to seek other and more extended fields of labor for employment, 
and the demand for skilled labor occasioned by the Chicago conflagration. 

The number of females for the present year, as estimated, is in our judgment much less than the 
actual number, but as it is based upon the figures of the Federal Census of 1870, it will not be 
regarded, at any rate, as being excessive. 

For the purpose of reference, we republish from the San Francisco Directory for 1871, the 
figures of the Census of the City and County of San Francisco as compiled in this City, adding 
thereto the returns as published by the Census Bureau at Washington, and a table containing 
both series of "official figures," one opposite the other, a comparison of which will, when the fact 
is considered that they have been compiled from the same data, exhibit many remarkable discrep- 
ancies : 



FEDERAL CENSUS OF SAN FRANCISCO, 1870. 

(San Francisco Compilation.) 





White. 


Colored. 


1 


ClIIK 


ESE. 


*y. 


Wards. 


Mai's 

7,187 
8,868 
1,966 
6.358 
2,111 
3,192 
3,0*7 
2,607 
3,875 
4,293 
5,480 
2,814 
2,302 
1 3,071 
3,262 
4,962 
4,787 
1,307 
648 
2.433 
4.214 


F'm's 

3,2:i:» 
5.5110 

543 
4,314 

679 
3.05S 
2,895 
2.100 
3.202 
4,818 
5,084 
2.104 
2.158 
2,886 
3,202 
4,604 
3,930 
1,254 

511 
1,930 
3,766 

C1.S77 


Under 15. 


Born in Cal. 


M. 

68 
76 

5 
229 

2 
101 

4 

3 
34 
16 
21 

4 
14 

3 


F. 

9 

61 

1 

160 

1 

119 

5 


Under 15 B'n 


Cal. 


M. 1 F. 

303 2 

316 8 

545 16 

3,898 1,593 

50 

2,540 394 
107 2 

70 

203 

198 2 

211 5 

75 

54 1 

89 

60 , .. 
409 2 
203 10 
129 5 

27 

178 

112 

9,777 2,040 


Und 

M. 

48 
39 
5-1 
284 

4 
171 
11 
17 
5 1 
50 
20 
15 

4 
12 
15 
34 
40 

6 

3 
22 
23 

877 


er 15 B'n Cal. 
F. M.~ F. 


> 




Mai's F'm's Mai's 

1,389 1.397 1,158 

2,226 2,260 1,803 

132 144 104 

1,016 939 808 

151! 133 95 

865 864 719 

7591 797 523 

756 726 566 

976 1,020 829 

1,590 1,672 1,331 

2,030 1,980 1,556 

902: 810 573 

833, 858 614 

1.094 1,130 859 

1,292 1,285 987 

2,313 2,237 1,562 

1,959 1,657 1,565 

542, 563 408 

200, 261 160 

860 836 702 

1,837; 1,692 1,424 

23.722 23.261 18.346 


F'm's! 

1.188 1 

1,898 
108 
775 
81 
728 
532 
559 
868 

1.393 

1,479 
596 
584! 
848 1 
988! 

1,648! 

1.312 
403 
216 
663 

1,362 1 

18.219 


M. 

2 

27 

35 


F. j M. 

4 1 

18 26 

35 31 


F. 

2 
9 

1 
30 


on 


1st 




2d 


2 1 
2 


2 
102 




3d 




4th 

5th 


191 


140 


3 


Bill 


22 
1 


33 20 

4 1 


22 
2 


72 
1 

1 


44 
2 


24 

1 

.... 




7th, 1st Precinct. 


2 
1 


8th, lBt Precinct. 

'• 2J Precinct.. 

9th 


17 
22 

28 

4 

14 
7 


2 

i 


3 3 
2 .... 

6 2 


2 
1 
5 


3 
5 


10th, 1st Precinct. 


" 2d Precinct . 
" 3d Precinct.. 


3 
1 


4 
2 


2 
1 


4 

1 


1 

1 


.... 
1 


1 

1 


a 


11th, 1st Precinct. 


6 

18 

'"7 
9 
6 

626 












■1 


" 2d Precinct.. 

" 3d Precinct.. 

" 4th Precinct 

12th, 1st PrecinctJ 


S 
1 

8 

1 
M8 


6 

"'3 
2 


.... 
5 


4 

' "2 
2 


.... 
5 


7 

8 




271 


189 


131 


1 




108 






84 






74.824 


117 95 


41) 



HUNTINGTON, HOPKINS & CO., Importers Hardware and Iron, Cor. Bush and Market. 



C. P. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 703, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Boots and Shoes. 



PROGRESS OF THE CITY 



13 



Real. 



1st 

2d 

3d 

41 li 

5th 

6th 

7th, 1st Precinct. 

" 2d Precinct. 
8th, 1st 'recinc.t. 

■' 2d Pn cin it.. 

9th 

10th, 1st Precinct. 

" id Precinct.. 

" 3d Precinct.. 

" 4th Precinct 
11th, 1st Precinct. 

" 2d Precinct.. 

" 3d Precinct. 

" 4 tli Precinct 
12th, 1st Precinct.. 

" 2d Precinct.. 

Total 



7.401,300 
10,939,828 

4.193.500 
7.913.500 
1,849,500 
20,619.550 
1,695.050 
6.667.250 
16.662.340 
13,662,110 
11.011.605 
6,603,810 
3.435.215 
5.170.780 
3,334,176 
7,978,840 
11,802.700 
3,408,550 
3,711,720 
4,240.430 
10,898,020 



9 7,407. 
5,005 
3,154, 
7 3^6 
7.172, 
11.766 

775 
4,115 
11.676 
6,1(19 
5.980 
4,558 
2,004 
2,081 

802 
3.930 
5,206 
1,276 

316 
1.734 
5,323 



Own. by Chinese 
Personal. 



,900 
,275 
,695 
650 940. 

,690 



34 



13,000 
5,900 
46,700 
230,3110 
8,600 
7S8.000 



14,050 
2,100 



700 
100 

39,930 
29.559 
4,500 



4.300 
1,250 



W. 

3,155 

2.098 

985 

1.559 
1,523 
1.711 
1,639 
1,256 
1.738 
1,916 
2.298 
1,337 
917 
1,177 
1,422 
1.882 
1,659 
585 
258 
1.029 
1,566 



$163,259,771 $07,796,741 $74,800 §1,188,080 31,701 352 [3,370 4,297 25,266 2,608 296 1,88611,893] 446.1,452 







Q 




C > 




S«i 




M 








C3W 








• > 




a 


c. 


M. 


F. 


42 


858 


363 1 


31 


181 


399 


ft 


129 


55 


140 


860 


696 


... 


103 


26 


52 


18 


113 


1 


137 


282 




ftl 


no 


1ft 


AS 


128 


8 


22 


337 


13 


77 


217 


4 


92 


235 


9 


1 


4 




45 


263 




39 


90 


6 


139 


196 


6 


304 


200 




74 


120 


8 


17 


45 


6 


33 


64 


5 


135 


294 


352 


13.370 


4,297 



No. lE'ty 



1.171 

2.485 

882 

1.575 

.'04 

1,450 

782 

1.027 

1,302 

1 ,502 

1.985 

927 

826 

921 

1,178 

1.875 

1,700 

5-5 

262 

981 

1,080 



....| 11 

125 25 

■HI 11 

140 5 
22 .. 

100 4 

53 5 

120 18 

162 24 

154 35 

182 1 

38 39 

12 21 

31 1 8 

166 3 

138 1 26 

188 17 

34 111 

ftl 2 

104 6 

2521 25 



W.iCh. 



120 ... .... 

170 ... 

in 1 . . 

38 216 1,248 
2 

66 160 204 

91 
62 

76 28 
1111 35 
170 



28 
93 
112 
216 
187 
54 
34 
07 
159 



"The male population of this City, according to these figures, it will be observed, is 75,824 ; of 
this number 23,722 are under 15 years of age. No separate figures are presented of the adult 
portion or the number between 15 and 21, and in order to arrive at an approximation of these ele- 
ments, about thirty-five per cent, of the number under 15, the ratio according to the census returns 
of 1 SCO, of Massachusetts, Ohio, and Oregon, should be added thereto, and the aggregate made 
thereby, taken from the entire census of males, will produce the following result: Under 15, 
23,722, add thirty-five per cent., 8,302 for those between 15 and 21 ; total under 21, 32,024, which 
deducted from 75,824 will leave as tjie adult population, according to the Federal Census of 1870, 
43,800." 



FEDERAL CENSUS-SAN FRANCISCO, 1870. 

(Census Bureau Compilation.) 




Wards. 


9 


"9 

c 
o 


*i 


a s 


> 

a 


o 


Seventh 


5178 


5 '111 


10228 


16 1 


134 


10379 


Eighth 


9474 


7029 


16006 


88 ft 


41 i 165 a 


Ninth 


5964 


4725 


10420 


49 8 


212 10689 


Tenth 


12307 


9! 58 


21985 


48 7 


'..85 22325 


Eleventh 


12853 


98 1 3 


21825 


43 17 


781 22666 


l'wclflll 


7436 


5145 


12270 


22... 


289 12581 




75753 


73720 


1361)59 


1341 55 


120181 149473 



FEDERAL CENSUS— SAN FRANCISCO, 1870. 
( Washington and San Francisco lie/unis Compared.) 



First... 
Becon 1 . 
Third... 
Fourth . 
Fifth . 
[Sixth. 



Seventh 

Eighth 

Ninth 

Tenth 

Eleventh 

Twelfth 



Totals. 



-3 

o p 



10.3*5 

11.359 
2,400 

10.282 
2,758 

6,139 
10.228 
16,006 
—20,420 
21.985 
21,825 
12,270 

136,059 



77 

145 

13 

621 

3 

216 

16 

88 

49 

48 

43 

22 



137,401 II 1341 



77 
137 
6 
389 
3 
220 
12 
89 
49 
46 
45 
21 



1,094 I' 55 



~3 



r. 



305 
322 
5ftl 

5,6.50 
52 

3,033 
134 
404 
212 
285 
7M 



12,018 



305 
3.4 
5-d 

5,491 
SO 

2,934 
179 
403 
216 
279 
785 
290 



149.473 



10.8118 

11.832 
3.076 

16.555 
2,843 

9.411 

10,383 

10.08;! 
10.8-4 
22.431 
22,850 
12.055 

150,361 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 113 Eanaom Street, Best Paper end Linen Collars. 



Visit WATKINS' YO-SEMITB ART GALLERY 20 Montg., opp. Lick House entrance 



14 SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



CURRENT HISTORY. 

In each succeeding volume of the San Francisco Directory we have endeavored to trace briefly 
the current history of a young and growing city which, within twenty -two years, has attained 
the fourth (if not the third) rank among the great maritime ports of the Union. A review of our 
labors will enable the reader to form a very accurate conception of the progress made from year to 
vear. Bv reason of our isolated position, the peculiarities of our soil and climate, the sparseness of 
our population as compared with the area, susceptible of yielding the most copious returns in a 
multiplicity of natural productions, and the scarcity of appliances for developing our wealth of re- 
sources, the onward march of San Francisco has been subjected to certain arrests and halts not in- 
cident to other cities, but by no means of a formidable or insuperable character. Cool reflection will 
recognize in these breathing spells so many opportunities to revise what has been done, and to take 
measures for more solid and permanent advancement. The year 1871 was of this nature. Several 
causes combined to retard the rapidity of our usual progress. Two consecutive years of drought 
had produced a failure in the wheat crop — our staple export ; the payment of Government indem- 
nity by France caused a panic in Eastern money markets, which reacted upon our own, and induced 
the transmission of not less than $12,000,000 in gold from California — principally from San Fran- 
cisco — depleting the amount of available funds for local improvements and the fostering of home in- 
dustries. Real estate — partly from sympathy, and partly from the natural reaction attending a long 
period of inflated prices — suffered a serious decline ; loans on the best of city property, formerly es- 
teemed as offering the most acceptable security, were effected only on the basis of largely increased 
margins. The overland railroads had confronted our manufactures with those of the East, where 
lower rates of interest and lower scales of wages prevailed. General business was correspondingly 
sluggish, and the situation was not such as to entice capitalists into large expenditures for local 
improvements. But every cloud, however dark it may seem, has its silver lining. In many par- 
ticulars, substantial, if not brilliant progress was made. Although the number of arrivals from all 
ports holding maritime commerce with San Francisco was 46 fewer than in 1870, the a^regate of 
tonnage entered was increased 5,979 tons — the total being 1,0(58,178 tons. The population of this 
State was augmented by 10,282 souls, from immigration alone; new and valuable deposits of the 
precious metals were discovered and profitably worked, while mines long under development ex- 
hibited larger and richer lodes than ever. The various processes for reduction had been so materi- 
ally improved, that claims formerly abandoned as unremunerative were again operated with satis, 
factory results. In the meantime signal additions were made to the extensive reduction works in 
this city, and San Francisco became the exporter instead of the importer of lead, shot lead pipe and 
other kindred articles extracted from galena. In the same period San Francisco became the great 
receiving and distributing mart for the teas and silks of China and Japan, and the coffees produced 
in countries washed by the Pacific. Atlantic and other American cities, and Western Europe, are 
to a great extent investigating our capabilities for supplying them with these and other necessary 
wrtides of Asiatic production and constant demand, more readily, in finer quality and condition, 
and more cheaply than by any other route. The amount of teas forwarded overland — chiefly in 
bond — during 1871 reached the unexampled quantity of 17,829,928 pounds, against 3,104,290 pounds 
in 1870, showing an increase of 14,735,632 pounds in the course of a single twelvemonth. So won- 
derful has been the development of this important branch of commerce, that the Pacific Mail Com- 
pany found itself wholly incapable to furnish the requisite transportation with all the facilities at its 
command, and is now constructing five first-class iron propellers, three of which are destined for 
this trade, to meet the quick-growing exigencies of our Oriental commerce. Our relations with 
Australasia have been signally improved by r the inauguration of steamship intercourse which promises 
to be permanent and of inestimable future value. Contemporaneous with these triumphs on the 
ocean, remarkable energy has been displayed in providing for augmented overland commerce — the 
Northern Pacific, Southern Pacific, and Atlantic and Pacific railway companies urging forward 
their respective roads with zeal and dispatch. This cursory review of our commercial status has 
been deemed necessary, as illustrating the foundation upon which our prosperity is based. Local 
improvements are but the results of exterior relations, depending upon them for vitality, progress 
and permanency. Owing to the several drawbacks specified in the commencement of these re- 
marks, the march of local advancement was somewhat retarded in 1871, as compared with the on- 
ward strides of some other years. But, if there was a seeming decline in this particular, the im- 



HUNTIN OrxCN, HOPXLJNiS & CO., Wnolesaie -=.:ir^are and Iron, Cor. Bush and Market. 



C. P. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708. 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Tobacco and Cigaro. 
PROGRESS OF THE CITY. 15 



provements actually secured were substantial, and well calculated to inspire the fullest confidence in 
the growth and development of the city. 

The following extract, from the valedictory of ex-Mayor Thomas H. Selby, delivered in Decem- 
ber, 1871, will afford the reader a bird's-eye glance at several of the leading features of our internal 
condition during that year : 

"A brief summary of the present, while it illustrates what has been accomplished, must be ac- 
cepted as indicating continued progress. The population, numbering at least one hundred and 
sixty-five thousand, embracing all nationalities and creeds, have gathered in a little more than 
twenty years, while thousands from here have contributed to the growth of thriving cities and towns 
in neighboring counties. The corporate limits embrace an area of thirty-six square miles, having 
ten miles of available wharf-frontage on the harbor. The buildings number over twenty thousand, 
exclusive of the Federal structures erected or being built, and to which the Government will, it is 
believed, add others ; for San Francisco, although only the tenth city in the Union in population, 
ranks fourth in maritime importance, having paid last year $8,000,000 into the Custom House. In 
the value of its commerce, this port is exceeded only by New York and New Orleans — the total 
amount of our foreign and domestic exports, in gold and produce, the last fiscal year, having been 
$64,000,000, of which $32,000,000 was foreign. The number of arrivals during the year 1871 
from foreign and Atlantic ports and coastwise was 3,620. Six lines of ocean steamers connect us 
with the principal sea ports, north and south, and with China, Japan, Australia, New Zealand and 
the islands of the Pacific. During the last year we paid $13,000,000 in Federal taxes and duties, 
and our Internal Revenue tax is larger in proportion to the number of inhabitants than that of any 
other city in the United States. The total operations of the Branch Mint in San Francisco (where, 
since its establishment, $321,000,000 in gold and silver have been coined) amount to more than one- 
half of the entire coinage at the Philadelphia Mint since the organization of the United State- Gov- 
ernment. Occupying such a position, therefore, relatively to the national trade, finance and reve- 
nue, San Francisco may reasonably expect increased outlays by the Government. The Bran lb 
Mint now being built will be on a scale in keeping with the above figures. We also require larger 
and more commodious buildings for the United States Customs, Courts, Internal Revenue and other 
Federal purposes. Our Common Schools, eighty-seven in number, are liberally-supported — the ex- 
penditures of that Department last year having been upward of §700,000. There are forty-four 
large and substantial school houses belonging to the city, the remaining schools being held in rented 
premises. All are free from sectarian teachings, and are attended by 20,000 children. We have 
also sixty-three private and denominational schools, seminaries, and colleges, attended by about 
7,000 pupils. There are sixty-eight churches in the city, and eighty newspapers and periodicals 
(daily, weekly and monthly^ are published here. A city which, not many years ago, was a by-word 
for violence and crime, is now noted for its progress in culture and refinement, the beauty and com- 
fort of its homes, the variety and richness of its wares, the number of its literary and educational 
institutions and its varied and thriving industries. The provident character of its people is seen by 
the great number who possess homesteads of their own, and in the substantial fact that the aggre- 
gate deposits in our savings ba"ks amount to §35,000,000 in gold. The streets, roads and avenues 
improved by wood and cobble-stone pavements, macadamizing and planking, measure one hundred 
and twelve miles, and are lighted at nigbt by 3,600 gas lamps, at a cost of about $200,000 per annum. 
Under the thoroughfares the pipes of the Water Company extend a distance of one hundred and 
twenty-five miles, and there are forty miles of street railroad. Of carriages, omnibuses, cars and 
other licensed vehicles, there are 4,800, and probably as many private conveyances. Since the close 
of the fiscal year 1870-71, the Funded Debt, which was then §3,624,200, has been reduced by can- 
cellation of Bonds to §3,106,500. Deduct §228,000, now in the Treasury, to the credit of the Sink- 
ing Fund, and there remains an actual debt of §2,878,500. At no time during the last fifteen years 
has the indebtedness of our city been so small, nor its credit stood so high as now. Municipal taxes 
are collected on an assessment' roll of $100,000,000, of real and personal property, realizing about 
$3,000,000, of which nearlv one-third is for State purposes— San Francisco contributing a little less 
than one-half of the revenue of California. For several public charities, including Alms House and 
Hospital, upward of §1,000,000 have been paid out of the City Treasury in the last five years. < <t 
private relief and benevolent societies, some of them maintaining their own hospitals and asylums, 
we have about seventy, not counting subdivisions of orders." 

Supplementary to the foregoing epitome of his Honor, Mr. Selby, we note the steady improve- 
ments made in the southern portion of the city, where a large number of commodious and handsome 
residences have been erected, all of them giving unmistakable indications of social comfort and do- 
mestic attachments. Without architectural pretension, they are, nevertheless, infinitely in advance 
of the tenement structures so prevalent during the first fifteen years of American occupation, and 
are quite equal in all respects to the suburban homes of Eastern cities. The process of preparing a 
public park, suitable for the future of San Francisco, was carried on with more or less vigor during 
the year past, and public opinion has so settled down to the necessity of having a noble resort of 
this kind, that its early completion may be regarded as certain. Our Senators and Representatives 
in Congress are also making strenuous efforts to obtain from the General Government the relensc of 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sansorn Street, General Stock of small Wares. 



Piews of any part of the Coast mado by WATKINS, 23 Montg., opp. Lick House entrance. 



16 SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



a portion, if not the whole, of the Presidio Military Reservation. With the exceptions of Fort Point 
and Black Point, necessary for the proper defence and protection of this harbor, the Government 
really has no need of any other strategic position on the peninsula, and the cession of its claims 
upon the Presidio will be an act of graceful courtesy to the young Queen of the Pacific, which has 
already done so much toward elevating the renown of American enterprise and progressive devel- 
opment. Directly and indirectly the Pacific coast has contributed over fifteen hundred millions of 
dollars, in gold and silver, to the commerce of the world within the brief space of twenty-two years. 
San Francisco alone, of all American cities, has maintained the flag of our country at the mast- 
heads of ocean-going steamers ; to her is due the credit of having seized upon the most-coveted Oriental 
commerce, with a fair prospect of permanent retention ; upon her shoulders rests the mantle of honor 
for inaugurating a broader and more enlightened intercourse with China and Japan, which is now cul- 
minating into proportions of natioual magnitude, replete with future benefits of inestimable value. 
Under the light of these, and similar services of no ordinary character, it would seem as if the Fede- 
ral Government could well afford so small a boon in aid of her absolute requirements. Among 
other noteworthy improvements is the filling up of the water channel now formed bj what is termed 
Long Bridge, at the foot of Fourth Street. The Southern Pacific Railroad Company has for some 
time been employing a heavy force of laborers in this business, with the intention of erecting upon the 
made land large and commodious depots as the San Francisco terminus of the road. The newBranch 
Mint is also progressing finely, and when completed will be an ornament as well as a valuable busi- 
ness auxiliary to the city. Congress has been importuned, by petition and by our Representatives in 
Senate and House, to improve the valuable Government lots bounded by Washington, Battery, 
Jackson and Sansom streets, by constructing thereon suitable buildings for the various Federal 
officials, so as to insure the transaction of business without unnecessary loss of valuable time. As 
similar requests have been freely granted to Chicago, there seems to be no valid reason why San 
Francisco should meet with refusal. Compliance and speedy action would impart a notable im- 
pulse to the valuable property in the northern portion of the city, without deteriorating from that of 
real estate elsewhere located, as all other sections would partake, more or less, of the benefits accru- 
ing to any one. The new City Hall, which is being erected on the large triangular lot formed by 
the intersection of Park Avenue, Larkin Street and McAllister Avenue, is the most noteworthy im- 
provement commenced during the year under review. When completed it will be much the largest, 
most costly and noblest structure in the State, at once an ornament and an indispensible public edi- 
fice. The main building — the comer stone of which was recently laid, with appropriate ceremo- 
nies, by the Masonic Fraternity — will form three sides of an irregular triangle, inclosing a square 
court, which will be decorated with a fountain and appropriate shrubbery. The Beveral frontages 
will aggregate 1,960 feet — having S00 feet on Park Avenue, 500 feet on Larkin Street, and 660 feet 
on McAllister Avenue. The average hight of the structure will be 84 feet, with a central spire, 
over the main entrance, towering to the altitude of 290 feet. Detached from the City Hall proper, 
but connected with it by an open arcade, leading from the main building, will be the Hall of Records, 
fire-proof in all respects, with an inside diameter of 86 feet. There will be a ground floor and two 
upper floors, in the form of galleries twenty feet wide, besides the necessary offices for the Recorder: 
and his deputies and clerks. The dome of the Hall of Records will be 57 feet in diameter, sup- 
ported by twelve iron columns rising from the floor of the Hall, which columns will also support 
the galleries. These columns will form a circle 56 feet in diameter, and be connected together by 
arches springing from ornamental capitals at a hight of 58 feet from the floor. The center of the 
Hall will be open to the top of the dome, giving an internal hight of 120 feet. The hight from 
the terrace to the top of the dome will be 126 feet, and this will be surmounted by a pedestal and 
statue, increasing the hight to a total of about 135 feet. As a detailed and minute statement of all 
the local improvements made during 1871 is neither expected nor possible within the range of a re- 
view like this, we shall conclude our remarks by simply alluding to the fact that the t iregoing u'ives 
but a faint intimation of what has been done by the genius, enterprise and indomitable energy of the 
American people within one-third of the period allotted to a single generation. The peninsula on 
which San Francisco stands has been redeemed from a sandy waste — a howling wilderness — and has 
become the center of commerce, art, science, refinement and literary culture, on the extreme western 
confines of the American contine'nt. Every year adds materially to its strength ami viral power to 
overcome obstacles, to grapple with opposing forces, and to lay the foundations for a future of pre- 
eminent greatness. 



ifctU.NTlJM'GTO.N', HOPKINS & CO., Agent3 Jeasop & Sons' Steel, Cor. Bush and Market. 



C. P. VAN SCUAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street. Smokers' Articles. 



PROGRESS OF THE CITY. 17 



PUBLIC PARKS. 

Next to public baths, public parks may justly be deemed the most important material blessings 
to the people of a large city. Their sanitary influences have been the theme of laudatory comment 
on the part of men eminently fitted to instruct their fellow beings, but this feature is not the only 
one which commends them to popular favor. They produce very charming moral effects, especially 
upon the young, who insensibly acquire a love for nature and are imperceptibly weaned from the 
frivolities and allurements of a purely metropolitan existence. In addition, public parks have im- 
parted somewhat of celebrity to the communities which have been wise enough to make provision 
for them on a scale proportioned to the wealth, population, and prospective growth of the place. 
Hyde Park, although containing but 400 acres, enjoys a celebrity little inferior to but inseparable from 
that of London, The Champs Elyse'es, the Place de Concorde and the Bois de Boulogne of Paris, 
are of a world wide celebrity, intimately connected with that of the gay capital itself. Boston Com- 
mon has ever been one of the attractions boasted by the Athens of America, while the Central Park 
of New York is justly considered a prominent source of pride, pleasure, health and profit to the 
people of that great metropolis. It was a wise policy — instigated by the press of San Francisco — 
which culminated in providing for spacious and attractive public parks for the Queen of the Pacific 
at an early day, when the value of laud is comparatively small, and the city in its youth. The 
reputation of these valuable belongings must necessarily add to that of the metropolis, as indicating 
refinement, intelligence, and public spirit, while imparting health, innocent recreation, good moral 
influences, and augmenring the value of property. The Legislature of 1S70 passed an act providing 
for public parks in San Francisco, and this movement was speedily followed by the appointment of 
commissioners to carry out the object. The city was authorized to issue bonds to the extent of 
$225,000, bearing interest at the rate of <7 per cent, per annum, the interest to be paid semi-annually, 
and the principal at the expiration of fifty years; but no bonds to be issued at less than par. Thus 
far but $75,000 of these bonds have been taken, and work has necessarily been delayed to a con- 
siderable extent, although the progress made is exceedingly satisfactory. Up to January 8th, 1872, 
a little over t ; 42,000 had been expended, leaving on hand a cash balance of more than $33,000. 
The Golden Gate Park, as this grand enclosure has been felicitously named, contains 1,013 acres, 
eligibly located between the ocean beach and the northwestern suburbs of the city, arid possessing 
all the requisites of hills, vales, lakes and arable lands to render it a delightful resort as well as a 
picturesque ornament. It will be intersected by a fine macadamized avenue, affording a drive of 
four and a half miles in length. It is nearly one mile wide, has two miles of secluded roadways, 
mainly for equestrians, seven miles of broad, open walks, three and a half miles of narrower and 
more retired rambling pathways, besides three handsome lakelets, a dressed lawn of 30 acres, a 
flower garden and conservatory of 15 acres, a base ball and cricket ground of 20 acres, a botanical 
garden of 12 acres; together with extensive grounds of a park-like description, play-grounds for 
children, and thickly wooded tracts intersected with a maze of walks and shaded avenues. Much 
progress has already been made in setting out trees and shrubbery. Over ten thousand trees of 
different varieties have been contracted for and will soon he adding their charms to this noble place 
of public resort. Among some in the nursery are fine specimens of the Monterey Cypress, Lawson 
Cypress, Ordinary Monterey Pine, Seaside Pine, fifteen varieties of the Eucalyptus, (Australian 
Gum) Cork BinkElms, Black Walnut, Lombardy Poplar, Locusts, White Mulberry, and Maples. 
Great judgment and good taste have been exercised in selecting the trees for this Park— one half 
being deciduous, and the other for ornamental purposes. It is proposed to complete the following 
during the present vear : The dressed ground or lawn, flower garden, conservatory, manor house, 
croquet or children's play grounds, plateau, or carriage concourse, botanical garden, lakes, meadow, 
parade, cricket or base ball ground, strawberry hill, bridges, fountains, traffic road and walks. A 
bill is now pending before the Legislature of the State, for the issuance of seven per cent, bonds to 
the amount of five hundred and fifty thousand dollars. This sum will afford the Commissioners 
ample funds for the prosecution and completion of this most necessary public improvement. 
The Board of Commissioners is now constituted as follows : Eugene L. Sullivan, Gen. B. 
F. Alexander, and C. T. MacDermott. In addition to the Golden Gate, there will be the 
Buena Vista Park, containing 36 acres, and the Mountain Lake Park, of 20 acre-, each of 
which will be laid out so as to render it an object of attraction. It is not a vain boast to assert that 
at no distant dav San Francisco will possess superb public parks equal to those of the largest and 
most ambitious "American cities, with the single exception of New York ; and, as has already been 
remarked, only second in importance to a system of well conducted public baths. 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street, Suspenders and Neck Ties. 



WATKINS' YO-SEMITE ART GALLERY, 26 Montg. St., opp. Lick House Entrance. 



18 SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



New Buildings. During the past year, notwithstanding the general depression existing in al- 
most every department of business, a considerable number of Buildings, several of which of an ex- 
tensive character have been erected, and active operations continued upon the several public build- 
ings in the course of construction. The number erected from Jannary, 1871, to March 1st, 1872, 
fourteen months, is estimated at 920,* of which 40 are of brick. About ten per cent, of this number 
replaced old or worn out structures and those damaged by fire. The most important improvements 
are the works of the City and Metropolitan Gas Companies, Potrero ; Levison's building, Sutter 
Street; Olympic Club building, New Montgomery Street; Tattersalls', Sansom Street; Worm- 
ser's and Kcyes' buildings, California Street, and the new Church edifices of St. Patrick's Roman 
Catholic, Mission Street ; First Congregational, corner Post and Mason streets ; First Methodist 
Episcopal, Powell Street; St. Peter's Episcopal, Stockton Street ; Baptist Mission, Tenth Avenue 
near I, and the Memorial Presbyterian, Eighteenth Avenue. In addition to these, there are a num- 
ber of elegant and costly private residences, several of which have been erected or nearly completed 
at an expense of from $25,000 to $75,000. This enumeration does not include the New United 
States Branch Mint, the new City Hall and the new City and County Hospital now being con- 
structed. 

Important additions to our city improvements have been made by several of the co-operative asso- 
ciations recently formed in this city. The Real Estate Associates, Rondel's Homesteads and 
the Building and Improvement Union have erected during the past year an aggregate of 45 private 
dwellings for the accommodation of those who prefer to own their residences by the payment of a 
stated sum monthly than to rent them in the usual way. 

It is gratifying to notice an improved style and finish of the exterior and the many additions to 
the interior arrangements of the private residences erected during the past year, which must secure 
for their occupants increased comfort and convenience. 

Number of Buildings. Total, December 31st, 1869, 18,659; erected during the year 1870, 
900; of this number, 100 replaced old buildings. Total, December 31st, 1870, 19,459, of which 
4,380 are of brick and 15,079 are of wood. Total, March 1st, 1872, 20,287, of which 4,420 are of 
brick and 15,867 are of wood. The Federal Census, August, 1870, returns the total number at 
25,266. (See article on Population, page 11.) 

Churches — St. Patrick's. — In our report of last year we remarked upon the general lack of 
architectural beauty, or grandeur, in the ecclesiastical edifices of this city; buildings which in all 
countries claim the first attention, and to construct which the highest genius has been engaged and 
countless treasure lavished. Then the great St. Patrick's on Mission Street was in course of con- 
struction, and is now nearly completed and will be dedicated with appropriate ceremonies, on the 
17th of March of this year. The finishing of the interior is now — March 1st — progressing. This 
is a vast space of 82 feet in width, by 120 in length, and 75 feet high, to the crown of the ceiling of 
the nave. The nave comprises the main hall, each is 44 feet in width and on each side are aisles of 
19 feet in width separated from the nave by rows of 16 crystal columns, 8 on a side, from which 
spring the upper walls of the main building. The ceiling is a succession of groined arches and is 
beautifully frescoed in a ground of blue. The light will be ample, there being 36 large windows in 
the wings and tier and five in the chancel, all filled with stained glass. The windows of the chan- 
cel will represent St. Patrick, as a center piece, with historical pictures representing scenes in the 
life of the patron saint of Ireland. Rows of niches are in the walls, between the windows, twelve 
of the most conspicuous of which will hold statues of the twelve Apostles. 

At night the church will be lighted by gas, a large number of burners springing from the pillars, 
rather than from chandeliers pendant from the ceiling. A mammoth organ, which is intended to 
be the largest on the coast, is now making in Germany, and will soon be placed in position. The 
lofty belfry, 100 feet from the ground, will contain a chime of bells, the present to the church of Peter 
Donahue Esq., of San Francisco. The total cost of this great structure is about frl 75,000, and 



* The San Francisco Evening Bulletin of March 12th, 1872, reports the number of buildings erected during the year 
1871 at 311, and at a cost of $1,618,700, Our estimate has been made upon nformation obtained daring the canvass for 
the DiRKCToitY, and compared with the returns of the leading architects of this city. The returns of the Spring Valley 
Water Works Co. show that during the year 1871. 830 new taps were made, and it is believed that tin' number of new 
buildings from which no orders were received will more than overbalance the orders from old ones. The great differ- 
ence between the estimates herein referred to renders this explanation necessary.— CoMPltER. 



flUNTmaTON", HOPKINS &. CO., Importers Hardware and Iron, Cor. Bush and Market. 



C P. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708. 712, 714 & 716 Kearny St., Hubber Goods and Umbrella* 



PROGRESS OP THE CITY. 19 



has been built under the supervision of Mr. G. P. Cummings, the architect. At this date St. Pat- 
rick's is the largest and most costly church edifice in the State and its lofty spire supporting a large 
cross richly gilded with gold, 240 feet high, is one of the most conspicuous objects in the city. 

First Congregational Church.— On the southeast corner of Post and Mason streets is one 
of the most tasteful architectural ornaments of the city. Light and graceful in design, it seems as 
if it would leap from the earth to the heavens, where its lofty spire so proudly points. This is the 
First Congregational Church, popularly known as Dr. Stone's, and has been constructed during 
the past year, under the superintendence of Messrs. Wright & Sanders, architects. The dimen- 
sions are 92 feet frontage on Post Street by a depth of 135 on Mason Street, and is 90 feel to the 
apex of the roof, which is steeply pitched. On the northwest angle is the grand tower and spire, 
rising to the hight of 230 feet, surmounted by vane and weathercock in gilt. The style of archi- 
tecture is the early English Gothic. The walls are of brick, relieved by pressed brick arches and 
buttresses capped with concrete stone manufactured by the Pacific Stone Co. This matei ial i- used 
in place of stone in slips, sills, keystones, watertables, etc., through the building, with excellent ef- 
fect. The three principal entrances are on Post Street, with one in the tower fronting on Mason, 
and are all reached by broad nights of stone steps partly covered by deeply recessed porches Blip- 
ported on brick piers and detached stone columns. The porches are finished above with gablets 
and carved terminals representing birds and foliage. The entrance doors are wide and made sliding, 
and are banded and ornamented with iron. Between the buttresses of the side walls are live large 
windows on each side of the church, having deeply molded and trained heads and recessed arches. 
These windows terminate with gablets extending above the eaves of the building, and finished with 
iron terminals. The other gables throughout are finished with terminals, and those of the front 
and rear main gables are ornamented in character and richly gilded. The roof is broken by venti- 
lators, in the style of dormers, having iron terminals, and the ornamental roof is crowned with a 
cast iron ridgeway. The front of the church, on Post Street, is designed with groups of two and 
three-light windows, arranged centrally over doorways with deeply recessed arches, relieved by 
white and dark brick ornamentally disposed. The tower on three of its faces has an arcade of light 
columns and arches, and the belfry has two large and lofty windows divided by buttresses on each 
face. The angle buttresses terminate upwards in bold pinnacles, and group well with the canopies 
and pinnacles of the spire windows. There is also a second or midway tier of spire windows. 

The front entrance doors open into a large and airy vestibule, with doors opening opposite into 
the auditorium, and stairways right and left leading to the galleries. The auditorium is 88 feet in 
length on the ground floor, and 74 feet wide — the length above gallery, including the organ and 
choir recess, being 125 feet. The hight to the center portion of the ceiling is 65 feet. The walls 
and ceiling are richly decorated in fresco, of a prevailing tone of blue and white, relieved by light 
red. The walls are a light salmon color, and the graining over the galleries and in the organ recess 
is finished in blue with white and gold stars. The upholstery will be of the first quality, the cush- 
ions being of the best English damask and the carpeting of three-ply Kidderminster, body Brussels 
being used for the pulpit platform and minister's study. The furniture of the pulpit platform will 
be black walnut, richly carved and of appropriate design. The seating accommodations on ordi- 
nary occasions will be for 1,600 or 1,700 persons, but will comfortably receive 2,000. 

The basement is divided into lecture-room, class-room, infant class-room, ladies' room, library 
and lumber rooms, which are provided with all necessary lavatories and convenience-.. The base- 
ment rooms are so arranged that they can all be thrown into one apartment during exercises or lor 
social purposes. 

The present organ of the First Congregational Church will be used until a new organ can be pur- 
chased, which, judging from the enterprise displayed by the congregation, wdl not be a very long 
time. 

For evening services the church will be lighted by "sunburners," and the utmost care has been 
taken with the heating apparatus, and abundant provision made for perfect ventilation. A brick 
wall surmounted by an iron fence will enclose the building, having gates supported by massive east 
iron posts, with grouped gas burners at each entrance. 

The total cost of this elegant and commodious structure will be a little over $100,000. 

Powell Street Church.— The Methodist Episcopal Church on Powell Street, named as 
in course of construction in the Directory for 1871, has been finished during the past year. This is 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street. Braids of all kinds. 



For the finest Paintings, Oil or "Water, of yourself, go to WATKINS', 20 Slontg. St. 



20 SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



a wooden structure on a brick foundation and is 45 by 77 feet in dimensions on the ground. In 
the rear of the spacious auditorium is a lecture room, and from the southeast angle rises a graceful 
tower to the highth of 165 feet, constituting a conspicuous object in this portion of the city. The 
windows are filled with stained glass, from the manufactory of Mallon & Boyle, of San Francisco. 

Tattersalls. — The site of the old American Theatre, so long neglected, is again to become a 
busy spot in San Francisco life. This is on Sansom Street, where the alley called Hal leek Street is 
cut through to Battery. Upon this lot of 54 feet front and 160 deep, an elegant brick building, with 
iron front, three stories and basement, has been erected. The basement and the principal portion of 
the first and second stories are designed for the " Tattersalls," for the keeping and sale of horses, 
carriages, harness, and all furniture and equipments pertaining to the road or the turf. The stables 
in basement and first floor will afford accommodation for one hundred horses, with closed hoxes for 
stallions and blooded stock requiring extra care. The first floor gives room for a circuit of horses 
and carriages for inspection on days of sale. On two sides are galleries for spectators and at one 
end are spacious public and private offices. An elevator carries carriages or other matter from the 
lower to upper stories, having room for four hundred carriages. The institution altogether is upon 
the most approved plan of the "Tattersalls" of London, New York and other large cities which 
have proved so beneficial to dealers and so popular. The projectors and proprietors of the estab- 
lishment are Messrs. A. M. Burns and K. G. Brush, of the firm of A. M. Burns & Co., and Henry 
A. George is Superintendent. The front room on first floor is adapted for a saloon or store ; the 
front of the second story will be occupied by the offices of the Regents of the State University and 
the Raymond & Ely Mining Company, and the third story by the shoe manufactory of Einstein & 
Co. In this factory will be room for three hundred workmen, with store, offices and exhibition 
rooms. The cost of this fine building has been about $130,000. 

Haggin's Residence. — While the millionaires of San Francisco do not indulge in the marble 
and freestone palaces, as do the men of wealth in Eastern cities, there are here many residences ex- 
ceeding in taste of external appearance, equaling in comfort and rivaling in splendor of internal 
finish and decorations, those that are so much more costly. One of these in course of construction 
under the superintendence of Messrs, Raun & Taylor, architects, is the residence of Mr. J. B. Haggin, 
on the southeast corner of Taylor and Washington streets, and with stable and premises occupying 
the whole block bounded by Taylor, Washington, Mason and Clay streets. The building is of 
wood on a brick foundation and basement of 13 feet in hight, two main stories respectively of 16 
and 15 feet, and a mansard roof affording capacious chambers of 12 feet high. Over the front en- 
trance rises a tower of a total hight of 86 feet above the sidewalk. The ground plan is a square of 
100 feet on each side, and the house will contain some 50 large rooms, besides closets, lavatories, 
bathroom?, etc. The basement contains a billiard room 22 by 28 feet in dimensions, laundry, etc. 
The parlor, in the northern portion of the first story, is a capacious room 52 feet long by 20 wide. 
The main entrance is from Taylor Street; a broad flight of steps leads to an elegant recessed vesti- 
bule and into a wide hall that passes through the building. On the left is the parlor and on the 
right is the library, dining and other rooms. The sleeping apartments in the second story are large 
and conveniently arranged, being in size from 20 by 30 to 18 by 20, and there are also numerous 
bathrooms, closets and balconies. In the third or attic stories are well arranged sleeping apartments, 
with bath, store rooms, etc. Altogether with its every arrangement of different hoists, dumb waiters, 
heating, cooking and washing apartments, it seems to combine all that is possible for convenience 
and comfort of a luxurious home. The framework and exterior is of cedar and redwood, and the 
interior will be finished in laurel, French walnut, and other of the most elegant fancy woods. The 
locality is very elevated and the high tower attracts attention from nearly all parts of the city. 
From the observatory a grand view can be obtained of the southern, eastern and northern portions 
of the city, also of the bay as far as the eye can reach, with its islands and busy shipping, the Contra 
Costa and Marin County shores constituting one of the loveliest panoramas it is possible to conceive. 

On the same block, though fronting on Mason Street, the same gentlemen has had built a stable 
that would of itself make a fine residence or a building for some important public purpose. The 
main building is 61 feet long by 28 wide, two stories high, and on each end is a wing 33 feet long by 
18 wide, making a total length of 127 feet. The carriage room has capacity for 18 carriages, and 
stalls for six horses. The upper story is provided for storage of hay and grain, with three conven- 
ient rooms, bathroom, etc., for the residence of the groom and family. Great care has been be- 



HUNTINGTON, HOPitIN3 & CO., Wholesale Hardware and Iron, Cor. Bush and Market. 



C. P. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Yankee Notions. 



PROGRESS OF THE CITY. 21 



stowed on the sanitary arrangement of the stable, and every convenience that skill could devise or 
wealth secure. 

Dam's Building.— On the northwest corner of Bush and Stockton streets, George W. Dam, 
Esq., of the well known real estate firm of Dam & Blanchard, has built of wood one of the prettiest 
houses in the city. This was designed for a private boarding-house, and the beauty of the exterior 
and convenient arrangement of the interior should make it an attractive one. The house is th 
ries in bight, with Mansard roof- and observatory, and contains sixty rooms. The cost of construc- 
tion was $25,000. 

Montgomeky Avenue.— Under a statute passed by the legislature of 1869-70, a Board of Com- 
missioners was appointed, consisting of Messrs. J.C. Maynard, R.H. Sinton and A.M. Hay, for the pur- 
pose of opening a street to be called Montgomery Avenue, extending from the corner of Washing- 
ton and Montgomery streets in a norhtwesteiiy direction to Beach Street between Leavenworth and 
Hyde streets near Black Point in the northern portion of the city. The original surveys had been 
such as to make the streets run perpendicular to the slopes of the hills on which the city is built 
thus rendering many sections almost inaccessible, and Montgomery Avenue was designed to remedy 
this defect. The route of this street would lead to the northern portion of the city by a grade of but. 
four feet in one hundred, as far as Green Street, thence down by a grade of two and one-half feet in 
one hundred, while by the present streets it is such as to forbid extensive traffic in that quarter. The 
avenue was to be 80 feet in width and its length 6,177 feet. The commissioners entere I actively upon 
their duties, in the survey of the route, assessing damages and benefits resulting from cutting it 
through buildings and streets and estimating its cost. The total cost of construction was estimated 
at $2,612,070 85 while the benefits to property was estimated at $8,426,035. The payment for the 
right of way purchasing land and buildings along the line, would have been $1,974,632, and the ex- 
pense of construction, widening lateral streets, repairing sewers, adjusting water and gas pipe, court 
expenses, interest and expenses of the commissioners were placed at $637,438 85. A vast amount 
of work was done by the commissioners, in surveys, searching of titles, estimates, etc., but so 
strong an opposition was raised as to cause the abandonment — temporarily at least — of the project, 
and the commission has been dissolved. 

South San Francisco. — The building of street railroads has made accessible the extreme lim- 
its of the city. The Potrero and Bay View Railroad opened the Potrero and South San Francisco 
to settlement, and pleasant suburban villages have there grown up, attached to and under the munici- 
pal government of the city. The localities afford most available sites for manufacturing, metallur- 
gical works, and shipbuilding. There are already several important establishments in operation, as 
the Rolling Mills, Silk Factory, Ropewalk, etc. At Hunter's Point is the great Dry Dock ; the 
Catholic Orphan Asylum crowns the South San Francisco hill; New Butchertown is a busy qqar- 
ter in Islais Creek Bay; the extensive works of the City Gas Company are in course of construction 
at Potrero Point, and other institutions and enterprises give life to this southern quarter of the city 
The sale of tide lands, the proposition to construct a bridge across the bay, and the expectation that 
the Southern Pacific Railroad will enter the city in this quarter, have drawn attention to the locality, 
and its rapid improvement is anticipated. 

A new line of street railroad to South San Francisco, commencing at Twenty-sixth Street and 
passing University Mound is projected, which will still further enhance the attractiveness of this 
pleasant suburb. This railroad will connect the Market Street Railway with the Potrero and Bay 
View Railroad in a distance of about two miles, giving access to an important section of country, 
and affording a circuit of the southern portion of the city. To aid and encourage the construction 
of this road, the owners of property along the line have agreed to build a bridge across Islais ( Ireek 
and to grade both sides of the canon for the reception of the rails. For this purpose $40,000 have 
been raised by subscription, articles have been drawn, and the franchise secured. 

Citt Gas Company.— The formation of new gas, water and railroad companies, where the sup- 
ply already seems abundant, indicates a plethora of capital more ready for cautious city investment 
in channels proven by others than in speculative enterprises for developing the resources of the 
country, great though they be, and upon which all prosperity depends. The City Gas Company is 
one of the most important of these new enterprises. This is a combination of San Francisco capi- 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO.. 116 Sansom Street Yankee Notions. 



WATKINS' YO-SEMITE ART GALLERY, 26 Montg. St., opp. Lick House Entrance. 



22 SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



tal, organized April 4th, 1870, and composed of Messrs. A. Hayward, N. Luning, Lloyd Tevis, H. 
E. Robinson, J. B. Haggin, Thomas Bell, S F. Butterworth, and C. J. Brenham. 

The charter of the company limits the price of gas to $4.50 per 1,000 feet. Work was com- 
menced in June, 1870, and has been vigorously prosecuted since. These works were recently de- 
scribed in the Alta California. They are situated at Potrero Point, occupying four blocks of land 
fronting on the bay,and lying between Humboldt and Sierra streets. A substantial wharf was first built, 
at which the largest vessel can lie and discharge coal or other material. Over the wharf runs an ele- 
vated platform with car tracks for moving coal from the ship, whence it is raised by steam derrick 
to warehouse. This building is 280 feet long by 123 feet wide ; is 26 feet high, and capable of hold- 
ing 24,000 tons of coal. In the railway the cars pass over a platform scales, the apparatus of which 
is in an enclosed room, thus weighing the coal with facility and without delay. Next above jthe 
coal warehouse is an excellent building containing the retort ovens, condensing and washing rooms, 
and basement below for storing coke. This is a fine brick structure, of great strength, and well ar- 
ranged for the purpose designed. The length is 200 feet and width 65 feet. The floors of the retort 
room are of brick, arched on iron beams, and supported on seven transverse rows of immense arched 
pillars. 

In the retort house there are forty-two benches, each with six retorts. Into these the coal is 
placed, and the gas is then driven off by heating the furnaces. In a crude state the gas passes 
from the retorts into large iron pipes, whence it is conducted through the condensers and coolers, 
and thence through the washing apparatus, where still further impurities are removed. 

In the condensing-room there is also a complete apparatus for the testing of different qualities of 
coal, with a separate meter and receiver connected. 

The next building is 200 feet long by 78 feet wide, containing main floor, basement, and at one 
end a second story. In this are the boiler room, engine room, purifying house, lime house, carpen- 
ter and meter shops. The principal points of attraction here are — first, the engine, which is a 
beautiful piece of machinery, with walking beam, the whole being as handsome as a piece of parJor 
furniture ; second, the exhausting pumps, very ingeniously arranged, and the purifying house, in 
which the gas is caused to pass through grates containing lime, for the still further removal of im- 
purities. 

The south building is at the upper end of the tract occupied. It consists of two stories, with 
basement and cupola. In the latter is to be placed a large clock, of the finest workmanship, which 
will be visible from all parts of the premises. This building contains the meter, which is twelve 
feet in diameter, and is used to determine the daily amount of gas made by the retorts ; the manu- 
facturing and district offices, and private rooms and conveniences for the officers. Outside of this 
building are two immense holders, 117 feet in diameter and 52 feet in hight. These combined will 
hold upward of one million cubic feet of gas. 

The masonry and brick work, as well as the wood finish in the offices, are of the very finest order. 
There is probably no private work in the State of equal excellence throughout. 

On one side of the space occupied are two comfortably arranged and constructed cottage-houses 
for the use of the engineers. 

From ten to twelve miles of pipes are already laid in the streets by this Company. When the 
present plans are completed, and which are being pressed forward as rapidly as possible, there will 
be three miles of twenty-four inch pipe and thirty-five miles of eighteen, sixteen, twelve, ten, eight, 
six and four inch. The mains cross Mission Bay at Ninth Street, running thence to Market. The 
cross streets are all supplied from these. 

These works when completed will have cost one and a half million dollars, and the capacity will 
be about one and one half million cubic feet per day. 

The Metropolitan Gas Company. — The Metropolitan Gas Company was incorporated March 
4th, 1871, and immediately commenced the laying of pipe in the business districts of the city, and 
the erection of works. This company purchased from the Pacific Pneumatic Gas Company, the 
assignee of the Gale & Rand patents, the right for San Francisco, to make illuminating gas by dis- 
tilling liquid or solid hydro-carbons at a low temperature and passing the vapors so obtained into a 
red-hot retort. The site selected of the gas works is Mission Block, No. 43, fronting on Channel 
Street (Mission Creek) west of Ninth Street. The company has performed a large amount of work 
here ; erecting a costly bulkhead and wharf raised the ground nine to twelve feet, bringing it up to 



HUNTINGTON. HOPKINS & CO., Agents Jeoaop & Sons' Steel, Cor. Bush and Market 



C P. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 703, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, White Shirts. 



PROGRESS OF THE CITY. 23 



the official grade, excavating for, and building a first-class gasholder, having a capacity of over 
400,000 cubic feet. The other works of the company consist of a substantial brick building 1 7:, feet 
in length, containing still house, retort house, condensing chamber, exhauster, engine, boiler and 
meter rooms, and in the upper story, offices, photometic room, and engineer's apartments. The 
company has also erected two large reservoir tanks, capable of storing nearly 100,000 gallons of 
petroleum and naphtha, also a commodious coal shed. The works though smaller than those of the 
City Gas Company, on the Potrero, are very complete, and in consequence of the simplicity of this 
process, quite adequate to the manufacture of all the gas that is, or will be, consumed in the city for 
many years to come. 

The holder was manufactured by Messrs. Hoy, Kennedy & Co., of the Atlantic Dock Iron 
Works, New York— the makers of the King Street gas holder and the gas holders of the City Gas 
Company. The columns and girders are on a new principle, recently patented by Mr. Kennedy, and 
first seen on this coast at these works, and are known as " lattice work " . The holder is ninety-two 
feet six inches in diameter, and fifty feet high, in two lifts, being telescoped. 

The company claims that petroleum gas is superior in lighting qualities and in purity to coal gas, 
and passes less swiftly through the consumers' meters. The Metropolitan gas works are on the 
point of completion, and the company promises to make gas, not later than the first week in April. 
The maximum price which it can charge under its charter is $3.50 per thousand cubic feet. The 
officers are J. W. Stow, President; W. W. Montague, H. B. Williams and J. W. Stow, Trustees, 
and A. D. Bell, Secretary. 

Maxim Gas Company. — Science and mechanical ingenuity continue their researches after some 
material, liquid or gaseous, that will afford a cheap and brilliant light, with ttfe desiderata of safety 
cleanliness and convenience of arrangement. Great advances have been made within the past 
twenty years in lighting our rooms, and the dim glimmer of the fish-oil lamp, and the faint flicker 
of the tallow dip, are almost banished from memory. The determination to rise above these wus 
apparent, and every substitute was willingly tried. Camphene, phosgene and other burning fluid 
were introduced and extensively used, until the inventor prepared a lamp for burning petroleum, an 
oil that the rocks of several of the States of the Union supply in abundance, and cheaply. To burn 
it in perfection was the desired object. Gas makes the cleanest and pleasantest of all lights ; but its 
manufacture from coal, in the usual manner, requires extensive and costly works, with most expensive 
distribution, and single houses or small towns cannot avail themselves of it. After noticing the great 
gas companies operating in this city, a reference to the Maxim Gas Company will not be out of place. 
This is founded on a patented machine and apparatus for making gas from the volatile products of 
petroleum which accomplishes its work in a very simple, efficient and inexpensive manner. The ap- 
paratus is peculiarly adapted for single buildings, or villages, and may be extended indefinitely. The 
machines are manufactured at the factory in this city, No. 417 Mission Street, the office being at 238 
Montgomery Street. Quite a number of business houses, schools, manufactories and private residences 
are now lighted by this gas, and also many of the interior towns of the State. It is contemplated 
to light by this machine every town in the State. The gasoline of which the gas is made, can be 
placed at any convenient distance from the machine, to insure the most perfect safety, aud is then 
drawn in constant supply, as needed, all of which is automatically regulated. The officers of the 
company, are among the best known of San Francisco's successful business men, J. O. Eldridge, 
being President; Wm. H. Ladd, Vice-President ; Chris. Reis, Treasurer; James H. Clark, Man- 
ager ; and Robert Day, Secretary. 

California Silk Manufacturing Company.— In noting the progress of the city, mention of 
of such an establishment as the California Silk Manufacturing Company will not be inappropriate, 
although its statistics are given under another heading. The fact of the building was mentioned in 
.the Directory for 1871, but it was only last summer that machinery was procured, and on the 1st of 
August, 1871, work commenced. 

The company is an organization incorporated under the laws of California, with a capital stock of 
$50,000. San Francisco capitalists venture but little in untried fields ; and silk manufacture or pro- 
duction seemed an experiment, good to encourage in newspapers and agricultural society addresses, 
as one of the great sources of future wealth, but too unknown to be considered as a safe investment. 
In 1 870, the company erected at South San Francisco, on the corner of Eleventh Avenue and P streets, 
a building of 50 feet front by 125 in depth, and two stories in bight, each story comprising one 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street, Fancy Jewelry and Jet Goods. 



WATKINS' YO-SEMITE AR.T GALLERY, 26 Montg. St., opp. Lick House Entrance. 



24 SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



large room and the necessary offices ; the cost being about $7,500. The room is sufficient for a man- 
ufacturing business of $250,000 per annum, but at present only apart, the lower story, is occupied. 
Here are about two thousand spindles which are driven by a ten horsepower engine. There are forty 
operators, principally females, some quite young, ~and the wages are from $3 to $10 per week. The 
products are machine sewing silks, twist, tram, organzinc and fringes. The raw material is ruled 
silk from China and Japan. A small quantity is obtained from California, and this, it is remarked, 
is of a far superior quality. Unfortunately but little of the latter can be obtained, our people not 
yet having learned the care of the silk-worm and the ruling of cocoons. This is a business of the 
future. The California Silk Manufacturing Co. is now in successful operation, and should it prove 
as profitable as some enthusiastic advocates have predicted, the experiment will be of the highest 
interest to this State. 

Pavements. [Communicated.] — In countries where timber is abundant and accessible, wooden 
pavements have long been used. They have been first employed for convenience and economy 
and afterwards continued for the comfort they afforded. Pavements of stone are resorted to when 
the wood of a country is exhausted faster than its wealth grows. With the increase of wealth, 
however, there is a disposition to enjoy the luxury of a smooth, clean and comparatively noiseless 
pavements of wood, at a cost if necessary, exceeding that of stone. 

In the cities of Chicago and Detroit scarcely anything else is now laid ; and in the city of New 
York, the wooden blocks are being put down at about double the cost of cobble stones. 

In San Francisco we are now making the comparative trial with cobble and wooden blocks, and 
the solution of the question is one of much interest both present and future. Prior to 1863, a 
street paving in the City of San Francisco was laid and kept in repair at the expense of the owners 
of the adjacent property. Since that time, the first laying has been done as before, at the expense 
of the property owners, but when done to the satisfaction of the city authorities, the paving is ac- 
cepted by them, and is maintained in repair at the public cost. According to the last municipal report, 
paving along two hundred and thirty blocks and crossings have been so accepted, and as Mayor Selby 
states, is about equally divided between cobble stones and wooden block pavements. These the 
city has to keep in repair, and the late mayor thinks it a question of vital importance to the city to 
ascertain if some better style of pavement cannot be found. He arrives at the conclusion that 
wooden pavements will be found too expensive because of the perishable character of the materials 
used, and recommends the introduction of artificial stone, and even suggests that iu some localities; 
a return to cobble stones may be found advisable. 

A careful examination into the facts of the case forces us to the conclusion that our late worthy 
Mayor has not given the subject the consideration which it deserves. It may be a good suggestion 
to adopt artificial stone in preference to wood, if such an article can be found, both cheap and dura- 
ble; but we cannot subscribe ta the suggestion of returning to the barbarous cobble stones when 
every other city in Christendom is seeking to discard them. 

The oft repeated assertion that cobble stones are indestructible, and consequently a cheap material 
for street paving, is less an axiom than many persons imagine. It is very poor economy indeed for 
the body politic to use an article, however durable, if its use causes waste of other property in ex- 
cess of the value retained in the material itself. Such, we think, is unmistakably true of cobble 
stones — careful scientific reports in many parts of the world have shown such to be the case. The 
destruction to animals and vehicles by passing over cobble stone pavements, in every city where 
used t exceeds the value retained in the cobbles themselves, according to the best judgment of those 
who have thoroughly investigated the subject. 

But if that view of the question be discarded entirely, the economy of cobble stone pavements in 
this city cannot be demonstrated by an examination of the official reports and other facts. 

There are now in the city of San Francisco, of accepted cobble stone pavements, 113 blocks and 
crossings, with an aggregate area of 1,803,999 square feet, which have been laid since 1863, at a 
cost to the property holders of $462,703 74-100, or 25 3-5 cents per foot. 

The repairs on this cobble pavement during the past fiscal year amounted to $83,703 35-100, and 
the total cost to the city for repairs since their acceptance amounts to $199,883 45-100, or about 11 
cents per foot, thereby making the total cost of these cobble pavements, as they stand to-day, 
,587 19-100, or 36 3-5 cents per foot, on an average. 

There are, on the other hand, 1 1 1 blocks and crossings of accepted wooden block pavements, 



HUNTIN GTON, HOPKINS & CO., Importers Hardware and Iron, Cor. Evrah and Market 



C P. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708,712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Paper and Envelopes. 



PRO.GRESS OF THE CITY. 25 



with an aggregate area of 1,808,951 square feet, which have been laid since 1863, at a cost to the 
property holders of $470,412 50-100, or 26 cents per foot. 

The repairs during the past fiscal year amounted to only $9,526 35-100, and the total cost to the 
city for repairs since their acceptance amounts to $16,902 97-100, or a trifle less than one cent per 
foot ; thereby making the total cost of the wooden block pavements, as they stand to-day, $487,- 
315 47-100, or a fraction less than 27 cents per foot on the average. 

This shows a difference, within the same time, of $175,271 72-100 in favor of the wooden block 
pavements, over about an equal area of cobble — an amount, we think, sufficient to put all the 
wooden block pavements in the city in thorough repair; at any rate, our company will enter into 
such a contract with the city, and will furnish satisfactory bonds for the faithful performance of the 
same. And when once put in repair, we will contract to keep them in order, by replacing new 
wood for old, whenever necessary, at the average cost for repairing cobble pavements the past fiscal 
year. In other words, for the cost of rough cobble stones, the city may have permanently the 
smooth and even wooden block pavement. 

It is not denied, by those now engaged in laying wooden block pavements, that many of the 
early samples were laid with Oregon fir — a quality of lumber which has proved almost valueless for 
the purpose ; but the material now used — black heart redwood — is known to be durable, and the 
samples referred to in our advertisements, as seen in front of the City Hall and elsewhere, are cer- 
tainly fine specimens of pavement. 

After a careful examination into the municipal reports to ascertain the cost thus far incurred for 
street paving in this city, we are unable to discover any just cause for the alarm sounded by the 
late Mayor in his valedictory; but, on the contrary, we find cause for congratulation in reviewing 
the exact state of facts. If contrasted with other cities, the sum thus far expended by San Fran- 
cisco upon paved streets is certainly very small. 

Upon page 242 of the last municipal reports, there is a summary of all expenditures for street work 
of every kind since 1856; and it is there shown that the entire sum thus far expended on paved 
streets amounts to $1,091,214 31-100, which is only about one-third of the annual expenditure for 
the same purpose in Chicago, and is less than the amount expended last year in the city of Detroit 
on wooden block pavements alone. 

Of the $2,798,389 37-100 paid into the city treasury last year for taxes, the insignificant sum of 
$196,000 only was expended upon the streets for repairs, cleaning, etc. 

The truth is, San Francisco is behind the age in street improvements, and a more liberal policy 
should at once be inaugurated. There is not a street in the city well paved for three blocks cou- 
secutively. If you find one block well paved, the chances are the adjoining one will be in a dilapi- 
dated condition. 

The sooner our people learn that it is true economy to have their streets thoroughly and uni- 
i formly paved with the most comfortable and approved pavement, the sooner they will give evidence 
of the fact that they are trying to keep pace with the spirit of the age in which they live ; and when 
thus prepared the city should not hesitate to accept and maintain them in the same good condition 
in which they are delivered to her, because the aggregate amount required for said purpose will be 
found a small proportion of the annual tax receipts ; and certainly there can be no more deserving 
call upon the public purse, to benefit the tax payer, than that which goes to the maintenance of 
good thoroughfares, for the convenience and comfort of an active, busy population who are required 
to pass to and fro in the pursuit of their daily vocations. City Paving Company. 

Insurance Companies. 

There are seven insurance companies devoted to fire and marine risks, organized in this city, one 
of which, the Merchants Mutual Marine, attends to marine business only. The aggregate paid up 
capital is $3,152,250. During the past year three companies, the Pacific, Occidental.and Peoples.have 
gone into liquidation in consequence of the losses sustained by the Chicago conflagration, and two 
new companies, the State Investment and the Commercial, have commenced o] erations. In addi- 
tion to the home companies, there are twelve Eastern and seventeen foreign companies represented 
in this city by agents. There are thirty-six life insurance companies transacting business in Cali- 
'■ fornia, with agencies in this city, of which only two are home institutions — the California Mutual of 
his city, and the Pacific Mutual of Sacramento. 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street, White Gooda. 
2 



WATKINS' YO-SEMITE ART GALLERY, 26 Montg. St., opp. Lick House Entrance. 



26 SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



RAILROADS— PACIFIC COAST. 

The railroad system of the Pacific coast, as now projected, promises, when completed, to be one 
of the most valuable in the United States. That portion, in particular, which is comprised in Cali- 
fornia, has already been in large part constructed, and has done much to develop the agricultural 
capabilities of sections of the country that, from their remoteness from extensive markets, would 
not have paid to cultivate. The great valleys of the Sacramento and San Joaquin, extending par- 
allel to the coast, between the 35th and 41st degrees north latitude, are completely shut out from 
the East by the lofty Sierra Nevadas, and on the west, iD most part, by the lower but stilt rugged 
Coast Range. Two streams only, in this large tract of country — the Sacramento and San Joaquin 
rivers — admit of cheap water transportation for about two hundred miles north and south to the Pa- 
cific coast. These rivers are located in the centers of the vallies — a considerable portion of the lat- 
ter one being only navigable from four to six months each year, according to the fall of rain in the 
winter season. As a consequence, the high cost of freight by teams will not admit of profitable 
grain-growing, except in favored localities, and large tracts of arable land are only valuable for 
sheep and stock raising. The settlement of these portions of the State was for many years greatly 
retarded, so that the bulk of the population and property was concentrated in comparatively few 
localities. 

This state of things existed until the advent of the railroad-building era, which may be said to 
have commenced in 1863, and which, year by year since then, has been making great progress, 
bringing remote sections of the country into quick and profitable intercourse with San Francisco and 
other large domestic markets. Permanent population has thereby been spread into the more dis- 
tant portions of the State, the value of arable land largely increased, and a condition of general 
prosperity produced in places where formerly the herder of cattle was the onl}" inhabitant, and the 
live srock about the only taxable property to be found. 

The extension of railroads is also causing the development of large sections of mining country, 
where the presence of lead and other base metals, in combination with gold and silver, has hitherto 
made such mining often unprofitable. The result is the opening up of many old mines that have hith- 
erto been virtually abandoned, the discovery of new deposits of mineral through the stimulation of 
prospecting, and the extension of operations on such mines as have proved profitable to work under 
the heavy expense of team and pack-train transportation. At present the large amount of base bullion 
produced from the mining regions in Mono and Inyo counties has to be transported, in most part, 
by pack-trains to San Pedro, from whence it is brought by sea to San Francisco, to be refined or 
sold. The expense of this long land-carriage and subsequent water transportation is very great, 
and only admits of a f<iw of the richest mines being worked under such circumstances. When the 
San Joaquin Valley road, now in construction, is completed to Visalia, the transportation of this 
bullion will be transferred from San Pedro to the former place, and thence by cars to San Fran- 
cisco, saving at least one-half in expense, and enabling returns to be had within less than one-third 
the now usual time. 

Another feature that the present winter of 1871— '2 has developed, is the difficulties arising from 
the storms and the drifting of snow on some portions of the Union Pacific Railroad, thereby caus- 
ing that road to be blockaded for passenger transit for several weeks at a time, and showing it to be 
liable to such drawbacks during at least four months of each year. The consequence has been the 
detention of hundreds of passengers while in mid transit, who in many cases suffered from sick- 
lies-; nrought on by exposure and scarcity of suitable food. Also the detention and damage caused 
to hundreds of car-loads of valuable and perishable goods, which have in many instances been more 
than three months exposed to the inclemencies of the weather on their way across the continent. 
The detention of freight alone has resulted in great losses to importers on the Pacific coast, who de- 
pended upon quick and continuous rail facilities to keep up assortments of stock, while the forward- 
ing of teas and other foreign products to the Atlantic States by sea, via Panama, is tedious arnd un- 
satisfactory to shippers. 

The Central Pacific Railroad officers having become aware of the great liabilities of detention by 
the northern route in severe winters, have been using every energy in pressing forward the con- 
struction of the San Joaquin Valley Railroad, of which they are also owners. This road, which 
runs for a long distance south through the San Joaquin Valley, has comparatively few obstacles to 
overcome in its construction, and is being built at the rate of about half a mile daily. The mana- 
gers intend to push its construction well into the southeastern section of California, with the view 
of subsequently pressing it forward to connect with one of the two projected trans-continental roads, 
on the 35th or 32nd parallel, as may show the best proofs of early completion. By this means 
they will be assured of a secure route to the Mississippi Valley, even in the most severe winters, 
and also will thereby head off all probable opposition or competition in securing the trans-conti- 
nental traffic. 

The connection of the San Joaquin Valley road with the Central Pacific road is at a point callei 
Lathrop, about 18 miles south of Stockton, thence having connection with San Francisco Bay al 
Oakland. This latter place will thereby soon become the most important railroad terminus in thi 
State, the following roads ending there, viz.: The Central Pacific road, main line to the easte: 
boundary of the State, 293 miles ; the California and Oregon road, from the southern line of Oregoi 
ito Roseville Junction, about 200 miles ; the Northern California road, from Oroville to Marvsvilli 
£6 miles ; the Sacramento Valley and Plaeerville roads, from Shingle Springs to Sacramento, 4i 
miles ; the Stockton and Tulare road, from Visalia to Stockton, about 170 miles ; the Stockton anc 

TU'TINGTON, HOPKINS & CO., Agents Jeasop & Sons' Steel, Cor. Bush and Markcl 



C. P- VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Importers and Jobbers. 



RAILROADS. 27 



Copperopolis road, from Copperopolis to Stockton, 48 miles ; the San Joaquin Valley road, from 
Lathrop's to the southeastern boundary of California, probably 300 miles ; the San Jose branch of 
the Central Pacific road, from Niles Station to San Jose. 14 "miles ; and a road projected but yet 
unnamed, from Hollister to a point on the San Joaquin Valley road about 20 miles south of Visaiia, 
a distance of about :40 miles. These when completed will make a total of 1,250 miles of railway 
within the boundaries of California that will terminate at Oakland, or at Goat Island, in San Fran- 
cisco Bay, if the latter place can be obtained from the United States Government for that purpose. 

In addition to these roads, the main lines of the trans-continental road via Ogden, and its con- 
nections, the Oregon and California road in the former State, and the proposed 35th or 32nd parallel 
roads, from St. Louis or Texas, as the case may be, when completed will add at least 5,000 miles 
additional roads whose Pacific terminus will be in Oakland City. 

The second railroad terminus in the State promises to be located at Saucelito — a point on the 
western shore of the Bay, about five miles north of San Francisco. The plan, as contemplated by 
the projectors of this enterprise, is to have the following, built and projected railroads, end there, 
viz.: The present roads from Vallejo to Sacramento, Marysville and Calistoga are to be changed 
as follows : The lines of the two first roads are to be run from a point a little south of the present 
summit, near Bridgeport, Solano county, in a direct line to Saucelito, skirting mostly the shores of 
the Bay ; the Napa and Calistoga branch is to intersect the line at or near Suscol ; the North Pa- 
cific running from Donahue to Humboldt Bav, at a point below the former place, and the North 
Pacific Coast (narrow gauge) road, at San Rafael or Saucelito. By this combination the varied 
products of a large extent of country north of San Francisco can be transported almost directly to 
that city, or sent over the various lines of connecting roads to many points of the interior, when 
needed. The time of transit between San Francisco and Sacramento will be much shortened, the 
total distance being only 83 miles, with less than five miles water transportation. The deep water 
and bold shores at Saucelito will also admit of the building of comparatively inexpensive wharves, at 
whii h the largest vessels can load, sheltered in all directions from violent storms. This combination 
points to a virtual abandonment of Vallejo as a railroad shipping point, and, if carried out, will proba- 
bly cause the discontinuance of lines of steamers now running to San Rafael, Donahue and Suisun, and 
a portion of the lines to Vallejo, as freight and passengers can be forwarded by rail more quickly 
than by ether means. Should tiiis project be carried out to its promised completion, the result will 
be the building up of an extensive system of warehousing and shipping business at New Saucelito, 
where the roads terminate. 

Another railway terminus is in San Francisco, where the Southern Pacific road, now completed 
to Hollister, a distance of 100 miles, with a branch line of 20 miles to Watsonville, and also another 
branch line of 20 miles to Santa Cruz, will be built this year. How much further these lines — 
which belong to the same parties as the Central Pacific — will be extended in future is at present 
very uncertain, it being reported that the company have given up and abandoned the idea of con- 
structing the road over the mountains south of Hollister, on account of the ruggedness of the coun- 
try, which will involve a vast outlay without probable commensurate benefit. An addition to the 
foregoing is the Atlantic and Pacific Railroad, which is projected to be built from San Francisco 
along the coast southward to Salinas Valley, in Santa Cruz county, thence in a southeasterly direc- 
tion to that boundary of the State. This road will be a narrow gauge one, and has been surveyed, 
but as vet no actual work in its construction has been performed. 

The following railroads in California are now the property of the Central Pacific Railroad Com- 
pany, although running under their original names. This company have thus virtual control of the 
transportation of freights and passengers, they also owning the steamboats of the late California 
Steam Navigation Co. 

The Sacramento Valley Railroad was the first constructed in the State, and run from Sacramento to 
Folsom, on the American" River, a distance of 22 miles— the Sacramento Valley and Placerville Rail- 
road connecting with the foregoing and running to Shingle Springs, a distance of 26 miles. _ This lat- 
ter road was originally intended to be constructed to Placerville, some 12 miles further. It is reportea 
that the original intention will in time be carried out by the Central Pacific Railroad Company, who 
now own it, and will probably extend it some 20 miles further south, into a region of timber lands, 
(sugar-pine) therebv giving it an extensive and profitable down traffic. 

The Central Pacific Railroad Company, organized in 1861, whose original lines ran from Sacra- 
mento eastward, has since that date absorbed the Western Pacific, Alameda and Oakland railroads, 
making a continuous line from Oakland to Ogden, in Utah Territory, total distance 880 miles, with 
a branch from Niles Station to San Jose, 14 miles, and the Alameda Railroad, which has a separate 
line of rails from Alameda Point to Hay wards, a distance of 17 miles. 

The Southern Pacific Railroad — formerly known as the San Jose and San Francisco Railroad- 
is now completed from San Francisco to Hollister, a distance of 100 miles, with a spur road running 
from Gilroy to Pajaro, near Watsonville, a distance of 20 miles. This branch road is intended to 
be continued, during the present vear, 20 miles further, to the town of Santa Cruz, the people of that 
place having voted a subsidy for "that purpose. The continuation of the main line of the Southern 
Pacific Railroad across the' Coast Range of mountains into the San Joaquin Valley, and thence 
southward, is reported to be abandoned, the difficulties in the different lines of surveys showing 
that it can'only be accomplished at an immense cost, far more than commensurate with the probable 
advantages to be gained. In place of the Southern Pacific Koad, the Central Pacific Company have 
decided on devoting their energies to the speedy completion of the San Joaquin Valley Road, which 
can be built'at a much less cost, and will better accomplish their purpose. 



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28 SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



The California and Oregon Railroad, extending from Roseville Junction (18 miles from Sacra- 
mento) to the Oregon State Hue, is now completed to Red Bluffs, a distance of 115 miles. Surveys 
lnwe been made of the remaining distance, one of which it is reported has been adopted, and work 
will he continued vigorously during the present year. 

The San Joaquin Valley Railroad is now completed from Lathrop's Station (18 miles south of 
Stockton) to a point 30 miles beyond Merced City, to which place passenger trains are now run- 
ning. The construction of this road to Visalia is being pressed, the road being built at the rate of 
half a mile or more daily — the intention of the Company being to have the cars at Visalia by the 
1st of July, in order to remove the immense grain crops sown in anticipation of cheap transportation. 
The freight traffic on this road from Visalia promises in time to be the most important, consider- 
ing its length, of any line in the United States. Some portions of tins valley are well adapted to 
the production of cotton, rice, sugar and hemp, the former staple having been successfully and 
profitably raised in 1871 under all the disadvantages of a very dry season. The mineral resources 
ut Mono and Inyo count : es, that now have to be sent by pack train to San Pedro, and thence by 
sea to San Francisco, will also find transit via rail from Visalia. The wealth of this section of the 
State in base and precious metals is already said to be fully equal in importance to that of any other 
portion of California. What it will become when cheap transportation will be added to its other ad- 
vantages, time only can prove. The importance of this mineral region is estimated so highly by 
the Central Pacific Company that it is reported they will build a branch road across the Sierras 
from Visalia to Owens' Lake mines, a distance of about 75 miles in a straight line. 

The California Pacific Railroad, running from Vallejo to Sacramento — to Marysville and Calis- 
toga — has, during the past year, passed into the hands of the Central Pacific Railroad Company; 
and is virtually their property. The main line of this road from Vallejo to Sacramento is GO miles; 
to Murysville, via Davisville, 95 miles ; while the Napa Valley branch to Calistoga is 33 miles 
long. These lines of roads now center or rather end in Vallejo ; but if the plan of removing to 
Saucelito the termination of the roads in the peninsula north of San Francisco is carried out, they 
will leave Vallejo almost in her original isolation, doing simply a local bay business. 

The North Pacific and Humboldt Railroad, running from Donahue (on Petaluma Creek) north- 
ward to Humboldt. Bay, has been completed through Russian River Valley to Healdsburg, a dis- 
tance of 42 miles. The larger portion of the road bed to Cloverdale, 22 miles further, >ha- l>een 
graded and built, and it is expected to have trains running to the latter named place in June, 1372. 
The branch line running from Santa Rosa to North Bloomfield, a distance of 14 miles, has been 
partially completed, but work on the same has been temporarily suspended, owing to the time hav- 
ing expired for its construction to entitle the Company to receive subsidy bonds from the county. 
A bill to extend the time three months passed the Legislature, but was vetoed by the Governor of 
the State. This road, as before stated, will connect with a main line running from Sacramento to 
Saucelito. 

The Stockton and Copperopolis Railroad, running from Stockton to Milton, a distance of 48 
miles, has during the past year been purchased by the Central Pacific Railroad Company. This 
road was intended as a rival to the San Joaquin Valley Railroad, with the view of giving the trade 
of a large section of country to Stockton instead of passing south and west direct by the latter to 
San Francisco. This purpose has, however, been defeated by its sale, as it is probable that the 
line will, with view of economy in working, be diverted to some point on the San Joaquin Valley 
Railroad. 

An extension of the Central Pacific Railroad has been surveyed and partially constructed from 
Banta Station near the San Joaquin River to Antioch on Suisun Bay, and thence via San Pablo 
Pass to Oakland, which, when completed, will not only shorten the distance some 20 miles between 
Stockton and Oakland, but will admit of greater economy in working, owing to its lighter grades. 
The extension will also tap the trade of a very populous and productive section of country that is 
now supplied with inconvenient transportation to San Francisco. 

All the foregoing roads are now the property of the Central Pacific Railroad Company, although 
in some cases carried on in their original names — yet all having the same individuals as officers. 
The other Railroads in the State are as follows : 

The California Northern Railroad, running from Marysville to Oroville, a distance of 2G miles. 
This road when first built was intended to form a portion of the line through Beckwith Pass into 
the northern portion of Nevada, and probably thence eastward to some point of connection with the 
Union Pacific Railroad — thus forming a second and rival line of railway across the western portion 
of the continent. The sale of the California Pacific Railroan^ with which it made its connection 
with tide water, has now isolated the California Northern Railroad, and confines its scope of action 
to the small local traffic along its immediate line of road. 

The San Pedro and Los Angeles Railroad runs from Wilmington on the sea-coast to Los An- 
geles, a distance of 21 miles. This road is at present valuable for the local traffic only, but its 
extension into San Bernardino county is intended, which will largely increase its importance and 
open up a section of country which, owing to high cost of transportation, is at present of compara- 
tively little value for agricultural purposes. The extension of tin- road (rill also prove valuable to 
the trade of Arizona Territory, which now procures its supplies mostly overland through Sao Diego 
and Fort Yuma. 

The Pittsbnrg and Black Diamond are two railroads, each 7 miles long, used entirely for the 
transportation of coal from the mines around Mount Diablo, both terminating at landings on Suisun 
Bay, named respectively Pittsburg Landing and New York of the Pacific. The San Rafael and 



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METEOROLOGICAL OBSERVATIONS. 29 



San Quontin Railroad is three and a half miles long, and connects the former place with a ferry to 
San Francisco. 

The North Pacific Coast Railroad Company has been incorporated for the purpose of constructing a 
narrow gauge railroad from San Rafael via Tomales to the mouth of Walhalla River, in the north- 
ern portion of Sonoma county. The people of Marin county have voted a subsidy to this road, 
and the surveys and preliminary work of construction has been already commenced. This road 
when built will open up an outlet for a large lumber region on the coast "that is by sea almost inac- 
cessible during several months in the year. 

The Atlantic and Pacific Railroad Company has been formed by Boston capitalists with the in- 
tention of constructing a line of narrow gauge road along the coast of California to the southern 
part of the State. The initial point of this road commences at San Francisco — the line being 
along the coast in San Francisco, San Mateo and Santa Cruz counties to Salinas Valley. It runs 
up this valley and in the interior until it again strikes the coast in San Luis Obispo county; thence 
to Santa Barbara via Foxen Canon, and down the coast again to San Buenaventura. From thence 
two lines of survey have been run, neither of which has yet been accepte I by the Company. One 
line goes through the San Fernando Pass to Los Angeles ; thence to San Bernardino anil to the 
Colorado river, with a branch line from San Bernardino to San Diego. The other line runs from 
San Buenaventura through Soledad Pass to the Mohave river, via the "Needles," its termination 
being about 15 or 20 miles below Fort Mohave. 

•Meteorological Observations made at San Francisco from January, 1850, to 

December, 1871. 

BT HENRY GIBBONS, M. D. 

In the following tables the reader will find, in a condensed form the results of twenty years' dili- 
gent observation of the climate of San Francisco, with more particular reference to rain. A single 
glance at the rain tables will present the quantity of rain which has fallen in each month since 1850, 
the quantity in each season; the quantity before and after the end of the year; th<> date of the 
beginning and ending of each rainy season, and the date of the first and last scattering rains. The 
following are some of the deductions presented by this record : 

Rain lias fallen in every month of the year. In July it has rained only in one year; August has 
furnished rain in four years ; June in six years ; September in seven years ; October in eleven years. 
No account is made of a mere sprinkle, nor of the deposit of Summer mist. The greatest quantity 
of mist which ever falls in twenty-four hours is about three-hundredths of an inch. But this 
quantity is very rare. Near the ocean the mist is much more copious. 

The driest season was 1850-51, which gave only seven inches. Next to that was 1863-4, with 
eight and one-half inches. The winter of 1867-8 gave the most rain — forty inches. The average 
is between twenty-one and twenty-two inches. 

The earliest setting in of the rainy season was November 1st; the latest, January 12th. An 
early beginning and an abundant supply arc apt to go together, but there is no rule in this respect. 
The latest beginnings have been followed by an average supply. 

The average date of the beginning of the rainy season is November 28th; of the termination, 
April 10th. March is as certain to bring rain in liberal amount as any other month. In one year 
out of every three there is no rain of importance after March. The last showers of the season 
come, with remarkable uniformity, about the third week of May. 

The middle of January is the average dividing point of the rainy season. The mean quantity 
before January 1st is about equal to the mean quantity after January 31st. 

December gives the greatest average quantity ; January is not far behind ; February, March and 
November come next, and are nearly alike ; then April, May and October in the order named. 

The greatest amount of rain in any one month was in January, 1862, when there fell the enor- 
mous quantity of eighteen inches. 

It is worthy of note that in the driest seasons there has been an abundant supply for agricultural 
purposes, had it been distributed evenly. Three inches in December, with one inch in each of the 
four following months would answer all purposes. 

The rain-table of San Francisco may be made the basis for estimating the fall in other parts of 
the State. The mountains of the north have from two to three times as much, and the southern 
section of the State about half as much, or even less in some localities. The valley of the Sacra- 
mento has nearly the same quantity as Sau Francisco ; that of the San Joaquin one-fourth or one- 
third less, the quantity diminishing southward. 

Bv reference to the tables showing the extremes of heat and cold, it appears that the coldest 
weather was in January, 1854, when the mercury fell to 25<>. At that time the mud in the streets 
was frozen solid, and the shallow ponds were covered with ice strong enough for boys to skate on. 
But such weather is extremely rare, though since that time the ground has been frozen several 
times so as not to thaw fully in the shade for a day or two. The coldest noonday embraced in the 
record was 37°. Often the entire winter pis-es by without bringing the thermometer so low as the 
freezing point. In 1853 it fell at no time below 40<>. 

The extreme of heat was on the 10th and 11th of September, 1852, when the thermometer 
reached 97o and 9S<> on the two days respectively. This, however, was entirely exceptional, and 
might not occur again in half a century. The air was dry as a sirocco, and caused the woodwork 
of houses to crackle and the plaster to break on the wooden walls. 



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30 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



With the exception just noted, the hottest day on record was 93<> on the 6th day of July, 1867. 
In October, 1864, and in September, 1865, it reached 91°, and in July, 1855, it reached 90°. Thus 
it appears that there were only six days in twenty years when he thermometer rose as high as 90°. 

The table of mean temperature shows that our summer does not come till the summer months have 
passed by. September is the warmest month in the year, and October riext; then comes August; 
July, the hottest month elsewhere, is the fourth here, or ranks with June; next come April and May; 
then March and November ; then February, and finally January and December, which are the only 
winter months, if indeed we have any weather that deserves the name of winter. 

Twice the ground has been covered with snow. On the 29th of December, 1856, it snowed very 
fast for several hours, and two or three inches gathered, but it melted before night. On the 12th of 
January, 1868, it snowed fast before day, so that two inches collected. But it disappeared before 
sunrise, so that but few persons enjoyed the rare spectacle. 

The extraordinary evenness of the climate depends on the adjacent ocean, the water of which, 
flowing in a current from the north, is always at a temperature of about 50°, summer and winter. 
The sea breeze of Summer, which chills the air at noonday, leaves no place for hot nights. There 
is not, on an average, one night in the year, when it is warm enough to sit out of doors at midnight 
with thin clothing. 

Table I. — Showing the amount of Bain in each Month since 1850 ; and the Total Amount in each 
Rainy Season. Note. — Each Column represents one Rainy Season. 



Aug.. 
Sept . 
Oct .. 
Nov. . 
Uec. . 



Jan... 
Feb. . 
Mar'h 
April. 
May.. 
June. 
Jul v.. 



•61. 



■52. 



1 
1.0 

.2 

2.2 5.3 
7.1 11.9 



'53. I '54. 



'62. 

6 

.1 

6.4 

.2 
.3 



'53. I '54. 



4.3 
8.4 
3.2 
3.3 
.1 
.1 



'65. 

4.5 
4 6 
4,3 
5.6 
2.2 



'55. 



'56. 

S.4 

.5 

1.6 

3.2 



•57. '58. 



.1 
.5 

2.9 
4.0 

'57. 

2.1 
8.6 
1.6 

".'i 
.1 



.9 
3.0 

4.2 

•58. 

4.4 
1.8 
3.9 
1.1 
.1 
.1 



3.4 

.5 

4.8 

•59. 

1.0 
5.2 

2.5 

.3 

2.0 



59. '60 



5.4 
1.5 



'60. I '61. 



'61. 



r,2. 



1.2 18.1 



•62. '63 



.1 2.5 
2.7 1.7 



'63. j'64 '65 



3.3 1.3 

3.3 .. 

2.4 1.4 
2.9 9 

.4 .5 



'05. 



3.9 11.0 
.81 1.5 

.6) 2.6 

.7 .1 

.4 1.8 

.... .2 



2 
13.1 12. 



'07. 



'07. 



'69. - 70. '71. 



_ 2.34| 

1.2 1.24| 49 

4.3 4.50 3.04 



'69. 

9.6 6.4 

6.21 4.0 

6.4 3.2 

2.2 2.2 

... .1 



'70 



71. 



3.76 2.34 
4.53;3.55 
1.841.24 
1.49 2.05 
0.361 31 



.04 

.13 

2.27 

13.40 

.'72. 

6.50 

7.90 



Total. 18.2 33.5 23.0 24.1 21.2 20.0 19.0 19.8 17.1 14.6 38.0 15 2 8 5 21.3 21.2 32.040.5 21.6 20.08 13.03 
1850— Nov., 1.3; Dec, 1.1 1851 — Jan., 0.6; Feb.,0.4; March, 1.9; April, 1.1; May, .7 Total, 7.1 



Table II. — Date of the First a/id Last Rains, and of the Beginning and Ending of each Rainy Season . 
a/so, the Amount of Rain which Fell before the End of the Year, and the Amount after the End of 
the Year, in each Season, since 1850. 





First 


Last 


Rainy Season. 


Before 


Afr 1 




First 


Last 


Rainy Season. 


Before 


Afr 




Rain. 


Rain. 




Jan. 


Dec. 




Rain. 


Rain. 




Jau. 


Dec. 




Begins. 


Ends. 




Begins.] Ends. 


1350-1 Nov. 10 


Mav 20 Dec. 5 


May 1 


2.4 


4.7 


1860-1 <>C. 4i May 22 Dec. 6: April 5 


6.0 


8.6 


1851-2 Sept. 


May 17 Dec. 19 


Mar. 31 10.5 


7.7 


1861-2NOV. l;May 12 Nov. 10 April 14 


9.9 


28.1 


1852-3 Oct. 2S 


May 12 Nov. 9 


April 29 18.0 


15.5 


1862-3 Nov. 5 May 19 Dec. 18 April 20 


2.9 


12.3 


18o3-4 : Sept. 15 


April 28 Jan. 12 


April 28l 3.6 


19.4 


1863-4 Sept. 19j May 17 Nov. II 1 April 4 


4.4 


4.1 


1854-5 Oct. 4 


May 20 Dec. 31 


April 17 


2.9 


21.2 ! 


1864-5!Nov. 15 May 19 Nov. 23 March 4 


14.9 


6.4 


1855-6 Nov. 10 


May 25 Nov. 10 


April 14 


6.6 


14.6 


IS05-0 Sept. 24| June 8 Nov. 13 Mar. 31 


4.0 


17.2 


1856-7! Sept. pi 


Mar. 31 Nov. 15 


Mar. 31 


7.5 


12.5 


1866-7 Nov. 3 May 17 Nov. 10 April 12 


15.8 


16.4 


1857-8 Oct. 6 


Mav 21 Nov. 24 


April 7 


8.1 


10.9 


1867-8 Sept. 14 June 23 Nov. 19 April 13 


15.9 


24.6 


1858-9: Oct. 21 


May 22 Dec. 4 


April 10 


8.8 


11.0 


(868-9 Oct. 1 May 19 Dec. 17!Mar. 29 


5.7 


15.9 


"5b-60jNov. 9 


May 22 Nov. 9 


April 8 


6.9 


10.2 1 


'69-70iSept, 1 May 19 Dec. 7 April 11 
11870-1 Nov. 4, May 28 .Dec. 2 April 17 


8.1 
3.50 


12.0 
9.30 


1 


' 






' 


Mean I 'Nov. 28'April 10 


8.0 


13.6 



Table III. — Maximum Quantity of Bain in each Month, Minimum Quantity in each Month, and 
Average Quantity in each Month, since 1850. 





Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April. 


May. 


June J July. 


Aug. 

0.2 

0.0 

.01 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 




18.1 
0.6 
4.8 


8.6 
0.0 
3.3 


6.4 
0.6 
3.0 


5.6 
0.0 
1.7 


2.0 
0.6 
.50 


0.2 1 0.3 

0.0 0.0 

.04| -01 


1.0 

0.0 

.05 


3 4 
0.0 
.37 


7.6 
0.1 
2.4 


13.4 




04 




5.0 



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METEOROLOGICAL OBSERVATIONS 



31 



Table IV. — Mean Temperature of each Month, since 1850, deduced from Two Daily Observations, 
One at Sunrise, ike other at Noon ; also, the Mean Temperature of each Year. 



'51. '52. '53. '54. *55. '56. '57. '58. '59. I '60 



•61. '62. '63. I '64. '65. 



"69. '70. 



January .... 
February.. . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September. . 

October 

November. . 
December. . 

Mean. . .. 



49-3 
51.1 

53.8 
57.7 
57.0155. 

58.8 60 
57.9[61, 
63.2 61. 
61.6 63. 

61.9 58 
56.3J53 
51.3j50 



52.0 
54.1 
55.9 
58.3 
60.7 
61.9 
60.3 
60.0 
62.7 
62.7 
.5 57.0 
.8152.1 



48.2151 
53.6156 
54.1 59 
59.8 5; 
56.8 57 
5S.5 ! 59 
61 3 61 
60.3 62 
60.5 ! 62 
60.7J61 
58.0 52 
53.8J47 



.0 48.8 

.8 53.7 

. 4 ' 55 . 9 

55.9 

.7156.2 

.9159. 1 

.2 59.4 

59.6 

61.5 

57.6 

53.3 

47.0 



51.2 
51.4 
55.9 

58.8 55. 
57.5 57 
60.9 ! 5S. 
59. 2 i 60. 
59.H61 
60.8162. 
61.6157. 
54.5 54 
59.5 44. 



3 46.5 47 
1 48 . 8 i 50 
49.0 53. 
7 53.6 53 
6 57.2:54 
7'61.557 
7159. 361 
9J61.162 

4 61.4 62 
8,59.7|56 
53.5 52 
8J46.3 49 



58, 
58 
1 Hi 
56 
54 
2'51 



5 47 

1 46 
7 50. 
l!51 
5 1 55 

6 61 
5;61 
9,62 

3:61 

u .;:; 

2 5i; 
7149 



6 57.7J52.5 

7 50.9 55.9 

2 57.8 55.6 

3 55.7 57.9 
5 57.6 58.9 

2 58.2 58.3 
7 59.7 57 6 
61.1 60.6 

3 03.6 60.3 
3 62.2 59.6 
2 57.3 56.0 
5 53.7 51.0 



49.4 49 
51.053 
53.354 
55.5,58 
62.058 
61.262 
61.159 
60.0 59 
63 3 62 
58.7 62 
57.656 
47.2 54 



0!51.2 
4 52.0 
3 50.5 
4:57.5 

58.3 
11 r,n. •• 
03.2 
60.4: 
1161.3 
58.2! 

6 56.7! 

7 55.3 



45.9 61.2 52.5 
61.961.263.5 
53. 5 1 57. 4 61.6 
55.3 56.5 54.8 
58 58.5 68 1 
58.0 60.0 58 I 
59.6 60.2 62.4 
59.8 59. tl '4.3 
59.3 60.0 61.5 
60.8,60.6i5S.O 
57.2 56.4 55.4 
53.2 50 7:51.0 



56.6156.5158.1 57.1.57.6 55. 7 1 57 . , 55 . 4 [ 54 . 8,55.1i55.4|55. 5 57. 5'57. 0.56. 757. 4:57.1.56.1 56.9 56.8 



Table V. — Extremes of Heat in each Month since 1850 ; also, in each Year. 





'51. 


•52. 


'53. 
62 


*54. 
69 


'55. 
72 


'56. 
60 


'57. 
67 


'53. 
62 


'59. 
65 


'60. 
62 


•61. 

60 


'62. 
62 


'63. 
63 


*64. 

70 


'65. 
63 


'66. 

61 


'67. 
61 


'68. 
"58 


'69. 
64 


'70. 

69 ] 


January.. 


64 


64 


February. 


71 


65 


67 


69 


72 


70 


68 


70 


65 


74 


61 


58 


64 


73 


65 


70 


64 


68 


69 


7D 


March .... 


74 


SI 


77 


72 


78 


80 


74 


73 


70 


75 


82 


72 


79 


74 


71 


69 


65 


70 


72 


67 




84 


82 


75 


83 


78 


69 


81 


80 


80 


83 


79 


75 


82 


84 


75 


88 


85 


75 


70 


™ 




71 


67 


81 


73 


83 


69 


75 


87 


85 


73 


76 


76 


78 


75 


87 


79 


87 


86 


86 


87 


June 


78 


80 


87 


74 


82 


74 


87 


77 


85 


74 


76 


79 


78 


70 


87 


85 


86 


72 


72 


74 


July .... 


73 


79 


78 


84 


90 


78 


72 


86 


82 


82 


78 


86 


72 


70 


79 


76 


93 


75 


74 


83 | 


August. . . 


82 


76 


76 


85 


79 


80 


S3 


73 


80 


86 


76 


87 


82 


78 


75 


75 


73 


75 





SO 


Sept'mb'r 


(O 


98 


88 


87 


84 


85 


88 


88 


87 


83 


76 


84 


82 


86 


91 


1 1 


88 


70 


85 


78 


October.. 


83 


78 


85 


83 


79 


79 


83 


79 


89 


79 


83 


84 


87 


91 


80 


80 


79 


85 


85 


76 


Novenib'r 


73 


80 


73 


72 


67 


74 


7^ 


73 


71 


70 


69 


70 


72 


72 


76 


72 


70 


75 


73 


72 


December 


61 


63 


69 


71 


61 


58 


60 


59 


63 


61 


63 


64 


69 


63 


60 


64 


66 


63 


64 


62 


Year. . 


84 


98 


88 


87 


90 


85 


88 


88 


89 


88 


83 


87 


87 


91 


91 


88 


93 


86 


■86 


87 



Table VI. — Extremes of Cold in each Month since 1850; also, in each Year. 





'51 


'52. 


'53. 


'54. 


'55. 


'56. 


'57. 


'58. 


'59. 


'60. 


'61. 


'62. 


'63. 


'64. 


'65. 


'66. 
3S 


'67. 
37 


'68. 
32 


'69. 
35 


'70. 1 
36 1 


January . . 


30 


35 


41 


25 


33 


33 


32 


30 


30 


31 1 29 


29 


40 


38 


a5 


February. 


33 


40 


42 


38 


41 


40 


31 


30 


34 


32 i 38 


34 


38 


43 


33 


42 


37 


31 


36 


38 


March . . . 


34 


36 


41 


38 


44 


41 


41 


36 


35 


.37 


37 


37 


44 


44 


36 


42 


38 


38 


44 


38 




42 


37 


46 


45 


40 


40 


44 


38 


34 


39 


40 


36 


43 


40 


40 


45 


42 


42 


43 


39 


May 


45 


41 


47 


43 


44 


43 


43 


40 


39 


39 


43 


38 


44 


47 


46 


43 


47 


44 


47 


4b 


June 


49 


49 


50 


47 


49 


46 


50 


44 


45 


45 


49 


49 


50 


48 


49 


49 


48 


45 


48 


i< 


July 


47 


49 


51 


46 


51 


48 


50 


48 


48 


48 


49 


49 


50 


48 


50 


49 


52 


46 


52 


53 


August. . 


50 


49 


51 


50 


53 


49 


50 


49 


48 


50 


47 


49 


51 


48 


50 


50 


51 


49 


48 


56 ] 


Sept'mb'r 


50 


45 


50 


46 


50 


51 


51 


44 


43 


47 


47 


42 


53 


48 


47 


50 


50 


49 


48 


54 


October.. 


47 


4-i 


49 


46 


51 


41 


45 


36 


38 


40 


40 


50 


42 


47 


47 


49 


41 


4b 


45 


42 


Novenib'r 


4! 


40 


44 


47 


42 


40 


31 


34 


36 


39 


35 


44 


43 


42 


44 


44 


44 


45 


36 


40 


December 


35 


36 


40 


38 


29 


35 


34 


27 


32 


32 


35 


33 


40 


38 


27 


42 


39 


41 


28 


32 


Year .. . 


30 


35 


40 


25 


29 


33 


31 


27 


30 


31 


29 


29 


38 


38 


27 


38 


37 


31 


28 


32 



Real Estate. — The following figures taken from the San Francisco Real Estate Circular, show 
the number and value of the real estate sales made in the City and County of San Francisco during 
the year ending December 31st, 1871 : Jauuarv, 362 sales, value $1,084,154 ; February, 339. $97b, 
601; March, 344. $1,289,8 J6 ; April, 325, $l"O05,844; May, 293, $1,204,640; June, 247, $678,- 
671; Julv, 269, $958,424 ; August. 305, $1,307,725 ; September, 318, $880,386 ; October, 416, $1,- 
234,192 ; November, 423. $1,031,216; December, 375. $1,066,133. Total sales for the year, 4,016. 
Value, $12,717,792. The total sales effected in 1871, show a reduction, when compared with the 
transactions of 1870, of 661 in number and $2,912,480 in amount. A comparison of the sales of 
1871 with those of 1869 also shows a reduction in last year's transactions of 2,892 in number and 
$17,219,925 in value. 

Streets and Hcghwats.— In this department of the City Government the amount expended 
for the year ending June 30th, 1871, is $843,415, of which $373,510 was for grading. The total 
length of streets within the city is over one hundred miles, of which sixty-eight miles are paved or 
planked. The total length of sewerage is fifty-seven miles. The aggregate amount expended from 
July 1st, 1856 to June 30th, 1871, is $10,599,256.75. 

Mortality— San Francisco, 1870-71. 
The Report of the Health Officer for the year ending June 30th, 1871, places the number of deaths 
as follows : Males, 2,075 ; females, 1,139 ; total, 3,214— of which 2,872 were white persons, ' 
total deaths during the year 1869 was 4,093 ; 1870, 3,243. 



The 



JONES, PULLMAN' & CO., 116 Sansom Street, General Stock of small Wares. 



Tiews of any part ofthe Coast made by WATKINS, 26 Montg., opp. Lick House entrance. 



CHRONOLOGICAL HISTORY OF CURRENT EVENTS, 



From December 6th, 1870, to September 22d, 1871. 



December 6, 1870. The telegraph station on 
Telegraph Hill, a relic of Forty-Nine, demolished 
daring a gale. 

Dec. 8. A fire at 515 Market Street ; loss $10,- 

0(H) Col. A. W. Von Schmidt receives $75,000 

in currency for blowing up Blossom Rock. 

Dec. 11. Amelia Morales dies in the County 
Hospital, of erysipelas, produced by a bite on the 

linger inflicted by a woman a few days previous 

Peter Bowe killed by falling down a flight of stairs 

George Black fatally injured by falling from 

Howard Street wharf. 

Dec. 14. Edward Matthews drowned in the bay 
A man named Wood6 dies suddenly in a saloon. 

Dec. 15. Seven vagrants sentenced for niuety 
days to hard labor on the public works. 

Dec 16. Unusually cold weather and heavy frost 

Helen A. Moslay sues Morris S. Galvin for $20,- 

000 damages for breach of promise of marriage. 

Dec. 17. Charles B. Traf'ton, taken suddenly ill 
while riding in a car, dies before reaching his resi- 
dence. 

Dec. 18. Dr. Amos H. Titcomb, a pioneer Cali- 
fornian, dies, aged 42 years. 

Dec. 20. Henry Blohm falls dead in the street 

The steamship Japan collides with the ships 

Marmiou and Caroline, doing considerable damage 

John S.Tyler, who killed James Dobsou in a 

street light, is acquitted. 

Dec. 21. The anniversary of the landing of the 
Pilgrims on Plymouth Rock celebrated by literary 

and social exercises A large and enthusiastic 

meeting of French citizens held to receive the re- 
port of the Committee to solicit subscriptions in aid 

of the widows and orphans of French soldiers 

James Kiernan dies suddenly. 

Dec. 23. The hark Nicholas Biddle collides with 
the bark Nuevo Brignardello. doing some damage. 

Dec. 24. A fire at 19 Perry Street destroys 

two small buildings The steamer Thoroughfare 

launched. 

Dec. 25. The Chinese Mission Institute, corner 
oi Washington and Stone streets, dedicated, with 
appropriate exercises A man named Massett at- 
tempts suicide by shooting himself in the mouth 

Walter Scott Poore, a pioneer and highly respected 
citizen, dies, aged 35 years. 

Dec. 26. Kannavan and Maxwell, two pedestri- 
ans, on their return from a walking match, are es- 
corted through the principal streets, and a collection 
taken up for the benefit of the Orphan Asylums, 

amounting to about $2,000 Col. J. Newton Mc- 

Elroy, who served with distinction in the Union 
Army, dies, aged 33 years. 

Dec. 27. Robert Biber sentenced to eighteen 
months in State Prison and $1,000 fine for debasing 
gold coin. 

Dec. 28. Walter B. Turner dies suddenly. 

Dec. 29. J. J. Gossens commits suicide Milk- 

mens' Union organized. 

Dec. 31. Edward J. Murphy mortally shot by 
Dennis Gnnn. 

January 1, 1871. John Lynton attempts suicide 



by cutting his throat Mrs. John H. Tobin fatally 

injured by being thrown from a buggy, on the Cliff 
House Road. 

Jan. 2. The eighth anniversary of the Emanci- 
pation Proclamation celebrated by the colored res- 
idents The body of Joseph F. Dodge found float- 
ing in the bay Alfred Reidinger commits suicide. 

Jan. 3. The first National Gold Bank of San 
Francisco commences operations. 

Jan. 4. Dr. Isaac Rowell, a highly esteemed 
physician and pioneer Californian, dies, aged 53 
years The El Progreso makes its first appearance. 

Jan. 6. Henry B. Dexter dies suddenly. 

Jan. 7. Capt. James MeElrov, a pioneer resident 
and a prominent member of the Police force, dies, 

aged 46 years The steamer Pelican disabled by 

running on a rock off Point Bonita. 

Jan. 8. George Hersee dies in the County Hos- 
pital from the effect of wounds inflicted by himself. 

Jan. 11. George T. Russell sues the Chronicle 
and News Letter for $15,000, each, for alleged libel. 

Charles McCann, formerly Assistant Engineer 

of the S. F. Fire Department, dies. 

Jan. 12. A billiard match between Joseph Dion 
and John Deery, for $1,000 results in favor of the 
former. 

Jan. 13. The Russian New Year celebrated by 
the residents of that nationality. 

Jan. 14. The aerial steamer successfully tested 

by an ascension at the City Gardens A fire on 

the corner of Sutter and Taylor streets ; damage, 
$3,000. 

Jan. 15. A. C. Benham drops dead from the 
bursting of a blood vessel. 

Jan. 17. Several Japanese officials arrive. 

Jan. 18. J. A. Bergner, who sued Oliver Dale 
for enticing away his wife, awarded $i!,500 dam- 
ages. 

Jan. 19. William Hooper, a pioneer Califoraian 
and highly esteemed citizen, dies, aged 63 years.... 
Charles Widergren found dead in a cellarway. 

Jan. 21. Orrin Pulsifer fatally injured 'by falling 

from the roof of a house The Japanese Embassy 

visit the Navy Y'ard, receiving a salute of fifteen 

guns A brevverv belonging to Joseph Albrecht 

seized by the U. S. Marshal for non-compliance with 
the Internal Revenue Law. 

Jan. 22. John Gibbous fatally injured by falling 
down a flight of stairs. 

Jan. 23. Two hundred barrels of beet smjar ar- 
rive from the factory at Alvarado Mrs. Rebecca 

Cash man commits suicide by severing an artery. 

Jan. 21. Margaret Ryan dies of starvation 

Eugene McNally fatally injured by tailing down a 
flight of stairs. 

Jan. 25. Three persons arrested, charged with 

selling lottery tickets John E. Johnson commits 

suicide in Hamilton Square The California Wo- 
man's State Suffrage Convention meet at Dashaway 
Hall. 

Jan. 26. A billiard match between John Deery 
and Joseph Dion for $500 a side, results in favor of 
the former. 



if UNTIN GTON", HOPKINS & CO., Agents Jessop & Sons' Steel, Cor. Bush and Market. 



C. P. VA1NT SCUAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Smokers' Articles. 



CHRONOLOGICAL HISTORY. 



83 



Jan. 28. News received of the capitulation of 
Paris, causing intense excitement... John Short, Jr., 
drops deaii from apoplexy. 

Jan. 29. Mrs. Ellen Brown dies suddenly from 

apoplexy Commodore Selim E. Woodworth, 

who served with distinction in the U. S. Navy during 

the late war, dies, aged 55 years Mrs. Dennison 

dangerously shot during a fracas among some visit- 
ors at her house Captain John Hanna, Jr., a well 

known merchant of this city and an officer of the 
Second Regiment California Volunteers, daring the 
late war, dies at Honolulu, S. I., aged 34 ye;irs. 

Jan. 30. Enthnsiatsic rejoicing and procession of 
the German residents over the news of the capitula- 
tion of Paris. 

Jan. 31. A large numher of birds pass over the 
western portion of the city, almost darkening the 

Bkies The sloop Eliza totally wrecked at Point 

Lobos. 

February 2. The United States Court Building 
Bet on lire in two places ; damage slight. 

Feb. 3. David McGrath dangerously shot by 

James Murphy John G. Bray, a pioneer and 

highly esteemed merchant of this city, dies at Santa 

Clara, Cal., aged 58 years A. C. Bothemce 

killed by being run over by a car John Goss 

killed by falling down a well Major Samuel A. 

Foster, U. S. A., who served with distinction during 
the late war, dies, aged 30 years. 

Feb. -1. F. E. YVeygant, a well-known hotel 

proprietor, dies suddenly, aged 59 years Casimir 

Winter commits suicide. 

Feb. 5. Daniel Kelly dangerously stabbed by a 
Mexican "William H.Conrad drowned in the hay. 

Feb. fi. George Linden dies suddenly A slight 

earthquake shock The will of Charles J. E. Fahl- 

Bten, bequeathing to the Protestant Orphan Asylum, 
Roman Catholic Orphan Asylum and Ladies' Pro- 
tection Relief Society $5,(101) each, filed for pro- 
bate Thomas J. Haynes, a pioneer merchant, 

dies, aged -10 years. 

Feb. 7. The surviving officers and crew of the 
U. S. steamer S:i;_dnaw arrive. 

Feb. 8. J. G. Corson, formerly Assistant Engi- 
neer of the S. F. Fire Department, dies at Vallejo, 
Cal. 

Feb. 9. George E. Clifford commits suicide 

A slight earthquake shock A billiard match be- 
tween John 1 leery and Joseph Dion, for $500 a 
side, results in favor of the former The Hist an- 
nual meeting of the Ornithological and Piscatorial 
Acclimatizing Society held. 

Feb. 11. The body of Fanny Hirsch, a suicide, 
found floating in the bay. 

Feb. 12. The new hall of the Ancient Jewish 
Order, Kesher Shel Barsel, dedicated. 

Feb. 14. At a large and enthusiastic meeting 
held for the relief of the suffering French, $11,561 

was contributed Robert Rourke fatally injured 

by striking his head against the timber over a gate. 

Feb. 1 1»7 Several Japanese officials of high rank 
arrive in the steamer Great Republic L. Bern- 
hard dies suddenly A dispatch of 2,770 words 

sent to New York direct, over the Western Union 
Telegraph wires, in two hours and five minutes. 

Feb. 17. George L. Israel commits suicide 

John H. Moran, who came to California with Col. 
Stevenson's regiment, dies, aged 45 years. 

Feb. 18. Chinese New Year celehrated with the 
usual ceremonies. 

Feb. 19. Francis Daley, Jr., drowned at Bay 
View. 

Feb. 20. Afire at 918 Jackson Street, destroy- 
ing a frame dwelling house and contents A ter- 
rific storm prevails, during which the wall of a 
brick building on Minna Street is blown down, 
crushing through the roof of an adjoining dwelling 
and kdling five of the occupants. In other portions 
of the city several buildings and fences are blown 



down, and many trees nprooted The fire alarm 

hells rung by atmospheric electricity. 

Feb. 21. A fire at 805 Market Street, destroying 
two frame buildings A slight fall of s'low. 

Feb. 22. The anniversary of the birth of AVash- 
ington celebrated by a military parade The Lin- 
coln School House partially destroyed by tire; loss 
ahout $20,000. 

Feb. 23. The topographical survey and maps of 
the City Park completed and accepted by the Com- 
missioners David V. Gerald, a prominent law- 
yer, dies, aged 30 years Frederick Ruppin com- 
mits suicide. 

Feb. 21. News received of the signing of a treaty 

of peace between Germany and France The ship 

Galatea and schooner Lovett Peacock collide, doing 

some damage The U. S. war steamer Nyack 

arri ves. 

Feb. 25. Mrs. Laura D. Fair arraigned in the 
Fifteenth District Court ami pleaded not guilty. 

John Wallace fatally injured by falling down a 

hatch on the steamer Constitution The skeleton 

of a man found in the sand near Lake Merced. 

March 1. St. David's Day celehrated by the 
Cambrian Mutual Aid Society. 

March 3. Emma Thompson found dead in her 
store B. Schroder found dead in his bed. 

March 5. The Metropolitan Gas Company in- 
corporated The first, anniversary of the organiza- 
tion of St. John's Church celehrated. 

March 7. William Parker, a pioneer boatman, 
drowned. 

March 9. The ship Annie M. Small seized by 
the United States authorities for violation of the 
Revenue Law Peter Hermann drops dead. 

March 10. Gold discoveries in a hill near Black 
Point, causing some excitement. 

March 11. Mary McCarthy commits suicide. 

March 12. Horace Hawes, a prominent lawyer 
and ex-State Senator, author of the Registry Law 
and San Francisco Consolidation Act, dies, aged 59 
years. 

March 13. Grocers' Protective Union organized. 

March 15. A billiard match between Joseph 
Dion and A. P. Rudolphe, for $1,000 a side, results 
in favor of the former. 

March 16. The libel suit of Susan W. Coon vs. 
the San Francisco Bulletin 'Co., resulted in a ver- 
dict for defendants. 

March 17. St. Patrick's Day celebrated by the 

Irish residents A. Falk dies from the effects of 

poison taken a few days previous. 

March 18. The Japanese Ambassador to Russia 
and several Japanese students arrive. 

March 19. Charles McGuire found dead in his 
bed. 

March 21. Grand illuminations by the German 
residents in honor of the declaration of peace be- 
tween Germany and France. 

March 22. The German residents celebrate the 
declaration of peace by a large and imposing pro- 
cession and literary exercises at the City Gardens. 

March 21. The trial of Dennis Gunn tor killing 
Edward J. Murphy results in a verdict of acquittal 
Owen Murphy dies suddenly in an apoplec- 
tic fit. 

March 25. John Jackson, Sheriff of Trinity 
County, convicted of collecting a mining tax from 
Chinese, sentenced to pay a nominal line of $20. 

March 27. The trial of Mrs. Laura D. Fair for 
the murder of A. P. Crittenden commences in the 
Fifteenth District Court. 

Afril 1. Several Japanese officials, bankers and 

merchants sail on the steamer China for Japan A 

seaman named Alfonzo drops dead on the BChooner 
Litfht Wing A billiard match between A. P. Ru- 
dolphe and Joseph Dion, for $1,000 aside, results 
in favor of the former Charles D. Connell, for- 
merly Assistant Engineer of the Fire Department, 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street, Suspenders and Neck Ties. 



WATKINS' YO-SEMITE ART GALLEEY. 26 Montg. St., opp. Lick House Entrance. 



34 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



drops dead J. IT. Grady, an inmate of the Indus- 
trial School, fatally injured by falling from a swing. 

Aprils. A Blight earthquake shock The new 

edifice erected by the First Methodist Episcopal 
Chinch dedicated. 

April 4. David Scannell elected Chief Engineer 
of the S. F. Fire Department. 

April 5. The Russian war corvette Almaz ar- 
rives John Stewart found dead iu his cell in the 

City Prison A man named Lancaster jumps into 

the bay from the steamer El Capitan and drowns, 
without any effort being made to rescue him. 

April 6. The anniversary of Grecian Independ- 
ence celebrated by the Greek residents. 

April 7. A billiard match between Cyrille Dion 
and John Deery, for $1,000, results in favor of the 
former The steamship Nevada, the pioneer ves- 
sel of the New Zealand and Australia Line, sails. 

April 8. Eugene McCarthy, convicted of libel 
against Richard Tobin, sentenced to pay a fine of 
$500... .A billiard match, Cyrille and Joseph Diou 
playing against John Deery and A. P. Rudolphe, 
for $500 a side, resulting in favor of the Dions. 

April 10. H. Von Heimburg commits suicide in 
the Odd Fellows' Cemetery. 

April 11. The body of' P. B7. Skinner found on 
the beach near the Ocean Side House. 

April 13. Mrs. Kate Murphy and her child fa- 
tally burned by the explosion of a coal oil lamp. 

April 16. Manuel Gnlarte commits suicide. 

April IT. A billiard match between Joseph Dion 
and A. P. Rudolphe, for $1,000 a side, results in favor 
of the former. 

April 18. John C. Horan, a pioneer merchant, 
dies. 

April 19. The libel suit of G. T. Russell vs. 
Frederick Marriott, resulted iu a verdict of $2,000 

damages A cordial reception given to W. H. 

Webb, by the Mechanics' Institute, on his arrival 

from the East Charles Peterson stabs his wife 

to death and then kills himself. 

April 23. Three slight earthquake shocks 

William Connell Walker, a pioneer Califoruian, 
dies. 

April 24. Miss F. A. Cook found dead in her 
bed. 

April '25. A fire at 109 Pacific Street destroys 
the Pacific Hotel and injures adjoining buildings. 

John Cummings fatally injured by being run 

over by a horse Leopold Tichuer, a pioueer mer- 
chant, dies, aired 52-J'ears. 

April 26. The trial of Mrs. Laura D. Fair, for 
the murder of A. P. Crittenden, terminates on the 
twenty-sixth day in a verdict of guilty of murder in 

the first degree The fifty-second anniversary of 

the foundation of Odd Fellowship in America, cele- 
brated by the Order Joseph Mariani fatally in- 
jured by a piece of rock thrown from a blast. 

April 29. Michael Dwyer killed by falling from 

a balcony William II. Miller dies suddenly from 

apoplexy. 

April 30. Marie Geradin commits suicide. 

May 1. Constant ine Carteron found dead in his 
bed John W. Davis commits suicide. 

May 2. The twenty second annual session of the 
American Medical Association commences at Pacific 

Hall John Sweeny commits suicide in the County 

Jail Thomas Bryant found dead in his room 

George Piatt, a well-known merchant, dies, aged 
36 years. 

May 3. The Government storehouse at Goat Is- 
land destroyed by fire The Americus Club, of 

New York, arrive on a tour of the State A race 

between several noted horses, at the Bay District 
Agricultural Park results iu Harvest Queen win- 
ning the first premium — $3,000. 

May 5. Henry Blease commits suicide C.Vell- 

miro, a well-known journalist and linguist, dies. 

May 8. A man named Antonio commits suicide. 



May 12. The suit against the proprietors of the 
Alta California, for libel of O. Kloppeuberg, County 

Treasurer, results in a verdict of not guilty James 

O'Neal killed by being run over by a cart Lord 

Walsingham and several other prominent English- 
men arrive overland A. W. Pitts and John Ban- 
nan, pioneer Californians, die. 

May 13. The body of a man, with a bullet-hole 
through his head, found near the Protestant Orphan 

Asylum Suit brought, in the Fourth District 

Court, to restrain the City Hall Commissioners from 

selling any portion of Yerba Bnena Park The 

police make a descent on a gambliug establishment, 

resulting in the arrest of two keno dealers A 

large number of Japanese students arrive on the 

steamer Great Republic John B. Gough, the 

uoted temperance lecturer, arrives overland. 

May 14. Dr. George Eidenmuller dies from in- 
juries received by being thrown from a buggy 

William Fay found dead in his room. 

May 15. August Kamp fatally shot by John De- 
vine. 

May 16. The Pacilic Slope Woman's Suffrage 
Convention assemble at Pacific Hall Capt. Fran- 
cis Langlois dies suddenly John B. Gough lec- 
tures to a large audience iu the Mechanics' Pavilion. 

Sixteen Chinamen arrested for alleged violation 

of the Internal Revenue Law. 

May 17. $5,000 damages awarded Warren O. 
Bowers for injuries received by a marine accident. 

Foong Saung Nam, a highly-esteemed Chinese 

missionary, dies. 

May 18. The steamer North Pacilic launched. 

May 19. A fire at 52 Steuart Street, damaging 
several frame buildings. 

May 21. Samuel Gardner drowned. 

May 22. The British war corvette Scylla arrives. 

May 23. Valentine O'Connell drops dead The 

Police make a descent on two gambling establish- 
ments, arresting several persons The Shu Fran- 
cisco County Medical Society of Homeopathic Prac- 
titioners organize. 

May 24. G. Newmann commite suicide at the 
Occidental Hotel Thomas Harrison, first-assist- 
ant engineer, and five of the crew of the steamship 
Moses Taylor, killed by the collapse of a flue soon 
after leaving the harbor on a voyage to Honolulu. 

The anniversary of the birth of Queen Victoria 

celebrated by the British Benevolen: Society. 

May 25. A train of wood cars collide with a 
horse car, killing the driver, Patrick O'Hearue, and 
two horses. 

May 26. Charles D.Carter, a pioneer and highly- 
esteemed citizen, dies, aged 46 years. 

May 29. James Murray Mitchell commits suicide. 

May 30. Memorial Day celebrated by decorating 
the graves of deceased Union soldiers and an ora- 
tion at the Mechanics' Pavilion A lire on the cor- 
ner of Francisco and Fillmore Streets destroys a 
candle factory. 

May 31. A Chinaman stoned and beat to death 
by a gang of boys. 

June 2. Justus Reynolds dies suddenly. 

Junk 3. Mrs. Laura D. Fair sentenced to be 
hung on the 28th day of July, 1871. 

June 5. The Act authorizing the Harbor Master 
to collect tonnage on vessels entering port, declared 
unconstitutional by Judge Stanly, of the County 

Court The Irish exiles — Gen. Thomas F Bourke 

and Thomas C. Luby — arrive overland and are en- 
thusiastically leceived by the Irish residents 

Maud Wakeman burned to death Charles Reich- 

(iii commits suicide. 

June 6. Ehlert Brandt commits suicide. 

June 7. A meeting held by the owners of prop- 
erty along the proposed line of Montgomery Avenue, 
to institute organized opposition to the confirmation 

of the report of the Commissioners Helen Regan 

commits suicide. 



CUNTINGTON, HOPKINS & CO., Importers Hardware and Iron, Cor. Bush and Market. 



C P. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 & 716 Kearny St., Rubber Goods and Umbrellas 



CHRONOLOGICAL HISTORY 



35 



June 8. The corner stone of the new First Con 
gregatioual Church, laid with appropriate ceremo- 
nies. 

June 10. The first number of the California Mail 
Bag makes its appearance. 

June II. Andrew Kuntz commits stride 

Jacob Kempner killed and Mrs. Adam Meyers 
wounded, by the accidental discharge of a pistol, 
in the hands of the latter. 

June 13. Captain William Rankin, a Mexican War 

veteran, dies, aged 51 years Joseph Frazier, an 

old resident, dies suddenly John Palm drowned 

in the bay. 

June 14. Hon. Horace Maynard, of Tennessee, 
arrives overland. 

June 15. Augustus Thielpape drops dead The 

U.S. sloop of war Cyane arrives Thomas F. 

Chapman found dead on board the steamer El Cap- 
ital!. 

June 16. Gregory Yale, a prominent member of 
the bar, dies, ai?ed 54 years. 

June 17. The anniversary of the battle of Hunker 

Hill celebrated by a salute and display of fbigs 

Leopold Fried killed by being run over by a wagon 
Maria L. Tierney commits suicide. 

June 20. William H. Vance killed by being run 
over by a dray. 

June 22. One hundred and fifty troops under the 
command of Major Bronson leave for Sutter Creek, 
to quell a mining riot. 

June 23. Edward Manchester drops dead. 

June 25. Henry Viemer dangerously shot by 

James Farron Dr. William A. Barstow shoots 

himself through the head indicting a fatal wound. 

June 20. Ninety-four colonists from Magdalena 
Bay, arrive in a destitute condition A fracas be- 
tween several Chinamen during which one is mor- 
tally shot The schooner Aimer runs ashore near 

the Ocean Side House, during a fog Julia Kelly 

killed by being run over by a wagon, at the Alms 
House. 

June 27. The new building eracted by the Young 

Men's Beneficial Society dedicated Captain 

George S. Porter, a Port Warden of twenty years 
standing, dies at Alameda, aged 64 years. 

June 29. Mrs. Alice Pool commits suicide. 

June 30. Simon Harris killed by being thrown 

from a tio;se The Republican First Congressional 

District Convention nominate S. O. Houghton, of 
Santa Clara. 

July I. Alexander Denny drops dead Charles 

Hirth killed by being run over by a coach. 

July 2. A grand celebration by the Roman Cath- 
olics, in commemoration of the twenty-fifth anniver- 
sary of the accession of Pio Nino to the Papal 
Throne. 

Julv 3. J. R. Hughes fatallv stabbed bv James 
McLaughlin. 

July 4. The anniversary of American Inde- 
pendence celebrated by a military and civic parade 

and literary exercises at the Mechanics Pavilion 

Isaac Brooks fatally shot by Nicholas Violich. 

July 5. A Fire on Mission Street near First, 
partially destroying two buildings. Dennis Ahar 

perished in the dames An excitement among the 

Italian residents, in consequence of threats being 
made that a Hag bearing the inscription of Viva 
Italia; Roma Capitale, would be forcibly taken 
down. 

July 6. James F. Wilkinson, alias Ironclad 

Jimmy, fatally shot by officer John Waldron 

Sylvain Calm, a piominent merchant, dies, aged 34 
dears. 

July 7. Mrs. Ann Walters dies suddenly in a fit. 

July 8. Alexander Moore found dead in his bed. 

July 9. Charles Beach, a boy, killed, and two 
others seriouslv injured by the falling of a building. 

.Mrs. Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady 

Stanton, champions of Women's Rights, arrive. 



July 10. The Supreme Court serve a writ of 
supersedeas on Sheriff White, to stay the execution 
of Mrs. Laura D. Fair. 

July 11. Albert Skopensky commits suicide 

Mrs. Elizabeth Cady Stanton lectures to a large 
audience in Piatt's Hall. 

July' 12. William Winkler fatallv injured by 

falling down a flight of stairs Mis. Edward Vis- 

cher, a highly esteemed pioneer resident, dies, aged 
55 years. 

July 13. Simon S. Bamberger attempts suicide, 
when about to be arrested on a charge of forgery. 

July 14. One hundred and eight colonists from 
Magdalena Bav arrive in a destitute condition. 

July 15. Eight Chinese cigar manufacturers sen- 
tenced to tine or imprisonment for a violation of the 

Revenue Law The order restraining the City 

Hall Commissioners from Belling any portion of 
Yerba Buena Park, set aside, and tin- motion for an 

injunction to issue denied Samuel Pincott drops 

dead The stenmer America arrives, with a cargo 

valued at over $2,000,000, including sixty tons of 
Japanese and ten of Chinese contributions to the 
Mechanics' Institute Fair. Among the passengers 
are the Japanese Prince Stnidzu and Buite, and nine 
Japanese Commissioners to the Fair Miss Ma- 
til ffla Veneta, a German tragedienne, arrives over- 
land. 

July 18. The troops return from Sutter Creek, 
and are escorted to their armory by the military. 
Hon. S. S. Cox, of New York, arrives. 

July 19. James K. Sheffield found dead in his 
bed. 

July 20. Burnett Burns killed, ami Dr. Adams 
and Robert Croskey seriously injured, by being 

thrown from a wagon Dr. W. A. Barstow dies 

from the effects of a self-iutliited wound Albert 

Bierstadt, the noted landscape painter, arri is. 

July 21. A fracas occurs on board the bark 
Glimpse, between Captain Gorman and John Kane, 
oue of his crew, dining which both are seriously 

cut with knives An investigation into the affairs 

of the Sheriffs ollice commenced by a Committee of 

the Board of Supervisors Operations commenced 

in the California Silk Co.'s factory, at South S. F. 

July 22. Isaac Brooks, who was shot by Nicho- 
las Violich, dies in the County Hospital Roe una 

Welch found dead in the Baron House A fire on 

the southwest corner of Mission and Fremont 
streets destrovs several manufacturing establish- 
ments ; loss, $250,000 Major*.!: nes O'Brien, who 

served in the Union Army, dies, aged 25 years. 

July 24. Hermann Martine commits suicide. 

July 25. Willie Graham drowned in the bay. 

Rachel Lewis burned to death A woman 

named Latham, and her two children, found in an 
utterly destitute condition, in a house on Dupont 
Alley. 

July 27. Major John F. Bronson, a well known 

officer of the State militia, dies, aged $7 years 

Rear Admiral Crown, of the Russian Imperial 
Navy, arrives. 

July 28. Flags displayed in honor of the anni- 
versary of Peruvian Independence. 

July 29. The British Gunboat Sparrow Hawk 
arrives. 

July 30. The U. S. steam frignte California 

arrives A dead whale, measuring ninety feet 

from snout to flukes, washed ashore near Fort 
Point Henrv Busing drops dead. 

August 1. The Democratic Legislative and Ju- 
dicial, also the Municipal Convention, meet and or- 
ganize James Lick donates to the Society of Cali- 
fornia Pioneers a lot of land William Greene, a 

pioneer resident of this city, dies at San Rafael, aged 
59 years. 

Aug. 2. The Russian corvette Boyarin collides 

with the bark Emma C. Bell The I'. 8. gun- 

boat Mohican arrives Nine females apply to tiie 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sanson} Street. Braids of all kinds. 



For the finest Paintings, Oil or Water, of yourself, go to WATKINS', 23 Montg. St. 



36 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



County Clerk to have their names placed on the 
Great Register as voters. 

Aug. 3. A fire on King Street near Fourth de- 
Btroya Beveval manufacturing establishments ; lo6s 
$30,(100 Louis Brenner commits suicide. 

Aug. 5. The Republican Legislative Convention 
mecl and organize. 

Aug. 6. The Italian residents celebrate the unifi- 
cation of the Italian States. 

Aug. 8. The eighth Industrial Exhibition of the 
Mechanics' Institute opened with appropriate cere- 

monies Lewis Beach commits suicide at the grave 

of his son in Laurel Hill Cemetery. 

Aug. 10. A fire on hoard the ship Marianne 
Nottebohra, doing considerable damage Frede- 
rick Talberg fatally injured by being run over by a 

fire engine Richard Marsh killed by falling down 

a hatchway on board the ship Houghton Tower. 

Aug. 11. Michael J. Byron killed by beiDg run 

over by a car W. H. Coffey, a member of the 

Tide Land Survey, drops dead.". ..The first consign- 
ment of silk Bent from the factory of the California 
Silk Manufacturing Co. 

Aug. 12. Michael Crowley fatally stabbed and 
Edward Scheotze dangerously, by George Carlisle. 

Aug. 13. A. M. Eells, a prominent citizen, dies, 
aged 7 2 years. 

Aug. 14. Mrs. Elizabeth Cady Stanton lectures 
to a large audience in Piatt's Hall Peter Frank- 
lin, E. M. Brown and Alfred Yazell arrested for an 
alleged violation of the Lottery Law. 

Aug. 15. The remains of Lieut. McKee, who was 
killed in an engagement with the Coreans, arrive 
en route to Louisville, Ky.. and are escorted to the 
depot by a detachment of U. S. cavalry and ma- 
rines Hermann Schwarze, President of the 

Stock Brewery, commits suicide The one hun- 
dredth anniversary of the birth of Sir Walter Scott 
celebrated by a banquet at the Grand Hotel. 

Aug. 10. The Tax-Payers' Municipal Conven- 
tion complete their nominations. 

Aug. 17. The U. S. war steamer Saranac arrives 
Hon. Hannibal Hamlin of Maine arrives. 

Aug. 18. Mary Johnson found dead in a hovel 
on Broadway. 

Aug. 21. M. F. Butler, a pioneer architect, dies, 

aged -10 years The Bay District Agricultural Fair 

opened, under favorable auspices The application 

for injunction h gainst the City Hall Commissioners, 
to prevent the sale of any portion of Yerba Buena 
Park, denied by the Supreme Court. 

Aug. 22. Henry A. Gray found on the Cliff 
House Road, insensible, and soon expires. 

Aug. 23. Don Abel Stearns, of Los Angeles, a 
highly respected and widely know/n California pio- 
neer of 1828, dies, aged 82 years. ... Daidel Ford 
commits suicide. 

Aug. 24. Suit brought against owners of prop 
erty on the line of the Second Street Cut to recover 
$385,5-7 delinquent assessments. .. .A silver tank- 
ard and several other presents received from James 
Ashbury of the Royal Thames Yacht Club to the S. 
F. Yacht. Club, in return for courtesies received dur- 
ing a recent visit to this State. 

Aug 25. Hermann Harris and Octavia La Poiut 
commit suicide. 

Aug. 20. Mrs. Lizzie Smith commits suicide 

A man known as Felix drops dead. 

Aug. 27-. George Fike fatally injured by being 
thrown from a buggy. 

Aug. 28. The City Hall lots sold at auction, the 
aggregate sales amounting to $951,900. 

Aug. 29. Dr. Leon Suckert, one of Col. Steven- 
son's Regiment, found dead in his bed 

Aug. 81. Charles Bonner, extensively connected 
with the mining interests of California ami Nevada, 

dies Dr. Michael J. Bolau, Resident Physician of 

the County Hospital, removed from office by the 
Board of Health. 



September 1. The California Pacific Railroad 
and its branches, the Napa Valley Railroad and the 
San Francisco and Pacific Railroad, together with 
all steamers and water craft belonging to either, 
transferred to the Central Pacific "Rail road Co.... 
Biaggio Marinbovick drops dead Work com- 
menced preparing for the foundation of the new 
City Hall. 

Sept. 2. The third annual regatta of the S. F. 
Yacht Club results in the yacht Peerless winning 
the first of two races for the prize, a silver tankard, 
presented by Commodore James Ashbury. 

Sept. 3. During a fracas between Marion A. 
Wilson and Marks Grnschensky, Patrick Byrne, a 
bystander, was fat all v shot by the former. 

Sept: 4. Several lottery agents arrested Rich- 
ard Hartley shot dead, by Sydney Flag The Act 

providing for the opening of Montgomery Street 
South, declared invalid by Judge Stanly of the 
County Court. 

Sept. 5. Governor Bullock, of Georgia, arrives 
overland. 

Sept. 6. The Election results in the success of 
the Republican State and Legislative ticket and the 

Taxpayers Municipal ticket Dr. Richard P. 

Asher, a pioneer and highly esteemed citizen, dies, 
aged 48 years. 

Sept. 7. Mrs. Alpheus Bull, a highly respected 
resident, commits suicide while in a fit of temporary 
insanity. 

Sept. 8. A fire on the Potrero destroys a stave 

and barrel factory; loss, $50,000 Hon. Newton 

Booth, Governor elect, enthusiastically received on 

his arrival from the interior Adam Monk arrested 

for selling lottery tickets. 

Sept. 9. J. Walter Walsh, a well known jour- 
nalist, dies in the Alms House, aged 50 years 

The society of California Pioneers celebrate the 
twenty-first anniversary of the admission of Califor- 
nia The eighth annual Fair of the Mechanics In- 
stitute closes with appropriate exercises James 

Williams drowned in the bay A billiard match 

between J. B. McCleery and J. II. Mott, Jr., results 
in favor of the former. 

Sept. 13. Samuel Rosenthal, an old resilient, 

commits suicide Edward Eagle drowned in the 

bay James Barrett drops dead. 

Sept. 14. The twenty-fifth anniversary of the oc- 
cupation of the City of Mexico, by the U. S. Army, 
celebrated by the Associated Veterans of the Mex- 
ican War. 

Sept. 15. The ship Annie Sise totally wrecked 

by striking a reef at the South Farallonee Islands 

Mrs. Captain James II. Blethen, a highly esteemed 
resident, dies suddenly. 

Sept. 16. The schooner Mary Taylor condemned 

for smuggling The case of Mary Jacoby, the 

Indian girl, charged with the murder of her infant 

child dismissed The U. S. steamer Jamestown 

arrives The Mexican residents celebrate the an- 
niversary of their country's independence Mrs. 

William G. Badger, a highly esteemed resident, dies. 

Sept. 17. Andrew Dtuilevy, a police officer, 

dangerously stabbed by Frank Schwartz The 

U. S. steamer Narragansett arrives. 

Sept. 18 The case of Dr. O'Donnell, Dr. Cohen 
and Arabella Knapp, charged with the murder of 
Eugenie Chauvet, dismissed on motion of the Pros- 
ecuting Attorney A Blight earthquake shock 

E. Game dies suddenly. 

Sept. 19. S. Belden Mills, a pioneer resident, 
dies, aged 55 years Slight earthquake shocks. 

Sept. 20. At a coroner's inquest in the case of 
James Williams the jury is composed wholly of col- 
ored citizens, the first of that race impanueled on 

the Pacific Coast, 

Sept. 22. The trial of the proprietors of the S. 

F. Chronicle for libel of Richard H. Siuton results 
in a verdict of not guilty. 



HUNTINGTON, HOPKINS & CO., Wholesale Hardware and Iron, Cor. Bush and Market. 



C. P. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 718 Kearny Street, Yankee Notions. 



GENERAL REVIEW. 



Our Public Schools.* 
The educational year does not coincide with either 
the calendar or the municipal year. The municipal 
year begins December let, while the educational 
twelvemonth commences July 1st. Hence the Di- 
rectory's year, being identical with that of the 
calendar, includes the last half of one school year 
and the first half of the next. Our record for 1871, 
then, embraces the last half of the school year 
1870-1, and the first half of the school year 1871-2. 

MOKE EFFICIENT SUPERINTENDENCE. 

In January, 1871, the newly appointed incumbent 
of the lately created office of Deputy City Superin- 
tendent, John Swett, began his work. The Deputy 
really doubles, even more than doubles, the activity 
and consequent usefulness of school superintendence. 
Personal attention to the constantly increasing throng 
of petty details very far exceeds the power of any 
one man, even the most versatile and experienced. 
Eastern cities no larger than ours provide two, and, 
in some cases, even three deputies, to do the work 
here exacted from one. The Deputy's duty is to 
visit schools, observe methods, commend excellen- 
cies, note defects, suggest improvements, counsel 
younger teachers, advise with principals, and com- 
municate results to the Board; in short, to promote 
unity, foster harmony, and increase efficiency. In 
some respects he is a traveling Normal School, which 
kindly goes round to the teachers instead of com- 
pelling the teachers to come to it. The eminent 
ability and extended experience of the first incum- 
bent have caused his office and his duties to seem as 
natural and become as useful as if both had been 
long established. Doth office and duties had long 
been needed, and have already paid many times 
their cost to the Department. 

THE NEW COURSE OF STUDY. 

Decidedly the next gain, in point, of value, has 
been the dropping of the less essential studies from 
nearly all the grammar grades, and the material 
reduction of the amount required in several of the 
studies retained. The new course cumbers pupils 
with fewer tasks, but requires them to make up iu 
thoroughness what they may lack in variety, so 
that, while the whole amount of formal study is 
considerably lessened, the thoroughness of the drill 
aud the real quality of the education secured is cor- 
respondingly enhanced. 

CONSOLIDATION OF PRIMARY GRADES. 

A third impi'ovement, of hardly less importance, 
was the consolidation of primary grades in such a 
way as to reduce their number and double the time 
allowed to each without increasing the time required 
for the completion of the full primary course. For- 
merly the primary system included six grades each 
occupying six months, while the grammar course 
consisted of four grades each reqnring one year. 
The manifest difficulty was that the highest primary 
grade would he graduating pupils into the lowest 
grammar grade twice as often as the beginning 
grammar grade was ready to receive them. By 



♦We are indebted to the courtesy of Prof. K. Knowiton 
for this interesting Communication.— [Compiler. 



reducing the number of primary grades and extend- 
ing the time of each through one year, the com- 
pletion of each grade, the examinations therein, and 
the promotions therefrom, are made coincident with 
those of each grammar grade. 

COMPETITIVE EXAMINATION OF TEACHERS. 

The fourth improvement, and one tending directly 
and especially to enhance efficiency at its very 
source, was the establishment of quarterly Compet- 
itive Examinations of Teachers. All candidates for 
position as teachers in the Public Schools of San 
Francisco, regardless of age, sex, previous experi- 
ence, number of testimonials or character of indo Bi- 
ers, are required to pass an oral examination con- 
ducted by specially elected practical teachers, in the 
presence of the other candidates and. frequently, 
before members of the Committee on Classification, 
with the Superintendent or Deputy, or both. The 
Board of Examination subsequently classifies the 
successful candidates into three grades or ranks, 
and submits a written tabulated report of such clas- 
sification to the Board of Education, for its informa- 
tion in the nomination and election of teachers. 

The averages of several such examinations thus 
far have clearly demonstrated three things i 

1st. Surprising incompetence in candidates claim- 
ing, and supposed, to be thoroughly qualified. 

2d. The imperative need of thorough examina- 
tions, faithfully conducted by competent and impar- 
tial examiners. 

3d. The great aid rendered, by these examina- 
tions, to the Committee on Classification, in its nomi- 
nation of teachers; and to the whole Board in their 
subsequent election. 

Unfortunately, however, truth compels us to state 
that, some of these subsequent elections have clearly 
shown that unquestioned natural capacity and the 
best certified experience, joined with the highest 
rank in scholarship, cannot always command the 
number of votes requisite to secure a position as 
teacher in the public schools of this city. Here, as 
elsewhere, the question more frequently asked is, 
not what, but who the candidate may be. Personal 
influence — the baue of California public lite — rein- 
forced by prepossession or prejudice, occasionally 
causes obvious personal partiality and gross injus- 
tice. 

EVENING NORMAL SCHOOL FOR TEACHERS. 

A City Normal School, just established, or revived, 
affords younger teachers, and, in fact, all teachers, 
opportunity to learn what older or other professional 
brethren or sisters can teach. This tends immediately 
to make them better teachers iu their own classes, 
and, incidentally, to qualify them for passing the 
competitive examination necessary to obtain a higher 
grade certificate should they so desire. This school 
meets on Monday evening of each school-week, 
continues two hours, is conducted by competent 
teachers, — tinder the direction of the Deputy Super- 
intendent as Principal, — is numerously attended, and 
promises much good. 

INCREASED PAT OF GRAMMAR ASSISTANTS. 

To raise one's salary generally stimulates one's 
efficiency, and to increase one's efficiency certainly 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO.. 116 Sansom Street, Yankee Notions. 



W ATKINS' YO-SEMTTE ART GALLERY, 26 Montg. St., opp. Lick House Entrance. 



38 



AN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



tends most directly to secure better work and more 
of it. This pecuniary inducement, in some slight 
degree, lias been added to the motives which may 
urge grammar assistants, whose monthly pay was 
raised from §67.50 to $70 a month, that is from $810 
to $SI0 a year, gold coin; always excepting the 
cases, unpleasantly frequent of late, where the un- 
fortunate shortsightedness of the pecuniary manage- 
ment cuts ott' the pay of the last month or two. 
The salaries of female bead-assistants in Grammar 
Schools has been raised from one thousand to fifteen 
hundred a year, and their title changed to Vice- 
Princip il. Sun Francisco pays her female teachers 
more and her mule teachers less thau any other 
American city. It is but simple justice to state, how- 
ever, that, tal;eu as a whole, her female teachers 
decidedly surpass the males in character, education, 
competence and success. This testimony may, pos- 
sibly, possess the greater value from the fact that it 
is voluntarily and cheerfully given by a male teacher 
of seven years' observation and experience in this 
department. 

EVENING SCHOOLS. 

These indispensable agencies for educating young 
men and women who either lost or neglected the 
educational facilities of earlier youth, as well as, 
and, indeed, mainly, for boys and girls whose family 
circumstances compel them to labor through the day, 
continue to exiend their facilities to all, either old 
or young, who choose to accept and improve them. 
The burning of the Lincoln School Building, in 
February, 1871, temporarily and partially demoral- 
ized several of the largest classes, hut the scattered 
pupils soon regathered and renewed operations with 
increased efficiency. A new regulation of the Board 
has adopted these schools as a prominent and perma- 
nent feature of the regular public school 6ystein. 

THE GERMAN AND FRENCH LANGUAGES. 

Besides the two large and well-known distinct- 
ively Cosmopolitan Schools, previously established 
and deservedly popular, two others, the Valencia 
Street and the Hayes' Valley, have been made 
semi-cosmopolitan, by the appointment to each, of 
two special teachers, one of German and one of 
French. Each language now occupies half an hour 
daily in each class throughout these schools. Over 
5,000 pupils are daily receiving free public instruc- 
tion in German and Trench. 

VOCAL MUSIC. 

Under the new order, the special music teachers 
personally conduct one exercise a week in each 
Grammar and High School class, and direct the 
daily practice during their absence. The regular 
teacher of the class, having witnessed the special 
teacher's lesson, is required to devote at. least ten 
minutes daily to its repetition and extension, and is 
held chiefly responsible for results. The i. ;w system 
works admirably ; constantly redounding to the 
credit of its author, Prof. Mason, who personally 
introduced it. It is doubly valuable ; first, for its 
own sake and own results; and, secondly, for the 
cheer and help which it gives to every other study. 



Drawing is now regularly taught, at least once a 
week, by specially qualified teachers, through the 
first and second grades of all the Grammar Schools, 
and in all High School classes. In third and fourth 
grade classes, and through all the primary grades, 
the regular class teacher is required to conduct it, 
with the help of books, cards or 6lates. Before 
completing the public school course, or even before 
graduating from the Grammar School, every faith- 
ful pupil may obtain a scientifically correct knowl- 



edge of at least the rudiments of linear, perspective 
and landscape drawing, or of mechanical and archi- 
tectural planning and delineation. Some evening 
classes, composed chiefly of young mechanics, also 
receive similarly valuable training in drawing. 

EDUCATING BOYS AND GIRLS TOGETHER. 

Of the thirteen Grammar Schools of San Fran- 
cisco, three are for girls alone, three for boys alone, 
and seven mixed. Whatever, therefore, may be 
the preference of any parent or guardian, he can 
easily gratify it in selecting a school. As society 
becomes more equally composed, families more nu- 
merous, and social life more safely settled,, public 
opinion is obviously favoring the natural order. 
The more closely a school can resemble a family in 
composition or membership, as well as in associa- 
tion, discipline, culture and influence, the more 
naturally, harmoniously, speedily and completely 
will it accomplish its priceless ends. 

When the families of earth are found to be com- 
posed, some wholly of boys and the rest wholly of 
girls, it will be ample time to favor the separation 
of the sexes in the most vital business of their 
younger life. At present, nature, reason and ex- 
perience say : "Put the boys and girls fog-ether in 
schools, as God does in families!" And let every 
intelligent and progressive Director say " Amen ! " 

General Statistics, June 30, 1871. 

Number of children under 15 years of age, 

(increase for the year * 998) 46,615. 

Number of children between 5 and 15 years 

of age, (increase for the year 1,475) 28,530. 

Number of pupils enrolled in the Public 

Schools, (April, 1871) 19,756. 

Average number belonging to the Public 

Schools, (April, 1871) 18,559. 

Average daily attendance of pupils, (April, 

1871) 1",434. 

Number of School Houses: High, 2; 
Grammar, 13; Primary, 32; Total, 
47, of which several are rented, at an 
annual expense of $13,617.60. 

Number of Teachers, 416 ; Classes, 357. 

Expenditures. Salaries, Teachers, $345,718.91. 

Janitors, $24,172.73. 

Annual cost per Pupil, not including building fund, 
$30.43. 

Annual cost for tuition, exclusively, $19.83 

Repairs, $28,093.87 ; Books, stationery, etc., $16,- 
290.58 ; Rents, $13,617.60 ; Sundries, $35,132.- 
70 ; Total, (actual running expenses) $ 163,026.39. 

The following is a comparative statement of the 
daily attendance of all the public schools from 1852 
to 1871, being a period of nineteen years: 1852, 
445; 1853, 703 ; 1854, 1.011; 1855, 1,484; 1856, 2,516; 
1857, 2,155; 1858, 2,521; 1859, 2,829; 1860,2,837; 
1861, 3,377 ; 1862, $3,794 ; 1863, 4,389 ; 1861, 5.470 ; 
1865,6,718; 1866,8,131; 1867,10,177; 1868, 11,871; 
1869,13,113; 1870, 15,394; 1871,17,434. 

Subjoined is a statement of the yearly expendi- 
tures of the department since 1852 to the present 
time: 1852, $23,125 ; 1853, $35,040 : 1854, $159,249 ; 
1855, $136,580 ; 1856, $125,064 ; 1857, $92,955 ; 1*58, 
$104,808; 1859, 134,731; 1860, $156,407; 1861, $158,- 
855 ; 1862, 134,567 ; 1863, $178,929 ; 1864, $228,411; 
1865, $346,862; 1866. $361,668; 1867, $507, 822; I SOS, 
$376,932; 1869, $400,842; 1870,543,519; 1871, $163,- 
026, making a total expenditure in nineteen years, 
of $4,668,852. 



*The School Census for 1871 shows a gain of a fraction 
over two per cent, for the year, while the census for 1870 
gives nearly ten per cent, for the year previous, a discrep- 
ancy doe entirely to the incompetency or carelessness of 
several of the enumerators. 



HUNTINGTON, HOPKINS & CO., Aeents Jeosop & Sons' Steel, Cor. Bush and Market 



C P. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, White Shirts. 



GENERAL REVIEW 



39 



Location of Schools. 

Number of Pupils Enrolled and the Average At- 
tendance of School Month ending April 'iQth, 
1871. 

Boys' High School (location east side of Powell 
Street near Clay). — Pupils registered, 125 ; average 
attendance, 119. 

Girls' High School (location north side of Bush 
Street between Hyde and Larkin). — Pupils regis- 
tered, 187 ; average attendance, 180. 

Lincoln Grammar School (location east side of 
Fifth Street near Market). — Pupils registered, 726 ; 
average attendance, 071. 

Denman Grammar School (location northwest 
coiner of Bush and Taylor streets) . — Pupils regis- 
tered, 714; average attendance, 664. 

Rincon Grammar School (location Vassar Place, 
leading from Harrison Street between Second and 
Third). — Pupils registered, 516; average attend 
ance, 486. 

Broadway Grammar School (location north 
side of Broadway, between Powell and Mason 
streets). — Pupils registered, 575; average attend- 
ance, 510. 

South Cosmopolitan Grammar School (loca- 
tion north side of Post Street between Dupont and 
Stockton). — Pupils registered, 655 ; average attend- 
ance, 591. 

Union Grammar School (location north side of 
Union Street, between Montgomery and Kearny). — 
Pupils registered, 467 ; average attendance, 412. 

Washington Grammar School (location south- 
west corner of Mason and Washington streets). — 
Pupils registered, 470 ; average attendance, 416. 

Spring Valley Grammar School (location south 
side Broadway, between Larkin and Polk streets). — 
Pupils registered, 562 ; average attendance, 501. 

North Cosmopolitan Grammar School (loca- 
tion north side of Filbert Street, between Jones and 
Taylor). — Pupils registered, 591 ; average attend- 
ance, 528. 

Hayes Valley Grammar School (location nor 1 ' 1 
side of McAllister Street between Franklin and 
Gough). — Pupils registered, 899 ; average attend- 
ance, 7S6 (Febrnary, 1872). 

Valencia Street Grammar School (location 
east side of Valencia Street between Twenty -second 
and Twenty -third). — Pupils registered, 594; average 
attendance, 541. 

Eighth Street Grammar School (location east 
side of Eighth Street between Harrison and Bryant). 
— Pupils registered, 886 ; average attendance, 794. 

South San Francisco School (location South 
San Francisco, near Railroad Avenue.) — Pupils reg- 
istered, 300 ; average attendance, 263. 

Tehama Primary School (location sonth side of 
Tehama Street, near First). — Pupils registered, 901; 
average attendance, 811. 

Mission Primary School (location west side of 
Mission Street, between Fifteenth and Sixteenth). — 
Pupils registered, 418 ; average attendance, 354. 

Lincoln Primary School (location southeast cor- 
ner of Market and Fifth streets) .—Pupils registered, 
871 ; average attendance, 766. 

Fourth Street Primary School (location 
northwest, corner of Fourth and Clara streets). — 
Pupils registered, 560 ; average attendance, 518. 

South Cosmopolitan Primary School (loca- 
tion north side of Post Street, between Dupont and 
Stockton).— Pupils registered, 533 ; average attend- 
ance, 477. 

Bush Street Cosmopolitan Primary School 



(location southeast corner of Bush and Stockton 
streets). — Pupils registered, 505; average attend- 
ance, 447. 

Mason Street Cosmopolitan Primary School 
(location east side Mason Street between Post and 
Geary).— Pupils registered, 389; ayerage attend- 
ance, 340. 

Geary Street Cosmopolitan Primary School 
(location south side Geary bet Stockton and Pow- 
ell). — Pupils registered, 259: average attendance, 
228. 

Greenwich Street Cosmopolitan Primary 
School (location sonth side Greenwich Street 
between Jones and Leavenworth I. — Pupils regis- 
tered, 524 ; average attendance, 458. 

Powell Street Primary School (location 
west side of Powell Street between Jackson and 
Washington). — Pupils registered, 517 ; ayerage at- 
tendance, 453. 

UnioN Primary School (location northwest 
corner of Filbert and Kearny streets). — Pupils reg- 
istered, 505 ; average attendance, 440. 

Silver Street Primary School (location 
north side of Silver Street between Second and 
Third). — Pupils registered, 792; average attendance, 
6S6. 

Broadway Primary School (location north 
side of Broadway between Montgomery and Sanson) 
streets). — Pupils registered, 138; average a;tend- 
ance, 114. 

Mission Street Primary School (location cor- 
ner of Mission and Mary streets). — Pupils registered, 
284 ; average attendance, 230. 

Model School (location north side of Bush Street 
between Hyde and Larkin). — Pupils registered, 
276 ; average attendance, 242. 

Market Street Primary School (location 
south side of Market Street between Fourth and 
Fifth). — Pupils registered, 687; average attend- 
ance, 588. 

Pine and Larkin Street Primary School 
(location southwest corner of Pine and Larkin 
streets). — Pupils registered, 641 ; average attend- 
ance, 554. 

Eighth Street Primary School (location 
east side Eighth Street between Harrison and toy- 
ant). — Pupils registered, 668; average attendance, 
559. 

Hayes Valley Primary School (location north 

side Grove Street between Franklin and Gough) 

Pupils registered, 324 ; average attendance, 300. 

Shotwell Street Primary School (location 
east side Shotwell Street betweeu Twenty-second 
and Twenty-third) .—Pupils registered, 478, average 
attendance, 425. 

Spring Valley Primary School (location 
south side Union Street between Franklin and 
Gough). — Pupils registered, 232 ; average attend- 
ance, 195. 

Pine Street Primary School (location north 
side of Pine Street between Scott and Devisadero). 
— Pupils registered, 83 ; average attendance, 78. 

Tyler Street Primary School (location north 
side of Tyler Street between Scott and Pierce). — 
Pupils registered, 283; average attendance, 238. 

West End ScHooLflocation near Six-mile House). 
— Pupils registered, 57; average attendance, 47. 

Potrero School (location southwest comer 
Kentucky and Napa streets). — Pupils registered, 
134 ; average attendance, 123. 

San Bruno School (location San Bruno Road 
near Toll gate).— Pupils registered, 89 ; average at- 
tendance, 82. 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street, Fancy Jewelry and Jet Goods. 



WATKINS' YO-SEMITB ART GALLEEY, 26 Montg. St., opp. Lick House Entrance. 



40 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



Ocean House School (location near Ocean 
Hou6eJ. — Pupils registered, 35 ; average attendance, 

Point Lobos School (location Point Lobos Road 
near the Turf House). — Pupils registered, 37 ; ave- 
rage attendance, SJ9. 

Laguna Honda School. — Pupils registered, 38! 
average attendance, 35. 

Faiioiuuxt School (location Fairmount Tract). 
— Pupils registered, 91 ; average attendance, 79. 

Evening Schools (Central School, Lincoln 
Grammar School Building;). — Pupils registered, 
64it ; average ai tendance, 443. 

Colored School (location northwest corner o* 
Taylor and Vallejo streets). — Pupils registered, 78! 
average attendance, 66. 

Colored School (location Fifth street near 
Harrison). — Pupils registered, 10; average attend- 
ance, 8. 

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA. 

This institution, now in active operation in the 
City of Oakland, was organized by Act of the Leg- 
islature, approved March 23d, 1868. It embraces 
five distinct colleges, viz.: a College of Agriculture, 
of the Mechanic Arts, of Civil Engineering, of 
Mines, and Letters. 

The management and control of the University 
are intrusted to a Board of Regents, composed of 
the following gentlemen.- 

Regents of the University. — Ex-officio : His Ex- 
cellency Newton Booth, Governor, and President of 
the Board , His Honor, Romnaldo Pacheco, Lieu- 
tenant-Governor; Hon. Thos. B. Shannon, Speaker 
of the Assembly ; Hon. Henry N. Bolander, State 
Superintendent of Public Instruction; Hon. Charles 
F. Reed. President of the State Agricultural Society, 
and A. S. Hallidie, Esq.. President of the Mechanics' 
Institute of San Francisco. Appointed: Hon. Sam- 
uel Merritt, M. D., Oakland; John T. Doyle, Esq.. 
Menlo Park ; Hon. Richard P. Hammond, San 
Francisco ; Hon. John W. Dwindle, Oakland ; 
Rev. Horatio Stebbius, San Francisco ; Hon. Law- 
rence Archer, San Jose ; J. West Martin, Grass 
Valley ; Hon. Samuel B. McKee, Oakland. *Ebn- 
orary : Louis Sachs, San Francisco; Hon Edward 
Tompkins, Oakland ; J. Mora Mors, Esq. Temescal ; 
S. F. Better worth, Esq., San Francisco ; Hon. John 
S. Hager, San Francisco ; A. J. Bowie, M. D., San 
Francisco; William C. Ralston, Esq., San Francisco; 
John B. Fclton, Esq., Oakland. 

Officers of tke Board of Regents. — His Excel- 
lency Newton Booth, President ; Andrew J. 
Moulder, Esq., Secretary ; Wdliam C. Ralston, 
Esq., Treasurer; Office, No. 3^0 Sansom Street, 
San Francisco. 

The University was inaugurated on the twenty- 
third of September, 1869, in the buildings formerly 
occupied by the College of California, iu the City of 
Oakland. The following are 

The Faculty mat Officers. — Henry Durant, A.M., 
President ; John LeConte, M. D . Professor of Phy- 
sics and Industrial Mechanics ; Joseph Le Conte, 
M. D., Professor of Geology, Natural History and 
Botany ; Martin Kellogg, A. M., Professor of An- 
cient Languages ; W. T. Welcker, Professor of 
Mathematics ; Paul Pioda, Professor of Modern 
Languages ; Willard B. Rising, Professor of Mining 
and Metallurgy ; Ezra S. Carr, M. D., Professor of 
Chemistry, Agriculture, Agricultural Chemistry and 
Horticulture ; Willi un Swiuton, A. M., Professor of 
Englisb L-mgu Lge and Literature, including Rheto- 
ric a nl Logic ; Robert E. Ogilby, Instructor of 

* The term " Honorary" applied to these Regents, indi- 
cate-- onlv the mode of their election, which is made hy 
the ex-ufficio and Appointed Resents. Every Regent, how- 
ever appointed, is a voting, legislative and executive mem- 
ber of the Hoard. 



Drawing ; Frank Soule, Jr., Assistant. Professor of 
Mathematics ; George Tait, Assistant Professor of 
Ancient Languages, and Master of the 5th Class. 

The session opened with about fifty students, dis- 
tributed into four classes, and attached to the various 
colleges. There are now, (March, i 87:2) two hund- 
red and ninety-eight students in the University' 
proper and Preparatory Department, and three 
hundred and fifty students at large in the Mechanic 
Arts College, a branch of which is located in San 
Francisco. 

The University is now open to young ladies, on 
equal terms, in every respect, with males. Quite a 
number of young ladies have regularly entered. 

The whole course of instruction, in each of the 
colleges, occupies four years. In each year there 
are three terms, ending, respectively, on the twenty- 
second of December, the sixth of April, and nine- 
teenth of Julv, the last date being Commencement 
Day. 

Method of Instruction — In all the different col- 
leges, the method of instruction is by means of lec- 
tures and the study of text-books, accompanied in 
either case by rigid daily examinations. 

Optional Courses. — Besides the students pursuing 
the regular courses, any resident, of California, of 
approved moral character, has the right to enter 
himself in the University as a student at large, and 
receive tuition in any branch or branches of instruc- 
tion, at the time when the 6ame are given in the 
regular course. 

Expenses. — The University is absolutely free in 
the four higher clases. There is a small charge for 
tuition in the 5th class or Preparatory Department. 
There are no dormitories and no commons connected 
with the University. Students can obtaiu bo ird and 
lodging at reasonable rates in private families in the 
City of Oakland. By forming clubs they can much 
reduce the price of board. 

Equipment. — The University has been superbly 
equipped with apparatus of all kinds, of the most 
improved pattern. It has been selected with great 
care, and at a large expense, in the Atlantic States 
and Europe. Instruction in every branch of study, 
capable of illustration, is aided by instruments aud 
appliances of the most approved workmanship and 
latest device. 

The Site. — The University owns a beautiful tract 
of two hundred acres at Berkeley, situated four -and 
a half miles north of Oakland. On this site, ar- 
rangements have been made to put up permanent 
and spacious buildings, capable of accommodating 
live hundred students, and provided with all the 
modern conveniences which experience can suggest. 
The whole cost is estimated at $250,000. Meantime 
the University is located iu spacious buildings in 
the City of Oakland. 

Private Educational Institutions. 

The total number of colleges and private schools 
in this city is seventy-one ; of which fifteen are un- 
der the control of the Catholic denomination. Many 
of these institutions are in a very flourishing condi- 
tion , and the private schools will compare favorably 
with the public schools for thoroughness of instruc- 
tion and excellence of discipline. 

From the report, of the school census for 1871, it 
will be seen that the number of children between six 
and fifteen years of age that have attended private 
schools for the year euding June 30th, 1871, was 
four thousand eight hundred and twenty-four. The 
number attending public schools for the same period, 
seventeen thousand, four huudred and thirty four. 

In addition to the attendance of the pi ivate schools, 
there are about nine hundred and fifty children 
under six years of age at the different infant schools, 
and about eleven hundred attending the higher pri- 
vate schools aud colleges. 



HUNTINGTON, HOPKINS & CO., Importers Hardware and Iron, Cor. Bush and Market. 



C. P. VAN 5CHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Fancy Goods. 



GENERAL REVIEW 



41 



SANTA CLARA COLLEGE, SAN JOSE. 

This establishment is under the superintendence 
of the Fathers of the Society of Jesus, and is open 
to all who choose to avail themselves of its advan- 
tages. It is situated in the beautiful valley of Santa 
Clara, so celebrated for the mildness and salubrity 
of its climate, and is about three miles distant from 
San Jose, and quite close to the Southern Pacific 
Railroad. 

The College was founded in 1851. On the twenty- 
eighth of April, 1855, it was incorporated and em- 
powered to confer degrees and academical honors, 
and to exercise all the rights aud privileges common 
to any other literary institution in the United Slates. 
It has a full staff ot professors, and presents advan- 
tages for the mental, physical and moral training of 
the students unsurpassed in California. It possesses 
a complete philosophical apparatus, purposely made 
in Paris for Santa Clara College, aud furnished with 
all necessary instruments for experiments in me- 
chanics, hydraulics, pneumatics, caloric, electricity, 
magnetism, optics, acoustics and surveying. New 
and important additions are being made every year 
to keep pace with the progress of science. 

The chemical laboratory is provided with a full 
assortment of chemicals, a very good set of furnaces, 
ana" all that is necessary for the different kinds of 
chemical analyses. The museum of natural history 
comprises a valuable collection of mineralogy and 
geology; also three thousand specimens of "shells 
and other natural curiosities. As an accessory to the 
scientific department there is a photographic gallery, 
where the students who wish may learn photogra- 
phy in all its different branches. Practical lessons 
are given also on the electric telegraph. The col- 
lege library numbers about twelve thousand vol- 
umes. (See advertisement, page xli.) 

Medical Colleges. 

There are two medical colleges in this citv— the 
"Toland Medical College," and the "Medical Col- 
lege of the Pacific." The latter was established in 
1858, and was until 1872 the "Medical Department 
of the University of the Pacific." It is now the 
"Medical Department of University College," and is 
situated on Stockton Street near Geary. The form- 
er was established in 1864, under a special charter, 
aud is situated on Stockton Street near Francisco. 
Both have a very efficient corps of professors — the 
most eminent physicians of the State. The attend- 
ance upon these colleges is not large; yet from some 
cause, hoth are contmued with good assurance of 
success. 

The clinical instruction given in connection with 
these institutions is unsurpassed by that of any other 
city of like population, owing to our ample hospital 
facilities, and the evenness of the temperature of 
our climate, which afford opportunities of witness- 
ing all the varied types or phases of disease during 
any mouth of the year. The world cannot boast of 
! a climate so peculiarly adapted to the practical teach- 
ing of anatomy by dissections. 

There are peculiar advantages to students of med- 
icine iu attending at least one, if not both courses of 
medical instruction in the locality where they intend 
to practice. The most promineut of these advan- 
tages are the experience of the faculty in the dis- 
eases incident to the climate, aud the opportunity of 
observing the peculiarities of these diseases under 
clinical instruction. 

The healthful and invigorating influence of our 
climate is an additional inducement to strangers to 
visit here to pursue the study of medicine, and it is 
to be hoped that those who are to be the physicians 
and surgeons of the Pacific coast, will receive their 
degrees of "Doctor of Medicine" from our home in- 
stitutions, which will greatly conduce to their suc- 
cess. 



Heald's Business College. 

The object of this school, as its name implies, is to 
educate for business. It is the leading commercial 
school of the Pacific coast, and one of the largest, 
most complete and most thorough institutions of the 
kind in the United States. During the past year it 
has had iu attendance over six hundred students, 
which is a considerable increase over preceding 
years. Among its pupils are the sons of many of 
our most prominent business men. The plan of 
operation adopted by this school is quite novel and 
interesting. Instead of a dry aud tedious study of 
mere textbooks, actual practice in business affairs 
is so united to the theoretical study of accounts, pen- 
manship, arithmetic, etc., that the progress of the 
student becomes easy and rapid. The information 
thus acquired is also of the most practical nature, 
and ready for immediate use. In order to carry out 
the system of business training, the school-room has 
been fitted up to represent a miniature business 
world. There are, in active operation, banks, job- 
bing and importing houses, insurance and real estate 
offices, commission houses, express offices, whole- 
sale and retail merchandising houses, etc., etc. In 
all of these establishments an actual business is car- 
ried on by the student, who acts in turn as clerk, 
salesman, book-keeper, cashier, agent, merchant, 
broker and banker. In these various capacities he 
makes out all varieties of business and legal papers, 
and writes up notes, drafts, bills, statements of ac- 
counts, orders, receipts, invoices, account sales, cer- 
tificates, bills of lading, contracts, deeds, leases, bills 
of sale, articles of co-partnership, etc. As a mer- 
chant he buys, sells, ships, consigns, orders, barters, 
insures, anil keeps a complete and systematic record 
of his business transactions. As a banker he re- 
ceives and pays out deposits, makes collections, 
loans, discounts, buys and sells exchanges, issues 
certificates of deposit, keeps the corporation books, 
issues and transfers stock, aud enters up the results 
of all these transactions in the proper books. In 
fact, so thorough and practical is this system of in- 
struction, that the graduates of this school are fitted 
to pass directly from the school-room to the couut- 
ing-rooin. 

This school is one of the Bryant & Stratton col- 
leges, so long and favorably known in the Eastern 
States. The schools now number thirty-six, of the 
leading business colleges iu the country, and are as- 
sociated under the title of the "International Busi- 
ness College Association." This Association meets 
annually lor the discussion and advancement of the 
cause of commercial education. The scholarships 
of this college are good for tuition in all the schools 
of the association. 

There is also connected with the college a tele- 
graph institute, where young men and ladies are 
fitted for telegraphic operators. This department has 
been fitted up at a great expense, aud is one of the 
most complete of the kind in the country. The 
office is supplied with a great variety of telegraphic 
instruments and electrical apparatus. A line of wire 
has been extended around the city for the practice 
of the students, and there are at present over twenty 
offices on the line, thus affording pupils an opportu- 
nity of writiug with experienced operators. 

Within the past year a new feature of consider- 
able importance has been introduced into this school. 
Until recently ladies have not been received into the 
college for tuition, but they are now admitted into 
all the school departments, and already about twenty 
five ladies are availing themselves of this opportu- 
nity for obtaining a practical education anil learning 
telegraphy. We are told by the teachers that their 
progress has been very satisfactory in every case, 
thus demonstrating the fact that women can readily 
learn business. 

This school is now permanently located in what 
is known as the College Building, at No. '24 Post 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street, Perfumery and Fancy Soaps. 
58 



W ATKINS' YO-SEMITE ART GALLERY, 26 Montg. St., opp. Lick House Entrance. 



42 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



Street, between Montgomery and Kearny streets. 
This building was constructed about two years at r o, 
and these apartments especially arranged for the 
college. The rooms are very line for this purpose, 
and, we are told, are in every respect equal to those 
of the best sclioolsof like nature in our largest East- 
ern cities. A visit to them during school hours will 
always prove interesting as well as instructive. 

The faculty of the college comprises the following 
well known teachers and officers : E. P. Heald, Pres- 
ident ; F. C. Woodbury, Secretary ; L. H. Clement 
and J. D. Blackmail, Teachers of Accounts and Pen- 
manship ; F. Seregni, Professor of Plain and Orna- 
mental Writing; H. M. Stearns, Teacher of Mathe- 
matics and English Studies; A. A. Heald, Book- 
keeping ; O. Brooks, Superintendent of the Tele- 
graphic Department ; W. P. Casey, Surveying and 
Navigation ; R. K. Piotrowski, Modern Languages ; 
and Lloyd Baldwin, Commercial Law. 

Academie Parisienne. — This new institution, 
the specialty of which is to instruct young ladies in 
French, has been established at 912 Sutter Street as 
a French Boarding and Day School. The building 
recently erected by Mine. Forster to accommodate 
the increasing wants of the School, formerly locHted 
on Bush Street, is large and commodious and fur- 
nished with all the modern improvements. The 
locality, as regards health and pleasant surroundings, 
cannot be surpassed. The Principal is Mine. Fors- 
ter, well known as a preceptress of youth, and a 
lady who has had long experience in her profession. 
The method of instruction pursued is essentially the 
European. The Kindergarten system introduced 
into this School with such marked success, will be a 
leading feature of the Primary Department. Though 
every effort will be made and every facility afforded 
to secure for each pupil a thorough and complete 
English education, yet French will he the language 
of the School and of the household. All the ap- 
pointments will he such as will afford the pupils 
every advantage to be secured in a first-class French 
hoarding school. 

Young ladies having completed their English 
course of studies, and wishing to acquire fluency 
in the French language, or to pursue any other 
branch taught in the School, can do so provided 
they will conform to the regulations of the house- 
hold. If desired by parents or guardians, pupils 
will have the same facilities for acquiring German. 
Boarding pupils will be accommodated with large 
cheerful rooms and excellent board, and the sur- 
roundings and household regulations will be such as 
will give a home-like charm to every department 
connected therewith. Special attention will be 
given to the physical development and the moral 
and social culture of the pupils. Exercises in Cal- 
isthenics will be given daily. The government of 
the Academy will be mild and impartial, but firm 
and prompt obedience and lady-like deportment will 
be required of all. Course of Study— French, 
German, and as complete an English course as is 
usually taught in our best seminaries. Those who 
desire can take a select course. 

Benevolent and Social Societies. 

The acquisition of California by the American 
Republic drew the attention of the world to this 
coast, and when, a short time subsequently, the 
announcement was made of the marvelous fields 
found here, the bold, the enterprising and the 
adventurous of every country, race, religion and 
character, turned their steps "hither, and the most 
cosmopolitan State of our Union was created. A 
people of such elements, widely separated from their 
native homes, friends and associations, and govern- 
ments, naturally gathered each to his class, order, 
or nation, and thus, at an early date, at the central 
port of the country, were formed some of those 



societies of grand benevolence which now form so 
distinguishing a feature of San Francisco's society. 
The verv isolation, so far removed from the succor 
of relatives or the protection of their flag made 
these organizations a necessity, and the generous 
and kindly spirit pervading the brave pioneer class 
with the abundant wealth the soil gave, rendered 
such associations more than usually effective. Sick- 
ness and death are inevitable, and want, through 
accident, disease or improvidence, is the lot of some, 
however bountiful the country, or genial the clime. 
To relieve suffering, assist the depressed, and bury 
the dead, have been the objects of the benevolent 
societies formed. The good deeds accomplished, and 
the constant care and watchfulness exercised, have 
given to San Francisco a world-wide reputation 
which is richly deserved. Aside from the organized 
societies, the popular benevolence is proven by the 
large sums ofren given for various objects at the 
call of charity or sympathy. Millions of dollars 
have been sent abroad when'the good heart thought 
it was required to alleviate distress either among 
our own people or those of foreign lands, and never 
is relief called in vain for any individual case of 
destitution found in our midst. Fortunately cases 
of destitution are rare, and the provisions made by 
the law and by social organizations prevent any 
necessity for such distresses drives to importunate 
begtrary. 

The large sums sent with such a willing hand to 
aid the sick and wounded of the Union armies dur- 
ing the war of the rebellion and which constituted 
such a noble support, will always be referred to, 
in this connection, with just pride. A similar ex- 
hibition of benevolence and patriotic sympathy has 
been manifested on the part of the German aud 
French citizens during the late war in Europe, 
each party having sent to their suffering country- 
men nearly a quarter of a million dollars to aid the 
wounded of the battle field, assist the widows and 
orphans, and restore prosperity as far as it lay in 
their power. The grand piles of gold sent to the 
distant home will stand as a lasting monument of 
the golden State of the far West, aud of the munifi- 
cence of her people. Upwards of four hundred 
thousand dollars were collected and remitted in the 
brief space of six months, the free contributions of 
those classes of our citizens. More recently over 
one hundred and fifty thousand dollars were col- 
lected to relieve the sufferings occasioned by the 
disastrous conflagration in Chicago. 

As individuals, and the citizens en masse, have 
shown nnequaled benevolence, so do they manifest 
the same disposition in their numerous organ iz iiious 
for social and charitable purposes. There are now 
eighty-five such organizations in the city aud many 
of these are divided into lodges, groves, stamina 
vereins, councils, posts, etc., making a total of one 
hundred and ninety-three, some having upwards of 
a thousand members. These are of every class of 
reputable orders, and include those of every nation- 
ality that make up our population. From their 
number and strength it would appear that nearly 
all the people of San Francisco were members of 
one or other of these orders. Their wealth is shown 
in the possession of asylums, halls, hospitals, and 
schools, and the fine appearance members make on 
days of public celebration. 

As their name implies, the general object of the 
societies is benevolence, assisting unfortunate mem- 
bers, or their wives and children, when in sickness, 
burying them when dead, or. if of foreign birth, 
aiding their return to their native land. But t>y no 
means do all limit their charities to their members. 
Several of these noble organizations are controlled 
by ladies whose care is for the orphan, the sick, and 
needy of all classes, and for the reclamation of the 
degraded of their own sex. Two asylums generous 
homes for the tender orphaus, are under their con- 



HTJNTINOTON, HOPKINS & CO., Wholesale Hardware and Iron, Cor. Rush and Market I 



C. P. VAN" SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Furnishing Goods. 



GENERAL REVIEW 



43 



trol, and the excellent condition of the charge is 
evidence of the care bestowed. As early as 1851, 
the gentle Sisters of Charity, as ever devoting their 
lives to the holy cause of doing good to others, 
founded the Roman Catholic Orphan Asylum on 
Market street, and have continued it with the addi- 
tion of schools and further extensions to the present. 
The Protestant Orphan Asylum founded by promi- 
nent ladies of this city in 1854, and on Laguua street 
near Market, have erected an elegant and commo- 
dious building, costing $60,000. At the asylum are 
two hundred and forty children unfortunate in their 
orphanage, but most fortunate in having such a 
noble home and parental care as the benevolent 
ladies have prepared for them'. During the past 
year our Hebrew citizens have organized the Pacific 
Hebrew Orphan Asylum, and have adopted meas- 
ures for the speedy erection of a building that will 
meet the wants of that portion of our population. 

But the ladies' charity does not end here. The 
San Francisco Female Hospital; the Lying-in and 
Foundling Asylum; the Magdalen Asylum; the St. 
Mary's Ladies Society and numerous others, attest 
the scope of their ministering care. The kind atten- 
tion and the liberal expenditures by the ladies of 
San Francisco, without distinction of natiouality, 
race, or religion, is most honorable and praise- 
worthy, and is a subject of just pride to every citizen 
of San Francisco. 

The broad field of labor of the San Francisco Be- 
nevolent Association has been well filled, the mem- 
bers exercising a generous guardianship over the 
distress and wants of the City. No membership of 
other societies, nor any race or condition, forbid 
their action, but their compassion, like the cloak of 
charity, covers all. The Young Men's Christian 
Association occupies a noble position among the be- 
nevolent societies of San Francisco. Possessing a 
tine hall, with library, gymnasium, baths, ect., it is 
well enabled to extend the hand of charity to all, to 
guide the erring, and to give pleasure and instruc- 
tion to its members and proteges. 

The benevolent societies, composed of people of 
foreign birth, for the object of aiding their fellow- 
countrymen, are numerous and efficient. The Eug- 
lish, Scotch, Welsh and Irish have their organiza- 
tions divided into several classes and divisions, all 
with a large number of members. The British Be- 
nevolent Society exercises a supervision over the 
wants of the subjects of that empire. The Ger- 
mans, French, Italians, Russians, Portuguese, Mexi- 
cans, Greeks, Scandinavians, Sclavonians, Hebrews 
and Chinese, maintain organizations for the same 
purpose, showing a benevolence of the highest char- 
acter, and mogt worthily occupying their appropri- 
ate field of usefulness. The German General Be- 
nevolent, Society is a large and effective organiza- 
tion, having one thousand three hundred and forty- 
two members residing in the city, and four hundred 
and eighty in the interior. This generous society 
maintains a hospital worthy of its high character, 
and which would be an honor to any city or state. 

The French Benevolent Society is an institution 
in keeping with the most noble of its class here, 
where the -rank is of the highest grade. This soci- 
ety has one of the finest hospitals of the State, occu- 
pying a spacious block bounded by Fifth and Sixth 
streets, and south of Bryant Street. This is a spa- 
cious edifice of brick, witB pleasant gardens and or- 
namented grounds surrounding it, making it a most 
desirable home to the invalid. Other nationalities 
maintain their hospitals and their homes, thus indi- 
cating the care taken of all, and the unbounded be- 
nevolence of all classes and peoples who have made 
San Francisco their abiding place. 

The secret orders and societies are in great num- 
ber and of high standiug. Masonic, Odd Fellows, 
Druids, Red Men, etc., are bodies of great wealth 
and usefulness, aud fill an important place in the 



society of San Francisco. Several of these possess 
stately edifices, have extensive libraries, maintain 
hanks, publish papers, and in various ways manifV-st 
their importance and perform their duties. Added 
to these are the Immigrant Aid Association, Prison 
Association, Society for the Prevention of Cruelty 
to Animals, and numerous others, showiug the broad 
field occupied. The extent and character of these 
compare favorably with the Social and Benevolent 
societies of any other land, and are a matter of just 
pride to every citizen. Their maintenance usually 
depends upon voluntary contributions or exactions 
by the rules of membership. To some of these, effi- 
cient support could not be obtained in such a man- 
ner ; and being of general benefit, aid from the State 
was obtained. Thus, in part, are the three Orphan 
Asylums, San Francisco Female Hospital, Found- 
ling Hospital, Prison Commissions, Magdalen Asy- 
lum, Lying-in Hospital, and Ladies' Protection and 
Relief Society maintained. 

The Appendix on page 882 contains a complete list 
of the different organizations, exhibiting in detail 
their operations during the past year and their pres- 
ent condition, to which attention"is invited. 

YOUNG MENS' CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. 

This association, founded in 1853, has for its object 
the moral, mental, and social improvement of young 
men. It has, at its elegant building on Sutter Street, 
a line reading room, library, gymuasium, lecture 
room, etc. It is also the design of the association to 
provide, so far as possible, employment, a place of 
social comfort and resort, aud a local point of pleas- 
ant attraction for young men arriving in the city 
without other acquaintance than those made here. 
The library contains about four thousand volumes 
of well-selected and valuable works, embracing all 
branches of literature ; and the reading-room is sup- 
plied with the best newspapers and leading periodi- 
cals of the country. 

The regular meetings of the association are held 
on the third Monday evening of each month, when 
the usual business is transacted ; aud when there is 
not a pressure of business, literary and musical ex- 
ercises are held. 

The building of the association is on the north 
side of Sutter, between Kearny and Dupont streets ; 
is built of brick, with a massive and ornate stone 
front, and is one hundred and twenty feet deep by 
fifty-four aud a half feet wide. The basement and 
ground floors are occupied by stores, the second floor 
by the library, reading room, ladies' rooms, chess 
room, ante-rooms, and a hall for lectures, etc., which 
has a capacity for seating seven hundred and fifty 
persons. Beneath the lecture room is a gymnasium, 
aud in the third story are committee rooms, hall for 
meetings of the association, and apartments for offi- 
ces, etc., for rent. The edifice is well arranged with 
every convenience for comfort and for the purposes 
for which it was designed. 

SAN FRANCISCO BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION. 

Of all the benevolent institutions established in 
our city, none have beeu productive of more real, 
substantial and lasting good, in proportion to the 
means employed, thau the San Francisco Benevo- 
lent Association. Although only seven years old, 
filling up, as it has done, a most important hiatus 
in the benevolent institutions of the day, this asso- 
ciation has, in a quiet aud unpretentious way, been 
productive of incalculable good. 

The number of persons assisted since its organ- 
ization is as follows: From April, 1865, to April, 
1866, seven thousand six hundred and thirty -two ; 
April, 1866, to April, 1867, seven thousand four 
hundred and five ; April, 1867, to April, 1868, six 
thousand seven hundred and eightv-two ; April. 
1868, to April, 1869, seven thousand" one hundred 
and forty-eight ; April 1869, to April, 1870, seven 



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44 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



thousand and twenty-four ; April, 1870, to April, 
1871, eight thousand one hundred and sixty ; April, 
1871, to April, 1872, eight thousand two hundred 
and fifty— making a total of fifty-two thousand four 
hundred and one persons, at a cost of $188,325 75. 

THE CALIFORNIA. IMMIGRANT UNION. 

The immediate cause of the establishment of this 
society was the attempt of Mr. W. H. Martin, of 
Baltimore, to form in this city a branch of the In- 
ternational Union, of which he was General Agent. 
The committee of merchants and others to whom the 
subject was referred at a meeting of the Chamber 
of Commerce, reported in favor of a distinct organ- 
ization for California ; and accordingly in October, 
1869, the California Immigrant Union was formed 
for the promotion of immigration to California. 
This it was proposed to do by the publication and 
dissemination of information concerning the re- 
sources of the State, and the inducements offered to 
immigration, its vacant government and private 
lauds, and the means and cost of coming here, and 
facilitating by every possible means the travel of 
immigrants, and their location and settlement upon 
their arrival, and the establishment of foreign agen- 
cies for the same purpose. At the session of the 
Legislature of 1869-70, a strong effort was made to 
procure an appropriation of public monies to carry 
out these objects under the management of Com. 
missioners appointed by the Governor or otherwise, 
acting independently or in conjunction with the of- 
ficers of the Union. Differences of opinion as to 
the amount of such an appropriation, and the details 
of such a bill, prevented any legislation upon the 
subject, and the effort failed. 

The merchants of San Francisco, though discour- 
aged, were so thoroughly impressed with the im- 
portance of the movement, that, in April, 1870, they 
subscribed the funds necessary for the support of 
the Union, though its operations were necessarily 
more restricted than was originally contemplated. 
Since then it has been actively engaged in its work, 
and a large amount of printed information relative 
to the climate and resoures of California has been 
circulated throughout the Eastern States, Canada, 
Australia, England, and Europe, and supplied in 
answer to a very extensive correspondence request- 
ing such information. Immigrants upon their arri- 
val, on application at the office of the Union, are 
supplied with such information as they desire con- 
cerning the Government lands, private lands, etc., 
and routes and expense of travel, and otherwise fa- 
cilitated in their settlement. Correspondence is 
replied to and information supplied gratuitously to 
those abroad who desire to be informed concerning 
the State, and every legitimate effort made _ to in- 
duce those coming westward to select California 
as their future home, and assist in the development 
of its resources. From December, 1809, to Decem- 
ber, 1871, the number of applicants for information 
in reference to public lands, from the United States, 
amounted to 2,516 ; from foreign countries, 876, 
making a total of I), 422 — most of whom have been 
comfortable settled, and are well pleased with 
the country. No fee or charge whatever is made 
for services rendered. The office of the Union is 
at No. 316 California Street. Its officers are , C. T. 
Hopkins, President; Charles S. Capp, First Vice- 
President and Manager ; W. H. Martin, Secretary 
and General Agent. 

Hospitals. 

In so far as number and size are concerned the 
hospitals of San Francisco will compare favorably 
with those of other cities of its extent and population. 
Private institutions abound. The Germans and 
French have for years had fine hospital buildings, the 
one belonging to the latter having recently received 
extensive additions. The Sisters of Mercy own a large 



structure on Rincon Hill ; and the Italians have 
within a few years completed a commodious hos- 
pital four miles from the business part of the city. 
The special purpose of these hospitals is to provide 
for the necessities of certain classes of our popula- 
tion, but all who desire to avail themselves of their 
advantages are admitted. The buildings are not 
only commodious, but are well adapted for the pur- 
poses designed. It is to he regretted that the same 
remark cannot be made of the one belonging to the 
city. Several years since, authority was given 
the Supervisors to cause to be erected a hospital 
building, suitable to the requirements of our rap- 
idly growing city, aud $250,000 was appropriated 
for the purpose. For some reason or other, no 
steps, beyond procuring plans, toward the construc- 
tion of this much needed building were taken un- 
til recently. The buildings now in use are altogether 
inadequate for their purposes. The principal one 
was constructed for a school house aud converted 
into a hospital in 1857. Some years later a large 
wooden building — little better than a barn, was put 
up on the same lot. As the city grew and the num- 
ber of " indigent sick " increased, various means 
were adopted to supply immediate necessities. In 
1867, a large Almshouse was commenced near Lake 
Honda. The removal of the superannuated and 
permanently disabled to this place, from the City 
and County" Hospital, where they had been accumu- 
lating for years, relieved the latter of a serious in- 
convenience, and increased its capacity for those 
actually sick. The Hospital, however, was soon 
filled to overflowing again, and so great had this 
overcrowding become at the beginning of 1870, that 
it called forth a remonstrance from the San Fran- 
cisco Medical Society, which appointed a committee 
to institute suitable investigations. This committee 
found that the hospital contained 408 beds scarcely II 
one of which was vacant ; that the average space 
to each bed was 490 cubic feet, some having as low 
as 260 cubic feet, and none having so much as a 
thousand, while in all properly constructed hospi- 
tals of the present day, not less'than 1200 cubic feet 
are allowed to each patient. In consequence of this 
report, an additional building was erected upon the 
hospital lot, thus relieving, in large part, the over- 
crowding, but greatly curtailing the grounds. As 
this was but a temporary measure, it was hoped the 
new hospital would he commenced at once. The 
delay has been such, however, as to make us fear 
the necessity of using indefinitely the old tumble- 
down hospital, which would disgrace any city in 
America. But doubts have now given place to cer- 
tainty. The hospital building is in actual process of 
erection, and will probably be completed by the end 
of May, 1872. It is to be a building, too, worthy of 
the object in view ; and having a much more suita- 
ble location than the present one. It is to occupy 
the two blocks bounded by Nevada, Sierra and 
Nebraska streets aud Potrero Avenue, fronting 
on the latter. These measure 866 feet by 481 
feet, a sufficient area for hospital purposes for 
many^years to come. The plan of the building is 
entirely different from that usually adopted. Sev- 
eral individual structures, most of them at consider- 
able distance from each other, but connected by a 
long covered corridor, unite to form the hospital. 
With the exception of Ihe kitchen and laundry, 
which will be of brick, all the buildings are of wood 
with brick foundation. The individual structures 
are : The administrative and dining-hall buildings, 
each three stories high, situated in the centre of the 
block, opposite each other, and on either side of the 
centre of the covered corridor, which is 556 feet 
long and 18 feet wide, and runs lengthwise of the 
block ; the kitchen and laundry, back of the dining- 
rooms ; the chapel, at the south end of the corridor ; 
the gate-house, stable, morgue, operating room, 
dressing room, etc., scattered about in various 



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GENERAL REVIEW 



45 



places ; and lastly, six pavilions, each two stories 
high, and each designed to accommodate sixty-four 
patients (with their nurses), thirty-two on a floor. 
It is proposed to have eventually twelve pavilions, 
to be built in pairs opposite each other on either 
'side of the long corridor and parallel to the main 
buildings ; the first pairs on either side of the main 
[buildings being a hundred feet from them, the second 
pairs a hundred feet from the first, and so on. But 
the present purpose is to build only six of these 
pavilious, which will give the hospital a capacity j 
for only three hundred and eighty-four patients, 
and will either necessitate the retention of the old 
buildings at North Beach for some patients, or re- 
quire the erection of new pavilions almost imme- 
diately, if overcrowding, so much complained of 
(before, is to be avoided. However, we are not dis- 
posed to find fault, as iu any event, the new accom- 
modations will be far superior to those we have 
wJJ'ered under so long. 

I For some years our private hospitals have greatly 
lexcelled the nublic institutions. This was not al- 
ways so. When built, in 1853, the United States 
[Marine Hospital, on Bincon Point, was one of the 
[finest and most conspicuous structures in the city. 
It was calculated to contain about eight hundred pa- 
tients, and must have been planned by one who had 
jthe most extravagant anticipations of the growth of 
San-Francisco, as it has rarely had over a hundred 
inmates. Though a considerable distance from the 
settled part of the city, when built, it is now so sur- 
rounded by improvements that its site has become 
desirable for commercial purposes, and strenuous 
efforts have been made for its removal. Extensive 
grading of the surrounding property has left the 
building upon a high embankment and somewhat 
impaired its foundation, though it is believed that 
any further injury might be prevented by proper 
care. The severe earthquake too, of 1S68, did much 
to render the building unsafe, and it was soon after- 
jwards vacated. It is unknown what disposition is to 
ibe made of the structure. The patients have been 
jmoved from one locality after another, since their 
.exodus and are apparently as far from the" promised 
land " as ever. 

Besides the institutions enumerated above, there 
are several smaller ones which have been estab- 
lished through the munificence of our citizens, and 
whose names indicate their special uses ; these are 
the State Woman's Hospital, the San Francisco 
Woman's Hospital, the Foundling and Lying-in 
Asylum, etc., etc. 

At a rough estimate it may be stated that our city 
hospitals, public and private, (exclusive of the old 
Marine Hospital building, now vacant) can accom- 
imodate from thirteen hundred to fourteen hundred 
patients, and that the average number which they 
[actually contain does not vary much from one thou- 
sand. 

In the Fall of 1865 was created the San Francisco 
I Health office; before this time no mortuary records 
| had been preserved by the city. In 1870, a bill 
[passed the Legislature organizing a city Board of 
Health, and giving it control of the Health Office 
and the appointments in all the public charitable 
institutions of the city and county. From a small 
beginning, the Health department has grown into a 
I very important branch of -the city government. It 
[controls appointments involving an expense to the 
; city of several thousand dollars a month, and has a 
general oversight of all sanitary affiiirs. If its oper- 
ations are conducted with wisdom; foresight and 
intelligence, this department is calculated to be of 
great benefit to the city. 

Associations — Protective, Literary, Etc. 

For a description of the different associations, the 
I reader is refered to the Appendix, pages 8(39-916, in 
j which will be found the officers and operations of 



each during the past year. The progress made by 
many of these associations reflects credit upon the 
members thereof, and is worthy of the liberality so 
generously extended in their support. 

Libraries. 

It may be set down as a fixed fact that there is no 
surer indication of the progression and prosperity of 
a community than the number and condition of its 
libraries. In this department, San Francisco may 
safely challenge competition with any city of its age 
in the range of civilization. The Public Libraries 
are numerous and respectable, and notwithstand- 
ing the activity and energy exhibited by her citi- 
zens in every department of life, the statistics of 
these institutions prove beyond controversy that 
they are at the same time ess'eutially a reading peo- 
ple. Not physical alone, but mental activity is a 
prominent characteristic of our population. 

In addition to these libraries, several of the hotels 
of the city are provided with large and well-select- 
ed collections of books for the use of guests. That 
belonging to the What Cheer House numbers about 
seven thousand volumes of well-selected works, 
connected with which is an extensive cabinet of 
specimens in natural history, and a large number of 
paintings, with a marble bust by Powers, copied by 
that artist from his statue of California, and a fancy 
head iu marble by Gault, an eminent sculptor. 

Want of space prevents a reference iu detail to 
the numerous public libraries in this city, prominent 
among which may be named the Mercantile Library. 
Association, containing thirty thousand volumes ; 
Odd Fellows', twenty thonsaud ; Mechanics' Insti- 
tute, nineteen thousand ; San Francisco Law Li- 
brary, six thousand ; Young Men's Christian Asso- 
ciation, four thousand ; California Pioneers, fifteen 
hundred and fifty ; San Francisco Verein, four 
thousand. 

Fire Department. 

The new paid Fire Department has been in opera- 
tion since December 3d, 1867, and has fully met the 
expectations of those under whose direction its man- 
agement is placed. On page 804 of this volume will 
be found the law organizing the Department ; and 
on page 863 is a description in detail, in which will 
be found a mass of information concerning the dif- 
ferent companies, useful to its members and inter- 
esting to every citizen. 

Local Manufactures. 
Manufactures are in themselves a wonderful 
source of wealth and material prosperity to any 
community in which they are wisely fostered ; but 
when supplemented by a lavish abundance of raw 
material possessing the qualities of cheapness and 
excellence, and are prosecuted in a country whose 
climate renders every day in the year available for 
active operations, they assume a position of trans- 
ceudant importance. These are the more salient 
points of advantage pertaining to manufactures in 
California, although in many localities outside of 
San Francisco they have the additional aid of copi- 
ous, felicitously distributed water power, and good 
lumber supplies. In the metropolis, where Bteam 
is exclusively the motive power, greater difficulties 
have presented themselves by reason of the cost for 
fuel ; the value of land as sites for suitable build- 
ings, high rents and high rates of interest. Severe as 
have been the triak of our entire metropolitan 
manufacturers, they have been surmounted with an 
energy and perseverance, which more than any 
other one tiling demonstrates the unyielding pluck 
and nerve of our people. Nearly all the great man- 
ufacturing centers of the globe owe their success 
to the abundance of cheap fuel, cheap iron and 
cheap money at their command. Of this fact, Eng- 
land is the most striking example. Dependent upon 



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46 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



all tbe rest of the world for not only tbe bulk of 
raw materials which ber skilled workmen convert 
into fabrics of prime necessity and inexhaustible 
consumption, but even for the very food necessary 
for tbe support of ber people, she is, at this day, 
the great work-shop of the globe, controlling its 
commerce, and dictating much of its policy. Penn- 
sylvania, Massachusetts and New York forcibly 
show the wonderful ascendancy of extensive manu- 
facturing interests in the annals of the Nation. It 
is not necessary to' enter upon an elaborate discus- 
sion of so vital a point iu a cursory treatise on the 
present status of our manufacturing industries, to 
which these remarks are merely introductory. Ev- 
ery reader will form his own conclusions of our 
progress in this department of productive industry, 
by perusing the subjoined statements. As the cen- 
tering point of capital, and the population, commerce 
and enterprise which capital naturally attracts, 
San Francisco has necessarily become also the cen- 
tral point of the mechanic arts on the Pacific slope 
of this continent. 

Her progress in this direction has been facilitated 
within late years by the working of large native 
coal mines contiguous to the theatre of operations ; 
trie consequent decline in the cost of material for 
generating steam ; the successful convertion of crude 
petroleum into fuel for that purpose, although not 
yet utilized on a large scale ; the construction of 
railroad communication with the interior, and the 
great east, and the gradual, but certain decline 
of interest rates to a standard that will warrant the 
employment of -capital in manufacturing enterpris- 
es. That more extensive and varied operations 
in this field of productive industry have become an 
actual necessity, imposed by the growth of our 
population and the consequent increased consump- 
tion of manufactured articles, can scarcely be doubt- 
ed in the face of the following statistical deductions 
arrived at by the writer of a well considered article 
in the Overland Monthly. He says : 

"In 1868 we bought foreign goods to the amount of 
115,000,000, and Eastern goods, $43,000,000 ; paid 
freights and duties. $16,000,000 ; so that, the total 
cost to us (in first hands) was $74,000,000. We re- 
sold of these goods to the amount of $5,000,000 ; 
probably one-third of the freight money was paid 
outagainin the port — say $2,500,000 ; the balance 
was remitted to owners ; giving a total of $67,000,- 
000 to be remitted. During the first nine months of 
the current year, we have purchased to the amount 
of $43,300,(100 ; have paid freights and duties. $13,- 
700,000 ; total, (iu first hands) $57,000,000. We 
have resold of the goods and been repaid of the 
freight money, $5,500,000 ; leaving to be remitted 
for, $51,500,000. In the twenty-one months, the 
gross remittance called for is $118,500,000. On this 
account, our remittance in produce has been $30,- 
000,000 ; railroad bonds, $6,000,000 ; the balance, 
treasure, $« ? 500,000. * * * Of said total, 
foreign foods called for (including their duties and 
freight) $13,750,000 ; leaving, as remittance on our 
Atlantic account, $74,750,000. ' That sum— paid to 
the Atlantic in less than two vears — was composed 
of $8,000,000 paid to their ship-owners, and the bal- 
ance to their manufacturers. The whole of these 
Atlantic i;oodK were manufactured. More than half 
their value represented the wages that had been 
paid in their manufacture. In less than two years, 
then, we have paid $40,000,000 directly as wages to 
Eastern mill-hands and Lynn boot-makers. * * 
We pay freights on that Atlantic merchandise, $5,- 
000,000 per annum ; the wages paid on it amount to 
$-'5,000,000. We can afford, therefore, to pay our 
workmen about one-fifth more wajjes than are paid 
at the East. During the same period of twenty-one 
months, the product of bullion and surplus of raw 
produce united were insufficient to settle the trade- 
balance, and the previous stock of coin was drawn 



upon, to the amount of about $7,000,000, to make up 
the deficiency." 

It must be evident from the foregoing unpleasant 
exhibit that to continue such a state of dependence 
upon outside resources must eventuate ruinously, as, 
in the course of time, we should not possess the 
wherewith to pay for our purchases. Able minds 
became deeply interested in the solution of this 
problem, and, as a reanimating influence, recourse 
was had to grand annual displays of our manufac- 
turing industries, at which the freest competition 
was invited, and suitable recognition given to merit. 
Stimulated by the renown achieved in several im- 
portant branches, and the pecuniary success attend- 
ing it, our manufactories have received an impulse 
which promises to enlarge the field, and rule out of 
ourmarkets many lines of goods that have beeu here- 
tofore the exclusive products of exterior industries. 
In the mean time, our mercantile houses have been 
vigorously seconding the efforts of local manufac- 
turers by regaining possession of markets temporar- 
ily lost to us by reason of the facilities which the 
transcontinental railroads furnished for the intro- 
duction of cheap Eastern fabrics. Experience has 
convinced interior consumers that articles of Cali- 
fornia make, although of higher first cost than those 
of Eastern composition, invariably give better satis- 
faction, being more durable, of superior quality, and 
of pure raw materials. A revulsion of trade has 
been the result, and under its influence, our manu- 
factories, during 1871, were in a much more pros- 
perous condition than for two years anterior, with 
the gratifying prospect of greater development in 
quantity as well as variety. That our whole ener- 
gies have not been confined to commerce, mining 
aud agriculture, is sufficiently attested by the eight 
bundled and odd factories of different kinds which 
pulsate aud throb within the precincts of this me- 
tropolis, employing an aggregate capital of $12,5001 
000, consuming raw material to the value of $24,- 
000,000 annually, and turning out manufactured ar- 
ticles worth $16,000,000. Foremost among the me- 
chanical arts is the production of iron and steel, as it 
supplies the machinery and implements requisite for 
the prosecution of all other branches of industry. 
Oar leading iron foundries are the Union, Miner's, 
Fulton, Vulcan, iEtna, Pacific, Golden State, Phoe- 
nix, Pioneer, Portland, California, Eureka, Oc- 
cidental, Columbia, Eisdon Boiler Works, and the 
Pacific Polling Mill Company. All of these are 
in a high condition of effectiveness, being in full 
blast, and using at least thirty per cent, more 
raw material than usual. These establishments are 
large and complete, possessing all- the requisite ap- 
pliances for the production of the several specialties 
to which they are devoted. The aggregate value 
of castings turned out during the year 1871 was not 
less than $3,000,000, and this amount has been stead- 
ily increasing under the pressure of augmented for- 
eign, as well as domestic, requirement. The total 
number of bands employed is about thirteen bund 
red, subject to temporary modifications. Japan and 
China have been added to the list of our customers 
in this line of trade, and although their demands as 
yet are comparatively small, there is reason to hope 
that they will achieve signal proportions at no dis- 
tant date. The onward strides recently made by Ja 
pan necessitates the use of improved machinery and 
agricultural implements, while the geographical 
position and superior facilities possessed by San 
Francisco point to ber as being the natural market 
of supplies. 

The Pacific Rolling Mills commenced operations 
in August, 1866, and have been established on a 
large scale, with first class appointments and ahuud 
ant working capital. They are eligibly located, con 
veuient to deep water, and readily accessible to ship 
of heavy tonnage. This establishment Mils an im- 
portant void, and is in all respects an invaluable ad 



HUNTINGTON, HOPKINS & CO., Wholesale Hardware and Iron, Cor. Bush, and Market 



C. P VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Jewelry and Albums. 



GENERAL REVIEW. 



47 



dition to our artificial resources, rendering us quite 
independent of eastern manufacturers for an exten- 
sive line of articles indispensable to progress. An- 
chors, chains, steamship shafts of the largest dimen- 
sions, railroad iron, and a multiplicity of other equally 
valuable aids to commerce, manufactures and agri- 
culture, are the products of this prominent industry. 

The Union Foundry is the pioneer on this coast, 
having beeu commenced in a very humble and un- 
pretending manner in 1849, but has kept pace with 
the growth of the city and State, and now covers au 
area of 50,000 square feet, on which every branch 
of the business is conducted, with eminent skill and 
success. 

The Miners' Foundry is amply supplied with the 
requisites for conducting a large business, and em- 
ploys an average of one hundred and fifty hands ; 
the number varying somewhat to correspond with 
the pressure upon its capabilities. Its aunual con- 
sumption of the raw material is about 2,200 tons of 
iron, pig aud wrought, and between 700 and 800 
tons of coal. 

In 1850, the Pacific Iron Works were added to our 
growing manufacturing iulerests, aud have met with 
very gratifying success. Engine lathes, iron plau- 
ers, drills, punches, shears, and many other tools 
aud implements of kindred character are made here 
in great excellence. From one hundred and thirty 
to one hundred and forty hands are almost con- 
stantly employed, aud the consumption of raw ma- 
terials amounts annually to 800 tons of coal aud 
2,000 tons of iron, including pig, bar, and plate. 

Stove castings, ornamental iron fronts for build- 
ings, fences, etc., are specialties in the iEtiia Works, 
which consume an average of 700 tons of iron, and 
employ 31 men. 

Iron castings of every possible description used in 
the construction of buildings, are turned out in quan- 
tities to suit at the Atlas Works, which keep a force 
of thirty men in constant occupation. Much of the 
iron which adorns the fronts of many buildings in 
San Francisco was the product of this establishment. 

The Fulton Works employ sixty men, and con- 
sume annually 000 tons of iron aud about 400 tons 
of coal. 

Iron safes, doors, shutters, vaults, mantels, etc., 
are the regular products of the Phoenix Works, oc- 
cupying the time and skill of 25 workmen and con- 
suming between 280 and 300 tons of iron every 
year. 

The Empire, Pioneer, Eureka, Columbia and 
other foundries, are all in the full tide of successful 
operation, while the Risdon Boiler Works find no 
lack of demand for the admirable products of its 
skill and industry; nor is this demand glutted by 
the large surplus furnished by the Portland Boiler 
Works. 

It has become proverbial that machinery of nearly 
all kinds — especially for mining purposes, agricul- 
tural implements and mechanics' tools — are made in 
San Francisco of a better quality and more service- 
able character than anywhere else in the Union. A 
knowledge of this important fact, as ascertained by 
actual use and comparison, is driving foreign and 
Eastern fabrics of this kind from all our domestic 
mark&ts, as well as those of distant interior point6 
such as Utah, Idaho, Montana, Arizona and even 
New Mexico. Fanning machines, corn - shellers, 
and other simple implements of kindred character, 
aud of Sau Francisco manufacture, are now fre- 
quently seen among the Pimo, Maricopa and Papago 
Indians, to whom they prove invaluable assistants. 

Of notable importance are the Selby Silver and 
Lead Smelting and Reduction Works, covering a 
vast expanse and fitted with every appliance for 
conducting these operations on a grand scale. They 
are the most extensive and complete in the Union, 
and are susceptible of being greatly enlarged. This 
establishment is most advantageously located, at the 



very edge of deep water, where the heaviest ships 
can* load with facility and dispatch. The works are 
now capable of consuming 1,200 tons of lead aud sil- 
ver ore per month, for refining, and 1,001) tons per 
month for smelting and reduction. On several oc- 
casions 1,000 tons of pig-lead per month have been 
landed in New York, and a regular monthly supply 
of from 400 to 500 tons is maintained for exportation 
to the East, besides the large quantities required for 
domestic aud interior consumption. The superiority 
of our lead is now universally admitted, while the 
quality of the sheet lead, lead pipe, aud shot turned 
out at the Shot. Tower — which is an auxiliary to the 
Smelting and Refiuiug Works — is not equaled by the 
like fabrics of other places. Two sets of hands are 
employed, night and day, and number collectively 
over 130 men, many of them having families which 
are comfortably aud independently supported through 
the agency of this great industry. In addition to the 
lead obtained from the ores by these works, large 
quantities of gold and silver ore are also extracted, 
amounting during the past year to the handsome 
sum of over $800,000. The importance of such en- 
terprises cannot be over-estimated. Large and nu- 
merous as are the gold, silver, lead, copper and zinc 
working establishments of San Francisco, they are 
not yetmdequate to the full and efficient working of 
those leading interests, but their capacity is capable 
of indefinite extension, with the prospect of being 
fully taxed at no very remote period. 

This city contains fourteeu different establishments 
devoted to the manufacture of gold and silverware, 
employing an aggregate capital of $225,000, and 
fabricating articles valued at $430,003 per annum. 

The business of assaying and 'refining gold aud 
silver is energetically pursued, with profit, affording 
large facilities, indispensable to a first-class gold 
aud silver producing region. Heavy sums, formerly 
shipped to Oriental countries in Mexican dollars, as 
the only exchangeable medium for leas, silks, spices, 
etc., are now forwarded in refined silver and gold 
bars, facilitating commerce, aud rendering our pre- 
cious metals available for trade on a more liberal 
basis. Most of the gold and silver coined at the 
Branch Mint, is now refined at private offices. 
Nearly one-half the entire gold aud silver product of 
this Coast is refined in San Francisco. 

Our wooden fabrics are diversified and important, 
although for some of the materials employed we are 
dependent upon Eastern supplies. This is especially 
the case in the manufacture of wagons, buggies, 
carriages, and other articles requiting- the use of 
hickory, white oak and walnut. We are fairly fur- 
nished' with saw mills ; sash, door and blind facto- 
ries ; cooperages ; furniture makers ; billiard table 
constructors ; piano makers ; wooden ware aud 
broom manufacturers ; boat builders ; and other 
similar concerns, numbering one hundred and twen- 
ty-two, turning out an aggregate annual value of 
$4,000,000 worth of perfected articles. 

The brass foundries of San Francisco are six in 
number, with a joint capacity for running about 180 
tons of brass and copper per year, and employing, 
in the aggregate, from 150 to 160 men. 

A. S. Hallidie is proprietor of the only wire and 
rope works on the Coast. The establishment went 
into operation in 1857, and has met with a large 
measure of success, the demand being somewhat 
urgent, and steady. This gentleman has recently 
invented a cheap and ready mode for the convey- 
ance of ores to mill, by means of buckets or cars 
suspended on wire ropes, which traverse mountain- 
ous ridges inaccessible to ordinary modes of trans- 
portation. The works are capable of supplying 
from twelve hundred to fourteen hundred tons of 
wire rope per annum, besides manufacturing largely 
in the way of screens, sieves, wire cloth, cables for 
suspension bridges, and other like articles. 

1 he Woolen Mills of San Francisco have earned 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street, Porte Monnaiea and Keticules. 



Jj'or Photographic or Stereoscopic views examine W ATKINS', opp. Lick House entrance. 



48 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



a worldwide celebrity for the admitted superiority 
of the goods manufactured by then, and the extent 
t<> which their operations have reached. In 1858 the 
Pioneer Woolen Mills were erected at Black Point, 
but did not go into active operation until the year 
subsequent. Its productive power admits of the 
annual consumption of 3,000,000 pounds of wool, 
which is manufactured into blankets, broadcloths, 
twi rils. cassi meres, and table covers; Three bund- 
led and fifty-five persons of various ages, sexes and 
nationalities compose the operative force in its sev- 
eral departments. The goods are of admirable text- 
ure and superior finish, finding ready sale and large 
consumption. 

The Mission Woolen Mills having combined with 
the Pacific Woolen Mills, do a very large and thriv- 
ing business. The products of this establishment 
entered into competition with those of many other 
countries at the grand "Exposition Universelle" at 
Palis, and carried off the prize for superior excel- 
lence. The Mission Works proper were erected in 
1861, having a greater capacity than any other like 
factory in the State. Since its combination with the 
Pacific Mills its range of textile fabrics has been 
materially enlarged and diversified, including very 
superior blankets, broadcloths, eassimeres, tweeds, 
flannels, shawls, cloakings, hosiery, and all^orts of 
knitted goods. The joint consumption of these mills 
amounts to nearly 3,000,0(10 pounds of wool and 
200,000 pounds of cotton annually, giving employ- 
ment to between 700 and 800 operatives, male and 
female. The amount of capital invested is over one 
million of dollars, and the value of the products 
yearly turned out is from $2,800,000 to §3, 000,000. 
Large supplies of Australian wool have been recently 
imported for these works, winch will still further 
enlarge their field of operations, manufacturing lines 
of goods not heretofore made on this coast. The 
stock of raw material on hand is quite sufficient for 
the entire consumption of 187:2, and being obtained 
on favorable terms will prove a profitable invest- 
ment. 

A rather isolated representative of its class is the 
Pacific Cordage Factory, organized in 1856, and 
now grown to large proportions. Its extreme length 
is 1,500 feet, while the building which contains the 
spinning department is 100 feet long by -10 feet wide. 
It is driven by powerful machinery, employe over 
50 hands, and consumes annually more than 2,000,- 
1)00 pounds of the law material. 

In contrast with these single industries are the 
twelve tanneries of San Francisco, producing each 
year a large amount of manufactured goods, superior 
in quality to that of eastern make. We have been 
not only sufficiently provided by these establish- 
ments, hut have a considerable surplus of California 
tanned leather for export. 

Of glass factories we have two. jointlv employing 
from 100 to 110 hands, and producing about $200,000 
worth of manufactured articles every year. At these 
nearly all kinds of glass, with the exception of flint, 
are furnished for the market. Supplementary to these 
works is an establishment for making French plate 
glass f.>r mirrors, and for re-silvering or removing 
blemishes from imported articles of this kind. Cut- 
ting, grinding, polishing and ornamenting glassware 
is also prosecuted to some extent in this city, but not. 
sufficiently to supply our growing wants in this de- 
partment. 

We boast the possession of two candle factories, 
jointly producing from 00,000 to 70,000 boxes per 
year. The consumption of candles has now reached 

to 270,000,000 boxes per annum, equal to 5,-10(1, I 

pounds, with an ever increasing demand, especially 
for mining and tunneling purposes. This impor- 
tant industry is, however, hampered by the duty of 
one cent per pound levied on imported tallow — for, 
San Francisco being the only portion of the Union 
which imports that article, (the Atlantic cities be- 



ing all exporters) the tax is partial and injuriously 
discriminating. Efforts are on foot to obtain the 
abolition of this tax, and give our local manufac- 
turers an equal opportunity with others throughout 
the country. 

Some thirteen local soap factories furnish these 
cleansing products to the people of this coast. They 
turn out in the neighborhood of 12,000,000 pounds 
per year, including all varieties, such as plain, fancy, 
ornamental, toilet, and washing powders — enough to 
supply all our own wants, besides exporting largely 
to Mexico, Central and South America, the Pacific 
Oceanica, and British Columbia. 

The glue factory is flourishing, making enough 
for home consumption and considerable for export. 
The same concern also makes nea'sfoot oil. 

The several oil works of San Francisco include 
those for refining crude petroleum, sperm and whale 
oils, the manufacture of linseed oil, and expressing 
oil from sunflower, castor and other seeds. They 
are all doing an active and lucrative business. The 
Learning Petroleum Company, recently organized in 
this city, is now engaged in furnishing considerable 
quantities of crnde petroleum for gas companies, 
who refine it for market and convert it into 
gas. 

Several match factories are in full and paying 
operation. But a few years ago we were wholly 
dependent on outside sources for these articles of 
constant and large demand; we now export them in 
great quantities" During 1871 the Metropolitan 
Company turned out 37,310 gross ; the San Fran- 
cisco Company, 30,000 do ; Eureka Company, 30,000 
do ; and other factories, 10,000 do — the sales of lo- 
cal matches for the same year reached 100,000 gross, 
stamped, and the amount paid for stamps was $144,- 
000, currency. 

Several marble works are comprised among our 
local industries, with an aggregate production val- 
ued at $250,000 per year, "employing the regular 
services of 40 men, who are engaged in making 
mantels, monuments, grave stones, billiard-table 
beds, ornaments, etc. 

Manufactured stone has recently entered the list 
of our local productions, and is becoming very pop- 
ular, being readily molded into any required shape, 
and possessing qualities equal to the genuine rock. 
The material manufactured under the Rausome 
patent, by the Pacific Stone Co. in this city, resem- 
bles the best of natural stone, and is highly recom- 
mended for building purposes. The ornamental 
portions of the front of the new building of the 
First Congregational Church on Post Street, corner 
of Mason, is composed of pressed stone, manufac- 
tured by this company. 

The various potteries are doing well, and suf- 
fice for local needs in their respective lines. 
The wares of the Albion Pottery, J. Brow ell, 
proprietor, have obtained a wide reputation tor use- 
fulness and durability. This gentleman has added 
many improvements to his works, suggested by a 
recent visit to the East and Great Britain, and the 
quality of his wares will compare favorably with 
tnose manufactured elsewhere. His sanitary appli- 
ances are believed to be superior to all others. See 
advertising department page 3. § 

Every description of drain and water pipe is man- 
ufactured from cement by Martin Padey, at his 
Works, corner of Francisco and Taylor streets. 
Pipes, well seasoned, and of every size, from four 
inches to two feet in diameter, are kept always on 
hand, and in quantities to supply orders without 
delay. See advertisement page 515. 

Of hoots and shoes there are a large number of 
makers, employing a great many hands, and produc- 
ing very excellent wares. This business was trenched 
upon importations, which have met with a corres- 
ponding decline. 

In a new country, badly provided with roads, and 



HUNTINGTON", HOPKINS & CO., Agents Jessop & Sons' Steel, Cor. Bush and Market,] 



C. P. VAN" SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Trunks and Valises. 



GENERAL REVIEW. 



49 



with long stretches between inhabited places, the 
art of making saddles becomes a leading neces- 
sity, and is always one of the first industries claim- 
ing attention. Its prosecution in this city has been 
on an extensive scale, employing many bands and 
the use of considerable capital. The number of 
establishments engaged in manufacturing saddles 
and harness in San Francisco is about 33, which 
turn out articles of great variety and superior 
quality. 

Next, in natural order, are factories for the pro- 
duction of vehicles of all sorts, of which large num- 
bers are annually made in this city, employing over 
three hundred men, and turning out fabrics to the 
amount of nearly one million of dollars per annum, 
and supplying almost the entire home demand. All 
the cars required for domestic horse railroads are 
now obtained from our own workshops, while a 
considerable requirement has sprung up from 
Japan, China, and other foreign countries washed 
by the Pa< Hi''. 

In t lie matter of furniture, we have almost wholly 
thrown off our long- continued dependence upon 
Eastern makers ; but we are still compelled to im- 
port many of the finer and more costly woods used 
in this industry. The business has largely increased 
within the year past, and with sufficient success to 
warrant an early extension. The amount of capital 
employed is nearly two millions of dollars, with a 
proportionable working force of men and machinery. 
Brewing is one of our most extensively prosecuted 
lines of business, comprising twenty-four establish- 
ments, which jointly produce over 3,000,000 gallons 
of malt liquors per annum. In this industry Cali- 
fornia hops have recently acquired a leading reputa- 
tion. They were formerly esteemed as inferior, 
but are now admitted to be much better than any 
imported, and are more valued in Eastern markets 
as well as our own. 

The cigar factories of San Francisco bave ob- 
tained marked importance, amounting to 149 in 
number, of which 139 employ Chinese exclusively, 
and producing in 1871 the enormous quantity of 
65,000,000 cigars, besides cigaritos in great num- 
bers. The interior is almost wholly supplied by 
our local establishments. . 

A great many persons have embarked their capi- 
tal in the meat-packing and curing business, with 
varying success ; but it must be confessed that the 
quality of California prepared bacon, bams, lard, 
pork aud beef is not equal to the imported. There 
is something unfavorable in the generally high tem- 
perature of this climate which compels a resort to 
refrigerating absolutely necessary. It is hoped that 
some method will be discovered to render our local 
products in tin's line equal to the best obtained from 
the East or Oregon. 

The canning and preserving of fruits and vegeta- 
bles, has occupied the attention of skill and capital to a 
considerable extent, and has been attended with 
sufficient success to warrant a greater development. 
With the exception of certain superior articles of 
English and Freuch preparation, our local indus- 
tries supply all home wants, as well as those of 
adjacent States and Territories. 

Some idea of the extent to which the wooden 
ware and broom manufactures of San Francisco 
bave reached, may be inferred from the following 
facts: In 1871, two establishments used 1,850 cords 
of cedar and sugar-pine, bolts in the composition of 
pails, tubs and buckets, 045,000 broom handles, and 
30,000 syrup kegs. 

San Francisco contains eight flouring mills, which 
turn out annually between 400,000 and 450,000 bar- 
rels of superior flour, besides Indian meal, groats, 
hominy and feed stuff's. They employ a large 
number of hands and teams, and use heavy amounts 
of capital. Our progress in this direction has been 
remarkable as well as emiuentlv successful. 



Our sugar refineries are conducted on an exten- 
sive scale, having a joint capacity to refine more 
than double the quantity of sugar consumed on this 
coast, although our requirements are larger in pro- 
portion than those of any other section of the world 
— amounting in 1871 to 51,130,73(5 pounds. Our im- 
ports of foreign raws for the year specified reached 
49,674,000 pounds, a great proportion of which was 
refined by our local establishments, besides furnish- 
ing large supplies of syrup. 

A detailed and minute account of all our various 
manufacturing industries would exhaust infinitely 
more space than we have at command, and will not 
be expected in a work of this kind. We can there- 
fore only allude to others of more or less note, such 
as the manufacture of yeast powders, oil cloths, 
blank books, and book binding generally, ground 
coffee and spices, gloves, hats, wearing apparel, 
musical instruments, jewelry, straw, starch, leather 
hose and beltings, fireworks, moldings, and an end- 
less number of others, embracing a great variety of 
industrial pursuits, and employing a large aggregate 
amount of capital. 

Nor do the foregoing statements embrace those 
branches carried on outside of the city, many of 
which are of paraniouut importance — such as the 
California Powder Works, paper mills, stone quar- 
ries, lime and brick kilns, cement mills, potteries, 
acid factories, and numerous others, necessitating 
the outlay of large means and the employment of 
several tbousands of operatives, aided by machinery. 
Nevertheless, we have still abundant room for the 
display of enterprise and the use of capital in the 
field of manufacturing industry. Carpet and other 
works will some day be added to the list, and, in 
course of time, all the paper required for home use 
will be made on the Pacific slope, while establish- 
ments for the manufacture of small arms and other 
needed articles will be abundant enough to supply 
all our own requirements, with a large margin for 
export. 

The Electrical Construction Co. — This com- 
pany, comprised of leading telegraph men and elec- 
trical engineers, is rapidly developing the busiuess 
of manufacturing every kind of electrical machinery, 
including telegraph instruments, electro-medical ma- 
chines, batteries, electric machines and fuses for ex- 
ploding any number of blasts simultaneously, hotel 
annunciators, fire alarms, burglar alarms, and an in. 
finite variety of novel aud very valuable articles in 
their line. This company also furnishes South Am- 
erica, Mexico and Japan with most of the wires, 
insulators and other telegraph material used in those 
countries. They are now perfecting arrangements 
for manufacturing submarine telegraph cables, with 
a view to competing with England for the submarine 
telegraph business of the Pacific, and Asiatic waters. 

Their factory and salesroom is at No. 134 Sutter 
street, where they employ fifteen hands, at present, 
and will employ double that number as soon as the 
necessary machinery is erected. 

Incorporated 1871; capital, $100,000. Geo. S. 
Ladd, President ; Stephen D. Field, Superintendent. 

DiAMoNn-poiNTKD Drills. — These drills were 
first invented and used for rock drilling in 1860, by 
Professor Rodolphe Leschot, a civil engineer, resi- 
dent in Paris, France. He found that a rotating 
drill, armed with diamond points, could be made to 
bore holes in rock to great depths, and with a rapid- 
ity hitherto unknown. In 1863, letters patent were 
.granted him throughout the continent of Europe and 
in this country, which letters have, by mesne assign- 
ments, become the property of Messrs. A. J. Sever- 
ance & Co., of this city. This firm also manufac- 
tures various styles of drilling machines, of their 
own invention, which are used for mining, quarry- 
ing, shafting, tunneling, grading, prospecting, sub- 



JOJNTES, PULLMAN & CO., 118 Sansom Street, Sewing and Embroidering Silks. 



"OTATKINS' YO-SEMITE ART GALLERY, 26 Monte. St., opp. Lick House Entrance. 



50 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



marine blasting, boring artesian wells, etc. They 
are successfully employed throughout this coast and 
the Eastern Suites. Offices 1-1 and 26 Wall Street, 
New York, imd 315 California Street, this city. 

Brass and Bki.l Foundry. — The new and ex- 
tensive works of W. T. Garratt & Co., situated 
on the corner of Fremont and Natoma streets, 
San Francisco, are the largest Brass Works on the 
Pacific coast. W. T. G. & Co., commenced business 
in San Francisco at a very early day and have stead- 
ily increased their facilities and their manufactures 
are now widely and favorably known. Their present 
works, (the buildings for which cost about $24,000) 
occupy a space of 75x1371 feet, and consist of sub- 
stantial earthquake proof brick buildings of two 
stories — the lower one being 16 feet and the upper 
15 feet in clear hight, the buildings being divided 
into departments as follows: Stock and wareroom, 
40x75 feet ; braes finishing shop, 40x75 feet; ma- 
chine shop for heavier work, 37x75 feet; pattern 
shop, 37x75 feet; foundry, 37x75 feet. The works 
will accommodate 100 workmen; the foundry being 
capable of turning out about two tons a week of 
the smaller kind of castings, and a much larger 
amount when the work isof a heavier character. 
The manufactures to be found at these works in- 
clude church ami other bells, brasswork for marine 
and stationery engines, water gates, steam and water 
valves and cocks, all kinds of fittings for steam, 
fire and hydraulic machinery, hose couplings, gongs, 
steam, vacuum and water gauges, brass tubing, oil 
pumps and lubricators ; and all such articles as may 
be found or manufactured at a first-class establish- 
ment of the kind. 

Office at the Works, corner Fremont and Natoma 
streets. 

"Water Companies. 

Spring valley water works. 

The original Spring Valley Water Company was 

incorporated in June, 1858, and in July, 1861, the 

water from Islais creek was introduced into the 

city by the company. 

The present organization is formed by a consoli- 
dation of the San Francisco City and Spring Valley 
Water Works Companies. Date of incorporation, 
January, 1865. 

The present works receive their supply from two 
sources — Lobos and Pillarcitos creeks. Lobos creek 
is a stream of pure, fresh water, emptying into the 
bay near Point Lobos, which supplies" two millions 
five hundred thousand gallons daily. The distance 
of the stream from tbe Plaza is "three and a half 
miles, in a direct line. The water is, elevated by 
four double acting pumps, with a capacity of four 
millions of gallons daily, propelled by two steam 
engines of two hundred and fifty horse "power each, 
to the distributing reservoirs on the adjacent hills, 
the highest being thiee hundred and eight feet above 
the city base, located at the corner of Hyde and 
Greenwich streets ; the second, which is "situated 
immediately below, at the intersection of Hyde and 
Francisco .-tieets, is one huudred and fortv-five feet 
above the city base. The capacity of the first is 
four millions of gallons, and that of the lower, seven 
millions. 

Pillarcitos Creek is situated east of tbe coast range 
of mountains, distant from San Francisco about fif- 
teen miles, in a southerly direction, and seven hund- 
red feet above the level of the sea. 

A large dam has been constructed in tbe Pillar- 
citos Valley, which is ninety-two feet in hight aud 
6ix bundled feet long, containing one thousand mill- 
ions of gallons, and is drawn lroui as required in 
the city reservoirs. From the ea6t end of tunnel 
number one, the water is conducted by a Hume five 
by two feet, into a filter and sand-box,"in its passage 
through which it is cleansed from vegetable matter 
and sediment ; it tbeu enters tunnel number two, 



where the water undergoes another purification, 
and after passing through thirteen miles of thirty- 
inch wrought iron pipe, and one mile of forty-inch 
flume, enters tunnel number three, from whence 
Lake Honda and the city distributing reservoirs are 
supplied. 

Lake Honda has a capacity of thirty-five millions 
of gallons, and supplies the "city by means of three 
miles of cast iron mains to the reservoir on the corner 
of Buchanan and Market streets, which contains two 
millions of gallons, and was the main distributing 
reservoir, supplying two-fifths of the city. 

The Company has constructed a new reservoir, of 
fourteen millions of gallons capacity, near Holly 
Park, called College Hill Reservoir, which is the 
main distributing reservoir for the lower part of the 
city. There is also a large reservoir iu San Andreas 
Valley, thirteen miles south of the citv, containing 
four thousand six hundred aud fifty millions of gal- 
lons. The water level is four hundred and thirty 
feet above the city base, from which the city wiil 
have a never-failing supply of the pure element. 

The present amount of pipe laid down in the city 
proper, is one hundred and thirty miles. Capital 
stock of the company, $8,000,000, in eighty thousand 
shares of $100 each. 

LAKE TAHOE AND SAN FRANCISCO WATER WORKS. 

The rapidly increasing population of San Fran- 
cisco has caused our citizens to study the momentous 
question of its water resources. As it is possible 
that at no distant day the present means of supply 
may become entirely insufficient for our demands, 
a number of gentlemen conceived the idea of bring- 
ing the waters of Lake Tahoe to this city: To 
show the vastness of the undertaking, we give the 
following extent aud cost of the work : Lake Tahoe 
has a superficial area of two hundred and forty 
square miles, with an average depth of fifteen hund- 
red feet; it is situated iu the Sierra Nevada mount- 
ains, at an elevation of six thousand feet above the 
sea, and distant from Sau Francisco one hundred 
and fifty miles. The company have constructed a 
dam ou the Truckee river, at the outlet of the lake, 
and a second four miles below its outlet, near Squaw 
Valley. From thence the water is to be conveyed 
by aqueduct to the eastern mouth of the tunnel 
through the Sierras, and thence by canal along 
Forest Hill Divide, which includes Michigan Bluff, 
Bath, Iowa Hill, Wisconsin Hill, Yankee Jim's, 
Forest Hill, and numerous other mining camps, 
with an abundant supply of cheap water. The 
water required lor towns and cities will be taken 
out of the American River at a point above the 
mining grounds, and run in an open canal, to or 
near Auburn, aud thence by pipe one bandied and 
twelve miles to San Francisco, supplying on its 
route Sacramento, Vallejo, Benicia, Stockton, Oak- 
laud, etc., aud affording along its entire course ample 
quantities for towns, mines, mills, and agricultural 
purposes. The capital stock of the company is 
$•20,000,000, divided into twenty thousand shares of 
$1,000 each. The estimated cost is $10,000,000. 
The officers are : President and Chief Engineer, 
A. W. Von Schmidt; Trustees: A. W. Von Schmidt, 
David Hughes, Robert Simsou and Joseph Trench. 
Office: Pioneer Building, 808 Montgomery Street. 

To bring the water to San Francisco, a tunnel 
four and a half miles will be constructed through 
the mountain, connecting the lake with the north 
fork of the American River, through the bed of 
which the water will be carried about twelve miles. 

NEW WATER COMPANIES. 

During the past few years several new enterprises 
have beeu organized to supply this city and vicinity 
with water, but beyond the simple announcement 
of their incorporation, with the exception of the 
Lake Tahoe Company, but little progress has beeu 
made iu their operations. 



HUNTINGTON, HOP.KINS & CO., Wholesale Hardware and Iron, Cor. Bush and Market. 



LOW CASH RATES 

THE 





n. a. ir if ex 





ci 




CD 

CO >* 
CH f2) 
CD *— 



Life Insurance Company 

OF HARTFORD, COXT2T. 

Issues policies of Life Insurance on all the ordinary plans at lower 
rates than other mutual companies, and pays annual dividends in- 
creasing yearly. The plan called 

DEPOSIT INSURANCE, 

lately introduced by this company, is superior to any short term 
Endowment or Tontine plan, as it fixes a large surrender value for 
the policy at the end of any of its current years. 



CHAS. H. DENISON, 

GENERAL AGENT, 

331 Montgomery Street, Stevenson's Block, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

_ 



I 1 Hi 



issit mum 

No. 512 CALIFORNIA STREET, 



9 



One door west of Montgomery, 



\mm iFm,&mmB®m 



J. A. MARS, Assayer. 



ASASfBIl 01? OBIS, M11IS41 W, 



£s*33^9 S^s^s 



STAf f & BP111 






WOOL COMMISSION MERCHANTS 




625 SANSOM STREET, 



Corner ot Jackson, 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



RECEIVE CONSIGNMENTS OF 



W©8&, S^ KK'ifSK'f'HS. PBIS, Itc. 

Liberal advances made to Consignors. Keep on hand the best quality of 
"Wool Sacks, Twine and other Supplies. 



*A1 



C. P. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny St., Table and Pocket Cutlery 



ADDITIONAL NAMES, REMOVALS, CHANGES, ETC., 



RECEIVED TOO LATE FOR REGULAR INSERTION. 



Adams Henry, shoemaker with Buckingham & 
Hecht 

Adams Samuel, (Adams & Co.) dwl 814 Bush 

Adams William H., barkeeper, 318 Bu8h, dwl 7 
Liberty 

Adams & Co.. ( Samuel Adams.) druggists and apoth- 
ecaries, NW cor Post and Stockton 

Adamsou William R. H., bill broker, 408 California, 
dwl NW cor Lombard and Leavenworth 

Aguirre Peter, (Fernandez S? A.) dwl 2 Dupont PI 

Aitken C. (LoebelSf A. ) chiropodists, office aud dwl 
405 Kearny 

Allen Benjamin, (Benedict & A.) 124 Kearny 

Allen William H., attorney at law, office 716 Mont- 
gomery, dwl 101 Powell 

Altschul Charles, bookkeeper with Emil Altschul, 
dwl 736 Vallejo 

Altschul Emil, note and money broker, office 409 
California, dwl 736 Vallejo 

Amador Mining Co., office room 34, 402 Montgomery 

American, Australian and New Zealand Mercantile 
Agency, Stevens, Clarke & Co., 116 Kearny 

American Flag Mill and Mining Co., office 320 Cal 

Ames Fisher, attorney at law, office 522 Montgom- 
ery, dwl 10 Stanford 

Anderson Charles E., attorney at law, dwl 2109 
Jones 

Anderson John Jr., captain schooner Ino, dwl 2621 
Howard 

Anderson William B., clerk with H. B. Tichenor, 
dwl 2621 Howard 

Andrews Amasa B., merchandise accountant Cus- 
tom House, dwl 203 Turk 

Andrews Charles N., woodturner with Field & Frei, 
dwl 841 Mission 

Angell William C, physician, office NW cor First 
and Folsom. dwl 506 Folsom 

ANTHONY GEORGE W., real estate, office 417 
Bush, dwl 115 Turk 

Anthony Hall, G. W. Anthony proprietor, 417 Bush 

Anthony Mary E. M., (widow) female physician, 
dwl 115 Turk 

Anthony Sarah A., (widow) dwl5HaiKht 

Anthony William T., clerk with G. W. Anthony, 
dwl 115 Turk 

App Matthias J., furnished rooms, 128 Kearny 

Appel Theodore, (Samisch & A.) 343 Kearny 

Applebanm J. Rev., rabbi Congregation Tzedek, 
dwl 834 Broadway 

Arms Moses, night inspector Custom House, dwl 
609 Third 

ARMSTRONG GEORGE DARCY, attorney at 
law and proctor in admiralty, office U. S. Court 
Building, room 23, dwl 124 Stockton 

Armstrong John, (William Vale fy Co.) dwl 153£ 
Second 

Armstrong John Jr., reporter Morning Call, dwl 
928 Clay 

Aronstein Max, collector Germania Life Ins. Co., 
dwl 417 Post 

ATLANTIC AND PACIFIC TELEGRAPH CO., 
(Central Pacific Division) office 507 California 



Atmospheric Gas Co., office and manufactory 220 
Battery 

Aud Francis L., attorney at law, office 60 Mer- 
chants' Exchange, dwl 1306 Larkin 

AUSTIN & CO., (Alexander Austin and Alexan- 
der Chuholm) dry goods, 36 Montgomery 

Austrian Benevolent Society, rooms 71 New Mont 

AVY EUGENE & CO, .wine merchants, 513 Sac- 
ramento 

Babcock Fire Extinguisher, office 317 California 

Babcock H. P., physician and editor Western Lan- 
cet, office 721 Market 

Badgley Eugene F., ( Elleau & B.) dwl 434 Green- 
wich 

Bailey Alexander, bootmaker with Buckingham & 
Hecht 

Bailey Thomas, (James Hartley & Co.) dwl 1319 
Montgomery 

Bailey Thomas, wool assorter with James Hartley 
& Co., dwl 337 Bryant 

Baker Alfred W., clerk, dwl 824 WashiiiKton 

Baldwin Elias J., stockbroker, office 509 California, 
dwl 410 Geary 

Ball Dabney Rev., pastor Minna St. M. E. Church 
South, dwl 12 0'Farrell 

Ballard Edward, laundryman La Grande Laundry 

Ballenberg Nathan, band leader, dwl 711 California 

Baptiste Claude, machinist with Paul Fleury, dwl 
417 Dupont 

Barber Robert L., tailor, 327 Pine 

Baretti Madame, teacher music, dwl 783 Market 

Bargon Martin, merchant tailor, NW cor Jackson 
and Montgomery 

BARNES WILLIAM II. L., attorney at law, office 
438 Cal, dwl SW cor McAllister and Fillmore 

Barraud Louis, porter, dwl 533 Kearny 

Barrell Samuel, stockbroker, office 446 California, 
dwl 156 Third 

Barrere Louis, drayman with John C. Morrison 
Jr., dwl cor Clementina and Eighth 

Barrett J., dwl 829 Folsom 

Barrow Samuel, salesman with Engelbrecht & Lew, 
312 Front 

Barry James J., clerk New City Hall.dwl 111* Fifth 

Barry P. Oliver, law copyist, office 625 Merchant, 
dwl 25 Sixth 

Barton Robert, mining engineer, dwl 810 Leaven- 
worth 

Bartman Anton, carpenter Pioneer Woolen Fac- 
tory, dwl 1522 Dupont 

Bartman Ferdinand, carpenter Pioneer Woolen 
Factory, dwl 522 Filbert 

Bateman Isaac C, miner, dwl 555 Harrison 

Bates Cicero M. , physician and health officer Board 
of Health, office SW cor Bush and Monlgom- 
ery, dwl 206 Powell 

Bauer Charles &. Co., (Charles Kittclherger) na- 
tive wines and licjuors, SE cor Kearny and 
Commercial 

Beach Henry Martin, commission merchant, dwl 
615 Stockton 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sansom St., Ladies', Gents' & Children's Woolen Hosiery. 



For your Photographs go to WATKINS', 26 Morttg. St., opp. .Lick House entrance. 



52 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



BEACHY HILL, proprietor Lick House, W s 

Montgomery from Sutter to Post 
BEAMISH PERCY, manufacturer shirts and im- 

porter gents' furnishing goods, SE cor Third 

and Market, dwl 127 Kearny 
Beard George, calker, dwl 54 First 
Becker Peter. (Euert & B.) dwl 234 Sutter 
Bell William H., State stamp inspector, office C01 

California, dwl 514 Valencia 
Benedict &. Allen, fO. 5. Benedict and Benjamin 

AUi-ii) gents' furnishing goods, 124 Kearny 
Beneditti Louis, (Rafeto & B.J dwl 3 Bannam PI 
Bergen T. Adrian, (Biagi & B.J dwl 140(5 Powell 
Berger Gabriel, surveyor French Savings and Loan 

Society, dwl 111 Franklin 
Bergman Jacob, ( Frankenlhal $• Co.) dwl 759 

Clay 
Berrv S., landscape gardener, office 425 Washington 
Berry William O. M., (Treadwell & Co.) dwl 1716 

Turk 
Best John F., clerk, 509 Kearny 
Best Sc Belcher S. M. Co., office 419 California 
BETTS WILLIAM M. & BROTHER, Belts' car- 
riage, car and locomotive spring manufacturers, 

218 Fremont 
Betzel & Cohn, (Louis Betzel and L. M. Cohnj 

manufacturers clothing, 109 Sansom 
Biagi Domenico, (Biagi <fe Bergen) dwl 923 Wash 
Biagi & Bergen, (Domenico Biagi and T. Adrian 

Bergen) fruit and produce commission, 516 and 

518 Sansom 
Bickway Henry, dwl 700 Broadway 
Bigelow George H., with State investment and 

Insurance Co., dwl 2421 Buchanan 
Bilicke Gustave, merchant, dwl 2112 Mason 
Billings D., gas manufacturer, cor Bush and Larkin 
Billings Jennie, dressmaker, dwl 783 Market 
Binder George, manufacturer hair jewelry, 12 

Montgomery, dwl 26 Turk 
Bishop N. G., carpenter, 5 Belden, dwl 5 Harrison 

A venae 
BISHOP & MATTHEWS, (Thomas B. Bishop 

and William Matthews) attorneys at law, office 

522 Montgomery 
Bissell J. L., inspector gas meters, office SW cor 

Mission and First 
Bitter Her mine, (widow) laundry, 306 Post 
Bixby Llewellyn, (B. P. Flint fy Co.) res San 

Juan, Monterey County 
Bishop M. S. Mrs.," dressmaker, 314 Post 
Blaikie Andrew, draftsman Risdon Iron Works, 

dwl 2413 Buchanan 
Blair L., manufacturer and importer hoots and 

shoes, 9 Kearny 
Blanchetfe Louis, (Blanehctte & Van Haverbeke) 

dwl SF cor Sixth and Mission 
Blanchette & Van Haverbeke, (Louis Blanchettc 

and H //polite Van Haverbeke) boots and shoes, 

42 Sixth 
Blesi Sebastine, foreman with Buckingham & 

Hecht 
Blohme Hermann, (Grotheer & Blohme Bros.) dwl 

NE cor Second and Tehama 
Blohme John, (Grotheer & Blohme Bros.) dwl NW 

cor Sutter and Polk 
Blue Gravel M. Co., office 403 California 
Blum Isadore, furniture, 311 Pine, dwl Cosmopoli- 
tan Hotel 
BLUXOME & CASSEBOHM, (Isaac Blnxome 

and William Cassebohm) merchandise brokers 

and coal and iron dealers, 204 aud 206 Sansom 
B'nai B'rith Library Association, rooms 105 Post 
Boardman Henry W., ( Treadwell & Co.) res New 

York 
Boden John F., court room clerk, Fourth District 

Court, dwl 624 Filbert 
BOGART O. H., commission merchant, office 206 

Davis, dwl 1512 Mission 
Boland William H., bookkeeper, dwl 51 First 



Bolte W. L., commission merchant, dwl 311 Sutter 

Booth Lucius A., ( Perkins & Co.) res Oakland 

Bordeaux Board Underwriters, Henry Schroder & 
Co., agents, 433 Battery 

Bordin Joseph, dwl 824 Washington 

Bordwell W. H., (Bordwell & Matter) dwl 510 
Bryant 

Bordwell & Malter, (W. H. Bordwell and G. H. 
Matter) architects, office 48 Merchants' Exch 

Boseke William, (Joseph Wagener JJ- Co.) dwl 
1512 Stockton 

Bougraud , laundryman, dwl 1316 Dnpont 

Bourne John B., stockbroker, office 323 California, 
dwl 1022 Jackson 

Bovee William H., real estate agent, office 238 
Montgomery, dwl 115 Powell 

BOWIE HENRY P., attorney at law, office 318 
California, dwl 403 Stockton 

Bowman A., wholesale cigars, dwl 1 1 Eddy 

Bradbury William T., physician, office NE cor 
Mission and Twenty-secoud, dwl Ss Twenty- 
second bet Shotwell and Folsom 

Bradley John A., (Camroux, B. # Co.) dwl S 8 
Pacific we Laguna 

Brady Michael, stonecutter, dwl 1814 Powell 

Bragg Mary Mrs., teacher South Cosmopolitan 
Primary School, dwl 1021 Post 

Brandeustein Joseph, (A. S. Iioscnbaum & Co.) 
dwl 121 Eddy 

BRANDENSTEIN M.& CO., (La zard Godchaux) 
wholesale butchers, First Avenue, South S. F. 
office 529 Clay 

Brauuan Patrick, horseshoer, E s Belden nr Bush, 
dwl SW cor Guerrero and Sixteenth 

Brantle Gottlieb, barkeeper Swiss Brewery, dwl 
414 Dupont 

Breck Robert C, Q. M. agent Goat Island, bds 850 
Market 

Breidenstiue Leonhardt, manufacturer jewelry box- 
es, 328 Bush, dwl 1209 Kearny 

Brennan Thomas, bootmaker with Buckingham & 
Hecht 

Biiceland John M., physician, dwl 36!) Brannan 

Bridges Thomas, with J. Collins, 535 Sacramento, 
dwl Overland House 

BRIGGS EDGAR, real estate and general business 
agent, office 304 Sansom, and Tide Land com- 
missioner, office 715 Clay, dwl 33 Erie 

Brincatt Salvo, liquor saloon, W s Potrero Avenue 
bet Twenty-first and Tweuty-second 

Brodrick Richard, stockbroker, office 6 Merchants' 
Exchange, dwl 632 Sutter 

Brooks Orion, superintendent telegraphic depart- 
ment Heald's Business College, dwl 053* Minna 

BROWELL JEREMIAH, carpenter and builder 
and manufacturer waterpipe, 442 Jackson, dwl 
217 Lombard 

Brown Barbara Mrs., dressmaker, dwl 707 Vallejo 

Brown Benjamin B. , painter, cor Mission and New 
Montgomery, dwl 783 Market 

BROWN DAVID B., dealer coopers' stock, office 
S. F. & Pacific Sugar Refinery, NW cor Har- 
rison and Eighth, dwl 137 Chestnut 

Brown I. W. W. & J. B., butchers. 157 Third 

Brown Jared C, blacksmith, cor Twenty-fourth and 
Potrero Avenue 

Brown John Owen, messenger, dwl 707 Vallejo 

Brown Lizzie, dressmaker, dwl 783 Market 

Brown Richard, (Knox & B.) dwl S s Turk bet 
Pierce and Steiner 

Brown W. H, stock broker, office 121 Montgomery 

BRUNINGS M. & CO., [Henry Michaelis) grocer- 
ies and liquors and milk depot, SW cor Mission 
and Third 

Brunings Martin, (M. Brunings & Co.,) dwl SW 
cor Mission and Third. 

Brush Reuben G., (A. M. Burns & Co.,) dwl 1410 
Pine 

Buchanan Henry, liquor merchant, dwl 33 Geary 



HUNTINGTON, HOPKINS & CO., Importers Hardware and Iron, Cor. Bush and Market. 



C P. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Paper and Envelopes. 



ADDITIONAL NAMES, REMOVALS, ETC. 



53 



Buckalder E., dwl 829 Folsom 

Buck bee Charles A., assay department U. S. B. 

Mint, dwl 2217 Howard 
Buckelew T A. S., watchmaker, 44 Second 
Buel D. E., mining-, dwl 555 Harrison 
Buell Charles S., clerk Rediugton Quicksilver Co., 

dwl 435 Geary 
Bulger Jacob, hairdresser, 535 Pacific, dwl Prescott 

House 
Burdell H. & Co., (Harvey Burdell) Napa Soda 

Water Agency, office 18£ Geary 
Burdell Harvey, ( II. Burdell & Co.) dwl 629 Clay 
Burdell Harvey, agent Napa Soda water, 18£ Geary 

ter, res Napa Soda Springs 
Burge R. K., horseshoeing, E 8 Belden nr Bush 
Burgess Charles E., bookkeeper with Cyrus Adams, 

dwl 1501 Jones cor Jackson 
Burke Emma, waitingmaid, Pavilion Skating Rink 
Burlingame J. B., (Smith £ B.,) dwl 6li9 Howard 
Burnett 1\. Douglass, law student with Estee & Mc- 

Laurin, dwl 504 Powell 
BURNS A. M. & CO., (B. G. Brush) proprietors 

California, TattersalFs livery and sale stables, 

NE cor Sansom and Halleck 
BURR C. A., attorney at law, dwl 225 Ellis 
Bush Henry, (Bush & Still) dwl 704 Market 
Bush J. Deaiden, physician, office and dwl 722 Mont 
Bush & Still, (Henry Bush & Henry Still) photo- 
graphers, junction Market and Kearny 
Butler R. B. Mrs., proprietress Union House, 511 

Mission 
Buxtorf Christoph, cigars and tobacco, 423 Sansom 
Byrnes William A., {Sanborn & B.) dwl 348 Third 

California Borax Co. (Napa, Cal.) office 320 
• San^ome 

CALIFORNIA FURNITURE MANUFACTUR- 
ING CO, N. P. Cole Pres., O. W. Merriam 
Sec, salesrooms 220-226 Bush and 315-321 Pine 

California Jute Company, office 21 and 23 Battery 

California Last Factory, William H. Wing &. Co., 
proprietors, 10 Stevenson 

CALIFORNIA TATTERSALLS, A. M. Bums & 
Co., proprietors, NE cor Sansom and Halleck 

Callaghan John, deck Pavilion Skating Rink 

Campbell William T., Anglo-American Swamp Land 
Reclamation, 45 Montgomery Block 

Caniroux Murray O., (Camroux, Bradley & Co.,) 
dwl 1018 Stockton 

Camroux, Bradley & Co., (Murray O. Camroux and 
John A. Bradley,) tea brokers, 318 Front 

Card R. & Co., poultry and game, 67 California 
market 

Card Russell, (R. Card & Co.) dwl 14 Stockton 
Place 

Carlie E. J., bootmaker with Buckingham & Hecht 

CARLETON S. M., contractor night work, SE cor 
Kearny and California 

Carpenter Hugh Smith Rev., pastor Howard Pres- 
byterian Church, dwl 504 Powell 

Carpenter W. H., veterinary stables, cor Fourth 
aud Mission, dwl 757 Mission 

Carr Matthew D., printer, dwl 1016 Pine 

Carroll J., dwl 829 Folsom 

Carter F. S., clerk with B. F. Sherwood & Co., dwl 
1915 Sacramento 

Casanueva Francisco, (2°) , Consul General of Chili, 
office and dwl 27 aud 28 U. S. Court Building 

Casey Edward, merchant tailor, 79 Fourth 

Cassin C. L., physician, office and dwl 502 Wash 

Central S. M. Co., office 419 California 

Chapin Henry C, secretary American Flag M. &. 
M. Co., office 320 California 

Charpian Joseph, dwl 824 Washington 

Chase Alexander W., sub-assistant U.S. Coast Sur- 
vey, dwl 604 Geary 

CHASE ROBERT P., physician, office and dwl 
828 Howard 

Cheney M. E. Mrs., dressmaker, 303 Stockton 



Chester Frederick, salesman with Oulif, Dato & 
Co., dwl Nucleus House 

Chick A. C, stockbroker, office 500 Montgomery 

Child Edwin F., (Child & Tibhey) dwl 1618 Wash 

CHILD & TIBBEY, (Edwin F. Child and Edney 
S. Tibhey) stockbrokers, office 503 California 

Chisholm Alexander, (Austin & Co.) dwl 804 Geary 

Christenson Lars Peter, seaman, dwl 606 Third 

CHURCHILL CLARK, attorney-at-law, office 534 
California, upstairs, dwl 2722 Folsom 

CITY ACADEMY, J. K. Wilson proptr, 620 Bush 

Clarke Gus. M., (Stevens, C. & Go. and Allen, C. 
<fc Co.) dwl First Avenue nr Seventeenth 

Clason Cyrus S., (Glason & Co.) res Oakland 

Clasou R. S., (Glason & Co.) res Oakland 

Clason <fe Co., (Cyrus S. and B. S. Clason) real 
estate agents, office 607 Clay 

Clerks' Relief Society, rooms 509 Kearny 

Clinch Bryant J., architect, office 645 Market, dwl 
305 Lombard 

Cline Moses, general merchandise, 440 Broadway, 
dwl 627 Bush 

COBB HENRY A. JR., (Henry A. Cobb Jr. # 
Co.) merchant, 219 Sansom, res Saucelito 

COBB HENRY A. JR. &. CO., auction and com- 
mission merchants, 219 Sansom 

Cochran John, contractor New City Hall 

COCKRILL T. G. & CO., (H. E. Brooks and 
James L. Homer) impoiters and jobbers wines 
and liquors, 521 Front 

Coffey John A., clerk with Eastman &. Neumann, 
dwl 571 Stevenson 

Coggeshall J. H., cashier with A. M. Gilman, dwl 
714 Shotwell 

COHN JACOB M., importer and wholesale Jap- 
anese, Chinese and fancy goods, 212 Sansom 

Cohn L. B., merchandise broker, office 125 Sausom 

Cole N. P., president California Furniture Manufac- 
turing Co., (and N. P. Cole & Co.) dwl 806 Leav 

Colby Nellie Miss, compositor Evangel, dwl N 8 
Sixteenth nr Mission 

Callahan C, laborer Pioneer Woolen Factory, dwl 
White bet Green aud Vallejo 

Collins Walter J., Chrystal Palace Sample Rooms, 
535 Sacramento, dwl 309 Sutter 

COMMERCIAL INSURANCE CO. OF CALI- 
FORNIA, C. W. Kellogg, president, H. G. 
Horner, secretary, office 435 California 

Conant Augnstus F., drayman, 406 Davis, dwl 
Howard bet Third and'Fonrth 

Conlin John J., street contractor, office 226 Mont 

Couneff James, extraman Engine Co. No. 9, S.F.F.D. 

Connelly James E., extraman Engine Co. No. 9, 
S. F. F. D. 

Connor S. P. & Co., cooperage, N 8 Oregon bet 
Davis and Front 

Connor William G., extraman Engine Co. No. 9, 
S. F. F.D. 

Constalia Kien, laundryman, dwl 1316 Dupont 

Cook Charles, real estate agent, office 647 Sacra- 
mento, dwl 1710 Polk 

Cooke Daniel D., (Cooke & Smith) dwl 749 How 

COOKE & SMITH, (Daniel B. Cooke and Ed- 
ward L. Smith) furniture and bedding, 30 
Fourth 

Cooper William, agent Stockton Packets, office NW 
cor Clay and East 

Corcoran William, State Stamp Inspector, office 601 
California, dwl 1518 Mission 

Cornwell F. B,, clerk Lick House 

.Cottrell Edward M., city agent State Investment 
and Insurance Co., dwl W s Mission bet Twen- 
ty-second and Twenty-third 

Courtney Michael R., waiter Lick House, dwl 207 
Tehama 

Cousins Francis, porter with Adam & Kibbe, dwl 
dwl 516 Montgomery 

Crackbon Charles L., (0. A. Murdock & Co.) dwl 
140 Page 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street, Dress Trimmings. 



"WATKINS' YO-SEMITE ART GALLERY, 26 Montg. St., opp. Lick House Entrance. 



54 



SAN FR AN CISCO DIRECTORY 



CRADDOCK <fe KNOX, (Charles F. Craddock 
and George T. Knox) attorneys at law, office 
603 Montgomery 

Crane Addison M., attorney -at-law, office 410 Mont- 
gomery, dwl 547 Mission 

CRANE ALBERT E., agent Remington Fire Arms 
Co., office IH» Montgomery, dwl 12 O'Farrell 

CRANE & JOHNSTON, I Henry F. Crane and 
William W. Johnston) attorneys-at-law, office 
729 Montgomery 

Craiiert Frederick, batter and bats and caps, 503 
Kearny, dwl 12 Harlan Place 

CRITTENDEN JAMES L., attorney at law, office 
N\V cor Washington and Kearny 

CRITTENDEN PARKER, notary public and com- 
missioner deeds, office 340 Montgomery, dwl 2 
Villa Place 

Crocker John, foreman with N. P. Cole & Co., dwl 
716 Leavenworth 

Crocker Jobu H., clerk with N. E. Grimes, dwl 716 
Leavenworth 

Cronan William J., (Cronan & Johnson) dwl 23 
Hunt 

Cronan <fe Johnson, (William J. Cronan and Wal- 
ter Johnson) metal roofers, 130 Third 

Cross Robert, plasterer, dwl 128 Kearny 

CROWLY W. J., physician, surgeon and accou- 
cheur, office and dwl 227 Hayes 

CUB, (monthly) Alfred A. Wheeler publisher, 
office 343 Bryant 

CULVER JAMES H., manufacturer patent models, 
Mechanics' Mill, dwl 1013 Sacramento 

Culver Orrin B., salesman with LeCount Bros. & 
Mansur, dwl 1106 Mason 

Curlv P., dwl 8-29 Polsom 

Currier John M., secretary Tide Lnnd Commis- 
sioners, office SW cor Clay and Kearny, room 
12, dwl 526 Filbert 

Curtis Callie, with Pavilion Skating Rink Co. 

CURTIS LEILA & CO., wood engravers and de- 
signers, 405 Sansom 

Cushing Thomas Rev., pastor Mission Dolores 
Church, dwl SW cor Sixteenth and Dolores 

Cutter David S., (Cutler, Pitt & Swadley) dwl 10 
Hampton Place 

Cutter, Pitt & Swadley, (David S. Cutler, Rich- 
ard D. Pitt and W. W. Swadley) publishers 
and proprietors Enterprise, office 423 Wash 

CUTTING & CO., (Francis Cutting) manufact- 
urers pickles, preserves, etc., 21-31 Main, sales- 
room 415 Front 

Daily J. D. Mrs., test medium, dwl 11 O'Farrell 
Daily Register, C. A. Wave & Son, publishers and 

proprietors, office 228 Montgomery 
Dale R., commission merchant, office 302 California 
Dall J. II., miner, dwl 742 Washington 
Daly William S., barkeeper with Donohue & Phe- 

lan, dwl 530 Bush 
Danos J. B., real estate ngent, office 304 Montgom- 
ery, dwl NE cor Walker and Laguna 
Davenport Stephen, blacksmith, dwl S s Willow 

Avenue bet. Laguna and Buchanan 
DAVIDSON GEORGE, assistant U. S. Coast 

Survey in charge Pacific Coast, office 629 

Kearny, dwl Grand Hotel 
Davis George E. Rev., missionary Baptist Mission 

Chapel, dwl Tenth nr I. South S. F. 
Davis Morris M., (Davis $ Holhday ) A\v\\1\ Sixth 
Davis Samuel S., proprietor Racine House, 1023 

and 1025 Kearny 
Davis Solon H., broker and produce commission, 

SE cor Clay and Diumm, dwl 1014 Green 
Davis & Holhday, (Morris M.Davis and Isaac 

Holliday) wood and coal dealers, E s Webb bet 

California and Sacramento 
Dayton J. B., bookkeeper Lick House 
De Clec Henry Joseph, pastor Notre Dame des 

VictoireB Church, dwl 526 Bush 



DeGreayer Septimus S., stock broker, office 420 
Montgomery, dwl Cosmopolitan Hotel 

De Long Frank C-, (Rockwell, Coye & Co.) dwl 
634 Sutter 

De Sabla Eugene, vice-consul for Peru, office 304 
Davis, dwl 1019 Bush 

Deakin Edwin, landscape painter, studio 432 Mont- 
gomery, room 10, dwl 508 Fell 

Deas Henrv, (Deas & Roper) dwl 1402 Polk 

DEAS & ROPER, (Henry Deas and Jourdon W. 
Roper) attorneys at law, office 432 Montgom- 
ery, rooms 8 and 9 

Delbanty M., dwl 829 Folsom 

Dell John E., foreman sash shop Mechanics' Mill, 
dwl 23 Tehama 

Denicke D. F., physician, office 418 Kearny 

Derbam Bartholomew, Sen., bakery, 1031 Kearny 

Derham J. H. Rev., O. P., assistant pastor St. 
Bridget's (R. C.) Church, dwl Ws Van Ness 
Avenue nr Broadway 

DETELS MARTIN, groceries and liquors, SE cor 
Harrison and Main, (and M. 6r H- D. Detels 
and Detels & Schneider J dwl SE cor Main and 
Harrison 

DETELS & SCHNEIDER, (Martin Detels and 
Nicoli Schneider) Branch Saloon, SE cor Davis 
and Pacific 

DIAL PUBLISHING CO., publishers and pro- 
prietors Dial, office 409 Washington 

Diftot A., stock broker, office 422 Montgomery 

Dillon Charles H., (Dillon & West) dwl 804 Jones 

Dillon George L., drayman, SE cor Front and 
Washington, dwl cor Francisco and Kearny 

Dillon Paul, butcher, dwl SW cor Dtipont and 
Broadway 

DILLON & 'WEST, (Charles H. Dillon and Ed- 
icard. W. West) produce commission, 413 Davis 

Dirking August, importer watches, diamonds, jew- 
elry, etc., 128 Kearny 

Doane Sharron P., salesman with Treadwell & 
Co., dwl 615 Turk 

Doane Wilbur G., (Doane & Henshelwood) dwl 
Rubs House 

Doane & Henshelwood, (W. G. Doane and T. R. 
He nshehcood) retail dry goods, 1 Montgomery 

Dobson Henry, liquor saloon, NE cor Dupout and 
Geary 

Doe Stephen, bookseller, dwl 2311 Larkin 

Donnelly John, dwl 829 Folsom 

Donohue William, jeweler with Charles Lemme, 
dwl 158 Silver 

Donohue & Phelan, ( Thomas Donohue and Pat- 
rick Phelan) liquor saloons, 140 Third aud 31 
Second 

Douthitt D. William ,f Douthitt & McGraw) dwl cor 
Twenty fourth and Valencia 

DOUTHI'fT & McGRAW, (D. William Douthitt 
and E. W. McG-raw) attorneys at law, office 
414 California 

Downes J. F., woolbroker, office Pioneer Woolen 
Mills, North Beuch 

Downing I. G. Rev., pastor Larkin St. Presbyterian 
Church, dwl 1529 Washington 

Droge John C, groceries aud liquors, SW cor 
Washington and Stockton 

Dumont Belle Mrs., dressmaker, dwl 783 Market 

Duucan James W., supt. construction New City 
Hall, dwl SW cor Leavenworth and McAllister 

Duncan W. L. Jr., stock broker, office 413 Cal- 
ifornia 

Dungan Dellmar B., salesman with S. E. Dutton & 
Co., dwl 8 Hampton Place 

Durand A., importer and agent Tahiti, Moorea and 
Anaa Steamship Co., office 316 California 

Durning Thomas G., f Durning Sf French) dwl 
cor Tennessee and Minnesota 

Durning & French, (Thomas G. Durning and Jo- 
seph French)proY>rietors California File Works, 
Solano nr Tennessee 



HUNTINGTON, HOPKINS & CO., Importers Hardware and Iron, Cor. Bush and Market 



C P VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 718 Kearny Street, Glassware and Toys. 



ADDITIONAL NAMES, REMOVALS, ETC 



55 



DUTTON S. E. & CO., manufacturing and im- 
porting stationers, 402 and 404 Sansom 

Dutton S.' Edwards, (S. E. Button # Co.) dwl S 8 
McAllister bet Buchanan and Laguna 

Dyer C. P., dwl 700 Broadway 

EAKIXS PETER A., commission merchant, office 
and dwl 230 Kearny 

Easterbrook D. E., dwl 508 Mason 

Eastman J. G., (Neumann & E.) attorney-at-law, 
office 432 Montgomery, dwl 32 Ellis 

Ebermayer Adolph, editor, dwl 735 Green 

Eckert Charles E., bootmaker with Richard Pahl, 
bds 25 Morton 

Edson Clinton A., (Hughes, McBaniel <$* E.J dwl 
N s McAllister nr Fillmore 

Edwards Eliza J., dressmaker, 536 Bush 

Edwards <fe Tuckey, (Robert W. Edwards and Al- 
fred Tuckey) manufacturing jewelers, 616 
Merchant 

Ehrlicli Meyer, (Ekrlich & Sleinhart) dwl Stock- 
ton bet Washington and Jackson 

EHRLICH & STEINHAET, (Meyer Ehrlich and 
Bigmund Steinhart) stockbrokers, office 412 
Montgomery 

EiekhoffJohn P., porter, dwl 13 Hunt 

EISEN BROTHERS, (Francis T. Eisen) proprie- 
tors Pioneer Flour Mills, 10-20 Stevenson 

Eisen Francis T., (Eisen Bros.) dwl 11 Silver 

Elam Robert H., exchange and money broker, 312 
California, dwl 621 Leavenworth 

Elbe C. I?., druggist, SW cor Larkin and Geary 

ELECTRICAL CONSTRUCTION CO., George 
S. Ladd superintendent, 134 Sntter 

Elicamp Benjamin, teamster, dwl E s Second nr 

Elleau Henry, ( EUcan & Badgley) dwl 1524 Post 

ELLEAU k BADGLEY, (Henry Elleau and 
Eugene Badgley) diamond setters and manu- 
facturing jewelers, 328 Bush 

Elliott Frederick A., (Elliott & Willmot) dwl 634 
Sacramento 

ELLIOTT & WILLMOT, (Frederick A. Elliott 
and Charles Willmot.) Swan Brewery, SE cor 
Dolores and Fifteenth 

Ellis A. J., stock broker, dwl Pacific Club 

Ellis Joseph, assistant bookkeeper Sheriffs Office, 
City Hall, dwl W s Indiana bet Sierra and 
Shasta 

Elsasser M., bookkeeper Germania Life Ins. Co., 
dwl Van Ness Avenue nr McAllister 

Emerson L. Mrs., confectionery and varieties, 302 
Post 

Emery S. S., carpenter and builder, 737 J Market 
dwl 112 Eddy 

Empire House, Frederick Hoops proprietor, SE cor 
Sixth Avenue and M, South S. F. 

Engels Frederick P., metal roofer, dwl 622| Ellis 

Enterprise, (weekly) Cutter, Pitt & Swadley pub- 
lishers and proprietors, office 423 Wa6h 

Erlandsen Andrew, cutler with Will & Finck, dwl 
77 Fourth 

EVERETT A. P., forwarding and commission 
merchant, 405 Front cor Clav, dwl 615 Third 

EVERETT HOUSE, Fraser & Fredenbergh pro- 
prietors, 55 Second cor Mission 

Exodius Madame, astrologer, office and dwl 138 
Fourth 

Fabre M. E., Mrs., dressmaker, 303 Stockton 

Farnum J. E., attorney-at-law, office 20 Mont Blk 

Farren Robert J., barkeeper, 114 Sutter, dwl 427 
Bush 

Farriugton Frank C,, dwl 1723 Clay 

FASHION STABLE, White & McCord proprie- 
tors, 16 Sutter 

Faulhaber George, cutler with Will & Finck, dwl 
Battery bet Jackson and Pacific 

Fernandez Peter, (Fernardes <fc Aguirre) 116 Post 



Fernandez & Aguirre, (Peter Fernandez and Peter 
Aguirre) hatters and hats and caps, 116 Post 

Fengier Lucian, dwl 824 Washington 

Firmin John L. E., superintendent with J. H. 
O'Brien & Co., 67 New Montgomery, dwl 431 
Minna 

Fitzgerald Laurence, depnty license collector City 
and County, dwl 441 Haves 

Fitzgerald Thomas, foreman 'N. B. & M. R. R. Co., 
dwl 504 Jessie 

Fitzhugh Peregrine, (Filzhugh, Thompson <$• Co.) 
dwl 1312 Pine 

FITZHUGH, THOMPSON & CO.. (P. Fitzhugh, 
Q, Howard Thompson and Wm . Hammond 
Hall) general real estate agents, 306 Mont 

FLETCHER R. F. & CO., city agents Phcenix 
and Home and Travelers' Ins. Co., 42 1 Cal 

Flint Benjamin, (B. P. Flint & Go.) res San Juan, 
Monterev Countv 

Flint B. P., '(B. P. Flint <$• Co.) dwl 534 Bush 

FLINT B. P. & CO., (Benjamin and Thomas 
Flint, Llewellyn Bixby, John Lee and Daniel 
W. Fo/ger) wool commission merchants, ware- 
house and office SW cor Battery and Greenwich 

Flint Thomas, (B. P. Flint Jp Co.) res San Juan, 
Monterey Countv 

Folger Daniel W., ~(B. P. Flint & Co.) dwl 814 
Ellis 

Folsom George T., fire insurance adjuster and ac- 
countant, office 317 Montgomery, dwl NE cor 
Bush and Stockton 

FORBES BROTHERS & CO., (Alezandcr and 
Charles Forbes) importers and commission 
merchants, 308 California 

Forman Charles, (B. F. Sherwood # Co.) dwl Oc- 
cidental Hotel 

Forney Stetman, subassistant U.' S. Coast Survey, 
629 Kearnv 

Foutz William', (Martin Mangels # Co.) dwl 723 
Lombard 

Fowler M. S. Mrs., chiropodist, office and dwl 319 
Bush 

Frankenthal Jacob, (Frankenthal & Co.) dwl 19 
Stockton 

Frankenthal & Co., (Jacob Frankenthal and Jacob 
Bergman) importers fancy goods and Yankee 
notions, SW cor Battery and California 

Fraser E. J., physician, office and dwl 102 Stockton 

Fraser Hugh, (Fraser & Fredenbergh) dwl 55 Sec 

FRASER & FREDENBERGH, (Hugh Fraser 
and John H. Fredenbergh) proprietors Everett 
House, 55 Second cor Mission 

Fredenbergh John H., (Fraser fy F.) dwl 55 Sec 

Freelon Thomas W., attorney at law, office 728 
Montgomery, dwl 933 Sacramento 

Freeman Lewis II., whitener with J. C. Sellers, 
31 Second 

French Joseph, (Dnrning & F.) dwl Potrero 

Frischer Henrietta, (Wagner & F.) dwl 1008 
Kearnv 

FRONT STREET WAREHOUSE, James F. Hay- 
cock proprietor, SW cor Front and Bdwy 

Frost George, artist, dwl 1016 Clay 

Fuller William A., blacksmith with Brittau, Hol- 
brook & Co., dwl 2501 Bryant 

Fulton N. L. Miss, teacher, dwl 1600 Franklin 



Gallagher John A., liquor saloon, Market, opp 

S. P R. R. depot 
Gallagher William R., furniture, 20 Fourth, dwl 141 

Fourth 
Ganibaro Raphael, bookkeeper with B. Sbarboro & 

Bro., dwl 636 Broadway 
Gardiner John R., bookkeeper with Norton & Gar 

diuer, dwl 718 Lombard 
Garriga Andreas, pastor St. Francis R. C. Church 

dwl 519 Gteen 
Garwood Henrietta M., (widow) dwl 617 Third 



JONES, PTTT.T.MATf & CO., 116 Sansom Street, Dress Buttons In great variety 



WATKINS' YO-SEMITE ART GALLERY, 26 Montg. St., opp. Lick House Entrance. 



56 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



Gaubois Madame, proprietress Fogothey House, 826 

Broadway 
Gaven Michael J., salesman with Keane, O'Connor 

& Co., dwl S 8 Clementiua, nr Fifth 
GeiWcH AiexiH, former, dwl 5 Mason 
Gerberding Albert, bookkeeper with Leveridge, 

Wadhams & Co., dwl 823 Post 
Gibbs Frederick A., merchant, dwl E 8 Bartlett bet 

Twenty-fifth and Twenty-sixth 
GIBNET THOMAS REV., pastor St. Peter's R. 

C. Church, dwl Es Alabama bet Twenty-fourth 

and Twenty-fifth 
Gidley Theodore C. F., solicitor with Hope, McKil- 

lop & Co., dwl 737 Howard 
Gifh'n O. F., merchant, office 320 California, dwl 

Grand Hotel 
Gilbert J. J., eubassistant U. S. Coast Survey, 629 

Kearny 
Gilfeatlier James, carriagepainter with Henry <& Co., 

dwl 1108 Pacific 
Gillingham Charles F., physician, office and dwl 19 

Sixth 
Gilmore John H, salesman City of Paris, dwl 405 

Stevenson 
Gladwin William H, with G. S. Gladwin & Co., dwl 

SW cor Howard and Twenty-first 
Gonzalez Joseph, clerk with Johnston &. Gonzalez, 

dwl 949 Howard 
Goodall Edwin, bookkeeper, dwl 717 Shotwell 
Gray John, stock broker, office 102 Leidesdorff 
Gray R. B., office 302 Montgomery, dwl 720 Bush 
Green , attoruey-at-law, office 47 Exchange 

Building 
Green Henry E., office 428 California 
GREEN MILTON, dairy produce, preserved 

meats, etc,, 63 and 61 California Market, dwl 

322 O'Farrell 
GREEN W. S. & CO., (J. B.DeJarnatt) real 

estate agents and proprietor Green's Laud 

Paper, office NE cor Market and Montgomery 
GREEN'S LAND PAPER, W. S. Green & Co. 

proprietors, office NE cor Market and Mont 
Greenhood Otto, general insurance agent, office 302 

Sansoni , dwl 1030 Jackson 
Grossman Marks, glazier, 108 Sutter, dwl 1206 Sut 
Grossman Morris, clerk with LeCouutBros. & Man- 

sur, dwl 1206 Sutter 
Gulf of California Commercial Company, A. K. 

Macsnrley, secretary, office 226 Minna 
GUTTA PFRCHA AND RUBBER MANUFAC- 
TURING CO., Weaver & Taylor agents, 118 

Front 



Haden Porter, Port Warden S. F., office SW cor 

Front and Jackson, dwl 515 Bush 
Hafenrichter F. O, (F. von Leicht) civil engineer 

and draftsman, dwl 631 Sacramento 
Haffner Gottlob, engraver on metal, 616 Merchant, 

dwl 611 Stockton 
Hagenah Ferdinand, master mariner, dwl 617 

Davis 
Haight Andrew J., manufacturing jeweler, 328 

Bush, dwl 26J Kearny 
Hall Gaven D., attorney at law, office 31 Exchange 

Building, dwl 1054 Howard 
Hall George W., bookkeeper Loudon and S. F. 

Bank, dwl 912 Sutter 
Hall VVm. Hammond, civil engineer, office 240 

Montgomery, (and Fitzhugh Thompson & Co.) 

dwl 1709 Webster 
Hamilton William, reporter S. F. Chronicle, dwl 

531 Sacramento 
Hand John, (Tormey $c H.) dwl 207 Tehama 
Harloe Archie, Port Warden S. F., office SW cor 

Front, and Jackson, dwl 17 Park Avenue 
Harris Henry R., clerk with Adams & Co., dwl 60 

Natonia * 

Harris Robert L., civil engineer, 106 Mont Block 



Harrison John M., bookkeeper with Sroufe, Swee' 

ney & Co., dwl 1006 Van Ness Avenue 
Harrison Ralph O, (Jarboe & H.) attorney at law, 

402 Montgomery, dwl 919 Piue 
Harrison Randolph, engineer clerk with Mai. Geo. 

H. Mendell, dwl 307 Tyler 
Harrisou William P., real estate, office 421 Clay, 

dwl 14 Geary 
Hartley James, ( James Hartley & Co.) dwl 2605 

Bush 
Hartley James &. Co., (Thomas Bailey) Pacific 

Wool Depot, NW cor Front and Broadway 
Harvey C. O, stock broker, office 509 California 
Haste Julius A., (Haste & Paddock) dwl 626 Cal 
Haste & Paddock, (J. A. Haste and C. D. Pad- 
dock) real estate and employment, office SE cor 
Kearny and California 
Hathaway Rufus H, dwl NW cor Wash and San 
Hatherton E. A., chief clerk architect New City 

Hall, dwl 419 Hyde 
Haviland F. Mrs., dressmaker, dwl 783 Market 
Hawes Oliver O, clerk with Hartford Fire Insur- 
ance Co., dwl 156 Third 
Hawkins Frank C, bookkeeper with Williams, 

Deane & Co., dwl 422 Sutter 
HAYCOCK JAMES F., proprietor Front Street 
Warehouse, SW cor Front and Broadway, dwl 
1616 Washington 
Haves John, ( Toothaker & H.) dwl 533 Geary 
HAZARD POWDER CO., Weaver & Taylor 

agents, office 118 Front 
Heard Franklin B., mechanic, dwl 120 Leidesdorff 
HEBREW, (weekly) Philo Jacoby, publisher and 

proprietor, office 612 Commercial 
Henderson John A., phrenologist and magnetic 

physician, office aud dwl 11 O'Farrell 
Henne'berry Andrew, (Ryan S,- H.) 120 Kearny 
Henry C. D., (Henry & Co.) res San Leandro 
Henry & Co., (C. D. Henry) carriagepaiuters, 554 

Mission 
Henshelwood Thomas R., fJDoane & H.) dwl 325 

Ellis 
Hermann James, copyist County Clerk's Office 
Hermann Lucien, real estate, money and bill bro- 
ker, office 411 California, dwl 430 Tyler 
Hermann Peter A., (Hermann & Von Iiorstcl) dwl 

2626 Folsom 
Hermann & Von Borstel, (P. A. Hermann and 
Theodore Von Borstel) carpenters and build- 
ers, 110 Sutter 
Herzog Michaelis T., (of Herzog & Roth, Yoko- 
hama) office 212 Sansom, dwl 1007 Harrisou 
Hesse Christian, (Router & H.) dwl 326 Clem 
Hewer William, physician, office and dwl SW cor 

Dupont and Broadway 
Hickey M. Rev., assistant pastor Mission Dolores 

Church, dwl SW cor Sixteenth and Dolores 
Hill Edwin P., messenger London &. S. F. Bank, 

dwl 957 Harrisou 
Hill F. A., secretary Amador Mining Co., dwl 74i<. 

Washington 
Hill Rupert G., clerk S. F. Chronicle, dwl 615 Stock 
Hillyer Munson O, stockbroker, office 436 Califor- 
nia, dwl 331 Ellis 
Hilton William H., mining engineer, dwl 602 Stock 
Hiriart J. B. (Hiriart & Co.) dwl 835 Clay 
Hiriart & Co., (J. B. Hiriart and S. B. Rodes) 

bairdressintf saloon, 221 Montgomery 
Hoag David, restaurant, 64 First 
Hobart B., (Hobart, Wood % Co.) dwl 625 Geary 
Hobbs Frederick, grain broker, 404 Front, dwl 1008 

Bush 
Hoeathal Earnest, brewer with Wannenmacher & 
Krounenberg, dwl NE cor McAllister and 
Franklin 
Holdeu S. P. & Co., importers and jobbers linens, 

hosiery, trimmiugs, embroideries, etc., 28 San 
Holland Daniel D., (Richardson, H. & Co.) res 
Oakland 



HUNTING-TON, HOPKINS & CO., Agenta Jesaop & Sons' Steel, Cor. Bush and Market, 



C. P. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Yankee Notions. 



ADDITIONAL NAMES, REMOVALS, ETC 



57 



Ho] lid ay Isaac, (Davis & H.) dwl cor O'Farrell 
and" Larkin 

HOLMAN F. A., physician, office 235 Kearny, dwl 
707 Bush 

HOLMES WALTER G., notary public and attor- 
ney at law, office 418 Montgomery, dwl NW 
cor Bush and Stockton 

Holt John H. traveling agent Gile, Hayes & Co., 
office 0118 Front, dwl Cosmopolitan Hotel 

Holt Warren, school furniture, maps and apparatus, 
607 Clay, dwl NW cor Taylor and Jackson 

Holway Seth P., attorney-at-law, office 414 Cali- 
fornia, dwl 822 Sutter 

Holz Louis, teacher music, dwl 421 Bush 

HONG KONG DISTILLERY CO., W. F. Russell, 
office 224 Sansom 

Hoops Frederick, proprietor Empire House, SE cor 
Sixth Avenue and M, South S. F. 

Hopkins Mortimer, special policeman, dwl S s Sev- 
enteenth nr Guerrero 

Horn Jerome, hairdressing saloon, 304 Post 

Horner Frederick, mining, dwl 505 Sutter 

HORNER HORATIO G, secretary Commercial 
Insurance Co., offire 435 Cil, dwl 710 Post 

HOUSEWORTH THOMAS & CO., opticians, Cal- 
ifornia views, cutlery, etc., 9 Montgomery, Lick 
House Block 

Howard Michael, (colored) hairdressing saloon, 23 
Sutter 

Howell S. S., teacher Boys' High School, dwl 2217 
Leavenworth 

Hnhhack Edward T., (Ma kin & H.) res Oakland 

HUDSON DAVID, dwl Bay View, terminus Bay 
View and Potrero Railroad 

Huhn & Hunt S. M. Co., office 26 Merchants' Ex- 
change 

Hunter Nathaniel, clerk with Lieut.-Col. C. S. 
Stewart, dwl 130 Eighth 

Hutchinson Patrick, clerk, dwl 555 Mission 

Hynemau Samuel, stock broker, office 408 Mont 



Idh Ellmore S. M. Co., office 419 California 
Independent Alaska Co., R. Desty secretary, office 

20 Montgomery Block 
Irvine Robert, groceries and liquors, 1415 Folsom 



Jackman Man'jena, laborer, dwl 1316 Dupont 

Jacobs Joseph, salesman with I. G. Rice & Co., dwl 
4 Clay Avenue 

JACOBY PHILO, publisher and proprietor He- 
brew, office 612 Commercial, dwl 228 Bush 

Jameson William, real estate, dwl 930 Howard 

Jarboe John R., (Jnrboc& Harrison) dwl 917 Pine 

JARBOE & HARRISON, (John R. Jarboe and 
Ralph C. Harrison) attorneys at law, office 
402 Montgomery, room 19 

Johnson Henry, (H. Johnson Sf Co.) dwl 143 Third 

Johnson H. &. Co., (Henry IV. Severance) restaur- 
ant, 143 Third 

Johnson Walter, (Cronan & J.) dwl 435 Pine 

Jones T. H., extraman Engine Co. No. 2, S. F. F. D. 

Jones William, physician, office E s New Montgom- 
ery nr Howard, dwl 1520 Mission 

JORDAN DENNIS, builder, dwl 618 Ellis, rear 

Josselvn J. Aldrich Mrs., magnetic healer, office 
and dwl 71 New Montgomery 

Josselvn William R., magnetic healer, office and 
dwl 71 New Montgomery 

Josset Joseph, teacher languages, office and dwl 
404 Geary 

Jourdan Joseph, driver Engine Co. No. 9, S.F.F.D. 

Joyut George C, bookkeeper with Dalv & Ward, 
dwl 1212 Howard 

Julitz Herman, proprietor White Beer Brewery, 513 
Green 

Jungblut August, (Renner &? J.) dwl N s Jessie 
bet Fourth and Fifth 



KAHMAN JOHN G., wines and liquors, NW cor 
Bush and Kearny, dwl 1248 Howard 

Kanary David, painter, dwl 82 Natoma 

Kane Andrew J., soapmanufacturer, 212-216 Com- 
mercial, dwl Morton House 

Kedrolivansky Paul Rev., Arch-Priest Russian 
Church, 911 Jackson 

Keefe Cornelius, (John W. Smith & Co.) dwl 1426 
Geary 

KELLER HENRY & CO., subscription book 
agents, 543 Clay 

Kessing B. P., clerk with J. F. Kessing, dwl 421 
Bush 

Kimball John Rev., pastor Green St. Congrega- 
tional Church, dwl NW cor Clay and Powell 

Kiugslev H. C, extraman Engiue Co. No. 9, S. 
F. F. D. 

Kingley Joseph M., attorney-at-law, office 702 
Washington, dwl 844 Folsom 

KINNEY BROTHERS, (Albert IF. \ Marsh, ,11 
J".; agents Salem (Oregon) Flour Mill, 109 Clay 

Kittelbei'tier Charles, (Charles Bauer <jf> Co.) dwl 
409 Dupont 

Kline Abraham, fancy goods, 60 Third, dwl 701 ^ 
Mission 

Kuapp Nathaniel O., barkeeper with Christopher 
Mnrr, American Exchange 

KNICKERBOCKER LIFE INSURANCE CO., 
(New York) Daniel Nor cross general agent, of- 
fice 15 Stevenson's Building 

Knight H. L., attorney and accountant, office 423 
Washington 

Knowlton Ehenezer, principal Rincon School, dwl 
2626 Folsom 

Knowlton J. J. & Co., proprietors Pacific Ink Fac- 
tory, 405 Sansom 

Koch Charles, fruit stand, 617 Montgomery 

Koels A. E., local editor German Demokrat, dwl 
830 California 

Koster Albert/ Koster Jy Hesse) dwl 322 Clementina 

Koster Louis, (Peterson & Co.) dwl 18 Eleventh 

Koster &. Hesse, (Albert Koster and Christian 
Hesse) proprietors Union Brewery, 326 and 328 
Clementina 

Kovrigin Nicholas Rev., pastor Russian Church, 911 
Jackson 

KRAMER F. G. & CO., (Henry Kramer) import- 
ers and commission merchants, 214 California 

Kramer Frederick G., ( F. G. Kramer & Co.) dwl 
331 Kearny 

Kramer Henry, ( F. G. Kramer & Co.) dwl 1013 
Washington 

Kronnenberg Frederick, ( Wanncnmarher & K.) 
dwl NE cor McAllister and Franklin 



Lalame Charles, liquor dealer, dwl SW cor Du- 
pont and Broadway 
Lamarche Madame, dressmaker, 507 Van Ness Av 
Lathrop B. G., capitalist, office 506 Montgomery, 

res Brooklyn, Alameda Co. 
LATIMER LORENZO D., U. S. attorney, office 6 

U. S. Court Building, dwl 1031 Jackson 
Lawrence Andrew J., (Lawrence & Tripp) dwl 

551 Natoma 
LAWRENCE & TRIPP, (A. J. Lawrence and 

Josiah W. Tripp) attorneys at law, office 408 

California 
Lawton E., extraman Engine Co. No. 2, S. F. F. D. 
LAWTON FRANKLIN, secretary S. F. Stock 

Board, (and Wheeler & Co., and Wheeler, 

Ph?l<m & Co.) dwl Grand Hotel 
Lawton George H., engineer- New City Hall, dwl 

W s Larkin bet Grove and Hayes 
LEARY ANDREW J., bookbinder and paper ruler, 

KW cor Sac and LeidesdoriF, dwl 610 Pine 
Ledden John A., bookkeeper with J. S. Wall & Co., 

dwl W s Larkin bet Tyler and Turk 
Lee Francis, barber, dwl 637 Pacific 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO.. 116 Sansom Street, Yankee Notions. 
4 



"WATKINS' YO-SEMITE ART GALLERY - , 26 Montg. St., opp. Lick House Entrance. 



58 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



Lee John, (B. P. Flint & Co.) dwl SE cor Dupon 

and Bay 
Leszynskv Charles, drees trimmings, laces, embroid- 

eries, fancy goods, etc., 4 Kearny, dwl 26 Geary 
Leveridge William K., (Leveridgc, Wadhama & 

(Jo.) dwl as Stanly Place 
LEVERIDGE, WAD'HAMS & CO., (William K. 

Leveridge and William VVadhams) wholesale 

grocers, forwarding and commission merchants, 

318 Front 
Levin David, batter with Max Wolff.dwl 444 Third 
Levy Michael, dry goods, 731 Montgomery, dwl 

1423 Stockton" 
Levy P. L., tailor, 311 Sutter 
Liechtenstein Moses B., money broker, office 406 

Montgomery, dwl 127 O'Farrell 
Lieb Charles W., job printer, 115 Kearny, dwl E 8 

Mississippi nr Mariposa 
Liebmann Moses, fancy goods and trimmings, cor 

Pacific and Stockton, dwl 919 Jackson 
Lillie Hiram C, stock and money broker, office 11 

Montgomery, dwl '267 Minna 
Linden Otto, teacher music, dwl 829 Mission 
LITTLE JOHN T., real estate agent, office 304 

Mont, dwl SW cor Pacific Av and Buchanan 
Litton William, master mariner, dwl 742 Wash 
Livingston Frank, (B. F. Sherwood & Co.) dwl 

1713 Powell 
Loeper Charles, turner with Will & Finck,res 

Oakland 
Logan Harry C, (H. C. Logan & Co.) dwl 322 

Pine 
Logan II. C. & Co., stock and money brokers, office 

407 California 
Loebel G., (Loebel <$• Aitken) dwl 405 Kearny 
Loehel <fc Aitken, (G. Loebel & C. Aitken) chiro- 
podists, office 105 Kearny 
Lohbauher Andrew, cutler with Will & Finck, dwl 

Clay bet Dupont and Stockton 
Louderback Sophia M., (widow) dwl 925 Natoma 
Lovett C. 10.. superintendent Pavilion SkaTtr,g Rink 
Lowell A. O, clerk with N. R. Lowell, dwl 609 

Folsom 
Lufkin Joseph, (Lvfkin & Co.) res Oakland 
LUFKIN & CO., (Joseph Lufkin) contractors and 

builders and manuf's drain pipe, 506 Mont 
Luie Valuke, laborer, dwl 1316 Dupont 
Lutgens August, (Lulgens $• Mumson) dwl NE 

cor Turk and Fillmore 
Lutgens & Mumson, (August Lutgens and Angutt, 

Mumson) meat market, NE cor Turk and Fill- 
more 



MacCann William Jr., salesman Mission and Pa- 
cific Woolen Mills, dwl 1018 Stockton 

Mac Kenzie John W., janitor S. F. Law Library, 
dwl 902J Filbert 

MACE ALFRED A., attorney-at law, office Court 
Block, 636 Clay, res Oakland 

Macsorley A. K., Secretary Gulf of California Com- 
mercial Co., office and dwl 226 Minna 

Macsorley Alfred, (Macsorley Brothers) dwl 226 
Minna 

Macsorley Brothers, (Alfred and Henry) collectors 
and general business agents, 226 Minna 

Macsorley Henry, (Macsorley Brothers) dwl 226 
Minna 

Madden James F., delivery clerk S. F. Po6t Office, 
dwl 3 15 J Third 

Maehl Otto, beer saloon, 654 Washington 

Magenta House, Roger O'Donnell manager. 1316 
Dupont 

Magner Emil, bookkeeper City Stables, dwl 635 
Stevenson 

Magner Max L., clerk Int. Rev. tobacco ware- 
house, dwl 635 Stevenson 

Magrath Bros., (James E. and Richard) collectors, 
office 618 Market 



Magrath James E., (Magrath. Bros.) dwl N s Fell 
bet Webster and Buchanan 

Magrath Richard, (Magrath Bros.) dwl N s Fell 
bet Webster and Buchanan 

Makin Robert G./Makin & Hubbaek) res Marin Co. 

MAKIN & HUBBACK, (Robert G. Makin and 
E. T. Hubbaek j shipping and commission mer- 
chants, 316 California 

Malcolm Ellen, (widow) dwl 1525 Broadway 

Malter George H., (Bordiccll & M.) dwl E s Mis- 
sion bet Sixteenth and Seventeenth 

Mandel Emanuel, manfr cigars, 201) Bat.dwl 822 Post 

Mangels D. H., bookkeeper with F. Scherr, dwl 
55S Natoma 

Mantrels Martin, (Martin Mangels & Co.) dwl 1713 
Filbert 

Marchant Elihu A., collector, office 716 Montgom- 
ery, dwl 141 Minna 

Marks Simon, stockbroker, office 436 California, 
dwl 1408 Bush 

Marsden Henry, bookbinder with A. J. Leary, dwl 
418 Minna 

MARSH & OSBOURNE, (Andrew J. Marsh and 
Samuel Oshourne) official shorthand reporters, 
office, 24 Exchange Building 

Marshall Patrick S., bookkeeper with Kelly, Hen- 
derson &, Gilchrist, dwl 1219 Sacramento 

MARTIN & LANE, (Minor S. Martin & George 
E. Lane Jr.) stockbrokers, office SW cor Mont- 
gomery and California 

Ma6on Adoniram J., superintendent with Weaver 
& Taylor, 118 Front, dwl 117 Post 

May berry Edward L., contractor and builder, dwl 
522 Capp 

McALEER ANDREW, produce commission mer- 
chant, SE cor Clay and Davis, dwl 1304 Larkin 

McBride William, paperhanger with Frank G. Ed- 
wards, dwl 1710 Dupont 

McCabe James, attoruey-at law, office 645 Clay, 
dwl 515 Bush 

McCarthy R. G. Rev., pastor Olivet and Memorial 
Presbyterian Churches, dwl 6 Powell 

McCarty Eugene, stockbroker, office 327 Mont 

McCord Janies, ( White & McC.) dwl 1326 Bush 

McDONALD THOMAS A., dry goods, 218 Third, 
dwl 515 Tehama 

McEwan Patrick J., physician, office and dwl 1028 
Market 

McGILLAN STEPHEN, groceries and liquors, 
214 Fourth, dwl 325 Clementina 

McGrath Patrick F., bakery, 135 Fifth 

McGraw Edward W., ( Douthitt Jj- McG.) attorney- 
at law, office 414 Cal. dwl 2524 Bush ur Scott' 

McGregor Alexander e., civil engineer 

and surveyor, office 16 Court Block, 636 Clay, 

res Oakland 
McKenty Jackson, stockbroker, office 422 Mont 
McLaue George R., compositor Alta California, dwl 

720 Market 
McLaren Daniel, notary public and com'r of deeds, 

oflicev626 Mont, dwl SW cor Gough aud Geary 
McLean Alfred A., job printer, 605 Sacramento, dwl 

3 Hampton Place 
McLennan Frank P.. (Watt & McL.) dwl NW 

cor Folsom and Thirteenth 
McMAHON P. J., wines and liquors, 318 Bush, 

dwl 16 Geary 
McNess James J., Magnolia liquor saloon, 114 Sut 
McQuaid John A., ( Wheeler & McQ.) attorney at- 

law, office 411 £ California, dwl 820 Lombard 
Mead Le Grande, (Mead & Woolley) res Alameda 
MEAD & WOOLLEY, (Le Grande Mead and Lell 
■ H. Woolley) produce aud fruit commission mer- 
chants, 225 Washington 
Mendenhnll N. R., bookkeeper, dwl 120 Fourth 
MERCADO FELIX, agent old style hand made 

Bourbon whiskey, 626 Sac, dwl 111 Taylor 
Merschaert Adolphe, shoemaker, 914 Kearny, dwl 

S s Oregon bet Dmmm aud Davis 



HUNTINGTON, HOPKINS & CO., Agents Jeusop & Sons' Steel, Cor, Bush and Market 



C P. VATT SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 & 716 Kearny St., Rubber Goods and Umbrellas 



ADDITIONAL NAMES, REMOVALS, ETC 



59 



Meyers Benjamin, blacksmith, NE cor Jackson and 

Drmnm, dwl 220 Austin 
Meyers Harry, bookkeeper, dwl 1236 Mission 
Michaelis Henry, (M. Brnuings & Co J dwl SW 

cor Mission and Third 
Miley Jacob A., restaurantkeeper, dwl 738 Wash 
Miller John, extraman Engine Co. No, 2, S. P. F. D. 
Miller Louis, brewer with Wannenmacher & Kron- 

nenberg, dwl NE cor McAllister and Franklin 
Mills Frank, butcher, dwl 131b' Dupont 
Mineral Hill S. M. Co., office 419 California 
Minor M. Page, clerk with Thomas W. Fenn, dwl 

612 Taylor 
Mitchell David, ( Wilder $ 31.) dwl 056 Folsom 
Mollenhauer George, hatter, dwl 840 Folsom 
MOLLOY .JOHN, produce commission and gro- 
ceries, 54 Clay, dwl 1 603 Clay 
Molony Patrick, plumber aud gasfitter, 311 Sutter, 

dwl 273 Clara 
Moore Calvin, dentist, dwl 970 Harrison 
Moore James B , bookkeeper with Sroufe, Sweeney 

& Co., dwl Cosmopolitan Hotel 
Moore John F., porter with N. P. Cole & Co., dwl 

768 Mission 
MORELOS ANTONIO, manufacturer cigaritos, 

631 Pacific 
Morris Abraham, (J. Morris & Bro.) dwl 521 J Stev 
Morris J. <fc Bro., ( Abraham Morris) marbleworks, 

H7i O'Farrell 
Monis Joseph, ( J. Morris & Bro.) dwl 521 J Stev 
MOUSE C. N., dwl 162 Minna 
MUELLER F. D., physician and oculist, office and 

dwl 222 Stocktou 
Mugneridge Samuel, accountant, dwl United States 

' Hotel 
Muinson August, (Lntgens & M.) dwl NE cor 

Turk and Fillmore 
Murphy John .1., engineer, dwl 233 Hitch 
Murr Christopher, liquor saloou, 325 Sansom, dwl 

112 Eddy 
Myers S. D. Miss, dressmaker, 120 Post 

Nauntox George, shipping agent, office 524 Bat- 
tery, dwl 2338 Washington 

Naunto'n Robert EL, clerk Northern Assurance Co., 
dwl 2338 Washington 

Neuer Katie Miss, teacher music, dwl W s Valeucia 
bet, Nineteenth and Twentieth 

New Pavilion Skating Rink, (colored) SE cor Ma- 
son and John 

NEWMARK JOSEPH P., commission merchant, 
425 Sacramento, dwl 830 Post 

Niebour Theodore, shipping clerk, dwl 539 Second 

Noble Alonzo T., clerk with Walter A. Wood 
Machine Co., dwl S s Howard nr Twenty-sec 

NOBRIS EZRA, (Dial Publishing Co.) dwl 203 
Turk 

North , salesman, 200 Sansom (first name and 

dwl refused) 

Northern Hydraulic M. Co., office 313 California 

Nourse Joseph P., mining, office 19 Merchants' Ex- 
change, dwl 606 Folsom 

Nuuan Thomas, earriagetriramer, 554 Mission, dwl 
Quiuey House, SE cor Second and Natoma 

O'Bkiex John, (O'Brien Bros.) dwl 142 Perry 

O'Brien Thomas, (O'Brien Bros.) dwl NW cor 
Fourth and Perry 

O'Brien Thomas V., attorney-at-law, office 420 Cal- 
ifornia, dwl 347 Grove 

O'Connor Cornelius Rev., assistant pastor St. Peter's 
Church, dwl E s Alabama bet Twenty-fourth 
and Twenty-fifth 

O'Connor William, baker with R. R. Swain, dwl 
1 15 Natoma 

O'Hayan Michael, clerk, dwl 318 Pine 

O'Neil Philip, collector and agent Oakland Daily 
Transcript, office 26 Montgomery Block 



Oakville G. S. M. Co., office 411 J California 
Oliver Henry, designer and engraver on wood, studio 

425 Kearny, dwl SW cor Third and Howard 
Olmstead R. H., eclectic physician, office and dwl 

209 Kearny 
Onesti G. & Co. , fruit and produce commission, 501 

Sansom 
Owens James H., stockbroker, office 428 California, 

dwl 1616 Polk 



PACHE & CO., (Pierre Pache) manufacturers Ver- 
mouth, 40 Geary 
Pacific Borax Co. //'Esmeralda. Co., Nev.) office 6 

Merchants' Exchange 
Pacific Box Manufacturing Co., Charles S. Coussins 

seeretarv, 483 Brannan 
PACIFIC BUSINESS COLLEGE, Commercial 

Department University College, SE cor Stock- 
ton and Geary 
Pacific Guest, (monthly) Willie B. Thompson pub- 
lisher, office 535 California 
Pacific Wool Depot, James Hartley & Co., proprie- 
tors, NW cor Front and Broadway 
Paddock C. D., (Haste & P.) SE cor Kearny and 

California 
Page Charles, attorney-at-law, office 35 Exchange 

Building, dwl NE cor O'Farrell and VaaNess Av 
Page Henry, (Page. Bros.) dwl NE cor O'Farrell 

and Van Ness Avenue 
Page Wilfred, (Page Bros.) dwl NE cor O'Farrell 

and Van Ness Avenue 
Paitre Calvin, real estate, office and dwl (533 Com 
PARDOVV ALFRED A., (Sawyer & P.) attorney 

at law, office 637 Kearny, dwl 1025 Hyde 
Pascoe Geo. W., clerk with B. F. Sherwood &. Co., 

dwl 7 Verona 
Payne Warren R., real estate, office 214 California, 

dwl Grand Hotel 
Pearson Charles, draftsman with Board City Hall 

Hall Commissioners, dwl 906 Stockton 
Pease George S., machinist, dwl 535 Sacramento 
Peirce R. K. Mrs., dressmaker, 3I2j Post 
Perine George M., stockbroker, office 638 Market, 

res Brooklyn, Alameda County 
Perkins James E., (Perkins & Co.) dwl 615 Har 
Perkins James E., president Silver Wave and Pier- 

mont M. Co.'s, office 418 Cal, dwl Lick House 
PERKINS & CO., (James E.Perkins and Lucius 

A. Booth) general commission and dealers in 

wool, office 402 Front 
Peterson A. T. N., master mariuer. dwl 21 Fifth Av 
Peterson Ludwig, liquor saloon, 531 East, dwl N s 

Jackson bet Drumm and Davis 
Pfeiffer John W., locksmith, 924 Kearny, dwl W 8 

Haven Place 
Pheby T. B., stockbroker, office 446 California 
Phelan Joseph P., (Hanson & P.) attorney at law, 

office 609 Sacramento, dwl N s Sacramento bet 

Laguna and Octavia 
Phelan Michael J., (Wheeler, P. & Co.; res Oak- 

land 
Pierce H. & W., (estate of) loan and commission, 

office 728 Montgomery 
Pitt Richard D., (Cutter, P. & Swadley) dwl 227 

Second 
Pocock W. R. T., clerk with L. Kilgour, dwl 704 

Powell 
POLLOCK THOMAS C, agent W. J. Pollock & 

Co., office 306 Cal, dwl 933 Sacramento 
Pollock William J., ( W. J. Pollock & Co.) res 

New York 
POLLOCK W. J. & CO., importers and wholesale 

grain sacks, Thomas C. Pollock, agent, 306 

California 
Poole Marcus M., carpets, etc., 719 Market, dwl 

246 Third 
Popper Charles, shirt manufacturer, 431 Kearny, 

dwl 1061 Mission 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street. Braids of all kinds. 



For the finest Paintings, Oil or "Water, of yourself, go to WATKINS', 26 2Sontg. St. 



60 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY, 



Popper Max. shirt manufacturer, 517 Kearny, dwl 

1061 Mission 
Popper Simon, shirt manufacturer, 327 Kearny, dwl 

I Hi Seventh 
Potier X. J., attorney-afc-law, office 28 Court Block, 

636 Clay, dwl 30 Stone 
Ponlterei Thomas J., California Stock and Exchange 

Board, office 119 Cal rear, dwl 731 Sutter 
Price John J. S.. dwl 1014 Stockton 
Prichard John, clerk What, Cheer House, cor Sac- 

ramento and Leidesdorff 
Prichard Timothy, carrier Bulletin and Call, dwl 

8 Central l'liice 

Prichard William B., draftsman with Board City 
Hail Commissioners, dwl 313 Taylor 

PROCTOK'S IMPROVED TREADLE FOR 
SEWING MACHINES, Wilder A Mitchell 
agents, office 114 Post 

Purdy Samuel Jr., attorney-at-law, office 47 Ex- 
change Building, dwl 741 Washington 

Putnam S. N., (Wilson fy P.J attorney-at- 
law, office NE cor Montgomery and Washing- 
ton, res Santa Clara 

Racine House, Samuel S. Davis proprietor, 1023 
and 1025 Kearny 

Rafferty John W., blacksmith with Peter Wit- 
beck, dwl 57 Shipley 

Railroad Brewery, Frederick Schuster proprietor, 
E b Valencia bet Fifteenth and Sixteenth 

Ransom Lee J., /Hansom & PhelanJ dwl 599 Ellis 

Ransom <& Phelan, (Lee J. Ransom and Joseph P. 
PhelanJ attorneys-at-law, office 009 Sac 

Rearden Timothy H., (Robinson ir R.J attorney-at- 
law, office S\V cor Mont and Com, dwl 210 Bush 

Redding W '. S., dealer hides, wool and leather, 212 
Sansom, dwl 121 1 Jackson 

Regal C. P. Madame, physician, office and dwl 5 
Stockton 

Reimers A., bookkeeper and teacher Lincoln Even- 
ing School 

REMINGTON FIRE ARMS CO., Alfred E. Crane 
agent, office 410 Montgomery 

Rentier John, (Renner & JungblutJ dwl N s 
Jessie bet- Fourth and Fifth 

Renner & Jungblut, (John Renner and August 
JungblutJ billiard table and cabinetmakers, 10 
Tyler 

Riley "Patrick, carriage painter, dwl 1413 Mason 

Risley Arthur A., (Zinnamon fy R.J dwl 413 Pine 

Roach John, optician and mathematical instrument 
maker, 429 Montgomery, dwl 820 Union 

Roberts George W.. foreman brick work New City 
Hall, dwl 013 Mission 

Robinson Alfred, trustee Los Angeles Land Asso- 
ciation, office 512 Market, dwl 2 Park Place 

Robinson C. P., (Robinson & ReardenJ dwl 532 
Seventeenth 

ROBINSON & REARDEN, (C. P- Robinson and 
Timothy II. Rearden) attorneys-at-law, office 
S\V cor Montgomery and Commeroial 

ROCKWELL, COYE'& CO., (Waller M. Rock- 
well, Hiram L. Coye and Frank C. DeLongJ 
importers and jobbers hardware, SW cor Bat- 
tery and Pine 

Roddin Joshua, blacksmith with Peter Witbeck, 
dwl 8 Clara 

Rodes S. B.. (Hiriart & Co.) res Paris 

Roemer Cuit, clerk with N. B. &, M. Ins. Co., dwl 
610 Leavenworth 

Roemer Robert, bookkeeper German Savings and 
Loan Society, dwl 610 Leavenworth 

Rogers George E., stockbroker, office 336 Mont- 
gomery, dwl Cosmopolitan Hotel 

Rolls Thomas, (colored] restaurant, 229 Bush, dwl 
911 Sacramento 

Rondel Edward, lapidary, 600 Merchant, office 605 
Montgomery, dwl N s Fern Avenue nr Van 
Ness Avenue 



Roper Jourdon W., ( Dcas & R.) dwl Cosmopolitan 

Hotel 
Ropke Ahrend, barkeeper, NW cor Bush and 

Kearny, dwl 13 Eddy 
Rossa John, carpenter with E. Castagnini, dwl 

Union Place 
Rousset Paul, real estate, office 612 Commercial 
RUSSELL JOHN A., clerk Board Supervisors, 4 

City Hall, second floor, dwl 1107 Mason 
Ryan .Joseph R., clerk with Joseph C. Ford, dwl 

15 De Boom 
RYCKMAN G. W., real estate, office 15 Mont- 
gomery Block, dwl 730 Vallejo 
Rvckman William L., (M. G. Bernstein $• Go. J 

dwl 730 Vallejo 

Saalburg Siegfried, clerk Appraiser's Store, U. S. 

Custom House, dwl 80 Everett 
Saelstreng Charles, liquor saloon, 500 Broadway 
Samuels Joseph, drayman, dwl 822 Ellis 
Sanborn Bradbury, (Sanborn, Vail & Co. J dwl 202 

Hyde 
Santa Clara Vineyard Association, office 319 Stock 
Save Placido & Co., florists, 703 Mission 
SAWYER FREDERICK A., (Sawyer & PardowJ 

dwl Pacific Club Rooms 
Sawyer N. G., dwl 737 Fine 
SAWYER & PARDOW, (Frederick A. Sawyer 

and Alfred A. Pardow) attorneys at law, office 

037 Kearny 
Schilling August, bookkeeper with J. A. Folger & 

Co., dwl~622 McAllister 
Schilling Clans, bookkeeper with G. Groezinger, 

dwl 622 McAllister 
Schmidt Christian, importer engravings, moldings, 

etc., 122 Kearny 
Schmidt William C, (Slroh Sj- Schmidt) dwl 415 

Pine 
Schmitt M., stock broker, office 443 California 
Schneickert Henry, carriage trimmer with Kimball 

Manufacturing Co., dwl 309 Minna 
Schneider Nicoli, ( Delels & S.J dwl SE cor Davis 

and Pacific 
SCHRODER HENRY & CO., (Bernard Bert 

and Eugene Thomas J importers French wines 

and liquors and agents Bordeaux Board Under- 
writers, 433 Battery 
Seale II. W., stone contractor New City Hall, office 

Market Street Wharf, dwl 12 Clementiua .,.,. 
Seaton Phoebe J., (widow) dwl 141 Thirteenth 
SEATTLE COAL AND TRANSPORTATION 

CO., Bluxome <&, Cassebobm ageuts, office 

200 Sansom 
Seelig Simon, (A. Hollub & Co.) dwl 723 OFarrell 
Seligman Moses, collector, office 7 Court Block, 

030 Clay, dwl 822 Post 
Shattuck Charles C. (D. Hayes & Co.) dwl NE 

cor Sacramento and Yerba Buena 
Sheldon Henry F., clerk, 417 California, dwl 13 

Second Avenue 
Sheppard Rachel, (widow) dwl 1826 Clay 
Sherman J. A., physician and dealer trusses, 210 

Montgomery 
Sherwood Benjamin F., (B. F. Sherwood & Co.) 

dwl 114 Powell 
SHERWOOD B. F. & CO., (Charles Forma,, and 

Frank Livingston) brokers and commission 

merchants, office 430 California 
Short Julia B. Miss, teacher Spring Valley Gram- 
mar School, dwl 329 O'Parrell 
Shurvell John, clerk with Wilder A Mitchell, dwl 

1908 Broadway 
Sichel Max, dentist, office and dwl 103 Post 
Sleeper George, bookkeeper, 417 California, dwl 

222 Bbotwel) 
Smiley George W.. stockbroker, office 444 Califor- 
nia, dwl Grand Hotel 
Smiley Joseph E., clerk with Greenebanm & Co., 

dwl SE cor Bush and Mason 



HUNTINGTON", HOPKINS & CO., Wholesale Hardware and Iron, Cor. Bush and Market. 



C. P. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Boots and Shoes. 



ADDITIONAL NAMES, REMOVALS, ETC 



61 



SMITH ALFRED J., plumber, pumpmaker and 
manufacturer water closets, 220 Fremont, dwl 
N s Twenty-sixth nr Mission 
Smith Edward L., (Cooke & S.J dwl 749 Howard 
Smith Edwin L., stock broker, office 302 Montgom- 
ery, dwl 437 Natoma 
Smith Francis & Co., sheet iron water pipe manu- 
facturers, 112 Battery, res Santa Clara 
Smith Henry A., U. S. inspector tobacco, office NW 

cor California and Davis, dwl 713 Bush 
SMITH WILLIAM P., oculist and aurist, office 

and dwl 313 Bush 
Snowball Robert Y., stockbroker, office 305 Mont 
Solomun Samuel, butcher, 2 Grand Central Market, 

dwl Ss Stevenson bet Sixth and Seventh 
Simp* P. G., fP. G. Samps # Go.) dwl 736 Pacific 
&oujps P. G. & Co., (George F. Bragg and Philip 
CadvcJ soda and mineral water manufactory, 
712 Broadway 
Soren George S., stock broker, office 528 Mont 
Spaulding John E., teacher music, dwl 53ti Market 
Spaulding Madison, bricklayer and jobber, dwl 27 

deary, rear 
SPERANZA DOMENICO, teacher piano singing, 

dwl 1707 Powell 
Spring Meuzo. artificial leg maker and agent Dr. 

Bly's artificial limbs, 101 Jessie 
St. Cricq Madame, laundry, 310 Dupont 
Stark John, accountant with L. Kilgour, dwl 17 

Monroe 
Starr George R., commission merchant, 312 Wash- 
ington, dwl 21 Verona 
Steel James II., machinist with Wilder & Mitchell, 

dwl 1908 Broadway 
Stevens Alfred J., (Stevens, Clarke & Co.) dwl 539 

Second 
Stevens. Clarke & Co., (Alfred J. Stevens and Gus. 
M. Clarke) American, Australian and New 
Zealand Mercantile Agency, 116 Kearny 
Stevens Thomas, clerk with Stevens, Clarke & Co., 

dwl 539 Second 
Stitt James, rigger New City Hall, dwl 246 Minna 
STOCK REPORT, (daily) Wheeler & Co. publish- 
ers and proprietors, office 419 Cal, room 28 
Stocking Frederick M., solicitor with J. H. Carmany 

&. Co., dwl 2511 Octavia 
Stolz Aaron, (A. Stolz Sp Son) dwl 927 Sutter 
Stolz A. &. Son, (Charles H. StolzJ embroideries, 

laces, hosiery, etc., 402 Kearny 
Stolz Charles H* (A. Stolz & SouJ dwl 927 Sutter 
Stone Elise P., female physician, office and dwl 762 

Howard 
Stone George, bookkeeper with W. M. Betts & 

Bro., dwl 702 Howard 
Street C. C. Mrs., proprietor Albemarle Lodging 

House, 8 Mason 
Street Nathan J., life insurance agent, office 302 

Mo itgomery, dwl 8 Mason 
Stroh George, (Stroh & Schmidt J dwl 21 Fulton 
Stroh & Schmidt. (George Stroh and William C. 
Schmidt J wholesale diutrtjists, 535 Commercial 
Sumner J. R. &. Co., advertising agents, 416 Te- 
hama 
SUMNER WILLIAM B., hide and leather dealer, 

515 Front, dwl 959 Howard 
Swadley W. W.. (Cutter, Pitt & S.J 423 Wash 
Swain Isaac, Port Warden S. P., office SW cor 

Front and Jackson, dwl 909 Clay 
Swain Thomas T., laborer, dwl 107-Leidesdorff 
Sweeney Lemuel H., (Sroupe, S. & Co.) dwl 1234 

Mission 
Sweer Solomon, commission merchant, office SW cor 

Market and Fremont, dwl 1311 Larkin 
Swift Samuel, dealer sewing machines, 116 Post, 
dwl 716 Howard 



Tahiti. Moorea and Anaa Steamship Co., A. 
Duraud, ageut, office 316 California 



Tarns Sampson, merchant, office 214 California, dwl 

1116 Stockton 
TARPEY M. & CO., produce commission, 212 Clav 
Taylor J. W., ( Weaver & T.J dwl 1594 \ Bush 
TESMORE SOLOMON, oyster saloon, 57 and 59 

California Market, dwl 932 Mission 
Thiriot Eugene, agent Brockmau's Lozenges, 204 

Montgomery, dwl 37 Second 
Thomas D. B., carpenter, dwl 181 Jessie 
Thomas William, dwl 1025 Harrison 
Thompson William B., publisher Pacific Guest, 

office 535 California 
Tidball Scott, artist, dwl 519 Leavenworth 
Tilden Joseph, stock broker, office 2 Leidesdorff, 

dwl 122 Taylor 
Titcomb John H., attorney at law, office 639 Kearny, 

dwl 314 Bush 
Titcomb John W., clerk, dwl Russ House 
Tonks Joshua, engraver, 614 Merchant, dwl 531 

Greenwich 
Treadwell W. P., law copyist, office 15 Mont Block 
Trenor Eustace, physician and editor Western Lan- 
cet, office 330 Montgomery 
Tripp Josiah W., (Lawrence & T.) attorney at 

law, office 408 California, dwl W s Valencia 

bet Seveteenth and Eighteenth 
Turrill Charles B., dwl 502 Sutter 
Turrill M. H., contractor, dwl 502 Sutter 

Union Brewery, Koster & Hesse, proprietors, 
326 and 328 Clementina 

Vale William, (William Vale & Co.) dwl 1212* 

Jackson 
Vanderleith Jacob, proprietor S. F. Hotel, 502 Miss 
Vanier Madame, dressmaker, NE cor Post and Drip 
Vary Charles R., dwl 502 Sutter 

Wade A. P., clerk with B. F. Sherwood & Co., 
dwl 1432 Mission 

Wadhams William, ( Leveridge,W. & Co.) res Port- 
land, Oregon 

Wafer Henrv, freight clerk with P. M. S. S. Co., 
dwl 1132 Market 

Wafer William, barkeeper, dwl 232 Stevenson 

Wagner Jenuie, (Wagner & Frischer) dwl 1008 
Kearny 

Wagner & Frischer, (Jennie Wagner and Henriet- 
ta Frischer) liquor saloon, 1008 Kearny 

Walker William C, superintendent Tide Land Re- 
clamation Co.. dwl 1200 Leavenworth 

WALTER A. WOOD MOWING AND REAP- 
ING MACHINE CO., E. S. Whitcomb ageut, 
office 112 Front 

Walter Henry, draftsman with Bordwell & Malter, 
dwl S s Twenty-fourth nr Folsom 

Ward Peter, dwl N s Nineteenth bet Noe and Castro 

Ware C. A. &. Son, publishers and proprietors Daily 
Record, office 228 Montgomery 

Warner George P., ( William H. Wing & Co.) dwl 
1005 Clay 

Warren Albert T., job printer, dwl SW cor Seventh 
and Jessie 

Watson Ge.nre P. J., clerk, 302 Mont, dwl 118 Eddy 

WATT BROTHERS., (William & Robert) real 
estate, offiee 625 Sansom cor Jackson 

Watt Robert, ( Watt Bros, and Watt & McLennan) 
res Sacramento City 

Watt William. ( Watt Bros, and Walt $• McLen- 
nanjve* Grass Valley 

WATT & McLEXNAN, (William and Robert 
Watt and Frank P. McLennan J wool commis- 
sion merchants, office 625 Sansom cor Jackson 

Weaver P. L., ( Weaver & Taylor) res Napa 

WEAVER & TAYLOR. (P. I. Weaver and J. W. 
Taylor) manfrs boots and shoes, atjents Hazard 
Powder and Gutta Percha and Rubber Mautg 
Companies, 118 Front 

Webb House, Ezra Hinckley proprietor, 35 Second 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street, Best Paper and Linen Collars. 



Visit W ATKINS' YO-SEMITE ABT GALLERY 26 Montg.. opp. Lick House entrance 



62 



SAN FE AN CISCO DIRECTORY. 



Weber Adolph C, civil engineer, office 507 Mont- 
gomery, ami president Humboldt Savings Bunk, 
16 Geary, dwl 810 Folsom 

Wenzel Edward, engraver metals, 328 Bush, dwl 
5 115 Jessie 

West Edward W., (Dillon 8? W.J dwl 447 Natoma 

Weyer August, dyeing and scouring, 130 Post, dwl 
Ashburton Place 

Wheeler E. Davis, captain, dwl 514 Brannan 

Wheeler Richard, ( Wheeler & Co. and Wheeler, 
Phelan Jj- Co.) dwl 656 Folsom 

WHEELER & CO., (Packard Wheeler _ and 
Franklin Lawton) publishers and proprietors 
Stock Report, job printers, bookbinders and 
pappr rulers, 419 California, room 28 

WHEELER, PHELAN & CO., (Richard Wheeler, 
Michael J. Phelan a ltd Franklin Law ton) lith- 
ographers and engravers, 419 California 

Wheeler W. D., office 35 Merchants' Exchange 

WHITE A. W. & CO., produce commission mer- 
chants, 202 Washington 

Wbitmore W. N., foreman Mechanics' Mill, dwl 
S s O'Farrell bet Jones and Leavenworth 

Whitney J. R. & Co., (E. V. Thorn) commission 
merchants, office 405 Front 

WICHELHAUSEN RUDOLPH, insurance agent, 
and cigars and tobacco, 210 Mont, dwl 205 San 

Wilder Frederick A., ( Wilder & Mitchell) dwl 1600 
Taylor 

WILDER & MITCHELL, (Frederick A. Wilder 
and David Mitchell) agents for Proctor's im- 



proved treadle for sewing machines, office 114 
Post 

Willard Joseph W., clerk with California Powder 
Works Co., 314 California 

Williams W. J., stockbroker, office 2 Leidesdorff 

Wilson John P,, barkeeper, SE cor Pacific and Davis 

Wing William H., ( William U. Wing & Co.) dwl 
10ii Hvde 

Wing William H. & Co., (George, P. Warner J pro- 
prietors California Last- Factory, 10 Stevenson 

Wittland & Garrett, (William Willland & James 
Garrett) produce commission, 507 Bansom 

Wolf Frederick, stockbroker, office 502 Montgom- 
ery, dwl 920 Market 

Wolff Max, importer and retail hats and caps, 502 
Kearny, dwl Tyler nr Larkin 

Wollett Edward, metallurgist, office 512 California, 
dwl 303 Lombard 

Woolley Lell H., (Mead & IV.) dwl 1211 Taylor 

Wright Charles S., (Hi chard son, Holland & Co.) 
res Oakland 

Wright William H., stockbroker, office 2 Leid 

Young Richard S., physician, office and dwl 536 
Sacramento 

ZELNER WILLIAM, apothecarv, SE cor Mission 
and Fifth, dwl 307 O'Farrell " 

Ziegenfuss Thomas H.. sawsmith with N. W. Spald- 
ing, dwl SE cor Fifth and Shipley 



Recently Published. One Vol, 8vo,, 1040 pp. Price, Five Dollars. 



THE 



PACIFIC COAST BUSIHESS DIRECTORY 



FOK 1871-3, 

CONTAINING THE 

NAMES, BUSINESS AND ADDRESS OF OVER 40,000 MERCHANTS, 

MANUFACTURERS AND PROFESSIONAL MEN 

In the States of California, Oregon and Nevada, the Territories of Washington, 
Utah, Arizona, Idaho, Montana and Alaska, and the Colony of British Columbia, 
with a Gazetteer of the Counties, Cities and Towns of the Pacific Coast, and the 
names of the Officers governing the same, Federal, State and Municipal. 

HENRY G. LANGLEY, Publisher, 

612 Clay Street, San Francisco, 



HUNTINGTON", HOPSZNS & CO., Wholesale hardware and Iron, Cor. Bush and Market. 



C. P- VAN 3CHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 710 Kearny Street, Importers and Jobbers. 



THE 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY, 

For the Year commencing March 1st, 1872. 



ttig^ Notice. — Names too late for regular insertion, removals, changes, etc., which have occurred 
during the printing of the work, will be found oji tlie pages immediately preceding this. 

For List of Boarding Houses, Hotels, Lodgings, etc., see Business Directory, pp. 724, 754 
and. 76G \for Packets — Sail and Steam, see pp.776 and 787 ; for the location of the offices of the different 
Mining Companies, see Business Directory, p. 773. 



ABBREVIATIONS. 



abv Above 

acct Accountant 

agt Agent 

ass'n Association 

atty Attorney 

av Avenue 

bldg.13 uilding or Buildings 

bds Boards 

bet Between 

blk Block 

C. II Custom House 

elk Clerk 

col'd Colored 

com Commission 

cor Coiner 

dept Department 

dwl Dwelling 

E East 

E.H.L. Eight Hour League 

exch Exchange 

forwd Forwarding 



I Int. Rev. Internal Revenue 

F. P Fort Point 

h House 

imp Importer 

lab Laborer 

manuf Manufacturer 

mec Mechanic 

mcht Merchant 

Mis Dol. .Mission Dolores 

mkr Maker 

mkt ..Market 

N North 

ur Near 

off. Office 

opp Opposite 

pi ■ Place 

P. M Pacific Mail 

P. O Post Office 

Preo Presidio 

pro Protective 

prod Produce 



proptr Proprietor 

res. .Resides or Residence 

Rev Reverend 

rms Rooms 

S South 

s Side 

S.F.F.D....S. F. FiieDep 
stm . Steamer or Steamship 

Supt Superintendent 

Treas Treasurer 

U.S.B.M.-U.S.Br'chMint 

wks Works 

W West 

STREETS. 

Bat Battery 

Bd wy Broadway 

Bran Brannan 

Cal California 

Clem Clementina 

Com Commercial 

Dup Dupont 



Fol Folsom 

Har Harrison 

How Howard 

Jack Jackson 

Leav Leavenworth 

Leid Leidesdoi ff 

Lomb Lombard 

Merch Merchant 

Min, Minna 

Miss Mission 

Mont Montgomery 

Pac l'acific 

Pow Powell 

Sac Sacramento 

San Sansom 

Sec Second 

Ship Shipley 

Stev Stevenson 

Steu Steuart 

Stock Stockton 

Wash Washington 



Aarees Peter, -waiter, dwl 2 Graham Place 
Aarnes Simon, shoemaker, 519 Sacramento 
Aaron Abraham, cigar dealer, 214 Sixth 
Aaron Abraham, peddler, dwl 25 >£ Ritch 
Aaron David, patternmaker, dwl f>26 Vallejo 
Aaron Henry, salesman with Peter T. Gannon, 

dwl 18 Sutter 
Aaron Joseph, hairdresser, 534 Third, dwl 131^ 

Perry 
Aaron Simon Mrs., dwl 733 Folsom 
Aarons Jacob H., saloon, dwl 508 Vallejo 
Abatie Mary, (widow) midwife, dwl 826 Jackson 
Abbey Homestead Association, office 507 Mont 
Abbey Jacinto, wireworker with J. M. Eckfeldt 

&. Co., dwl 819 Greenwich 
Abbey &, Twenty-sixth Street Railway Associa- 
tion, office 507 Montgomery 
ABBOT, DOWNING & CO., manufacturers Con- 
cord carriages, Concord, N. H., Hill <fc East- 
man agents, 411 and 415 Battery 
Abbot George, (E. Grisar & Co. J dwl Occidental 

Hotel 
Abbott Andrew J., carpenter, E 8 Van Ness Ave- 
nue nr Eddy 
Abbott Anne F. B. Mrs., bottling establishment, 

W s Gough nr Fulton 
Abbott Frank, cook with Frederick Schinid, dwl 
12 Hunt 



Abbott George F., carpenter H. C. League, 128 

Kearny 
Abbott Henry, ticket agent Chicago, Rock Island 

and PacilicR. R., 208 Mont, dwl 2003 Powell 
Abbott Isaac C, seaman bark Northwest, pier 1 

Stewart, 
Abbott J. C, dwl 411 Sansom 
Abbott Joseph E., machinehand Enterprise Planing 

Mill, dwl 8 Perry 
Abbott Osborn, bookkeeper with Sullivan, Kelly & 

Co.. dwl 939 Howard 
Abbott Samuel S., carpenter Woodward's Gardens, 

dwl W s Capp nr Twenty-second 
Abbott Thomas, boatman, dwl SE cor Front and 

Vallejo 
Abbott Thomas G., teamster, dwl N 8 North Point 

nr La r kin 
Abbott William, clerk Methodist Book Depository, 

dwl E s Russ bet Natoma and Howard 
Abbott William, seaman, dwl 112 Stewart 
Abby Richard, general superintendent Spring Val- 
ley Water Works Co., office 5115 California, 

dwl 405 Sutter 
Abejjo Calli, laborer, dwl Garibaldi House 
Abel Christian, laborer, dwl Goodsell Place, nr 

First 
Abel George, laborer, dwl 148 Shipley 
Abel Louis, with Joseph Marks, dwl 15 Taylor 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street, Laces and Embroideries. 



Nono but the best Photograpb.3 are made by W ATKINS, 23 Montgomery St. 



64 



SAN FRANCISCO [A] DIRECTORY. 



Al>ell Albert, seaman, dwl 32 Steuart 

ABELL ALEXANDER G., Grand Secretary 

Grand Lodge P. and A. If., office Masonic 

Temple, dwl 1027 Washington 
Abell Charles, captain echooner Salinas, dwl 160 

Stewart 
Abell Edward A., clerk, dwl 1027 Washington 
Abell Prank, photographer with William Shew, 

dwl 662 Bryant 
ABEND POST, (German daily and weekly ) Huef- 

ner, Herzer& Schindler, proprietors, office 521 

Clay 
Abercrombie Alexander R., clerk with P. M. S. S. 

Co., dwl 430 Eddy 
Abernethy James, seaman, dwl 37 Pacific 
Abraham Anna, (widow) dwl 605 Stevenson 
Abraham Gabriel, clothing, 729 Market, and 33 

Second, dwl 4 Hyde 
Abraham Isaac, clothing, -135 Pacific 
Abraham Joseph, clothing, 818 Mont., dwl 210 Pac 
Abraham L., ( M. Spiro & (Jo.) dwl 1134 Dnpont 
Abraham Marks, peddler, dwl "248 Clementina 
Abraham Max, barber, dwl E s Mont nr Jackson 
Abraham Philip, dry goods, 44 Sixth, dwl 9 

Seventh 
Abraham Simon, hairdresser and baths, 210 Pacific, 

dwl 818 Montgomery 
Abrahams Adolph, tailor, 1717 Mason 
Abrahams Esther Mrs., ladies' nurse, dwl 49 Jessie 
Abrahams Henry, hats and caps, 1012 Dnpont 
Abrahams John, cook, dwl 49 Jessie 
Abrahams Jonas, shoes and boots, dwl N s Olive 

Avenue nr Van Ness Avenue 
Abrahams Louis, clothing, 6 Clay, dwl 438 Natoma 
Abrahams Lipman. peddler, dwl 272 Jessie 
Abrabamsou Alexander, (Sheyer & A.) dwl 341 

Minna 
Abrahamaon Gustave, fancy goods, 428 Kearny, dwl 

824 Bus!) 
Abrahamaon Julius, salesman with S. Mish & Co., 

dwl 426 Kearny 
Abrabamsou Nelson, (Larson & A.J dwl 14K 

Frederick 
Abrah.unson Peter, stoves and tinware, 439 Bush, 

dwl 1022 Hyde 
Abrabamsou Siegfried, clerk with Moses H. Lich- 

tenstein, dwl N s Sutter nr Hyde 
Abrahamson Susan, (widow) dwl 305 Filbert 
Abrams David, merchant, dwl SW cor Tyler and 

Van Ness Avenue 
Abrams Edward C.. trimmer with E. Galpen & Co., 

dwl 90l)i Folsom 
Abrams Isaac, tailor, 433 PacifiO, dwl Bartol nr 

Broadway 
Abrams John, (Heathjield, Bogcl & Co.) dwl Lick 

House 
Abrams Louis, pawnbroker, dwl 809 Vallejo 
Abrams Marcus, dwl 786 Folsom 
Abrams Moses D , clerk, dwl SW cor Tyler and 

Van Ness Avenue 
Abrams Samuel, real estate, dwl 938 Geary 
Abramsou Adolph, clerk with Jacob A. Alexander, 

dwl 26 Clav 
ABRAMSON EDWARD, druggist and apothecary, 

753 Clav 
Abrate Donnnico, nurse Italian Hospital 
Abrego Ysmael, salesman, 5 Front, dwl 314 Bush 
Acclimatizing Society, rooms 622 Clay 
Achesou Thomas S., ( Syc & A.) dwl Lick House 
Achoru John W., carpenter, dwl 130 Second 
Acils E. M., clerk with Claus Ottcn, dwl NW cor 

Stockton and Vallejo 
Achille Peter, gardener, dwl 710 Kearny 
ACKERMAN BROTHERS, (Hart 8. and Samuel 

S.J Dollar Store, 123 Kearny 
Ackerman David, butcher with Felix Uri 
Ackermau Edward, upholsterer with Schlueter & 

Volberg, dwl 115 Perry 
Ackerman Hart S. (Ackerman Bros. Jdwl 311 Sutter 



Ackerman Henry, captain schooner Eden, dwl 32 

Natoma 
Ackerman Henry, jeweler with David W. Laird 

dwl 332 Eddy 
Ackerman Isidore H., bookkeeper with Ackerman 

Brothers, dwl 918 Sutler 
Ackerman Isidore S., salesman with Ackerman 

Brothers, dwl 918 Sutter 
Ackerman Samuel S., (Ackerman Bros.) dwl 918 

Sutter 
Ackerman Simon, dwl 11 Kearny 
Ackerman — See Akuiun 
Ackerson Charles H., carrier Wells, Fargo & Co., 

dwl 314 Folsom 
Ackerson John W., (Hanson, Ackerson & Go.) 

dwl 215 Jones 
Ackerson Mary Mrs., furnished rooms, 767 Howard 
Ackland Edward T., porter, 111 Pine, dwl 106 Hick- 
ory 
Ackland Francis, barkeeper New Pacific House, 

418 Drumm 

Acklemann John, barber, dwl 1115 Broadway 
Ackley Ezra, camageinaker with Kimball Manu- 
facturing Co., res Alameda 
Ackley Helen M.. (widow) dwl 340 Fifth 
Aconnen Andrew, cabinetmaker with Cbr. Scbrei- 

ber & Co. , dwl 54 Sac 
Acosta Leon P., retoucher with Selleck & Fisher, 

415 Mont, dwl NW cor Stock and Bdwy 
Acre George, boilermaker Kisdbn Iron Works, dwl 

308 Beale 
Acton Martin J., expresswagon, cor Fourth and Mkt 
Acton Richard, harnessmaker with J. C. Johnson 

& Co., dwl 5 Sonoma Place 
Acton Robert, shoemaker with Buckingham & Hecht 
Adair George B., salesman with Hooker <& Co., 

dwl 525 Folsom 
Adair William B.. clerk with Col.G. H. Meudell, 

533 Kearny, dwl 110 O Farrell 
Adam John, laborer with Prescott Bros., dwl 606 

Green 
Adam Pierre, laundry, 633 Third 
ADAM THOMAS, liquor saloons junction Market 

and Geary, Old Corner, 516 Mont, cor Com, and 

New Cor, junction Mkt and Post, dwl 2.17 Dnp 
Adamer William, calker, dwl 233 First 
Adanii John, expresswagon, cor Jackson and 

Stockton 
Adams A. F., (Hanson & A.) dwl NE cor Mission 

and Fourteenth 
Adams A. J., clerk, dwl 158 Tehama 
Adams Albert F., assistant assessor U. S. Internal 

Revenue, dwl lS.jo Mission 
Adams Alexander P., lumber surveyor, dwl 543 

Second 
ADAMS, BLINN & CO., (William J. Adams, 

Samuel P. Blinn, and Peter Taylor) lumber 

and Puget Sound line lumber packets, piers 17 

and 18 Steuart 
Adams C. A. Miss, teacher Broadway Grammar 

School, dwl Hyde bet Green and Union 
Adams Charles, driver City R. R. Co., dwi 13 First 

Avenue nr Sixteenth 
Adams Charles, longshoreman, dwl 114 Sac 
Adams Charles, master mariner, dwl E s Iowa nr 

Solano 
Adams Charles D., clerk with O. F. Willev & Co., 

dwl Twelfth Av nr M, South S. F. 
Adams Charles P., tinsmith with Brittan, Holbrook 

& Co., dwl 559 Stevenson 
Adams Christopher, freight clerk North Pac. Trans. 

Co., S. S. Pelican 
Adams Christopher, yunsmith with Charles Mevers, 

dwl 2 Vallejo Place 
Adams C. P., carpenter H. C. League, 128 Kearny 
ADAMS CYRUS, manufacturer fine-cut tobacco, 

419 Jackson, dwl 1501 Jones 

Adams E-, butcher, 155 Second, dwl 55 Second 
Adams George, dwl 2 Vallejo Place 



HUNTINGTON, HOPKINS & CO., Importers Hardware and Iron, Cor. Bush and Market. 



C. P. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Smokers' Articles. 



SAN 



FRANCISCO [A] DIRECTORY 



60 



Adams George F., printer 'with Bawden & Forbes, 

dwl 10 Langton 
Adams George &., barkeeper, 330 Bush 
Adams George M., assistant cutter U. S. B. Mint, 

dwl 347| Grove 
Adams Grove, distiller, office 314 Wash, dwl 920 Pine 
Adams Henry, brewer, dwl cor Vallejo Place and 

Vallejo 
Adams Henry, clerk, dwl 24 Third 
Adams Hemy, clerk, dwl S s Walnut. Av nr Larkin 
Adams Herman, tailor, 204 Leidesdorff, dwl 235 

Kearny 
Adams Horace E., porter, 337 Bush, dwl Maine 

Lodgings 
ADAMS HOUSE, John C. Beach proprietor, 535 

and 537 Sacramento 
Adams Howard, carpenter, dwl 363Jessie 
Adams Hugh, liquors, dwl 305 Fremont 
Adams Isaac, (Adams & Utschig) dwl 235 Kearny 
Adams J., plasterer, dwl 636 Green 
Adams Jacob, teamster Mason's Brewery, dwl 620 

Lombard, rear 
ADAMS JAMES, sheriff City and County San Fran- 
cisco, office 8 City Hall," first floor, dwl 962 Miss 
Adams James H., shoemaker with Charles Palmer, 

dwl NE cor Hyde and Delgardo 
Adams James S., (Adams & Butler) dwl E s Lar- 
kin nr Turk 
Adams John, laborer with Graves & Co., W s Long 

Bridge 
Adams John, waiter Lick House 
Adams John 1?., bootblack with S. W. Lipman & 

Bro., 403 Pine 
Adams John Q., clerk with William Hayes, dwl 

1317 Powell 
Adams John Q., U. S. Mail agent S. F. post office 
Adams John S., clerk C. P. R. R. 
Adams Joseph, laundryman La Grande Laundry 
Adams Joseph, soapmaker, dwl 525 Pine 
Adams K. F. Mis., dwl Cosmopolitan Hotel 
ADAMS LAWSON S., (of Adams, McNeil & Co., 

Sacramento) office 405 Front, dwl 825 Bush 
Adams Mary Jane Miss, nurse, dwl 15 Harrison 

Avenue 
Adams Nelson, carpenter, dwlNew Franklin House 
Adams Nelson B., superintendent Pacific File 

Works, 53 Beale, dwl 721 Market 
Adams Oscar B. , physician, office and dwl 1120 

Howard 
Adams Otis, engineer California Planing Mill, dwl 

426 Folsom 
Adams Otto, dwl 106 Dupont 
Adams P. F., carpenter with P. M. S. S. Co., dwl 

10 Langton 
Adams Q. L., dentist, dwl 1515 Leavenworth 
Adams Rhoda, (colored) (widow) laundress, dwl N 

s Broadway nr Mason 
Adams Richard, teamster, dwl N s Brannan bet 

Seventh and Eighth 
Adams Robert, baker with Werner &, Co., 20 Bel- 
den 
Adams Robert, salesman, 116 Sansom, dwl NW cor 

Green and Mont 
Adams Ross M., hatter, 657 Wash, dwl N W cor 

Mont and Green 
Adams S., dwl - J2J1 Jackson 
Adams Samuel, apothecary, dwl 814 Bush 
Adams Samuel J., machinist, dwl 516 Stevenson 
Adams W. E.. dwl 411 Sansom 
Adams William, caulker with P. M. S. S. Co., dwl 

31 Green 
Adams William, longshoreman with Charles E. Has- 

eltiue. dwl 331 Green 
Adams William H„ barkeeper, 7 Merchant's Ex- 
change, dwl 7 Liberty 
Adams William H., compositor Evening Bulletin, 

•dwl. cor Hyde and Union 
Adams William H., porter 205 Front, dwl W s 

Guerrero bet Twenty-fifth and Twenty-sixth 



Adams William J., (Adams, Blinn Sf Go) res 

Fair Oaks, San Mateo Co 
Adams William S., stevedore, dwl 421 Folsom 
Adams Zabdiel B., salesman, 216 Battery, dwl W s 

Filmore bet Eddy and Ellis 
ADAMS & BUTLER, (James S. Adams and 

Thomas J. Butler) hav and grain, 53 Clav 
ADAMS & UTSCHIG, (Isaac Adams and Louis 

Utschig ) hairdressing saloon, 6 Summer 
Adamson William R. H., bookkeeper, dwl NW cor 

Lombard and Leavenworth 
Adbarranton John, confectioner, dwl 1114 Stock 
Adcock Edwin, varnisher with Goodwin & Co., dwl 

36J Tehama 
Adcock John T., clerk with Knowland & Doe, dwl 

9 Hubbard 
Adcock William, porter, 15 Sansom, dwl 56 Tehama 
Addison William A., weighmaster Broadway 

Wharf, dwl 225 Bush 
Addoms Samuel K., salesman with Armes &. Dal- 
lam, dwl cor Thirteenth Avenue and N. South 
S. F. 
Adeleka Joseph, coffee saloon, 727 Pacific 
Adelphi Social Club, rooms 232 Sutter 
ADELSDORFER BROTHERS, (Zacharias and 
Joseph, and Ludwig P. Bormitzer and Max 
Frankenihal) importers and jobbers gent's fur- 
nishing fjoods, cutlery, etc., 21 and 23 Battery 
Adelsdorfer Ernest, bookkeeper, 21 Batterv, dwl 510 

Post 
Adelsdorfer Joseph, (Adelsdorfer Bros.) res New 

York 
Adelsdorfer Zacharias, (Adelsdorfer Bros.) res Ba- 
varia, Germany 
Adelstein Barnet, glazier, dwl 510 Post 
Adema William, cooper, dwl cor First and Tehama 
Adler Aaron A., salesman, 5 Battery, dwl 1309 Lar- 
kin 
Adler Alexander, printer with Leo Eloesser, dwl 

513 Post 
Adler Bar., real estate, dwl 748 Howard 
Adler Bernard, clothier, 427 Pacific, dwl 3 Vallejo 

court 
Adler Charles, bookkeeper, 14 Battery, dwl 4U 

Mason 
Adler Charles, carpenter, dwl N s Cortland Av nr 

Prentiss, Bernal Heights 
Adler Charles, clerk. 110 Bush, dwl 415 Eddy 
Adler Charles,/ W. & I. Steinhart % Co.) dwl 1309 

Larkin ' 
Adler David, clerk with A. L. Bancroft & Co., dwl 

Eleventh nr Folsom 
Adler David, meat and vegetables.SE cor O'Farrell 

and Stockton, dwl 1049 Howard 
Adler Herman, salesman, 119 Bat, dwl 502 Bush 
Adler Jacob, boots and shoes, 330 Kearny, dwl NW 

cor Bush and Dupont 
Adler Julius, solicitor Union Ins. Co., dwl 513 Post 
Adler Leopold, ( Schu-erdt & A.) dwl 507 Stevenson 
Adler Louis, boots and shoes, 333 East, dwl 22 Clay 
Adler Maurice, butcher, 302 Beale, dwl W s Elev- 
enth nr Folsom 
Adler Moses, salesman, 5 Battery, dwl 1309 Larkin 
Adler Solomon, merchant, dwl 23 Taylor 
Adlington David M., carpenter, dwl 1125 Kearny 
Adlington Mary Mrs., dressmaker, 6:i8^ Mission 
Adolph Julius, salesman, 502 Kearny, dwl 727 Clay 
Adolphus Henry, physician and druggist, 511 Jack 
Adonis Byron, dwl 1016 Stockton 
Adrian William, merchant, dwl 629 California 
Adrert Adolph R., foreman with F. Koibel & Bros., 

dwl 165 Silver 
Adsit L. B. Mrs., dwl 726 Sutter 
ADVOCATE, (weekly) office 711 Mission 
Aehrs Henry, jeweler with Charles Messeth, dwl 

227 Pacific 
Aerden James H. Rev., pastor St. Francis Church, 

dwl 519 'Green 
Aerial Steam Navigation Company, office 623 Mont | 



JONES PULLMAN & CO., 113 Sansom Street, Best Paper and Linen Collars. 

'5 



WATKINS' YO-SEMITE ART GALLERY, 26 Montg. St., opp. Lick House Entrance. 



6Q 



SAN FRANCISCO [A] DIRECTORY 



2ETNA INSURANCE COMPANY, (Hartford 

Conn.) Fiie, George C. Boardman, Manager, 

Henry Carlton, Jr., Agent, office 14 Merchants' 

Exchange 

2ETNA IRONWORKS, Hanscom &, Co., propri- 

etors, SE cor Fremont and Tehama 
.Etna Life Insurance Co., (Hartford. Conn.) M. P. 

Morse, General Agent, office 504 Kearny 
Affenach Isidor, cooper with Jobn P. Meyer, dwl 

620 Pacific 
Affleck Thomas B., physician, dwl 110 Powell 
Afiranchino A. Rev., professor Classics and English 

Grammar, St. Ignatius College, 841 Market 
Affron Sophia, (widow) dwl 915 Howard 
<\gan Thomas, laborer Russ House 
AGARD, FOULKES & CO., (William B. Agard 
inn! Thomas Foulkes) importers and commis- 
sion merchants, 4112 Front 
\gard William A. T., clerk with Agard Foulkes & 

Co., dwl 311 Green 
Agard William B., (Agard, Foulkes 8f Co.) dwl 

311 Green 
Agastiuo Manuel C, hairdresser, bds 116 Jackson 
A gazio Jacobi, jeweler with C. F. Mohrig 
Ager James E., bookkeeper with Bacon & Compa- 
ny, dwl 24 Second Avenue 
Ager John E., bookkeeper Mutual Life Insurance 

Co.,(N. Y.) dwl "-'4 Second Avenue 
Agerd George E., traveler with Mathias Rosen- 
shine, dwl Continental Hotel 
Agger Peter, boatman, dwl 637 Pacific 
Aggers Christopher, drayman with U.S. Drayman, 

dwl 409 Jones 
Aggers Minnie, (widow) dwl 426 Chestnut, rear 
Agnew Albert, calker with Middlemas & Boole 
Agnew Gilmore, compositor S. F. Chronicle, dwl 

124 Fifth 
Agnew John, dwl 508 Jessie 
Agnew John, seaman, dwl 32 Stewart 
Agnew John J., fireman San Francisco Gas Co., 

dwl 318 Jessie 
Agnew Luke, receiver Omnibus R. R., dwl 211 

Seventh 
Agnew Patrick, calker with P. M. S. S. Co. 
Agnew Richard, calker with P. M. S. S. Co. 
Agnew Richard, carpenter Lick House, dwl 103 

First 
Agnew Thomas, superintendent Market Street R. 

R., dwl SW cor Valencia and Twenty-second 
Agnew Thomas H., printer with Cuddy & Hughes, 

dwl International Hotel. 
Agostini Louis, watchman Washington Fish Mar- 
ket, dwl 515 Merchant 
Agrati Giulio C, agent, dwl 820 Washington 
Agricultural Park Race Course, James R. Dickey, 

manager, Point Lobos Road. 
Agst-e Charles, carpenter, dwl 415 Brannan 
Agiiayo Antonio, stoekraiser. dwl 754 Washington 
Aguirre Peter, hatter with Noriega & Co, dwl 2 

Dupont Place 
Aguirre Thomas, porter, dwl SW cor Dup and Bdwy 
Ah Long, (Chinese) interpreter with J. M. Shay, 

dwl 8 Brooklyn Place 
Ahcon John, drayman, cor Natomaand First 
Ahearn Henry, laborer, dwl 236 Sutter 
Ahem Bartholomew, laborer, dwl 215 Ritch 
Ahem James, driver with M. Shawl & Co., dwl 

309 Fifth 
Ahern John M., groceries and liquors, NW cor 

Larkin and Ash 
Ahern M. A. Miss, teacher Eighth Street Primary 

School, dwl cor McAllister and Larkin 
Ahern Martin, barkeeper, 200 Bush, dwl 519 Sac 
Ahern Michael, bootmaker, dwl 25 Lilly 
Ahern Owen, tailor with John S. Haud, dwl 1511 

Pine 
Ahern Patrick, lamplighter S. F. Gas Co. dwl 733 

Ellis 
Ahern Philip, fruits, SW cor Cal and Sansom 



Ahern Timothy, blacksmith, dwl 512 Mission 
Ahern William, boilermaker, dwl 728 Market 
Ahern William, oysterman with W. G. Jones, dwl 

151 Natoma 
Aherne Patrick, carrier Monitor, 622 Clay 
Ahlbom Charles, ( Weidenhofer & A.J dwl 429 Bush 
Aiders A- Co., (John Ahlers and Christopher Pos- 
ted J groceries and liquors, NW cor Pacific and 
Taylor 
Ahlers J. H. & Co., (F. Bischoff ) groceries and 

liquors, SW cor Powell and Vallejo 
Aiders John H. (J. H. Ahlers & Co.) dwl SW cor 

Powell and Vallejo 
Ahlers Richard, clerk with H. S. Nordbruch, 213 

Sixth 
Ahlers William, laborer California Sugar Refinery, 

dwl Decatur nr Bryant 
Ahlstrom Frederick, (Frederick Ahlstrom & Co.) 

dwl W s Diumm bet Jackson and Oregon 
Ahlstrom Frederick & Co., (Augustus Linn) coffee 
and liquor saloon, W s Drumm bet Jackson 
and Oregon 
Ahren Mary, (widow) dwl 551 Stevenson 
Ahren Patrick, butcher, dwl E s Boardman Place 

nr Brannan 
Ahrens Christian, watchmaker aud jeweler, 843 

Dupont 
Ahrens Henry, cook, dwl 39 Jackson 
Ahrens Henry, groceries and liquors, 520 Bdwy 
Ahrens Henry, groceries and liquors, 600 Third 
Ahrens Jacob H., liquor saloon, 218 Commercial, 

dwl 508 Vallejo 
Ahrnardt August, (Jenning & Ahmardt) dwl 621 

Union 
Ahumada Joseph M., engraver, 631 Sacramento 
Aicher Frank, blacksmith with John G. lis, dwl 

618 Stockton 
Aigeltinger Leopold, furrier with H. Liebes & Co., 

dwl 1069 Howard 
Aiken Andrew, carpenter, dwl N s Greenwich bet 

Montgomery and Sansom 
Aiken Charles, attorney-at-law, office 34 Montgomi 

ery Block, dwl 636 Minna 
Aiken Charles H., butcher, dwl S s Broadway be 

Van Ness Avenue and Polk 
Aiken James, hostler Front Street M. & O. R. R.I 

dwl NE cor Bush and Larkin 
Aiken John, sailmaker, dwl 1007 Market 
AIKEN WILLIAM H., attorney at-law, office 3 

Montgomery Block, dwl 636 Minna 
Aikin A. S., watches and jewelry, 608 Market 
Aiue Frederick, varnish er with Goodwin & Co. 

dwl 371 Jessie 
Aiuedez Pere, dwl 409 Post 
Ainsa James M., warehouse clerk naval office cm 

torn house, dwl 305 Lombard 
Ainsa Manuel, dwl 305 Lombard 
Ainslev James, compositor S. F. News Letter, dv. 

1023 Market 
Ainslev Matthew, seaman, dwl 210 Vi ashington 
\inslev William, painter with John F. Kenned 

dwl 1032 Market 
Aiuslie John, bootcutter, U. W. M, Boot 

Manufacturing Co. 
Ainsly Thomas, (Ainsly & Menke ) dwl 10- 

Market 
Ainsly & Menke, (Thomas Ainsly & Augu 

Menke) junk shop, 202 Dupont 
Ainsworth Henry, blacksmith with Deacon & Bi 

ger, dwl E s Dora bet Harrison and Bryant 
Ainsworth Peter, shoemaker, dwl 529 Natoma 
Aird Darling, engineer, 47 Beale, dwl 112 First 
Aird David! blacksmith, dwl 112 First 
Aitken C, dwl 424 Sansom 
Aitken Charles II., butcher, 5 Wash, dwl Ss Bdv 

bet Polk and Vau Ness Av 
Aitken Charles H. Jr., coffee saloon, 329 East, d 
S s Bdwy bet Polk and Van Ness Av 



Aitken James, (Moynihan $ A.) dwl 308 Sever J 



HUNTINGTON, HOPKINS & CO., Wholesale Hardware and Iron, Cor. Bush and Marl; I 



C. P. VAN a CHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Fancy Goods. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



[ A] 



DIRECTORY 



67 



Aitken James C, machinist with Raffertv & Cald- 
well, dwl 308 Seventh 
Aitken John F., dairyman with John A. Roy. dwl 

San Bruno Road nr Thirtieth 
Aitken Samuel Mrs., (widow) dwl NW cor Capp 

and Twenty-fifth 
Aitken Thomas, stevedoi'e, dwl NW cor Pacific 

and Davis 
Aitkens Robert, carpenter H. C. League, 128 Kearny 
Akerman Benjamin J., deputy U. S. Marshal, dwl 

747 Howard 
Akin Uriah, carpenter H. C. League, 128 Kearny 
Akinann William, (Meyer <fc A.J dwl SW cor 

Drnrfim and Sacramento 
ALAMEDA FERRY, Davis bet Pacific and Bdwy 
Alaska Coal Co., office 63 Merchant's Exchange 
ALASKA COMMERCIAL CO., John F. Miller 

Pres., E. Neumann, Secy., office 310 Sansom 
ALASKA HERALD, (semi-monthly) office 611 

Clay, Agapius Honcharenko, pub and proptr 
Alatoube Bernard, rancho, dwl 1414 Kearny rear 
Albach Jacob, blacksmith, dwl 222 O' Fan-ell 
Albach Peter, carpenter, dwl 222 O'Fan ell 
ALBANY BREWERY, Spreckels & Co., proprie- 
tors, 71-75 Everett 
AlbeeThaddens, seaman, dwl 26 Tehama 
Alberidge Danertrio, (Alberto Giovaninni & Co. J 

dwl SE cor Broadway and Sansom 
Albein Frank, laborer with Whitney & Freese 
Albers Albert, painter with N. P. Cole & Co., dwl 

SW cor Second and Minna 
Albers Anton, foreman with Lewis Bros., dwl 446 

Minna 
Albers August, clerk, 40 California Market, dwl 222 

Jessie 
Albers Henry, (Gatke $• A.J dwl NW cor Seventh 

and Mission 
Albers John, blacksmith, dwl 1318 Dupont 
Albers Marcus, groceries nud liquors, NE cor Fourth 

and Clara, dwl 225 Perry 
Albert Charles, longshoreman, dwl 906 Pacific, rear 
Albert Lewis, (Lewis Albert & Co. J dwl 148 Tehama 
Albert Lewis & Co., (John W. Norton, Jr., and 

George Hall J teamsters, pier 1 Steuart 
Albertd Charles, cook with Boghiscieh & Brown, 

dwl cor Powell and Pacific 
Albertson Henry, longshoreman with Charles E. 

Haseltiue 
Albertson Joseph A., physician, office and dwl 105 

O'Farrell 
Albertson William T., scrollsawyer Mechanics Mill, 

dwl 716 Mission 
Alborilli Antoine, upholsterer with Goodwin &Co., 

dwl 510 Yallejo 
Albrecht August, (Schroder & A.) res Sacramento 

City 
Albrecht John, tailor, 443 Bush 
Albrecht John B., clerk with Charles Duveneck, 

NW cor Seventeenth and Dolores 
Albrecht Joseph, proprietor Broadway Brewery 

631 Broadway 
Albrecht Richard, bakery aud confectionery, 109 

Taylor 
Albrecht Rudolph, draftsman City and County Sur- 
veyor's office 
Alburn Louis, teamster, dwl S s Alley nr Church 
Alcaros Valentine, saloon, 522 Broadway 
Alcayaga Jose\ groceries and fruits, 529 Broadway 
Aid Henry, painter, dwl SW cor Wash and Front 
Alden Abbie Miss, furnished rooms, 52 Second 
Alden Edgar, photographer with C. E. Watkins, 

26 Montgomery 
ALDEN RICHARD C, chief clerk Subsistence 

Department U. S. A., 703 Market, res Oakland 
Alden Samuel B., policeman City Hall, dwl 4 Ber- 
nard 
Aldeni Augustine, saddler with Stone «fc Hayden, 

dwl 524 Vallejo 
Alder Gottlieb, waiter Swiss Hotel, dwl 627 Com 



Alder Gustavus, seaman North Pac. Trans. Co 

S. S. Oriflamme 
Aldermann Oscar, policeman City Hall, dwl 217 

Third 
Aldis Edward, foreman with William F. Burke, 

dwl 821 JacksoD 
Aldrich F., nurse Alms House 
Aldrich George C, upholsterer, SE cor Third aud 

Tehama, dwl 217 Third 
Aldrich L. Miss, dressmaker, 314 Bush 
Aldrich Louis, attornev-at-law, office 338 Mont, res 

Oakland 
Aldrich William A., merchant, dwl Lick House 
Aldridge Robert, laborer S. P. Gas Co 
Alemand Lawrence, jeweler with Frontier & Belle- 
mere, dwl Mansion House 
ALEMANY JOSEPH S., Most Rev. Archbishop 

of San Francisco, dwl 628 California 
Alers August, physician, (and Alers Jj- BarkanJ 

office 722 Mont, dwl J024 Stockton 
ALERS & BARKAN. (August Alers and Adolph 

Barkan ) proptrs Russian and Turkish baths, 722 

Montgomery 
Alex Joseph F.*, coffee saloon, 725 Pacific, dwl 12 

Union Place 
Alexander, (first name refused) dwl 627 Post 
Alexander Aaron L., expresswagon, 117 Sansom, 

dwl W 8 Gough nr Grove 
Alexander Adolph, merchant tailor, 739 Market, 

dwl 464 Minna 
ALEXANDER BARTON S., Brevet Brigadier 

General U. S. A., office 533 Kearny, dwl 30 

South Park- 
Alexander Charles, cigars, dwl 6 Taylor 
Alexander Charles, laborer, dwl To Stevenson 
Alexander Charles G., farmer, office 539 Cal 
Alexander Charles M., clerk, dwl 503 O'Farrell 
Alexander D. & Co., manufacturer cigars, 211 Cal 
Alexander David, (D. Alexander & Co.) dwl 570 

Minna 
Alexander David G., clerk with Cantin & Everett, 

dwl 167 Silver 
Alexander D. G., carpenter and builder, cor Twen- 
ty-first Avenue and K, South S. F. 
Alexander D. N.. student, dwl 213 Geary 
Alexander E. L., clerk U. S. M. agent S. F. Post 

office, dwl Rnss House 
Alexander Eli, fruits and vegetables, 18 Metropoli- 
tan Market, dwl 344 Fifth 
Alexander Eugene, machinist, dwl 232 Jessie 
Alexander Flora Mrs., dwl 114 O'Farrell 
Alexander George, cooper, dwl 116 Gilbert 
Alexander George W., newspaper carrier, dwl 209 

Austin 
Alexander Israel, jeweler with B. Morris, dwl 1018 

Powell 
Alexander J., cigars, dwl 506 Market 
ALEXANDER J & CO., (Jacob % Leo Ash) im- 
porters aud jobbers clothing, X \V cor Battery 

aud Bush 
Alexander Jacob A., cigars and tobacco, NW cor 

Clay and East, dwl 1235 Mission 
Alexander James, tailor, dwl 223 Stevenson 
Alexander James, tailor, dwl W s Columbia nr 

Twenty-fifth 
Alexander James, wood and coal, 432 Sixth 
Alexander J. B., carpenter with P. M. S. S. Co., 

dwl 17 Harriet 
Alexander Jane, (widow) dressmaker, dwl 50 Everett 
Alexander John, laborer with Whitney & Freese, 

dwl 210 Folsom 
Alexander Joseph, (J. Alexander &■ Co. J dwl 319 

Ellis 
Alexander Joseph D., melter S. F. Assaying and 

Refining Works, dwl 1016 Green 
Alexander Julius, hairdresser, dwl NW cor Mason 

and Eddy 
Alexander L. L., carpenter H. C. League, 128 

Kearny 



JONES, PULLMAN" & CO., 116 Sanrom Street, Silk and Velvet Ribbons. 



WATKINS' YO-SEMITB ART GALLERY, 26 Montg. St., opp. Lick House Entrance. 



68 



SAN FRANCISCO [A] DIRECTORY 



Alexander M. Mrs., dwl 1400 Polk 

Alexander Maggie Miss, whipmaker with Main & 

Winchester, dwl 223 Stevenson 
Alexander Marks, shoemaker with John G. Werlin, 

dwl 548£ Tehama 
Alexander Mitchell, clothing dealer, dwl 18 Turk 
Alexander M. P. Mrs., dwl 213 Geary 
Alexander Philip, hosiery, 34 Sixth 
Alexander Robert, calker with P. M. S. S. Co. 
Alexander Robert, shipwright, dwl 167 Silver 
Alexander Samuel, cigars and tobacco, 1 Second, 

dwl 506 Market 
Alexander Samuel, clothing, 146 Stenart 
Alexander Samuel O., (S. O. Alexander & Co.) 

dwl 125 0'Farrell 
Alexander Siegfried, foreman with D. Alexander & 

Co., dwl 570 Minna 
Alexander Simon, hats and caps, HOOg Dupont, dwl 

1125Dupont 
Alexander S. O. & Co., (Ah ram Marcus) manufac- 
turers and importers clothing, 4 Battery 
Alexander Theodore, clerk, dwl 914 Jackson 
Alexander W. Rev., President University College, 

dwl 213 Geary 
Alexander W. F., expressman, cor Clay and Du- 
pont, dwl SW cor Gough and Vallejo 
Alexander William H., (colored) porter, dwl 1 107 

Dupont 
Alexis E. Mme., laundress, dwl 409 Sutter 
Alferitz Peter, (Dellepiane & Co.) dwl 437 Green 
Alford Amasa, lumber surveyor, office with Higgius 

& Collins, dwl 533 Mission 
Alger James, optician, dwl 1316 Broadway 
Algier William, tinsmith, S. F. Gas Co., dwl 429 

Bush 
Algren John, carpenter, dwl 252 Jessie 
Alhambra Building. 325 Bush 
Alhambra Hill Mining Co., (White Pine Co., Ne- 
vada) office 612 Clay 
Alhambra Lodgings, 319 Bush 
Alhambra Theater, Thomas Maguire, propr, 325 Bush 
Alhers Henry, waiter with William Reil, 531 Fourth 
Alisain Francois, cook, 324 Mont, dwl 712 Bdwy 
Alitte August, laborer with Hancock & Kelso 
Alizeri Louis, waiter with Preda &, Co. 504 Clay 
Allan George, tinsmith with Tay, Brooks & Backus, 

dwl 722 Folsom 
Allan John, stcne and seal engraver, 302 Mont 
ALLARDT GEORGE F., chief engineer tide land 
survey, SW cor Kearny and Clay, res Oakland 
Allari Joseph, preserved meats, 52 California Mar- 
ket, dwl 7 Belden 
Alldack Joseph, (Rohrs & A.) dwl SW cor Bush 

ami Devisadero 
Alleghany Consolidated G. M. Co., (Sierra Co, 

Cal.) office 37 Merchants Exchange 
Allen A. C, hairdresser, dwl E s Fillmore bet Post 

and Suiter 
Alien Addison F. clerk, dwl 263 Third 
Allen Adeline F. Miss, dressmaker, 131 Mont 
Allen Alexander, watchman Pioneer Woolen Mills, 

dwl cm- North Point and Larkin 
Allen Alexander, weaver Pioneer Woolen Mills, 
dwl W s Shotwell bet Nineteenth and Twen- 
tieth 
Allen Alfred D., miner, office 312 Montgomery, 

dwl 111 Oak 
Allen Albert, laborer Southern Pacific R.R. 
Allen Albert, laborer Pacific Rolling Mill 
Allen Albert J, foreman stables Market St.R.R., dwl 

cor Sixteenth and First Avenue 
Allen Alonzo W., patternmaker .(Etna Iron Works, 

dwl 112 Silver 
Allen Benjamin, merchant, dwl 236 Minna 
Allen Catharine, (widow) dwl 305 Mason 
Allen Charles, glasscutter with John Mallon, dwl 

26 Geary 
Allen Charles, florist with E. Allen & Co., dwl 26 
Geary 



Allen Charles, merchant, dwl 1009 Mission 

Allen Charles, teamster, dwl 109 Seventh 

Allen Charles, waiter, dwl 156 Clara 

Allen Charles, wireworker, dwl Mont House 

Allen Charles E., salesman, 5 Front, dwl 26 Second 

Avenue 
Allen Charles R., clerk with Bellingham Bay Coal 

Co., dwl 614 Third 
Allen, Clarke & Co., (Gus M. Clarice) subscription 

book and patent agents, office 116 Kearny 
Allen Curtis C, wireworker and cagemaker, 437 

Brannau, dwl 613 Mission 
Allen David H, salesman with Gile, Hayes &, Co., 

dwl 1412 Sacramento 
ALLEN E. & CO., (Auguste Dukem) Floral De- 
pot, 27 Post 
Allen Edward, (E. Allen & Co.) dwl 26 Geary 
Allen Edward, sawmaker Pacific Saw Manufactur- 
ing Co., dwl 1303 Montgomery 
Allen Edward W.. liquor saloon, 724 Pacific 
Allen E. G.. miner, dwl 236 Fifth 
Allen Ella Mrs., glovemaker Pacific Glove Factory, 

dwl First nr Market 
Allen E. S., adjuster U. S. B. Mint, dwl 547 Mis- 
sion 
Allen Esther, (widow) furnished rooms, 223 Minna 
Allen Eugene, sawfiler, dwl 75 Clementina 
Allen Eugene D., clerk, dwl 826 Greenwich 
Allen Eugene K., upholsterer with Mitchell & Bell, 

dwl 435 Pine 
Allen Franklin, liquor saloon, 726 Pacific 
Allen George, laborer, dwl 229 Main 
Allen Hannah, (widow) lodgings, 54 Jessie 
Allen Henry F., clerk, 202 Cal, dwl 570 Harrison 
Allen Henrv H., capitalist, office 106 Leidesdorff, 

dwl 1009 Mission 
Allen Henry IL, plasterer, dwl NE cor Mission 

and Eighteenth 
Allen Henry W., bookkeeper with A. S. Iredale, 

dwl 565 Mission 
Allen Horace, homoeopathic phvsiciau, office and 

dwl 314 Bush 
Alleu Hugh, nursery aud florist, SW cor McAllister 

and Buchanan 
ALLEN ISAAC S., secretary San Francisco Be- 
nevolent Association, office 10 Webb, dwl 1028 

Pine 
Allen .lames, ass't engineer with P. M. S. S. Co. 
Allen James, hostler, 921 Sutter, dwl 1316 Larkin 
Allen James, laborer, dwl 1316 Larkin, rear 
Alleu James, laborer, dwl N s Hunter's Point 
Allen James, tailor, dwl 574 Sixth 
Allen James E., (colored) steward steamer El Capi- 

tan, dwl 1006 Pacific 
Allen James M., general agent, dwl 826 Greenwich 
Allen Jeremiah, boarding anil lodging, 18 Wash 
Allen John, carpenter, dwl 1190 Broadway 
Allen John, clerk with William Winckler, dwl NW 

cor Shotwell and Twentieth 
Allen John, cook Railroad House, NE cor Pacing: 

and Sansom 
Allen John, drayman with Turner & Harvey, dwl 

1203 Montgomery 
Allen John, hardware, 735 Pacific, dwl W 8 First 

Avenue bet Fourteenth and Fifteenth 
Allen John, moulder, dwl 315 Beale 
Allen John, professor music, dwl 1914 Mason 
Allen John, seaman, dwl 15 Clara 
Allen John, seaman, dwl 32 Stewart 
Allen John, seaman, dwl 37 Pacific 
Allen John, seaman bark Fremont, pier 17 Steuart 
Allen John, tinsmith, dwl 559 Natoina 
Alleu J. W., dwl 124 Sansom 
Allen L. Mrs., teacher Tyler Street Primary School, 

dwl cor Hyde and O Farrell 
Allen Lorenzo D., principal Washington Grammar 

School, dwl W s Webster bet Pine and Bush 
Allen Lorenzo H., oysters aud clams, dwl W s Long 

Bridge 



HUNTINGTON", HOPKINS & CO., Agents Jessop & Sons' Steel, Cor. Bush and Market. 



C. P. V4N SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Furnishing Goods. 



SAN FRANCISCO [A] DIRECTORY. "69 



Allen L. S. & Co., ( Daniel 8. Small J shipwrights, 

calkers and sparmakers, 8 California 
Allen Lucius H.. merchant, office 202 California, 

dwl 570 Harrison 
Allen Lumber S., (L. S. Allen & Co.) dwl 311 

Pine 
Allen Mary Miss, dressmaker with Mrs. Adella 

Jaubert, dwl 4-1 Clementina 
Allen Mary, (widow) dressmaker, 866Folsom 
Allen Michael, groceries, SW cor Mary and Minna, 

and market, 429 Minna 
AllenwM. W. & Co., carriage manufacturers, SE cor 

Fourth and Silver 
Allen Myron W., ( M. W. Allen # Go.) dwl 149| 

Silver 
Allen N., piledriver with E. C. Boobar & Co 
Allen Oliver P., bookkeeper Bank California, dwl 

1421 Hyde 
Allen Peleg C, f Wilde & A.) dwl 164 Jessie 
Allen Peter, clerk with Lazard Freres, dwl 858 

Mission 
Allen Peter H., teamster with J. Schwegerle & Co., 

dwl 549 Fourth 
Allen Robert, compositor Monitor, dwl 910 Leav- 
enworth 
Allen Robert, cook, dwl 26 Sacramento 
Allen Robert, laborer with Flint, Peabody & Co. 
Allen Robert, seaman, dwl 48 Sacramento 
ALLEN ROE, livery and sale stable, 069 Market 
Allen Samuel G., salesman with Murphy, Grant & 

Co., dwl 1231 Union 
Allen S. Morrison, wheelwright, dwl 614 Taylor 
Allen Theodore H., (Theodore H. Allen & Go.) 

dwl Lick House 
Allen Theodore H. & Co., {Thomas Young) steve- 
dores, office Cowell's Wharf 
Allen Thomas J., telegraph operator Cosmopolitan 

Hotel, dwl 223 Minna 
I Allen Thomas W., conductor Omnibus R. R., dwl 

41 Everett 
Allen William, carpenter, dwl 617 Mission 
Allen William, hostler Front Street M. & O. R. R., 

dwl cor Polk and Pine 
Allen William, longshoreman, dwl 2 Green Court 
Allen William, machinist Southern Pacific R. R. 
Allen William, master mariner, dwl 659 Howard 
Allen William, molder Fulton Foundry, dwl 315 

Beale 
Allen William, scrollsawyer, dwl 34 First 
Allen William, seaman, dwl 32 Steuart 
Allen William, stevedore, dwl 124 Bernard 
Allen William, watchman, dwl SW cor Pine aud 

Polk 
Allen William Jr., sawyer with Kragen & Geish- 

aker, dwl 34 First 
Allen William B., commercial reporter Evening 

Bulletin, dwl 1010 Powell 
Allen William P., barkeeper Cliff House, Point 

Lobos Road 
Allen William H., attorney at law, office 522 Mont- 
gomery, dwl 101 Powell 
Allen William H., bookkeeper with McAfee, Spiers 

& Co., dwl 565 Mission 
Allen William R., dwl 807 Leavenworth, rear 
Allen William T. t purser steamer Antelope 
Allen W. R., bookkeeper with W. W. Walmsley, 

dwl S s Russ bet Howard and Natoma 
Allen— See Allyn, Allan, Alline, and Allyne 
Alley H. L., purser steamer Nevada, U. S. N. Z. & 

A. M. S. S. Line 
Alley William H., stevedore, dwl Ns Greenwich 

bet Montgomery aud Sansom 
Allfish Frederick, seaman, dwl 315 Beale 
Allias August, butcher, dwl 15 Railroad Avenue 
Allione Francisco, coffee saloon, 1324 Stockton 
Allis Philip S., (Ansbro & Co.) dwl SW cor Bush 

and Steiner 
Allison Charles, machinist Pioneer Foundry, dwl 

427 Third 



Allison David E., (D. E. Allison 8f Co.) dwl 917 

Stockton 
ALLISON D. E. & CO., fruit, and produce com- 
mission, 309 aud 311 Washington 
Allison Frank J., salesman with Braverman & 

Levy, dwl 615 Mason 
Allison Oscar, porter with Feldbush & Co., dwl 

537 Sacramento 
Allison Ranch M. Co., office 411 % California 
Allison Peter, carpenter with P. M. S. S. Co. 
Allison Thomas R., bookkeeper A. R. C. Ice Co., 

dwl 718 Battery 
Allkire Samuel H.! clerk, dwl 602 Filbert 
Allman George, livery and sale stable, 1123 Mission, 

dwl 995' Market 
Allmayer Max, paperhanger, dwl 902 Clay 
Allmaver Michael, painter and paperhanger, dwl 

902 Clay 
Allpetar Charles, dwl Amherst nr Henry, Uni- 
versity Mound Tract 
Allsgood Frederick, clerk with H. Lange, dwl 1115 

Folsom 
Allyn William II., machinist Southern PacilicR. R., 

' dwl 1226 Folsom 
Allyne John W., (Allyne & White) dwl SE cor 

Gough and Green 
ALLYNE & WHITE, (John W. Allyne # Wil- 
liam H. White) importers and jobbers oils, 
lamps, etc., 121-125 California, and proprie- 
tor's Pacific Oil and Kerosene Works, cor 
Chestnut and Taylor 
Almada Gregorio, mine owner, dwl 24 South Park- 
Almeida Manuel, restaurant, 654 Pacific 
Almera Frank, seaman, dwl 21 Commercial 
Almon David, barrel dealer, dwl E s Geneva bet 

Brannan and Townsend 
ALMS HOUSE CITY AND COUNTY, San Mi- 
guel or Mission Ocean House road, 4j miles 
from City Hall 
Almy Moses B., salesman with Wilmerding& Kel- 
logg, dwl 512 Bush 
Alonzo Thomas, cigarmaker, dwl 826 Jackson 
Alpen Herman, boatman, dwl 1525 Dupont 
Alper William, dwl 16 St. Charles Place 
Alpers Charles, teacher music, dwl 1623 Powell 
Alpers John, leader Germania musical band, dwl 

226 Bush 
Alpers Peter, carpenter, dwl 18 Sansom 
Alpha Consolidated S. M. Co., office 419 California 
Alphonzo Samuel, cigar and tobacco, 1423 Dapont 
Alphonse Jean, carpenter, dwl 731 Washington 
Alpine Gold Mill & M. Co., (Drytowu, Cat.) office 

438 California 
Alsing Frederick, candy and fruit, dwl 401 Bryant 
Alsop John, umbrellamaker 346 Bush, dwl 336 

Bush 
Alstrom Frederick, longshoreman with Charles E. 

Haseltme 
Alt. Christopher, bootmaker, dwl 608 Vallejo 
ALTA CALIFORNIA ALMANAC/flwM/trt/; Fred. 

MacCrellish & Co. proprietors, office 529 Cal 

ALT A CALIFORNIA BUILDING, 529 California 

ALTA CALIFORNIA NEWSPAPER, (daily and 

weekly) Fred. MacCrellish & Co. proprietors 

and publishers, office 529 California 

ALTA LODGINGS, Ralston & Cottrell proprietors, 

536 Sacramento 
Alta Water Co., office 808 Montgomery 
Altemus John, bakery, W s Folsom nr Twenty- 
second 
Altenberg Ernest, bookkeeper with A. S. Rosen- 

baum, & Co., dwl 822 Greenwich 
Altenberg Rosalie Mrs., cloaks and millinery, 528 

Kearny 
Altenberg Peter F., merchant, dwl 528 Kearny 
Altenbnrg Charles, cook, 228 Kearny 
Althof Brothers, ( Theodore and Ernest) Bay Oys- 
ter Saloon, 626 Market 
Althof Ernest, (Althof Brothers) dwl 622 Market 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street, Yankee Notions. 



W ATKINS' YO-SEMITE ART GALLERY, 26 Montg. St., opp. Lick House Entrance. 







SAN FRANCISCO [A] DIRECTORY 



Althof Hermann. (Althof S? Bahls) dwl 115 Stock 

Altbof John, painter, dwl 210 Minna 

Althof Theodore, (Althof Brothers) dwl 5-16 Jessie 

Althof & Bahls, (Hermann Althof and J. W. F. 
Bahls) bookbinders and blank-book manufac- 
turers, 423 Clay 

Altaian Charles, machinist with H. R. Josselyn & 
Co., dwl "~!07 Post 

Altaian Harry, tailor, dwl 7 Miller's Place, rear 

Altmark Louis, porter, 18 Battery, dwl 259 Ste- 
venson 

Altmayer Aaron, ( Einstein Bros. & Co.) dwl 115 
Eddy 

Altmayer Abraham, (Einstein Bros. & Co.) dwl 
334 Eddy 

Alton Frank, clerk with Dexter & Co., dwl' 901 
Jackson 

Altona Gravel M. Co., (Grass Valley) office 28 
Merchants' Exchange 

Altouter David, branpacker with J. Martenstein & 
Co 

Altschul Euiil, bookkeeper, 108 Sansom, dwl 736 
Vallejo 

Altshul Leopold, (Mayjield & Co.) dwl 665 Miss 

Altshuler Levi, dry goods, S s Sixteenth bet Val- 
encia and Mission 

Altube Pedro, (Louis Peres fy Co.) office 526 Mer- 
chant 

Altrater Francis, porter with A. J. Plate, dwl 30 
Eddy 

Alvarado Beet Sugar Refinery, Moore Bros, agents, 
office NE cor California and Davis 

ALVARADO JUAN C, attorney-at law, office 408 
California, room 8, res Oakland 

Alvarez Antonio, tinsmith with Tay, Brooks & 
Backus, dwl 1606 Mason 

Alvarez Francis, cigarmaker with Cobo, Martinez & 
Co., dwl 7 Pollard Place 

Alvarez T. Mrs., dwl 1606 .Mason 

Alvea Mann el, stoker, dwl SW cor Drumm and Or- 
egon 

Alvev Charles \V., stoves and tinware, 911 Kearny, 
dwl 1813 Stockton 

Alvord Mrs., bakery, 1(137^ Folaom 

Alvord Frank, carpenter, dwl 1 037 ^ Folsom 

Alvord Henry. U.S. mail agent S.F. post office, dwl 
Government House 

ALVORD WILLIAM, mayor citv and county, 
office 2 City Hall, first floor, dwl 564 Folsom 

Amador Co., (Chinese) manufacturers and retail 
cigars, 339 Bush 

Amador Mining Co., (Amador Co. ) office 410 Mont 

Amanus Frank, laborer, dwl 433 Broadway 

Ambler Benjamin, ( Wilson & Co.) dwl SE cor 
Mission and Fifth 

Ambrose James, poultry, dwl 619 Grove 

Ambrose Thomas, sheepraiser, dwl 14 Verona 
Place 

Ambrosio B., with Prosper May, dwl 37 Sac 

Ame Paul, furnished rooms, 919 Clay 

Amedee Candle, liarnessmaker with G. Vellitiger, 
dwl 409 Post 

Amely Rose Miss, laundress, dwl 304 Beale 

Amend Charles, packer with Emil Frese, dwl 324 
Clay 

Amendt Emile, carpenter, dwl 731 Pacific 

AMERICAN BREAD CO., (Charles F. Lipman 

and John D'Arcy) 833-837 Harrison 
AMERICAN CLOCK CO., Henrv Moliueux agent, 
520 Market and 19 Sutter 

AMERICAN EXCHANGE HOTEL, Timothy 
Sargent proprietor, 319-325 Sansom 

American H. & Co., gent's furnishing goods, 614 

.Market 
American Henry, (H. American & Co.) dwl 405 

O'Farrell 
American Home Missionary Society, 502 Mont 
American Lloyds, (Register Shipping) Amos Noyes 
agent, office 406 California 



AMERICAN QUICKSILVER COMPANY, {Lake 
Co., Cal.J office 318 California 

AMERICAN -RUSSIAN COMMERCIAL ICE 
COMPANY, D. E. Martin superintendent, office 
718 Battery 

AMERICAN SAW COMPANY, S. O. Putnam 
general agent, office 606 Front 

American Sunday School Union, A. Roman & Co., 
agents 11 Montgomery 

American Tract Society, Pacific agency, Rev. Fred- 
erick E. Shearer, district secretary D. W.^Mc- 
Leod, depository 757 Market 

Americns Club Room, SW cor Third and Howard 

Amerige George, printer, dwl 100 Stockton 

Amerman Isaac, (Amerman & Howell) res San 
Leandro 

Amerman & Howell, (Isaac Amerman and Joseph, 
L. Howell) stationery, 624 Montgomery 

Ames A., dwl What Cheer House 

Ames Benjamin F., teamster with Davis & Cowell, 
dwl 541 Stevenson 

Ames Fisher, attorney at law, office 620 Washing- 
ton, dwl 10 Stanford 

Ames F. L. G. Miss, teacher Silver Street Primary 
School, dwl 1512 Folsom 

Ames F. M., salesman with Haynes & Lawton, dwl 
1523 Mission 

Ames Francis F. B., painter, dwl 14 Bernard 

Ames Frederick, clerk, dwl 230 O'Farrell 

Ames Frederick F., clerk with Reid & Brooks, dwl 
611 Vallejo 

Ames George II., discharging clerk P. M. S. S. Co., 
dwl 1512 Folsom 

Ame.- Mary E., (widow) ladies' nurse, dwl 13 Park 
Avenue 

Ames O. A., seaman, dwl 409 Drumm 

Ames Octavius, driver Sierra Nevada Ice Co., dwl 
261 First 

Ames Orville T., agent California File Manufactur- 
ing Co., dwl SW cor Tennessee and Solano 

Ames Oscar H., painter, dwl 13 Park Avenue 

Ames William, seaman, dwl 411 Drumm 

Ainey Charles H., bookkeeper, 102 Kearny 

Aingott Simon, furniture, 1409 Stockton 

Amnion Frank, fruit stand, Broadway Wharf 

Amnions D. B., dwl 411 Sansom 

Amuer Thomas, foreman iEtna Iron Works, dwl 
317 Bryant 

Amore Catiello, laborer with Patrizio Marsicano, 
223 Drumm 

Amos Frederick R., agent Fischbeck & Dyer Soap 
Co., office 219 Clay, res Alameda County 

Amos George W., porter with Meeker, James & 
Co., dwl 640 Howard. 

Amos John, silversmith with W. K. Vauderslice & 
Co., dwl 810 Montgomery 

Amos John T., (Amos A/ Dm-is) dwl 1506 Leav 

Amos John T., physician, dwl 506 Miuna 

Amos Thomas, boxmaker Union Box Factory, dwl 
6 Thompson Avenue 

Amos Zacharias, lumber, dwl 536 Ellis 

AMOS & DAVIS, (John T. Amos and Mtlo S. 
Davis) millwrights and draftsmen, 213 Mis- 
sion 

Amrine Henry, tailor with Abraham Goldstein, dwl 
Sierra Nevada Hotel 

Amsbury Thomas, carpenter with P. M. S. S. Co. 

AMSTERDAM MARINE BOARD UNDER- 
WRITERS, James De Fremery, agent, office 
710 Sansom 

Amstutz Charles, watchmaker with Cummings & 
Sons, dwl '-'17 Montgomery 

Amundson August, upholsterer with E. C. Kennedy, 
dwl E s Harrison nr Twenty-third 

Amy Gustavo L., salesman, 17 Battery, dwl Cos- 
mopolitan Hotel 

Auderfuien Charles, patternmaker with John M. 
Stockman, dwl 755 Mission 

Anderfuren John, tailor, 755 Mission 



HUNTINGTON, HOPKINS & CO., Wholesale Hardware and Iron, Cor. Bush and Market. 



C P. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 & 716 Kearny St., Rubber Goods and Umbrellas 



SAN FRANCISCO A" DIRECTORY 



71 



Aiiderfuren William J., patternmaker with John 

M. Stockman, dwl 755 Mission 
Andersen Andrew, seaman, dwl 20 Sacramento 
Andersen Andrew, seaman, dwl 37 Pacific 
Andersen Andrew, stockraiser, dwl 39 Jackson 
Andersen August, seaman, dwl 37 Pacific 
Andersen Bruce, seaman, dwl 37 Pacific 
Andersen Charles, seaman, dwl 2(5 Sacramento 
Andersen Charles, seaman, dwl 37 Pacific 
Andersen Charles, seaman, dwl 39 Jackson 
Andersen Charles, seaman, dwl Oriental Hotel 
Andersen Frederick, cabinetmaker with N. G. 

Norden, dwl 249 Bluxome 
Andersen Frederick, pictureframer with Snow & 

Roos, dwl 49| Ritch 
Andersen G. A., night inspector Custom House 
Anderseu George, seaman, dwl 10 Jackson 
Andersen Jans, laborer, dwl 39 Jackson 
Andersen Joseph, seaman, dwl 26 Sacramento 
Andersen L., bookkeeper, dwl 11 Pacific 
Andersen L., seaman, dwl 26 Sacramento 
Andersen P. A., seaman, dwl 531 East 
Andersen Peter, seaman, dwl 531 East 
Anderson A., tanner with Funcke & Wassermann, 

dwl NE cor Seventh and Brannan 
Anderson A., watchman, dwl 512 Fourth 
Anderson Abraham, cabinetmaker, dwl E s Fif- 
teenth bet Sanchez and Noe 
Anderson Albert, porter, 329 Mont, dwl 528 Com 
Anderson Andrew, captain schooner Brilliant, office 

34 California 
Anderson Andrew, cook with Hans Jacobson, dwl 

S s Pacific bet Kearny and. Dupont 
Anderson Andrew, deckhand stm Pioneer, Jack- 
son Street Wharf 
Anderson Andrew, deck hand stm Reform, Jack- 
son Street Wharf 
Anderson Andrew, liquor saloon and boarding, 250 

Spear 
Anderson Andrew, seaman, dwl 32 Stewart 
Anderson Andrew, seaman, dwl 32 Stewart 
Anderson Andrew, seaman, dwl 104 Stewart 
Anderson Andrew, seaman hark Legal Tender, 27 

Market 
Anderson Andrew, seaman hark Northwest, pier 1 

Stewart 
Anderson Andrew, special policeman, dwl 349 Te- 
hama 
Anderson Andrew P., carpenter, dwl 252 Clementina 
Anderson Antonio, with S. F. Laundry Association, 

dwl NW cor Filmore and Turk 
Anderson Augustus, pressman, dwl 3 Hardie Place 
Anderson C. A. Mrs., teacher Lincoln Grammar 

School, dwl 29 Turk 
Anderson Charles, clerk with John J. Phelen, dwl 

769 Market 
Anderson Charles, collector, dwl 916 Vallejo 
Anderson Charles, laborer, dwl 523 Minna, rear 
Anderson Charles, laborer, dwl NE cor Howard 

and Spear 
Anderson Charles, laborer with Whitney & Freese 
Anderson Charles, longshoreman, dwl 106 Wash 
Anderson Charles, longshoreman with Charles E. 

Haseltine 
Anderson Charles, mariner, dwl 13 Frederick 
Anderson Charles, seamau, dwl 19 Commercial 
Anderson Charles, seaman, dwl 32 Stewart 
Anderson Charles, seaman, dwl 531 East 
Anderson Charles, .seaman, dwl NW cor Drumm 

and Commercial 
Anderson Charles A., Harris' sample rooms, 432 

California, dwl 266 Minna 
Anderson Charles C, messenger Cal P. R. R., dwl 

616 California 
ANDERSON CHARLES D., commission mer- 
chant, 403 Davis, dwl W s Ninth nr Market 
Anderson Charles E., watchman, dwl 2109 Jones 

Anderson Charles G., deckhand, dwl 103 Sac 



Anderson Christian, bath man with F. Zeile, dwl 

528 Pacific 
Anderson David, watchmaker, dwl 1117 Kearny 
Anderson Edward, seaman, dwl 32 Stewart 
Anderson Edward, seaman, dwl 41)9 Drumm 
Anderson Edward E., tailor with G.Abraham, dwl 

1021 Third 
Anderson Ellen L., widow, dwl 428 Chestnut, rear 
Anderson Erasmus, tanner, dwl N s Brannan bet 

Seventh and Gilbert 
Anderson Eric, watchman stm Pioneer, Jackson 

Street Wharf 
Anderson Frances, widow, (furnished rooms,) 323 

Sutter 
Anderson Frank, laundrvman with S. F. Laundry 

Ass'n, dwl NW cor Fillmore and Turk 
Anderson Frank P., special policeman, dwl 818 

Pacific 
Anderson Frederick, blacksmith with Barz & Suhl, 

dwl 26 Sacramento 
Anderson Frederick, framemaker with Snow &Roos, 

dwl NW cor Green and Hyde 
Anderson Frederick, seaman, dwl 26 Steuart 
Anderson Gabriel, clerk with Say ward & Fonda, 

dwl 320 Stockton 
Anderson George A., night inspector CustomHouse, 

dwl 103 Perry 
Anderson Hector, laborer with Card & Woods, 67 

California Market 
Anderson Henry, laborer, dwl N s Twenty Fifth 

nr Castro 
Anderson Henry, laborer with Whitney & Freese 
Anderson Henry, seaman, dwl 32 Steuart 
Anderson Heury A., pressman with S.F. Co-operat- 
ive Printing Co.. dwl 3 Hardie Place 
ANDERSON HENRY,' C, oysters, 45 Washington 

Market, dwl 917 Greenwich 
Anderson Henry W., woodcarver, dwl W s Mis- 
sion bet Twenty Fourth and Twenty Fifth 
Anderson Hugh, carpenter H. C. League, 128 

Kearnv 
Anderson J., merchant, dwl 320 Kearny 
Anderson James, apprentice Union Box Factory, 

dwl 15 Second 
Anderson James, laborer, dwl 51 Natoma 
Anderson James, laborer Swain's Bakery, 636 Mkt 
Anderson James, ropemaker S. F. Cordage Factory 
Anderson James, seaman, dwl 32 Stewart 
Anderson James, (Anderson &. Randolph) dwl 169 

Minna 
Anderson James H., bookkeeper with Hey wood & 

Harmon, dwl 9 Laurel Place 
Anderson James W., machinist Enterprise Mills, 

dwl 134 Fcdsom 
Anderson James W. Jr., jeweler with Huhash & 

Kutz, dwl 169 Minna 
Anderson Jane, (widow) fancy goods, 1215 Kearny 
Anderson John, builder, dwl 17 Fourth 
Auderson John, cook, dwl 103 Sacramento 
Anderson John, laborer with Edward Kennedy, res 

Brooklyn 
Auderson John, laborer with Whitney & Freese 
Anderson John, longshoreman with Charles E. Has- 
eltine 
Anderson John, lumberman, dwl SE cor Market 

and East 
Anderson John, mate hark Geu. Cohb, pier It 

Stewart 
Anderson John, painter, dwl 14 Brook 
ANDERSON JOHN, proprietor Ocean House, 407 

and 409 Drumm 
Anderson John, real estate, office 622 Clay, dwl 

De Haro nr Solano 
Anderson John, restaurant, 783 Market 
Anderson John, seaman, dwl 32 Stewart 
Anderson John, seaman, dwl 531 East 
Anderson John, seaman, dwl NW cor Drumm and 

Commercial 
Anderson John, seaman brig Hidalgo, pier 9 Steuart 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street. Braids of all kinds. 



WATKINS' YO-SEMTTE ART GALLERY, 26 Montg. St., opp. Lick House Entrance. 



SAN FRANCISCO [A] DIRECTORY 



Anderson John, seaman schooner Meldon, Wash St 

Wharf 
Anderson John, stevedore Black Diamond Coal 

M. Co., dwl 51 Natoma 
Anderson John Jr., captain schooner Iuo, dwl 335 

Bryant 
Anderson John A., commission merchant, dwl 639 

Vallejo 
Anderson John M., wood and coal, 818 Mission, dwl 

29 Turk 
Anderson John P., laborer with Joseph W. Winans, 

dwl 926 Clay 
Anderson Jonathan D., carpenter, dwl W s Illinois 

ur Napa 
Anderson Joseph, gardener, dwl San Jose Road nr 

Six-Mile House 
Anderson Joseph D.. books and stationery, 118 

Fourth, dwl 748 Folsom 
Anderson Julius, carpenter with P. M. S. S. Co. 
Anderson Julius, cigars and tobacco, NE cor Kearny 

and Clay, and 130 Kearny 
Anderson Lars, laundry, dwl 1313 Jackson 
Anderson Lochran C, molder Golden State Iron 

Works, dwl 37 Tehama 
Anderson Louis, carpenter, dwl 107 Leidesdorff 
Anderson M. A., teacher music, dwl Joues Place 

nr Bryant 
Anderson Margaret, (widow) dressmaker, dwl 589 

Market 
Anderson Margaret E. Mrs., seamstress, dwl 15 Sec 
Anderson Maria, (widow) dwl 713 Howard 
Anderson Mary, (widow) real estate, dwl S s Moul- 

ton Place nr Mont 
Anderson Neal T., stevedore, dwl W s Sansom bet 

Green and Union 
Anderson Nels, carpenter, dwl 56 Natoma 
Anderson Niles E., steamboat captain, dwl 10 Oak 

Avenue 
Anderson Oliver, seaman, dwl W s Seventh bet 

Brannan and Townsend 
Anderson Oliver, tanner, dwl S s Bran nr Seventh 
Anderson Olof, carpenter ship Lookout, Rincon Wf 
Anderson Peter, bagsewer with J. &. P. N. Hauna, 

dwl NW cor Jackson and Driimm 
Anderson Peter, cabinetmaker with Luchsinger & 

Son, dwl SE cor Seventh and Market 
ANDERSON PETER, (colored) editor and pro- 
prietor Pacific Appeal, office 511 Sansom, dwl 

15 Pinckney Place 
Anderson Peter, mate stm Reform, dwl 409 Drumm 
Anderson Peter, seaman, dwl 238 Stewart 
Anderson Peter W., (Anderson & Irving) dwl 713- 

Bush 
Anderson Pierre A., packer with Eberhart & Lach- 

man, dwl 924 Folsom 
Anderson Ralph, helper Neptune Irou Works, dwl 

•28 Minna 
Anderson Richard, seaman, dwl 32 Stewart 
Anderson Robert, carpenter H. C. League, 128 

Kearny 
Anderson Robert, clerk with Henry Lund, dwl 33 

Jessie 
Anderson Robert, laborer, dwl 42 Ecker 
Anderson Robert, laborer with P. M. S. S. Co. 
Anderson Robert H., longshoreman, dwl 15 Fred- 
erick 
Anderson Simon, clerk, 737 Jackson, dwl 1814 

Mason 
Anderson T., laborer Carmen Island Salt Works 
Anderson Thomas, dwl What Cheer House 
Anderson Thomas, carpenter H. C. League, 128 

Kearny 
ANDERSON THOMAS, Empire Coal Yard, 737 

Jackson, and President Mutual Provident As- 
sociation, dwl 410 Eddy 
Anderson Thomas, laborer, dwl 116 Tehama 
Anderson Thomas, laborer, dwl 320 Beale 
Anderson Thomas, Riggers and Stevedores' Ass'n, 

429 Pacific 



Anderson Thomas, seaman, dwl 32 Steuart 
Anderson T. W., plumber witli David Bush, dwl 

539 O'Farrell 
Auderson Walter B., local policeman, dwl 4 Vir- 
ginia Place 
Anderson W. B., wagoumaker, 770 Mission, dwl 

120 Fourth 
Anderson William, calker with P. M. S. S. Co. 
Anderson William, clerk New Zealand and Austra- 
lia Mail Line, dwl 33 Jessie 
Anderson William, engineer, dwl 32j Freelon 
Anderson William, engineer San Francisco Cordage 

Factory, dwl Ws Indiana nr Sierra 
Anderson William, piledriver with E. C. Boobar 

&Co. 
Anderson William, seaman, dwl 32 Steuart 
Anderson William B>, clerk with H. B. Tichenor & 

Co., dwl 335 Bryant 
Anderson William H., shipcalker, dwl 311 Har 
Anderson William H. A. B., (colored) porter, 206 

Mont, dwl 16 Scott Place 
Anderson William R., barkeeper, 31 Pacific 
Anderson William R., clerk and extramau Hook 

& Ladder Co. No. 1, S. F. F. D., dwl 7 Bagley 

Place 
Anderson William S., cashier U. S. N. Z. &, A. M. 

S. S. Line, dwl 10 Moss 
ANDERSON & IRVING, (Peter Anderson and 

Samuel Irving) gents furnishing goodB, 219 

Montgomery 
ANDERSON & RANDOLPH, (James Anderson 

and William C. Randolph) w.itches, jewelr^, 

diamonds, etc., 112 Montgomery 
Andes Louis, waiter, dwl SW cor Fourth and Berry 
Andizejeski John, butcher with Newman & Stroubl, 

dwl 704 Battery 
Andlauer Jacob, cabinetmaker with J. F. & H. H. 

Sehafer, dwl 409 Third 
Andornetti John, woodcarver,dwl 28 O'Farrell, rear 
Andornetti Joseph, clerk, 76 California Market, dwl 

28 O'Farrell, rear 
Andrade Evaristo, ( Andrade & Gonzalez) dwl 9 

Auburn 
Andrade Guillermo, (Gaxiola & Andrade) dwl 419 

Bryant 
ANDRADE & GONZALEZ, (Evaristo Andrade 

and Edward Gonzalez) editors and proprietors 

El Hispano Americano, office 603 Wash 
Andre Antonio, cook, dwl 116 Jackson 
ANDREI ADOLFO, physician, office 8 Breuham 

Place, Frank Building, dwl 317 First 
Andres Chris, musician California Theater, dwl 

345 Jessie 
Andres John P., clerk with A. M. Simpson & Bro., 

dwl 13 Geary 
Audresen Bros., (Christian and John) carriage- 
makers and blacksmiths, 607 Battery 
Andresen Christian, (Andresen Jims. I res Oakland 
Audresen John, (Andresen Bros.) res Oakland 
Andresen Peter, cutler with Samuel Figel, dwl 639 

California 
Andresson John, dwl 6 Ridley 
Andrew Alexapder, seaman, dwl 26 Sacramento 
Andrew Herman, carpenter California Planing Mill, 

dwl 535 Howard 
Andrew Lewis, seaman, dwl 26 Sacramento 
Andrews Amasa B., merchandise accountant Cus- 
tom House, dwl 932 Mission 
Andrews Charles, boxmaker Union Box Factory, 

dwl cor Twenty-sixth and Valencia 
Andrews Charles, steward, dwl 22 John 
Andrews Charles, (colored) steward, dwl S37 Bdwy 
Andrews Charles A., woodturner, dwl 84] Mission 
Andrews Charles R., gilder with Snow & Roos,d\vl 

1323 Stockton 
Andrews Elizabeth, (wiiow) dwl 1601 Pacific 
Andrews Ellen, (willow) dwl 1208 Pacific 
Audrews Edward O., (Andrews S,- FaneherJ dwl 

230 Kearny 



HUNTINGTON, HOPKINS & CO., Agents Jessop & Sons' Steel, Cor. Bush and Market. 



C P VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Glassware and Toys. 



Audrews Frederick J., carpenter California Planing 
Mill, dwl Treat Avenue nr Twenty-second 

Andrews G. 1)., carpenter H. C. League, 128 Kearny 

Andrews George, bookkeeper with William B. 
Hooper, dwl Nucleus Hotel 

Andrews George, liousepainter with Frost & Rich- 
ards, dwl 313 Harrison 

Andrews George, longshoreman, dwl 1110 Battery 

Andrews George B., driver Front St.M. and O.R.R. 

Andrews Hann ill, (widow) lodgings, NE cor Sec- 
ond and Market 

Andrews Henry, gatekeeper Woodward Gardens, 
dwl E s Bartlett nr Twenty-third 

Andrews Henry H, captain steamer Princess, dwl 
65i2 Wash 

Andrews James, laborer, dwl N s Fourteenth nr P, 
South S. F. 

Andrews J. B., purser California Pacific R. R. Co. 
steamer Sacramento 

Andrews Jeremiah, fireman steamer Amador, dwl 
SE cor Montgomery and Vallejo 

Andrews John B., barnessmaker, dwl W s Bartlett 
bet Twenty-fourth and Twenty-fifth 

Andrews John, teamster, dwl S s Mariposa nr Ar- 
kansas 

Andrews John B., bricklayer, dwl N s Indiana nr 
Sierra 

Andrews John C, barnessmaker with Main & Win- 
chester, dwl 223 Stevenson 

Andrews John H., laborer, dwl NW cor Hayes and 
Van Ness Avenue 

Andrews John R., signpaiuter, 412 Pine, dwl 1313 
Sacramento 

Andrews Nancy H., (widow) dwl S s Bush bet 
Laguna and Buchanan 

Andrews Oliver, market, 157 Second, dwl 62 Na- 
toma 

Andrews Richard, stevedore, dwl S s Alta bet Mont- 
gomery and Sansom 

Andrews Thomas, painter California Theater 

Andrews Thomas J., malster, dwl 436 Branuan 

Andrews T. N. , carpenter, dwl 721 Brannan 

Andrews William, stonecutter, dwl NW cor Clin- 
ton and Townsend 

Andrews W. Dtis, dwl 22 First Avenue 

Andrews & Fancher, (E. O. Andrews and Charles 
H. Fancher Jr.,) butter, cheese, eggs, etc., 23 
Occidental Market 

ANDROS MILTON, attorney-at-law, office 18 U.S. 
Court Building, dwl 649 Howard 

Andrus Jesse B., purser steamer Yosemite, dwl SE 
cor Taylor and Geary 

Andrus Thomas J., compositor Figaro, dwl W s 
Mason bet Pacific and Broadway 

Andrzejowski J. William, carrier S. F. post of- 
fice, dwl 702 Bush 

Anduin Charles, porter, 517 Sacramento, dwl 1217 
Dupont 

Angel Andrew J., butcher, 1 St. Charles Place 

Angel Moses, tailor. 110 Pacific 

ANGEL MYRON, agent White Pine News, office 
432 Montgomery 

Angel Philip, expresswagon, dwl 815 Union 

Angeli J. & Co., (Richard Braeg and E. M. 
Frank), importers and wholesale licpuors, 211 
and 213 California 

Augelis August, tinsmith with Martin Prag, dwl 730 
Clementina 

Angelis Theodore, teacher music, dwl 1623 Powell 

Angelius Oiederich, driver Albany Brewery, dwl 
756 Howard 

Angeli Horace B., {Angeli, Palmer & Go.) dwl 
11 Clementina 

Angeli J. M., carpenter H. C. League, 128 Kearny 

ANGELL JONATHAN W., apothecary, NW cor 
First and Folsom, dwl 24 Oak Grove Avenue 

ANGELL, PALMER & CO., (Horace B. Angeli 
and Cyrus Palmer), proprietors Miners' Foun- 
dry, 247-257 First 



Angeli William C, physician, office NW cor Turk 

and Folsom, dwl 506 Folsom 
Angelo Raymo (Angelo $? Banlz), dwl Ss Union 

nr Jones 
Angelo & Bailtz, (Raymo Angela and Leon Bautz) 

dealers bottled ale, porter and cider, 607 San 
Angerer Charles, bootmaker, dwl 225 Seventh 
Angh Kee &. Co., {Chinese) merchants, 7:iS Sac 
Angius J. D., miner, dwl Cosmopolitan Hotel 
Anglen Frederick, laborer Pacific Rolling Mill, 

dwl Potrero Point 
Anglin Patrick, laborer, dwl E s Bryant bet Twen- 
ty-fourth and Twenty fifth * . 
Anglin Thomas, laborer, dwl 721 Minna 
ANGLO-CALIFORNIA LAND RECLAMA- 
TION CO., office 45 and 46 Mont Block 
Angney L. J., dwl Portsmouth House 
Angus John A., weaver, dwl N s North Point nr 

Van Ness Avenue 
Angus William O., weaver, dwl N s North Point nr 

Larkin 
Aukele George, tanner with Funcke & Wasserman, 

dwl 626 Brannan 
Ankner Cris, assistant property master Metropolitan 

Theater, dwl Government House 
Annis Edward, tailor, 235 Sutter 
Annis James, carpenter, dwl 783 Folsom 
Annis Samuel, foreman with Green & Searle, dwl 

1329 Sansom, rear 
Annis William, cattle drover, dwl 327 Bryant 
Ansbro Thomas, (Anshro & Co.) dwl 431 Bran 
ANSBRO & CO., (Thomas Anshro, Philip S. 

Allis and Henry Johnson) detectives, office 

411^ California 
Ansburg B. & Co., (Adam Jack) , butchers, NE cor 

Montgomery and Broadway 
Ansburg B., (B. Ansburg & Co.) dwl NE cor 

Montgomery and Broadway 
Anschel Levi, tailor, 204 Commercial 
Ansel Philip, soap dealer, dwl 815 Union 
Anselm George, baker with Louis Valeute, dwl 216 

Broadway 
Anselm Otto, clerk, Headquarters Mil. Div. Pac, 

703 Market 
Ausiglioni Henry, real estate, dwl 523 Pine 
Anson Patrick F., painter with Wasou & Morris, 

dwl N s Pacific nr Polk 
Anson William, paper> banker with George W. 

Clark, 333 Pine 
Anspacber Abraham, real estate, dwl 808 Geary 
Ansvatigui M., laundryman with S. F. Laundry 

' Ass'n, dwl NW cor"Filmore and Turk 
Anthes Frederick, musician, dwl 7 Clairville Place 
Antbes & Fleiscbman, (Peter Anthes ami Charles 

FleischmanJ, hair dressing saloon, 315 Kearny 
Antbes Peter, (Anthes # Fleischmam,) dwl So- 
phie Terrace 
Anthony Abram, pedler, dwl 123| Shipley 
Anthony Abraham, shoemaker with Marks & Lev- 

insky 
Anthony Albert G., physician, office and dwl 128 

Kearny 
Anthony Edward T.,fE. T. Anthony & Co.) dwl 

124'Oak 
Anthony E. T. & Co., repackei'S, 321 Sacramento 
ANTHONY GEORGE W., real estate agent and 

general broker, office and dwl 417 Bush 
Anthony Henry, shoemaker, dwl 51 Natoma 
Anthony Henry A., barkeeper with J. Prinz, dwl 

51 Second 
Anthony Herman, junkdealer, dwl 769 Bryant 
An/hony Joseph, mattrassmaker, dwl 12 Natoma 
Anthony Richard M., bookkeeper with William 

Shermau & Co., 606 Montgomery 
Autlour Jacob, carpenter, dwl 409 Third 
Antoine John, laborer, dwl 132 Steuart 
Antoine John, musician, dwl S s Dupont Alley 
Antoine Joseph, dairyman, dwl N s Cortland Av 

nr Prospect Av, Bernal Hights 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street, Dress Buttons in great variety. 



WATKINS' YO-SEMITE ART GALLERY, 26 Montg. St., opp. Lick House Entrance. 



74 



SAN FRANCISCO [A] DIRECTORY 



Antoue Joseph, driver, dwl 532 Broadway 
Antonelli Pierre, gardener, Bay View 
Antonio Guiseppe, barkeeper, dwl 536 Bdwy 
Antonio Joan, farmer, dwl SW corDrummandOr- 

egon 
Antonio Jose\ cook, bds 116 Jackson 
Antunovich «fe Russell, (Florio Antunovich and 

Joint Tilts sell) coffee saloon, 403 East 
Antunovich Florio, (Antunovich & Russell) dwl 712 

Green 
Antunovich Nicholas, coffee saloon, SW cor East 

Commercial 
Antz Henry, meat market, 901 Larkin 
Apel John, architect, office 608 Sac, dwl 832 Folsom 
Apel's Building, 410 Kearny 
Apholdl Bernhard, cooper, dwl 39 Jackson 
Apholk Hermau B., cooper, dwl Fifth Avenue, 

South S. F. 
APOTHECARIES' HALL, Benjamin B. Thayer 

manager, SE cor New Mont and Market 
Appel Frank, baker, dwl Pinckney Place, rear 
Appel X., proptr Pallas Saloon, 417 Kearny 
Appel Simon, tailor, dwl 303 Third 
Appell John C, cabinet maker with Bryant, Strahan 

& Co., dwl SW cor Main and Mission 
Appiarius Henry, clerk with Chris. C. Butt, dwl 

Pine bet Stockton and Powell 
Appiarius William, driver with Goetjen &, Co 
Apple Sarah Mrs., fancy goods, 204 Kearny, dwl 

566 Minna 
Apple Wolf, merchant, office 204 Kearny, dwl 566 

Minna 
Applebee Hawley, teamster, pier 1 Steuart, dwl 

Farren Avenue 
Applebv Charles M., fireman California Planing 

Mill, dwl 123 Spear 
Appleby Thomas, nursery man and florist, NE cor 

Alabama and Twenty-second 
Applegarth Edward, mining, office 302 Mont, res 

Brooklyn, Alameda Co 
Applegate J. Henry Jr., bookkeeper with J. H. Car- 
many & Co., dwl 204 Lombard 
Applegate , John J., bookkeeper Standard Soap Co. 

dwl 22 Oak Avenue 
APPLEGATE JOSIAH H, attorney-at-law, office 

729 Montgomery, dwl Grand Hotel 
Applegate Uriah, carbuilder with Kimball Manu- 
facturing Co., dwl Steinmann's Hotel 
Appleton Abraham, shoemaker with Buckingham & 

Hecht, dwl 154 Natoma 
Appleton Abraham, porter with Buckingham & 

Hecht. dwl 135 Natoma 
Appleton Thomas Jr., superintendent Mission & Pa- 

eific Woolen Mills, dwl W s Folsom bet Nine- 
teenth and Twentieth 
Appleton Weller, dealer tobacco, dwl 504 Eddy 
Appo Junius B., porter North Pac. Trans. Co.'s S. 

S. John L. Stephens, dwl W s Railroad Avenue 

bet Eleventh and Twelfth, South S. F. 
Apps William, furnished rooms, 720 Market 
April Nicholas, steward, 519 Sacramento 
Apwold Herman B., seaman bark Legal Tender, 

27 Market 
Arago & Co., (Chinese) cigar manufacturers, 767 

Clay 
Aran J. G., caulker with P. M. S. S. Co 
Arata Bartolemo, liquor saloon and restaurant, 5 

Clay 
Arata David; vegetable dealer, dwl E s Ohio ur 

Broadway 
Arata Felicia Miss, dressmaker, 533 Vallejo 
Arata Francisco, boarding, 14 Union Place , 

Arata Nicolo, shoemaker, dwl 14 Union Place 
Arata Peter, laborer with Domingo Ghirardelli 
Arbogast Frederick, upholsterer with Frank G. 

Edwards, 628 Clay 
Arbogast George, dwl 708 Leavenworth 
Arbondin Henry, manufacturer smoking tobacco, 

1626 Stockton 



Arbuckle Henry, ( Arbuckle & Reynolds) dwl E 8 

Natoma bet Fourteenth and Fifteenth 
Arbuckle & Reynolds, ( Henry Arbuckle and T. 
W. Reynolds) groceries and liquors, NE cor 
Sixteenth and Howard 
Archbald John, secretary, dwl 1312 Powell 
Archer E., (widow) laundress, dwl 49 Louisa 
Archer William, machinist Philadelphia Brewery, 

dwl 415 Filth 
Archey Annie, (colored) (widow) dwl 27 John 
Archibald James G., driver N.B.&M.R.R., dwl 317 

Tehama 
Archibald Jesse G., driver N.B.&M.R.R., dwl 

312 Tehama 
Archibald P. L., receiver Central R.R., dwl 421 

Sixth 
Archibald William, saloon, NW cor First and Stev- 
enson, dwl 28 First 
Archimandritoff H, captaiu bark Cyaue, H. K. &. 

Co., 312 Sansom 
Arcos John, restaurant, 525 Broadway 
Ardrey Agnes Miss, dressmaker, dwl 6 Mont 
Arees John P., (A. Draycur fy Co.) dwl 2 Graham 

Place 
Arellano Ignacio, bootblack with Adam Grimm, 

Lick House 
Arena A., saddle maker, dwl 107 Chambers 
Arens Gertrude, (widow) shiitfinisher, 563 Howard 
Areuts Edward, barkeeper, dwl 749 Market 
Arentson John, shoemaker with Louis Adler, 333 

East 
Areskog Gustav, ( Areskog &,• Challman) dwl 819 

Kearny 
Areskog & Challman, (Gustav Areskog- and An- 
drew Challman) liquor saloon, 819 Kearny 
Arey John, mate ship Germania, Rincon Wharf 
Arey Robert B., master mariner, dwl 311 Biannan 
Arey Walter W., proprietor California Bellows 
Manufactory, 32 Fremont, and bookkeeper, 118 
Battery, dwl 6 Vassar Place 
Arfort John B., wagonmaker, 218 Post, dwl 509 

Fulton 
Argall John, machinist Fulton Foundry, dwl 566 

Howard 
Argenti Julio, varieties, W s Mission bet Tweuty- 

Fifth and Twenty-sixth 
Argenti Tullio, marbleworker, dwl Mission bet 

Twenty-fifth and Twenty-sixth 
Argyle Henrietta, (widow) nurse, dwl 417 Sutter 
Arjo Manuel, dwl NE cor Polk and Broadway 
Ailing Isaac S., weighmaster C. P. R. ft., dwl S s 

King nr Third 
Arlington House, Mrs. C. M. Gillen proprietress, 

127 Kearny 
Arlington Mary Miss, dressmaker, dwl Irving House 
Arlington Mary E. Miss, glovemaker Pacific Glove 

Factory, dwl 23 Minna 
Arlota Rita, (widow) dwl 12 Virginia Place 
Armaiid L., tailor, dwl 519 Sacramento 
Armann Edward, hairdresser with Montgomery 

Baths Co., dwl N s Everett, nr Fourth 
Armas Jose F., laborer, bds llti Jackson 
Armbruster Julius, jeweler with California Jewel- 
ry Co., dwl 925 Washington 
ArmerMax, (Kullman & A.) dwl 631 O'Farrell 
Armer Robert, laborer, dwl 5 Washoe Place 
Armer Thomas, cook, 520 Cal, dwl 5 WaHhoe Place 
Armes C. W., (Armes <fc Dallam) res Oakland 
Armes George W., (Armes Sf Dallam) res Oak- 
land 
Armes Moses, night inspector Custom House, dwl 

137 Montgomery. 
Amies Richard D., clerk- dwl 137 Montgomery 
ARMES & DALLAM, (C. \Y. & George W. 
Armes and Richard)). Dalltnit I nianut'actufers 
tubs and pails, 22 and 24 California, and im- 
porters wood and willow ware and manuf's 
brooms, 215 and 217 Sacramento 
Armon Isidor; teacher music, dwl 47 Clementina 



HUNTINGTON", HOPKINS & CO., Importers Hardware and Iron, Cor. Bush and Market. 



C. P. VAN" SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, White Shirts. 



SAN FRANCISCO [A" DIRECTORY 



75 



ARMORY BLOCK, NW cor New Montgomery 

and Howard 
ARMORY HALL, 134 Fourth 
ARMORY HALL BUILDING, 502 Montgomery 
Armstrong Abraham, seaman, dwl 37 Pacific 
Armstrong Abraham, seaman ship Lookout, Rincon 

Wharf 
Armstrong Bart. H., painter, dwl 18 Sansom 
Armstrong Carrie Miss, actress Bella Union The- 
ater 
Armstrong C. C, carpenter II. C. League, 128 

Kearny 
Armstrong Charles, laborer with Whitney & Freese 
Armstrong Christopher, clerk with J. W. Sullivan 
Armstrong Christopher, clerk, dwl 1018 Folsom 
Armstrong I). & Co., (Nathaniel Moore) gents' 

furnishing goods, 571 Market 
Armstrong Daniel, clerk, 317 California, dwl 726 

Clementina 
Armstrong David, commission merchant, dwl 522 

O'Farrell, rear 
Armstrong David, (D. Armstrong <!j* Go.) dwl SE 

cor Third and Hunt 
Armstrong Dennis, salesman, 628 Market, dwl 7 

Morse 
Armstrong Francis, porter with Rockwell, Coye 

& Co., dwl 7 Nuuan's Avenue 
Armstrong Frank, cook, dwl 531 East 
Armstrong Frank, steward schooner Meldon, Wash- 
ington Street Wharf 
Armstrong George D'Arcy, attorney at law, office 

430 California, dwl 24 Stockton" 
Armstrong Henry, painter, dwl 541 Natoma 
Armstrong James, engineer with City Paving Co., 

dwl 12* Harriet 
Armstrong James, gardener, dwl S s Fair Avenue 

nr Mission 
Armstrong James, stoves and tinware, 240 Sixth 
Armstrong James B., comedian, dwl 815 Clay 
Armstrong Joanna, (widow) dwl cor Henrietta and 

Buena Vista, Bernal Hights 
Armstrong John, engineer Steamer Newbern, dwl 

153 J Second 
Armstrong John, laborer, dwl N s Tyler bet Leav- 
enworth and Jones 
Armstrong John, plasterer, dwl 111 Clementina 
Armstrong John, Jr., reporter Morning Call, dwl S 

s Eiie nr Mission 
Armstrong John G., cooper with Cutting & Co., 

dwl 247 Fourth 
Armstrong John H., lather, dwl 245 Clara 
Armstrong John J., lather, dwl 245 Clara 
Armstrong John S., (Moore 8? A.) dwl 5 Latham 

Place 
Armstrong Matthew, seaman, dwl 12 Washington 
Armstrong Marietta, dwl 115 Ellis 
Armstrong Martin, seaman, dwl 12 Washington 
Armstrong Robert, capitalist, dwl 718 Union 
Armstrong Robert, carpenter H C. League, 128 

Kearny 
Armstrong Robert, laborer, bds 304 Beale 
Armstrong Robert, laborer with Graves & Co., W 

s Long Bridge 
Armstrong Robert, (Fagerkrantz fy A.) dwl 1707 

Dupout 
Armstrong Samuel C, salesman, 309 Montgomery, 

dwl 564 Bryant 
Armstrong Thomas, seaman, dwl 32 Steuart 
Armstrong Thomas C, messenger Bamber & Co.'s 

Express, res Haywards 
Armstrong Truman B., tinsmith with Brittan, Hol- 

brook & Co., dwl 924 Stockton 
Armstrong William, grainer with Hopps & Sons, 

dwl S s Eighteenth bet Mission and Capp 
Armstrong William H., clerk U. S. Medical Di- 
rector, 703 Market, dwl 617£ McAllister 
Armstrong William H., seaman, dwl 22 Mission 
Armstrong William J., clerk with S. Mosgrove & 

Co., dwl 318 Jessie 



Arnaud Albert, groceries and liquors, 214 Post, dwl 

2 Chelsea Place 
Arnaud Paul, upholsterer, dwl 44 Clara 
Arnaud Peter, boxmaker with Benjamin F. Gil- 
man, dwl Willow nr Valencia 
Arneson Torin, laborer, dwl 1432 Stockton, rear 
Arnest John M., artist Cosmopolitan Art Gallery, 

dwl 523 Kearny 
Arnheini Gustave S., salesman, 8 Steuarr, 
Arnheim Julius S., clerk with Samuel S. Arnheim, 

NW cor Fourth and Mission 
ARNHEIM SAMUEL S., apothecary, NW cor 
Fourth and Mission, and stationery and tobacco, 
8 Steuart 
Arnheim Saul, clothing, 361 Pacific 
Arnheim William S., jeweler, dwl 8 Steuart 
Arnhold Hugo, salesman, 223 California 

Arnold , teamster, dwl 216 Stevenson 

Arnold Alexander, furs, dwl 2526 Bush 

Arnold Ames, teamster, 101 Market, dwl E s Fair 

Oaks nr Twenty-third 
Arnold Amos E., watchman with Kimball Manu- 
f'ng Co., dwl NW cor Fourth and Brannan 
Arnold Anna, (widow) dwl 169 Perry 
Arnold A. S., merchant, office 116 Kearny, dwl N s 

Bush bet Scott and Devisadero 
Arnold Austin, bookkeeper with Marcus C. Hawlcy 

& Co., dwl 410 O'Farrell 
Arnold B. C, wholesale hog butcher, M Street S. F. 
Arnold B. F. K, salesman, 7 San, dwl 720 Geary 
Arnold Casper, hatter with Edward Stapleton, dwl 

Tittel's Row 
Arnold Charles B., clerk with Bowen Bros. 434 

Pine 
Arnold Cyrus, (Card & A.) dwl 410 Kearny 
Arnold D. Mrs., dressmaker, dwl 31 Eddy 
Arnold Edson, butcher, dwl E s Howard bet Twen- 
ty-fifth and Twenty-sixth 
Arnold Eldridge P., books, stationery and period- 
icals 427 Kearny, dwl 822 Filbert 
Arnold Ferdinand D., butcher, dwl 43 Tehama 
Arnold Francis W., cooperage, 708 Front, dwl 519 

Octavia 
Arnold Frederick, pressman Alta Job office, dwl 1314 

Kearny 
Arnold Frederick, watchmaker, dwl 338 Bush 
Arnold G. C, teacher, dwl 430 Geary 
Arnold J. C, author, BuckLey's Varieties 
Arnold John, mariner, dwl E s Mission nr Twenty- 
third 
Arnold John F., expresswagon and a^ent Hucks' 
& Lambert's axle grease, 324 Jackson, dwl 1503 
Leavenworth 
Arnold Joseph, shademaker with Fried & Besse, 

dwl 304 Minna 
Arnold Lewis, compositor Evening Bulletin 
Arnold Lewis L., commission merchant, dwl 515 

Minna 
Arnold Louis, grocer, dwl NE cor Vallejo and 

Powell 
Arnold Marcus P., salesman with E. F. Arnold, 

dwl 822 Filbert 
Arnold Noah S., salesman with California Type 

Foundry Co., dwl 918 Capp 
Arnold Otto, messenger London & S. F. Bank, 

dwl 725 Pine 
Arnold P., boxmaker, dwl 7 Willow Avenue 
Arnold Philip E., mining, dwl 221 O'Farrell 
Arnold Rudolf, laborer Mission Soap and Candle 

Works 
Arnold Rnfus, teamster, dwl 2014 Folsom 
Arnold Thomas C, clerk, dwl 1188 Broadway 
Arnold Thomas J., engineer State Harbor Commis- 
sioners, office 414 Mont, res Oakland 
Arnold W. A., carpenter H. C. League, 128 Kearny 
Amot Nathaniel D., manager Vulcan Iron Works, 

dwl 1514 Pine 
Arnot Nathaniel D. Jr., secretary Central R. R. 
116 Taylor, dwl 1514 Pine 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street, Perfumery and Fancy Soaps. 



WATKINS' YO-SEMITE ART GALLERY, 26 Montg. St., opp. Lick House Entrance. 



76 



SAN FRANCISCO [A] DIRECTORY 



Arnstein Eugene, (Stein, Simon & Go.) dwl 507 
Lombard 

Arold John, laborer Pacific Rolling Mill, dwl Po- 
trero Point 

Aron Joseph, ( Weil & Co.) dwl SE cor Sutter and 
Van Ness Avenue 

Aronson Arnold, cutter S. F. Shoe Factory, dwl 
3 Munroe 

Aronson Evan, cook, dwl 531 East 

Aronson G. & Co., pawnbrokers, 110 Kearny 

Aronson George, (G. Aronson & Co.) dwl 299 
Clementina 

Aronson Nathan, clerk with James & Peckerman, 
dwl N s Vallejo bet Stockton and Powell 

Aronson Sigmond, peddler, dwl 3 Munroe 

Aronson Sigmand, salesman, 4 Kearny, dwl 783 
Market 

Aronstein Adolf, physician, office 216 Kearny, dwl 
417 Post 

Arp Peter, stonecutter, dwl 423 Bush 

Arper Thomas, millwright with F. Korbel & Bros., 
dwl 559 Bryant 

Arrambid John B., butcher, dwl 600 Jones 

Arresren Harry, seaman, dwl 129 Jackson 

Arrington M. L. Mrs., dwl 729 Bush 

Arriola Edward F., photographer with I. W. Taber, 
dwl 14 Auburn 

Arriola Fortunato, landscapepainter, dwl 14 Au- 
burn 

Arris Henry, carpenter, dwl 828 Union 

Arrivey Thomas, blacksmith with Taber & Cunning- 
ham, dwl 656 Howard 

Arrowsmith David B.. local agent New York Life 
Ins. Co., dwl 607| Pine 

Arrowsmith John, laborer, dwl 5 Zoe Place 

Art en August, cook, dwl 7\ Tay 

Arthur Edwin M., collection clerk Wells, Fargo & 
Co.'s Banking Department, res Oakland 

Arthur George N., (J. D. Arthur & Son) res Oak- 
land 

ARTHUR J. D. & SON, [George N. Arthur) im- 
porters and jobbers machinery and wagons, 
SW cor California and Davis 

Arthur John D., (J. D. Arthur Sp Son) res Oak- 
laud 

Artignes Etnil, butcher, 14 San Francisco Market, 
dwl Fifth Avenue, South S. F. 

Arzaga Augustin, compositor L'Eco Delia Patria, 
dwl J 521 Dupont 

Arzaga Jose, compositor, dwl 408 Greenwich 

Arzberger Martin, painter, dwl 1614 Bush 

Asal A., manufacturer cane seat chairs, 8 Brooks 

Aschheim John, stock dealer, dwl 137 Mont 

Ageher Julius, photographic printer with Wilbur F. 
Bailey, dwl 417 Jones 

Aschersohn Emil, carrier Hebrew Observer, dwl 
462 Tehama 

Aschmann William, barkeeper with Henry Wohlt- 
man, S s King bet Second and Third 

Ash Caroline, (widow) dwl 540 Second 

Ash Charles, drayman, 425 Battery, dwl 434 Fifth, 

Ash David, manufacturer horseshoe nails, 13 First, 
dwl 10 St. Mary's Place 

A6h Jacob, (./. Alexander Sf Co.) res New York 

Ash James J., operator Western Union Telegraph, 
dwl 8 St. Mary's Place 

Ash Leo, (J. Alexander & Co.) dwl 700 Ellis 

Ash Louis, upholsterer Cosmopolitan Hotel 

Asli Mary, (widow) furnished rooms, 117 Natoma 

Ash Peter, helper Risdou Iron Works, dwl 551 
Minna 

Ash Thomas, conductor N. B. and M. R. R., dwl 
!H IS Folsom 

Ash Thomas P., phonographic reporter, dwl 8 St. 
Mary's Place 

Ash William, clerk, 2 Battery, dwl 326 Minna 

Asli Willi;' in H., clerk, dwl 911 Post 

ASHBURNER WILLIAM, mining engineer, of- 
fice 240 Montgomery, dwl 1014 Pine 



ASHBURY MONROE, auditor, Citv and County, 

office 3 City Hall, first floor, dwl 204 Mont 
Ashby Eldridge P., mariner, dwl 503 Wash 
Ashby Mark T., mining, dwl 514 Greenwich 
Ashcom James E. , register clerk, Fourth District 

Court, dwl 313 Stocktou 
Ashcroft William, mariner, dwl 1208 Jackson 
Ashdown Archibald, with Collie, Stewart & Co., 

dwl 24 Ellis 
Ashe Gregory, porter, 236 Montgomery 
Ashe Matthew, barkeeper, 236 Montgomery, dwl 

Third bet Folsom and Harrison 
Asher A. F., clothing, 16 Washington 
Asher Benjamin, bellman Occidental Hotel 
Asher Edward, waiter Occidental Hotel 
Asher Frank, teamster, dwl 420 Post 
Asher James, laborer, dwl SW cor Green and Bat 
Asher James, seaman North Pac. Trans. Co. S. S. 

Orizaba 
Asher Julius, portrait painter, dwl 417 Jones 
Asher Samuel, expresswagon, SE cor Kearny and 

California, dwl 366 Natoma 
Asher Simon, clothing, N s Jackson bet Drumm 

and Davis 
Asherson Emil, collector Hebrew Observer, dwl 462 

Tehama 
Ashley D. R., dwl 712 Bush 

Ashley Paciiicus S., porter, 226 Bush, dwl 712 Bush 
Ashely Samuel, painter with Wasou .fc Morris, dwl 

What Cheer House. 
ASHLEY SYDNEY J., Superintendent Streets 

and Highways, office basement City Hall, cor 

Merch and Duubar Alley, dwl 2025 Pacific 
Ashman Richard T. , market, cor Butte and Ken- 
tucky, dwl cor Indiana and Sierra 
Ashmead Gustavus S., (Ashmead & Kellum) dwl 

SE cor Mariposa and Columbia 
Ashmead & Kellum. (Gustavus S. Ashmead and 

Charles T. Kelhtm) carpenters and builders, 

5 Beale 
ASHTON CHARLES, real estate agent and col- 
lector, office 519 Mont, dwl 4 Hubbard 
Ashtou Charles S., clerk, dwl 10 Lilly 
Ashton George, real estate, dwl SW cor Shotwell 

and Fifteenth 
Ashton John, dyer Mission and Pacific Woolen 

Mills 
Ashton William, stevedore, dwl cor Howard and 

First 
Ashtou William C. salesman with Renton, Smith & 

Co., dwl 520| Howard 
Ashworth Robert J.,paiuter, dwl 22 Turk 
Ashworth Thomas, mining stocks, dwl 712 Natoma 
Askett John, seaman, dwl 238 Steuart 
Askey Armstrong, wharfinger Market St Wharf 
Asklaf Theodore, seaman, dwl 409 Drumm 
Askwith William C, steward, dwl Ss Sixteenth 

Avenue ur Q, South S. F. 
Asmus John, farmer, Ocean House and San Jos6 

Roads 
Asmus John, miller Commercial Flour Mills, dwl 

724 O'Farrell 
Asmussen Charles, groceries and liquors, NW cor 

Eighth and Bryant 
Asmussen W. A., groceries and liquors, NE cor 

Eighth and Harrison 
Aspell William, calker, dwl 230 Folsom 
Asphaltum and Mastic Roofing Co., (George Dun- 
can & Co.) 652 Market 
ASPHALTUM PRESSURE PIPE CO.. George 

P. Thurston, secretary, office 315 California 
Aspril William, calker with Middlemas & Boole 
ASSAYER STATE, Louis Falkeuau, office 421 

Montgomery 
Assel Pierre, cook, 435 Pine 
Asselin John, carpenter California Planing Mill, 

dwl 563 Mission 
Asseu Frederick, bottler with Eberhart & Lach- 

man, dwl 351 First 



HUNTINGTON, HOPKINS & CO., Agents Jessop & Sons' Steel, Cor. Bush and Market. | 



C P. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708,712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Paper and Envelopes. 



SAN FRANCISCO [A" DIRECTORY 



ASSESSOR CITY AND COUNTY, office 22 City 
Hall, first floor 

ASSESSOR UNITED STATES INTERNAL 
REVENUE, office U. S. Court Building 

Assion Joseph, merchant tailor, d05 Montgomery, 
dwl 348 Third 

Assmann Adolph, (Assmann & Neubert) dwl cor 
Channel and Market 

Assmann & Neubert, ( Adolph Assmann and Ru- 
dolph Neubert J butter, cheese, eggs, etc., 10 
California Market 

Asten John, expresswagon, cor Pacific and Davis, 
dwl NE cor Montgomery and Paeilic 

Aston Frank, carpenter H. C. League, 128 Kearny 

Aston James, teadealer, office with Macondray & 
Co., dwl 461 Jessie 

ASTOR BLOCK, 631 Sacramento 

Astor Frank, deckhand steamer Louise, foot Pacific 

ASTREDO ANTHONY, Astredo's Exchange, 635 
Washington, dwl 914 Vallejo 

Asyalon John, carpenter, dwl 563 Mission 

At Lee S. Yorke, editor New Age, office 421 Mont- 
gomery, dwl 37 Second 

At Thy, (Chinese) restaurant, dwl 535 First 

Atchinsou B. M., (B. M. Atchinson & Co.) res 
Brooklyn, Alameda County 

ATCHINSON B. M. & CO., (Benjamin W. Hayes) 
butter, cheese, eggs, etc., 7 Occidental Market 

Athearn Charles G., (Athearn & (Jo.) dwl 909 Mc- 
Allister 

AthSarn Charles M., milkman, dwl 1313 Larkin 

Athearn Joseph H., (Athearn & Co.) dwl Ws 
Franklin bet Fulton and McAllister 

ATHEARN & CO., (Charles G. and Joseph H. 
Athearn) groceries, provisions and ship stores, 
8 Clay 

ATHEN.EUM BUILDING, S E cor Mont and 
California 

Athertou F. D., capitalist, office 705 Sansom, res 
Fair Oaks, San Mateo Co 

Athey Andrew, laborer with Hancock & Kelso 

Athy Dominick, driver with R. S. Reardon, dwl 34 
Minna 

Atkin Samuel, clerk, dwl cor Campbell and Twen- 
ty -lift h 

Atkins Charles, clerk, dwl 845 Dupont 

Atkins Eben, clerk with Hall & Co., 21 California 
Market 

Atkins George, bellman Occidental Hotel 

Atkins Henry B., groceries and liquors, SE cor 
Jones and O'Farrell 

Atkins Joseph, pipefitter with P. M. S. S. Co. 

Atkins Robert, laborer, dwl SE cor Second and Na- 
toma 

Atkins Robert C, (Orr & A.) dwl 608 Geary 

Atkins Robert St. Leger, clerk, dwl SE cor Second 
and Natoma 

Atkins Thomas, weaver, dwl NE cor Kearny and 
Clay 

Atkinson David, laundryman Cosmopolitan Hotel 

Atkinson Francis, fireman steamer No. 6, S. F. F. 
D., dwl Engine house No. 6 

Atkinson George, master mariner, dwl cor Twenty 
fourth and Guerrero 

ATKINSON JAMES, Market Exchange Saloon, 
538 Market, dwl 41 Tehama 

Atkinson Joseph B., ( L. Atkinson & Co.) res 
Philadelphia 

Atkinson Joseph H., patent agent, dwl 1032 Bdwy 

Atkinson L. & Co., (J. B. Atkinson) importers and 
manufacturers shirts and collars, 310 Cal 

Atkinson Lewis, (L. Atkinson <$• Go.) dwl Cosmo- 
politan Hotel 

Atkinson Lizzie E., dwl 562 Howard 

Atkinson Nathan, (Hancock Sf A.) dwl 769£ Mis- 
sion 

Atkinson Rose II., (widow) dwl 365 Minna 

Atkinson Samuel, carbuilder, dwl 218 Shotwell 

Atkinson Thomas, real estate, dwl 26 Howard 



Atkinson Thomas T., • bookkeeper with Lyon & 
Co., dwl SE cor Hyde and Turk 

Atkinson William, laborer Laborers' P. and B. Asso- 
ciation 

Atkinson William, sailmaker with John S. Blak- 
istou 

Atkinson William II., Paragon shirt factory, 410 
Kearny 

Atlantic and Pacific R. R. Co., office 716 Mont 

ATLANTIC AND PACIFIC TELEGRAPH CO., 
(Central Pacific Division) Lelaud Stanford, 
President ; F. L. Vandenburgh, general Bopt, 
office 503 California. Branches: Grand Hotel, 
SW cor Market and New Montgomery, ami 
Oakland Ferry Wharf 

Atlantic House, M. McDonald proprietor, 210 and 
210 Pacific 

Atlantic Mutual Life Insurance Co., (Albany, N. 
Y.J T. Hart Hyatt general agent, office 420 
Montgomery 

Atterbury Alexander, bookkeeper wtth James N. 
McCune, dwl 18 Park Avenue 

Attinger Frederick, tailor with Isidor Eisenberg, 
dwl 2 Monroe 

Attinger Gottlieb, (Midler Sf Attinger) dwl 242 
Sutter 

Attinger John, tailor, dwl 2 Monroe 

Atto Frederic, shoemaker, dwl Myers' Hotel 

Attrich James, wood and coal, NE cor Leav and 
Broadway 

Attridge Arthur, shoemaker with S. W. Rosenstock 
& Co., dwl 211 Perry 

Attridge Edward, drover, dwl SW cor Vallejo and 
Davis 

Attridge Edward, porter, 223 California, dwl 1010 
Filbert 

Attridge James, porter with Lewis P. Sage, dwl 
Morse Place 

Attridge Thomas, porter Cowell's Warehouse, dwl 
S s Broadway bet Hyde and Larkin 

Atwell J. M., carpenter 'H. C. League, VI* Kearny 

Atwill Joseph F., (AtwiU 8f Clark) res Oakland 

ATWILL & CLARK, (Joseph F. Atwill \ Charles 
K. Clark) proptrs San Francisco Percussion 
Match Factory, 325 Ritch, office 408 California 

Attwood George, mining engineer, dwl 722-Bush 

Attwood Melville, mining engineer, dwl 722 Bush 

Atwood Charles E., shoemaker with D. W. Emer- 
son & Co., dwl 516 Bush 

Atwood C. L. Mrs., teacher Girls High School, dwl 
1806 Mason 

Atwood Ephraim A., {Atwood & Bodicell) dwl 
1320 California 

Atwood George, teamster with William H. Nichols, 
dwl SE cor Turk and Fillmore 

Atwood George A., (Sautif& A.) dwl E s Shotwell 
bet Twenty second and Twenty-third 

Atwood William T., ticket agent, 214 Montgomery, 
dwl Grand Hotel 

ATWOOD & BODWELL, {Ephraim A. Atwood 
and Harry H. Bodwcll) windmill, pump, horse 
power and tank manuf, 211 and 213 Mission 

Aubert Albert, pork butcher, 10 Ban Francisco Mar- 
ket, dwl 3 Graham Place 

Aubert Felix, cook with Louis Thorin, dwl SE cor 
Kearny and Pacific 

Aubert J. P., joiner, dwl N s Fulton nr Laguna 

Aubert Paul L., jeweler with California Jewelry 
Co., dwl 1314 O'Farrell 

Aubrey Edward, trunk manufacturer, 505 Jack- 
son 

Aubry Charles, tinsmith with G. & W. Snook, dwl 
423 Piue 

Aubry Francis O., cabinetmaker, 10 Taylor,dwl NE 
cor Chattanooga and Twenty-third 

And Francis L., attorney-at-law," office 65 Merchants 
Exchange, dwl 1306 Larkin 

Aud Joseph F., clerk with Francis L. Aud, dwl 
1306 Larkin 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street, Porte Monnaies and Keticules. 



WATKINS' Y/O-SEMITE ART GALLERY, 26 Montg. St., opp. Lick House Entrance. 



Audiffred Alphonse, driver with Hypolite Auditfred, 

dwl 22 1 Austin 
Auditfred Hypolite, wood and charcoal, Mission 

Street Wharf, dwl 224 Austin 
AUDITo u CITY AND COUNTY, office 3 City 

Hall, first floor 
Auerbach C. M., bookkeeper 14 Bat, dwl 117 Post 
Auerbach Louis, cigars and tobacco, SW cor Clay 

and East, dwl E s Clay nr Drunmi 
Auerns August, carpenter, dwl 54 Everett 
Anger 15. Eugene, (Auger, Christiansen & Go, J 

dwl 841 Howard 
AUGER, CHRISTIANSEN & CO., (B. Eugene 

Anger and Christian Christiansen) importers 

and commission merchants, 409 Battery 
Auger Jean, baker, 911 Pacific 
Auger Lambert, mathematical instrument maker 

with John C. Sack, 203 Montgomery 
Augsburgh Frederick, ( Fawcett & A.j dwl 18 San 
Auguson Robert, porter, 226 Bush, dwl cor Green 

and Calhoun 
August John, laborer with Graves & Co., W 6 

Long Bridge 
August Richard, teamster with Hancock & Kelso, 

dwl 414 Beale 
Augustine Morris, bookkeeper, 22 Bat, dwl 215 Ky 
Augustine Mastai, steward Italian Hospital, SE cor 

Third and Folsom 
Augusto Miguel, cook, dwl SW cor Drumm and 

( Oregon 
Augustus Joseph, painter with William Lee, dwl 

NW cor Davis and Broadway 
Auld George M., laborer Southern Pacific R. R. 
Aukl James, salesman with David Porter, dwl 2005 

Bush 
Ault Joseph, hostler, dwl 225 Perry, rear 
Ault Mathias O., miller Golden Aire Mills, dwl 54 

Third 
Aumanu Frederick, shoemaker, dwl Hotel Rhein 
Aura John, farmhand with Peter Burges, dwl nr 

Mountain Lake 
Auradon Jules, provision dealer, dwl 1611 Leav 
Auradou Leon, game, poultry, etc., 50/ Merchant, 

dwl 522 Merchant 
Aureau Frances Miss , glovecleaner. 210 Second 
Auriguac Marcelon, floral depot, b' Trinity 
Aurora Consolidated S. M. Co., (White Pine) office 

302 Montgomery 
Aurricoecliea Joseph, butcher, dwl 624 Post 
AUSTIN ALEXANDER, Tax-Collector City and 

County, office 1 City Hall first floor, (and Aus- 
tin it; Co.) dwl Lick House 
Austin B. C, tiucan and box manufacturer, 419 

Battery, res Oakland 
Austin Emilias, tinsmith with Osgood & Stetson, 

dwl 1425 Geary 
Austin Emmet, bookkeeper with Littlefield, Webb 

it Co., dwl cor Second and Mission 
Austin Frederick, clerk with Peter N. Ryan, dwl 

519 Folsom 
Austin George L., carpenter H. C. Leagne, 128 Ky 
Austin Henry, dentist, office and dwl 634 Wash 
Austin John, carpenter H. C. League, 128 Kearny 
Austin Joseph, drayman, 61;! Front, dwl 717 Natoma 
Austin Joseph, Port Warden S. F., office 525 Front, 

dwl 331 Montgomery 
Austin Alary E., bakery," 224 Fifth 
Austin Matthew A., captain bark Shooting Star, 

dwl944 "Howard 
Austin M. P.. teacher Girls' High School, dwl 226 

O'Farrell 
Austin Minnie F. Miss, (City Female Seminary) 

SE cor O'Farrell and Mason 
Austin Thomas, carpenter H.C. League, 128 Kearny 
Austin Thomas A., machinist ^Etna Iron Works, 

dwl 224 Fifth 
AUSTIN 1 &. CO., (Alexander Austin) dry goods, 

SE cor Montgomery and Sutter 
Austle Benjamin, waiter Lick House 



Australian Steamship Landing, Mission St. Wharf 
AUSTRIAN BENEVOLENT SOCIETY, office 

638 Market 
Authur Thomas, trunkmaker, dwl E s Howard bet 

Twentieth and Twenty-first 
Automatic Lubricator Co., office 428 California 
Auty William, waiter, dwl 541 First 
Auzinger Wolfgang, butcher with M. Brandenstein 

& Co., dwl First Avenue 
Avans John. Imp. Calkers' Ass'n, 713 Mission 
Aveline Louis I)., shoe and slipper manufactory, 

319 Battery 
AVERILL CHEMICAL PAINT CO., office NW 

cor Fourth and Townsend 
Averill Jackson L., physician, office 1120 Market, 

dwl 923 Harrison 
Averill M. H. Mrs., physician, dwl 923 Harrison 
Averill William, shipjoiner with Middlemas ifcBoole, 

dwl 333 Beale 
Averill Wilson, drayman, 321 Front, dwl 1 Clara 

Lane 
Aveillo Giovanni, with A.Ghirardelli & Co., dwl 536 

Broadwaj T 
Avery Annie, dressmaker, dwl 1 145 Folsom 
AVERY BENJAMIN P., Bulletin editorial rooms, 

517 Clay, dwl E s Hyde nr Pine 
Avery Charles, railroad operator, dwl 410 Kearny 
Avery Clark, carpenter, dwl Greenwich nr Scott 
Averv Dean R. , vegetables and fruits, 41 and 42 

Washington Market, dwl 1911 Polk 
Avery Eunice H, (widow) dwlNW cor Solano and 

Iowa 
AVERY FRANCIS, secretary European and Ore- 
gon Land Co., office 320 Cal, dwl 617 Bush 
Avery Judson, clerk with Dean R. Averv, dwl 1911 

Polk 
Avery Ophelia, (widow) lodgings, 53 Natoma 
Avery Ross, carpenter, dwl SE cor Capital and 

Broard 
Avery W. C, dwl 424 Sansom 
Avillas Antonio de, laborer, dwl 116 Jackson 
Avillas .Manuel, laborer, dwl 116 Jackson 
Axt Louis, bootmaker, dwl 936 Howard 
Axtell Samuel B., attorney at law, office 729 Mont 
Axtell William F., compositor Golden Era, dwl 

102(5 Montgomery 
Axt man Ferdinand, butcher with Strobel & Co., 

dwl 1 1 29 Folsom 
Axttmtn Herman, cabinetmaker with George B. 

May & Co., dwl 236 Sutter 
Ayala Calletauo, steward, dwl 522 Broadway 
Ayer George, driver Bay View and Potrero R.R., 

dwl Potrero 
Ayer Jonathan R., housepainter, 638 Sacramento, 

dwl 501 Third 
Ayer Joseph Y., contractor and builder, dwl W s 

Folsom bet Twentieth and Twentv-lirst 
AYER WASHINGTON, physician! office 410 

Kearny, dwl 428 Post 
Ayers Alonzo,glassblower S. F. Glass Works, dwl 

Potrero 
Ayers Charles, bricklayer, dwl 503 Washington 
Ayers Charles, carpenter, dwl S2I Vallejo 
Ayers Charles, laborer with Flynn & Co., dwl ISO 

Perry 
Ayers Grosvenor P., bookkeeper with Osgood & 

Stetson, dwl 623 O'Farrell 
Ayers Henry, (Pike & A) dwl NW cor Haight 

and Gough 
Ayers Humphrey, blacksmith with A. Folsom, dwl 

NE cor Fell and Fillmore 
Ayers Ira Jr., bookkeeper with George F.Bragg 

& Co., dwl 808 California 
Ayers John C, policeman City Hall, dwl 217 Pros- 
pect Place 
Avers Joseph, carpenter H. C. League, 128 

Kearny 
Ayers Mary Miss, housekeeper with Alpheus Bull, 

dwl NE cor Leavenworth and Francisco 



HUNTINGTON, HOPKINS & CO., Wholesale Hardware and Iron, Cor. Bush and Market. 



C. P. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Trunks and Valises. 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY. 



79 



Ayers Robert,*machiuist with Frank A. Hunting- 
ton, dwl Potrero 
Ayers William, compositor with Bacon & Company, 

dwl 512 Linden 
Ayers William H., carpenter Mission Soap and 

Candle Factory, dwl Florida nr Solano 
Ayhens Apolline, laundry, 231 Ritch 
Ayhens Leon, butcher, dwl 231 Ritch 
Ayhens Paul J., butcher with M. Brandenstein & 

Co., dwl S s Eleventh Avenue bet N and 0, 

South San Francisco 
Aylelt William D., physician, dwl 830 Market 
Aylward John, blacksmith, dwl 72 Broadway 
Aylward Michael, machinist Miners' Foundry, dwl 

12 Clementina 
Ayre James, laborer, dwl 7 Sherwood Place 
Ayre Lorenzo, lastmaker with Joseph Leveque, dwl 

27 Silver 
AyresEmma, (widow) dwl 407 Sutter 
Ayres Frank W., horseshoer, lSBelden 
Ayres Irving, clerk, 723 Harrison 
Ayfles James, laborer with Jason Springer 
Ayres John C. Mrs., (widow) dwl SE cor Santa 

Clara and Carolina 
Avres John G., bookkeeper with E. E. Evre, dwl 

420 Powell 
Ayres - William, shipcalker with P. M. S. S. Co. , 

dwl N s Twelfth Avenue bet N and P, South 

San Francisco 
Ayres Willliain H., carpenter, dwl E s Hampshire 

nr Santa Clara 
Azevedo Jean A., farmhand, dwl SW cor Drumm 

and Oregon 
BAAS CHARLES, liquor saloon, 530 Jackson, dwl 

NW cor Kearny and Pacific 
Babb Charles E., compositor Evening Bulletin, dwl 

204 Montgomery 
Babbitt John H., clerk with Sroufe, Sweeney & 

Co., dwl Chelsea Place 
Babcock A., printer, dwl 524 Eddy 
Babcoek Annie Mrs., furnished rooms, 845 Dupont 
Babcock Benjamin E., insurance agent, dwl 1034 

McAllister 
Babcock George, ( BabcJhk &, Sutton) dwl 7 Second 

Avenue 
Babcock George A., compositor Alta Job Office, 

dwl 524E(ldv 
BABCOCK HENRY S., vice president and man- 
ager Security Savings Bank, 304 Sansom, dwl 

11 Essex 
Babcock John, porter, dwl 719 California 
Babcock L., plasterer, dwl 1237 Dupont 
Babcock Riley P., (James Perrin Stevens & Co.) 

dwl 802 Stockton 
Babcock Warren, caulker with P. M. S. S. Co. 
Babcock William, caulker with P. M. S. S. Co. 
Babcock William, laundiyman with S F. Laundry 

Association, dwl cor Fillmore and Turk 
BABCOCK WILLIAM F., president Spring Val- 
ley Water Works, (and Parrott & Go.) office 

426 California, dwl 11 Essex 
BABCOCK & SUTTON, (George Babcock and 

William Sutton) produce commission, and 

second-hand sacks, and agents Lane's Flour 

Mills, 315 Davis 
Babcox Jefferson T., melting department U. S. 

Branch Mint, (and Merrill, B. <& Go.) dwl 35 

Second 
Babson Edward, (C. L. Taylor & Go.) res Boston 
Baca Pablo, (P. Baca & Co.) dwl 535 Clay 
BACA P. & CO., (Andres Calderon) wholesale 

butchers. Fifth Avenue nr R. R. Avenue, office 

535 Clay 
Baccala Louis, chief cook Sorbier's restaurant, dwl 

729 Clay 
Baccus Benjamin, plumber and gasfitter, dwl 515 

Stockton 
Baccus George, machinist, dwl 515 Stockton 
Baccus John B., physician, dwl 515 Stockton 



Baccus John B. Jr., compositor S. F. Chronicle, dwl 

515 Stockton 
Baccus Richard T., butcher, dwl 517 Geary 
Baccus Robert J., butcher, dwl 515 Stockton 
Bach Dora, (widow) dwl 82/ Vallejo 
Bach Frederick W., bookkeeper, 12 Batterv, dwl 

827 Vallejo 
Bach Isaac, clerk with J. Liebes & Co., dwl 773 

Folsom 
Bach John, guns and sporting materials, 325 

Kearny, dwl 508 Taylor 
Bachelder Frank J., clerk, 520 Market, dwl 17 

Sutter 
Bachelder John W.. attorney-at-law. dwl 1408 

Powell 
Bachelder T. F., (Bachelder & Marriner) dwl 

1107 Mason 
BACHELDER & MARRINEB, (T. F. Bachelder 

and Unfits K. Marriner) attorneys at-law, 

office 607 Kearny 
Bachelor William II., porter, dwl III Austin 
Bachert August, salesman, 510 Kearny, dwl 331 

Kearny 
Bachert Max, artist with Bradley A' Rulofson, dwl 

Occidental Hotel 
BACILMANBROS., (Herman S., Nathan S.. and 

David S.) importers and jobbers dry goods, 10 

Battery 
Bachman David S., (BachmanBros.) dwl 1109 Van 

Ness Avenue 
Bachman Herman S., (Bachman Bros.) res New 

York 
Bachman Leopolds., salesman, 10 Battery, dwl 1109 

Van Ness Avenue 
Bachman Nathan S., (Bachman Bros.) dwl 1109 

Van Ness Avenue nr Geary 
Bachman Rudoljm, merchant, dwl 027 Commercial 
Bachman Simon, (Esberg Sp B.) dwl 9 Mason 
Bachold Charles, tailor, dwl 1112 Montgomery 
Bacigalnpi Augustine, vegetable peddler, dwl 5 

Gaven 
Bacigalupi Carlo, vegetables, dwl 19 Lafayette 

Place 
Bacigalupi Felix, bootblack, NE cor Washington 

and Mont, dwl Vallejo bet Kearny and Dupont 
Bacigalupi Francis, distiller, dwl Twenty-fifth Av 

nr H 
Bacigalupi G., vegetables, dwl 540 Green 
Bacigalupi Giuseppe, hostler with Novella & Pitto 
Bacigalupi John, laborer, dwl 14 Pollard Place 
Bacigalupi Joseph, woodcarver with Bryant, Stra- 

han & Co., dwl 1805 Mason 
Bacigalupi Louis, laborer, dwl E s Bartol nr Val 
Bacigalupi P., painter, dwl 14 Pollard Place 
Bacigalupi Peter, clerk with Garland «fc Moore, 

dwl 1805 Mason 
Bacigalupi Theodore, saloon, 1402 Dupont 
Backe Frank, carpetlayer, dwl 230 Sutter 
Backer Casper, carriagetrimmer, 733 Mission, dwl 

W s Buchanan nr Hayes 
Backus M., waiter What Cheer House restaurant 
Backus Oscar J., {'Pay, Brooks cfc If.) res Oak- 
land 
Backus Philip M., auctioneer, dwl 725 California 
Backus S. W., secretary Columbia River Manufac- 
turing Co., office 111 Wash, dwl 1520 Mason 
Bacon Frank, machinist, dwl 54 First 
Bacon Gaston E., clerk with Painter Sc Calvert, 

dwl 5 Quincy Place 
Bacon George H., conductor N. B. &. M. R. R., 

dwl 153 Shipley 
Bacon George O., U. S. mail agent, S. F. Post of- 
fice, dwl Russ House 
Bacon George W., clerk with Ralston & Cottrell, 

SW cor Washington and Sansom 
Bacon Henry D., real estate, office NW cor San- 
som and California, res Oakland 
Bacon Horace, clerk U. S. Marshal, dwl 54 Third 
Bacon Jacob, [Bacon & Company) res Oakland 



JONE3, PULLMAN & CO., 11Q Sansom Street, Sewing and Embroidering Silks. 



WATKINS' YO-SEMTTE AET GALLERY, 26 Montg. St., opp; Lick House Entrance. 



80 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY, 



Bacon James, laborer Miners' Foundry, dwl 78 

Natoma 
Bacon Joseph S.. agent Boston Board Underwri- 
ters, office 428 California, dwl 334 O'Farrell 
Bac.n, Mill .V- Mining Co., (Gold Hill, Nev.) of- 
fice I N California 
BAC< >N TRUMAN F., secretary Security Savings 

Bank. 304 Sansom, res Oakland 
Bacon William, hostler Omnibus R. R., dwl 308 

Minna 
BACON & COMPANY, (Jacob Bacon and R. E. 

G. Stearns) book and job printers, 53b Clay, opp 

LeidesdoriF 
Baeqnie Henry, [Henry Bacquie & Co.) dwl NW 

cor Stockton and Broadway. 
Bacquie Henry & Co., (A. Masson) wines and 

liquors, NW cor Stockton and Broadway 
Badaracco Bernardino, marbleworker, dwl 13 

Union Place 
i Badenhop Henry F., groceries and liquors, SE cor 

Twenty-fourth and Harrison 
Badet Constance Mrs., milliner, 1106Dupont 
Badger James, expresswagon, NE cor Clay and 

Kearny, dwl 22 Langton 
Badger Thomas W., pilot examiner, office 34 Mer- 

cliam's Exchange, res Brooklyn, Alameda 

County 
Badger William, carpenter H. C. League, J28 

Kearny 
BADGER' WILLIAM G., agent Hallet, Davis & 

Co'*., pianos ami Willamette Woolen Mills, 7 

Sansom, dwl NW cor Sixth and Mission 
Badger William K, salesman, 7 Sansom, dwl 44 

Sixth 
Badgley Engene F.. salesman, dwl 434 Greenwich 
Badgley William, tailor, dwl 130 Fourth 
Badlam Alexander, Jr., (Badlam fyBerry) dwl 708 

California 
BADLAM & BERRY, {Alexander Badlam, Jr., 

and Fulton G. Berry) real estate agents, house 

brokers and rent collectors, olfice 418 Mont 
BadlesmaD Charles, upholsterer with William J. 

Heney & Co., 725 Market 
Badrach John, drayman, cor Union and Mason 
Badt Alexander L., bookkeeper, 10(5 Battery, dwl 

921 Sutter 
Badt Morris, (of Badt 8f Colin, Elko.) office 222 

S insom, dwl 307 Turk 
BAEHR WILLIAM & CO., manufacturing jewel- 
ers. 649 S icramento 
Baehr William, (William Baehr & Co.) dwl 1708 

Sacramento 
Baeshy Martin, shoemaker with Marks & Levinsky 

dwl 909 Folsom 
Baggs Isaac, attorney-at-law, office C22 Clay, dwl 

52(1 Third 
Baggs Mongomery M., compositor, dwl 520 Third 
Bagla Louis, fruit dealer, 202 Fourth 
Bagley Charles O., sawmaker with American Saw 

Co., 606 Front 
Bagley Daniel, stonecutter, dwl 191, Rausch, rear 
Bagley David T., mining secretary, office 403 Cali- 
fornia, dwl 116 Eleventh 
Bagley John W., deputy naval officer Custom 

House, dwl I 12f Silver 
Bagley Mary Miss, chambermaid Lick House 
Bagley Michael, mWder Miners' Foundry, dwl 

Sherman nr Seventeenth 
Bagley Patrick, laborer with W. W.Walmsley, dwl 

27 Rausch 
Bagley Peter, longshoreman with Charles E. Hasel- 

tiue 
Bagley Townsend, attorney at law, office 637 Kear- 
ny, dwl 45 Everett 
Bagley William P., inspector C. H. dwl ] 12^ Silver 
Bagtlay Annie Miss, dressmaker with Mrs. E. R. 

Smith, dwl 0(10 Folsom 
Bahlmann Henry, clerk Philadelphia Brewery, dwl 

832 Harrison 



Bahls J. W. V., (Althof Sf B.J dwP115 Stockton 
Bahmann Adolf, jeweler with California .lewelryCo. 
Bahr P., machinist Metropolitan Gas Co., dwl 32 

Rausch 
Bahr William, bootmaker with Fred. Koeper, dwl 

6 Telegraph Place 
Bahrmann Frantz, carpenter, dwl 115 Morton 
Bahrs Andrew, grocer, dwl 1109 Kearny 
Baicke Henry, messenger with Dr. Holland, dwl 

236 Stevenson 
Bailey Albert A. S., captain steamer Brisk, dwl 804 

Third 
Bailey A. M. Rev., pastor Kentucky Street M. E. 

Church, dwl Potrero 
Bailey Amos J., (Bailey Sf Garfield J dwl 522 Sut 
Bailey Ann, (widow ) shoefitter, dwl 233 Jessie 
Bailey Annie M., (widow) dwl 1423 Kearny 
Bailey Bernard, tinsmith with Locke & Montague, 

dwl Union Place 
Bailey Charles A. carpenter with D. A. Macdonald 

& Co., dwl 323! Third 
Bailey Charles E.. driver Omnibus R. R., dw*! 314 

Bush 
Bailey Charles P., clerk San Francisco Post Office 
Bailey Edward, clerk with Ellis AY. Moss, dwl 522 

Sutter 
Bailey Edward, conductor Bay Yiew and "Potrero 

R. R., dwl Potrero 
Bailey Edward, seaman, dwl lOOSteuart 
Bailey Edwin P., driver Front Street, M. & O.R.R., 

dwl SE cor Bush and Polk 
Bailey Frank, liquor saloon, 10 Washington 
Bailey Frank, photographer with Jacob Shew, dwl 

225 Fourth 
Bailey Henry, expresswagon, dwl 1013 Howard 
Bailey Henry, haircurler, dwl N s Carolina nr 

Mariposa" 
Bailey Isaac S., teamster Genessee Flour Mill, dwl 

911 Harrison 
Bailey James D., general agent Union Insurance 

Co., office 416 California, dwl Lick House 
Bailey James S., cook, dwl 42 First 
Bailey Joseph H., books and crockery, 1511 and 

1513 Stockton, dwl 850 Union 
Bailey J. Samuel, carpenter II. C. League, 128 

Kearny 
BAILEY 'LEWIS H, proprietor Portsmouth 

House, 1 Brenham Place 
Bailey Lewis II. , Jr., machinist with Frank A. 

Huntington, dwl 521 j Stevenson 
Bailey M. P., conductor, dwl W s Mississippi bet 

Santa Clara and Mariposa 
Bailey Nathan J., ( Alfred W. Morgenstem & Co.) 

dwl 537 Third 
Bailey O. E , conductor City R. R., dwl 2007 Miss 
Bailey Orrin, upholsterer with II. A. Gullixson, dwl 

1423 Kearny 
Bailey Patrick, barreldealer, dwl 710 Branuan 
Pailey Richard, (Root & B.) res Oakland 
Bailey Sarah M., (widow) furnished rooms, 757 

Howard 
Bailey Thomas, (James Hartley & Co.) dwl 1319 

Montgomery 
Bailey Thomas, 'laborer with P. M. S. S. Co. 
Bailey Thomas, longshoreman with Charles E. 

Haseltine, dwl 25 De Boom 
Bailey William, (colored) porter, dwl E s Washing- 
ton Avenue nr Howard 
Bailey & Garfield, (Amos J. Bailey and Henry L. 

Garfield) clubrooms, 305 Montgomery 
Baillie Emily P., (widow) dwl 7(1 Clementina 
Baillie George B., brakesman Southern Pacific R.R. 
Bailly Achille, (Badly Brothers) dwl 514 Filbert 
Bailly Alexander, billiardkeeper Occidental Hotel 
Bailly Arthur, (Bailhj Brothers) dwl 511 Filbert 
Bailly Brothers, (Arthur and Achille) pork and 

sausages, etc., 71 California Market 
Baily Alexander H., hotelkeeper, dwl 309 Fell 
Baily David, carpenter, dwl 309 Fell 



HUNTINGTON, HOPKINS & CO., Agents Jessop & Sons' Steel, Cor, Bush and Market. 



C. P. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Boots and Shoes. 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY 



81 



Baily James C, surgeon U. S. A., dwl Presidio 
Baily — See Bayley, Bayly, and Bailey • 
Bain Alexander, stevedore, dwl 1^-0 Greenwich 
Bain James S., engineer with Jonathan Kittredge, 

dwl cor Twenty-fifth and Noe 
Bain John, blacksmith, dwl 27 Ritch 
Bainbridge Arnop, policeman City Hall, dwl 312 

Green 
Bainbridge Charles, laborer, dwl N s Bay bet Stock- 
ton and Dupont 
Baine Kate M., adjuster U. S. B. Mint, dwl 407 

Minna 
Baird Andrew, insurance secretary, dwl 20 Laurel 

Place 
Baird G. A., second asst engineer U. S. Navy, office 

U. S. Naval Rendezvous, Government House, 

dwl Cosmopolitan Hotel 
Baird James M., compositor Woman's Co-operative 

Printing Union, dwl 1305 Powell 
BAIRD JOHN H., President California Powder 

Works Co., 314 California, dwl Pacific Club 
Baird Samuel H.. clerk, dwl 1305 Powell 
Baise John, drayman, dwl E Webster bet Post aud 

Sutter 
Baja Thomas, waiter, 260 Stenart 
Baker A. J., carrier Alta California, dwl 925 Sutter 
Baker A. J., with Lorenzo B. Clark, dwl 73 Fourth 
Baker Albeit, clerk, dwl 826 Washington 
Baker Alfred D., salesman with Rouse & Laws, dwl 

728 Vallejo 
Baker Caspar, tanner, dwl San Bruno Road bet 

Twenty-seventh and Twenty-eighth 
Baker Charles, waiter U. S. Restaurant, 507 Clay, 

dwl 48 Sacramento 
Baker Charles E., teamster with David L. Farns- 

wortb, dwl 7 Margaret Place 
Baker Christian, bakery, 088 Folsoni 
Baker Colin C, (Stevens, B. 4" Go.) res Provi- 
dence, R. I. 
Baker Conrad, assayer S. F. Assaying and Refining 

Works, dwl 52- Tehama 
Baker Dennie, clerk, 42 Stenart 
Baker Eugene J., teamster, dwl 764 Harrison 
Baker F. B., real estate, dwl 124 Geary 
Baker Francis, seaman, dwl 238 Steuart 
Baker Frederick, seaman, dwl NW cor Drumm 

and Commercial 
Baker Frederick D., employment office, 603 Kearny, 

dwl 124 Geary 
Baker George, laborer with Schmidt & Fretz, dwl 

338 Bush 
Baker George, oysterman, dwl 57 Jessie 
Baker George H., lithographer, office 408 Califor- 
nia, dwl 1513 Taylor 
Baker George L., melter S. F. Assaying and Re- 
fining Works, dwl 504 Seventh 
Baker George W., clerk, dwl 652 Market 
Baker 11. B., register deposits U. S. B. Mint, res 

Oakland 
Baker Henry, clerk New U. S. Branch Mint, office 

922 Mission, dwl 1015 Howard 
Baker Henry, hostler, dwl 27 Oak Avenue 
Baker Henry, (Createn & B. ) dwl 27 Grove Av 
Baker Isaiah, U. S. boarding officer, Vallejo Street 

Wharf, dwl 1304 Pacific 
Baker J. A., dwl Cosmopolitan Hotel 
Baker James, merchant, dwl 131 Montgomery 
Baker James E., painter, dwl 100 Silver 
Baker John, carrier Evening Post, dwl 636 Com 
Baker John, watchman North Pac. Trans. Co. S. 

S. California 
Baker John B., bookkeeper with E. E. Evre, dwl 

1215 Polk 
Baker John C, cooper, dwl SW cor Second and Mkt 
Baker John E., hack, cor Bush and Montgomery 
Baker John IL, clerk with Feldhusch & Co., dwl 

1513 Taylor 
Baker John S., clerk S. F. Directory office, dwl 

131 Montgomery 



Baker Jonathan W., captain ship Germania, Riucon 

Wharf 
Baker Joseph, drayman with E. W. Dore 
Baker Joseph, policeman City Hall, dwl 409 Green 
Baker Josiah Q., clerk Eureka Warehouse, dwl 

925 Vallejo 
Baker Judah Jr., (Stevens, B.&Co.) dwl 327 First 
Baker Livingston L., (Baker & Hamilton) res 

Oakland 
Baker Lou E. Mrs., seamstress, dwl 110 Welsh 
Baker Louis, baker with Henry Winkle, dwl W s 

Ohio nr Broadway 
Baker Louis, sashmaker Enterprise Plauinu- Mill, 

dwl 318 Folsom 
Baker Louis F., produce commission, 402 Davis, 

dwl N s Vallejo bet Fillmore and Steiner 
Baker Louis F. Jr., clerk with Louis F. Baker, dwl 

N s Vallejo bet Fillmore and Steiner 
Baker Maria, (widow) dwl 949 Bryant 
Baker Mary, (widow) dwl 312 Beale 
Baker Mary, Jwidow) dwl 114 Perry 
Baker Mary F., (widow) dwl 870^ Mission 
Baker M. C, carpenter H C. League, 12s Kearny 
Baker Orrin V., machinist with Tay, Brooks <fc 

Backus, res Oakland Point 
Baker Osborn F., extraman Steamer No. 1, S. F. F. 

D., dwl cor Second and Mission 
Baker Raphael, lamplighter with S. F. Gas Co., 

dwl 944 Howard 
Baker Richard, piledriver with E. C. Boobar «fc Co. 
Baker Robert B., machinist with H. A; Deming, 

dwl 1090 Union 
Baker Samuel, bookkeeper with Stevens, Baker it 

Co., dwl 4 Essex 
Baker Samuel, boots and shoes, 54 Fourth, dwl 1 

Cedar Avenue 
Baker Samuel, clerk, 624 Kearny, dwl Coso House 
Baker Samuel D., collector, office cor Montgomery 

and Jackson, dwl 839 Mission 
Baker T. B., carpenter II. C. League, 128 Kearny 
Baker Terry J., stablekeeper, dwl 225 Bush 
Baker William, carpenter, dwl 411 Clementina 
Baker William, laborer, dwl 503 Washington 
Baker William, laundryman with S. F. Laundry 

Association, dwl NW cor Fillmore and Turk 
Baker William, Pioneer Bakery, NE cor Mason and 

Clay 
Baker William, seaman bark Shooting Star, foot 

Second 
BAKLR & HAMILTON, (Livingston L. Baker 

and Robert Hamilton) importers and jobbers 

agricultural implements, machines, hardware, 

etc., 13-19 Front and 9-15 J street, Sac. City 
Bakker Beyer E., restaurant and lodgings, 101 

Steuart 
Balan Mercedes, (widow) dwl SW cor Dupont and 

Broadway 
Balcear Madame, proprietress Hair Rejuvenator, 

627 California 
Balch Adolphus, dwl 704| Mission 
Balch Horace M., repairer musical instruments, 432 

Kearny, dwl 614 Taylor 
Balch Stephen U.,(BnghamSfB.)Av,-\ 523 O'Farrell 
Balcom Charles F., mining secretary, office 426 

Montgomery, dwl 1021 Washington 
Baldaracco John, wood and coal, 1803 Mason 
Baldez Juan, eigarritomaker, dwl 815 Pacific 
Baldridge Michael, salesman with William Sher- 
man «te Co., dwl 528 Pine 
BALDWIN ALBERT S., physician, office and dwl 

208 Kearny 
Baldwin Alexander R., merchant, office 210 Front, 

hds Grand Hotel 
Baldwin Alfred W., shoe contractor California 

State Prison, dwl 418 Minna 
Baldwin Amos B., butcher with Eugene Moffatt & 

Co., dwl 2 Thirteenth Avenue 
Baldwin Barry, (Fassett, McCauley & Co.) res 

Pacheco 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street, White Goods. 
6 



WATKINS' YO-SEMITE ART GALLERY, 26 Montg. St., opp. Lick House Entrance. 



82 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY 



Baldwin Charles H., (C. Adolphe Low & Co.) res 

Yokohama 
Baldwin Charles H., captain U. S. N., dwl 928 Bnsh 
Baldwin Charles M., conductor N. B. & M. R. R., 

dwl 413 Fourth 
Baldwin Clara Miss, dwl 10 Ellis 
Baldwin D. P., attornev-at-law, dwl 209 Leides- 

dorflf 
Baldwin E.. butcher, dwl S s Thirteenth Avenue 

het N and P, South San Francisco 
Baldwin Edward, (Fassett MeCauley, fy Go. ) res 

Ellis Station, San Joaquin county 
Baldwin Elias J., stockbroker, dwl 4J0 Geary 
Baldwin Elihu P., mining, dwl 107 Hayes 
Baldwin E. S., graindealer, dwl 2405 Buchanan 
Baldwin Henry B., laborer, dwl S s Railroad Ave- 
nue bet Dolores and Guerrero 
BALDWIN HIRAM S., physician and surgeon, 

office 612 Clay, dwl .921 Geary 
Baldwin Jeremiah, distiller, dwl E s Columbia bet 

Eighteenth and Nineteenth 
Baldwin Joseph A., clerk, dwl 643 Vallejo 
BALDWIN LLOYD, attorney-at law, office 502 

Montgomery, dwl 613 Pine 
Baldwin Marcus M., deputy-superintendent streets 
(andM.M. Baldwin & Co.) dwl 1900 Bdwy 
Baldwin Mamie Miss, teacher Union Primary 

School, dwl 1305 Stockton 
Baldwin M. M. &Co., (Charles H. Dewey) import- 
ers and manufacturers jewelry etc., 433 Mont 
Baldwin N. S. Miss, teacher Uniou Grammar school, 

dwl 1305 Stockton 
Baldwin O. D., (Baldwin Sf Pike) res Napa 
Baldwin Oliver T., New York department Wells, 

Fargo, & Co., dwl 1411 Pacitic 
Baldwin" Sidney, carpenter, 226 Third, dwl 16 Noble 

Place 
Baldwin Siduey F., law-student with John B. Fel- 

ton, res Oakland 
Baldwin Starr, physician, office SE cor Second and 

Market, dwl 589 Market 
Baldwin Thomas S., porter with Miller & Co., dwl 

52 Minna 
Baldwin William H., shipwright, dwl 7 Liberty 
Baldwin, Pike & Bertz, (0. 1). Baldwin Jacob M. 
Pike, and Jacob Bertz) proprietors New York 
Bakery and restaurant, 626 and 628 Kearny 
Bale James, clerk U. S. Restaurant, dwl Coso House 
B iler George A., painter, dwl 3 Harriet 
Baii Michael, barkeeper Occidental Hotel 
BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., (Robert Balfour 
and Alexander Guthrie) commission mer- 
chants, office 308 Sansom 
Balfour James, mariner, dwl 311^ Ritch 
Balfour Robert, (Balfour, Guthrie & Co.) res San 

Rafael 
Balfrey William, shoemaker, dwl 562 Bryant 
Balink Hermann .cabinetmaker with Krageu & Geis- 

haker. dwl 245 Fourth 
Bilinsky Ida Miss, glovemaker Pacilic Glove Fac- 
tory, dwl 121 Garden 
Bilk Stephen, plumber with James K. Prior 
Balk Stephens., laborer, dwl 1325 Washington 
Balke William, boarding, SW cor Battery and 

Green 
Balkin S-, dwl 331 Montgomery 
Ball A. Everett (Sawyer <$• B.) attorney at law, 

office 419 California, dwl 819 Bush 
Ball Albert, physician, office and dwl 615 Sac 
Hall Catherine, (widow) dwl 7 Grand Avenue 
Ball Charles, carpenter, dwl W s Mission bet Twen- 
ty fourth and Twenty-fifth 
Ball Charles, clerk, dwl 712 Tehama 
Ball Charles, conductor Omnibus R. R. 
Ball Charles T., cook U. S. Restaurant, 507 Clay 
Ball Dabney Rev., pastor Minna Street M. E. 

Church, dwl 127 Kearny 
Ball George, laborer, dwl 132 Stewart 
Ball George, laborer with Whitney & Freese 



Ball George, longshoreman with Charles E. Hasel- 

tine 
Ball George A., bookkeeper with Adams, Blinn & 

Co., dwl 609 Sutter 
Ball Joel, dentist, dwl 1210 Uniou 
Ball John S., machinist with Andrea Cavalli, dwl 

408 Octavia 
Ball Martha S., (widow) furnished rooms and por- 
trait painter, 5 Hardie Place 
Ball Matthew, seaman barkeutine Occident, 1 How 
Ball M. F., (widow) dwl SE cor Green and Baker 
Ball Nathaniel A., conductor Ffont Street, M. & O. 

R.R., dwl Railroad House 
Bill Oscar D., mariner, dwl 20 Scott Place 
Ball Robert C, architect, office 302 Montgomery, 

res Oakland 
Ball Thomas A., superintendent agencies California 

Mutual Life Insurance Co., dwl 113 Eddy 
Ballard Duane, (Ballard & Hall) dwl 1006 Bush 
Ballard E. J., carpenter H. C. League, 128 Kearny 
Ballard George, painter, dwl 179 Minna 
Ballard John, (W. H. Martin & Co.) 240 Mont 
Bollard John W, bookkeeper with Ballard & Hall, 

106 Davis, dwl 208± Seventh 
Ballard Joseph, shipping clerk, dwl 1107 Stockton 
BALLARD & HALL, (Duane Ballard and Isaac 

R. Hall) commission merchants, 106 Davis 
Ballenger John, carpenter, dwl W s Bryant bet 

Twenty-fourth and Tweuty-lifth 
Ballentine James, mason and builder, dwl NW cor 

Ninth and Jessie 
Ballentine John P., mason, dwl N s Jessie bet Ninth 

and Tenth 
Ballentine Robert, salesman, 323 California, dwl 

729 Vallejo 
Bailey Edward J., collector with Forbes Brothers 

A Co., dwl 1409 Jackson, rear 
Ballhaus Frederick, dairyman, dwl W s Leaven- 
worth bet Greenwich and Lombard 
Ballheimer Charles H., porter, 115 Bush, dwl 721 

Union 
Ballhorn Henry, seaman brig Orient, 1 Howard 
Ballinger Andrew, laborer with E. Grisar & Co., 

dwl 19| Gilbert 
Ballinger Frank J., clerk -with James Mee, dwl 17 

Gilbert 
Ballinger John, (Roswell & B.) dwl 970 Harrison 
Ballinger Patrick R., cabinetmaker with Goodwin 

& Co., dwl 17 Gilbert 
Ballinger William, bagmaker with J.&P.N. Hauua, 

dwl 912 Kearny 
Ballinger William M., printer Alta California, dwl 

S s Lincoln bet Union and Green 
Ballou P., seaman North Pac. Trans. Co.'s S. S. Ori- 

flamme 
Ballou Savles M., carpenter, dwl cor Mission and 

Thirtieth 
Ballser Charles, butcher, dwl N s Fifteenth Avenue 

bet Q and R., South S. F. 
Ballser John, butcher, dwl 10 O'Farrell 
Balmer William, seaman, dwl 238 Stewart 
Baloun Joseph L. tailor with Peter Short, dwl 809 ' 

Mason 
Balske Joseph, tailor with Levi Herman, dwl 822 

Montgomery 
Balsou Harry, machinist, dwl 214 First 
Balthazard L., (Balthazard & Bebo) dwl E s Mis- 
sion nr Twenty-fourth 
Balthazard & Bebo, ( L. Balthazard and Thomas 
Bebo) carriagemakers and blacksmiths, NE cor 
Mission and Twenty-fourth 
Balz Adolpb, clerk Chief Qr Mil Div Pac. dwl 

704 1 Missiou 
Balz Valentine, butcher with M. Selig & Co.. dwl 

First Avenue nr Kentucky 
Balzer Ferdinand, bookkeeper with A. Blister & 

Co., dwl 531 Turk 
Balzer Henry, (Ziel, Bertheau & Co.) dwl 531 
Turk 



HUNTINGTON, HOPKINS & CO., Importers Hardware and Iron, Cor. Bush and Market 



C. P VA2J SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Jewelry and Albums. 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY 



Balzer Henry, upholsterer with William J. Heney 

& Co., 725 Market 
Bamber John, (Bamber & Co.'s Express J dwl 

1012 Montgomery 
Bamber Joseph J., (Bamber & Co.'s Express) dwl 

1012 Montgomery 
BAMBER & CO.'S EXPRESS, office SW cor 

Davis and Jackson 
Banahan Henry, hostler Fashion Stables, dwl 113 

Perry 
Banahan Margaret, milliner, dwl 113 Perry 
Banahan Patrick, hos'tler Fashion Stables, dwl 113 

Perry 
Bancroft A. A., farmer, dwl S s Cal nr Gough 
BANCROFT A. L. & CO., (Hubert H Bancroft ) 

publishers, importing booksellers and stationers, 

printers, bookbinders, lithographers, engravers, 

etc., 721 Market 
Bancroft Albert L., (A. L. Bancroft & Go.) dwl W 

s Franklin bet Pine and California 
Bancroft E. A., builder, dwl 515 Bush 
Bancroft Hubert H., (A. L. Bancroft & Co.) dwl S 

W cor California and Franklin 
Bancroft William W., (Longford Sr B.) attorney- 

at-law, office 411| California, dwl 303 Jessie 
BANCROFT'S BUILDING, 723 Market 
BANCROFT'S GUIDE FOR TRAVELERS, 

(monthly) office 721 Market ' 
Bandant Morris, expressman, dwl 1592 Bush 
Bandholt Frederick, farmer, dwl 736 Minna 
Baudmann Julius, (Bandmaun, Nielsen & Co.) dwl 

514 Lombard 
BANDMANN, NIELSEN & CO., ( Julius Band- 
maim, & H. Nielsen) importers and commission 

merchants, and general agents Giant Powder 

Co., 210 Front 
Bangen Frit/, laborer, dwl N s Bryant bet Seventh 

and Eighth 
Bangle Amos H., salesman with Edward Baugle, 

res Brooklyn, Alameda Co 
BANGLE EDWARD, paints, oils, glass and paper 

hangings, 426 Sanson), res Brooklyn, Alameda 

Co 

Bangs Edward, mate steamer Monterey, Washing- 
ton Street Wharf, dwl 540 Washington 
Bangs H. Frank, entry clerk Home Mutual Insur- 
ance Co., dwl 30' McAllister 
BANK BRITISH COLUMBIA, William H. Til- 

linghast, manager, SE cor Cal and Sansom 
BANK" BRITISH NORTH AMERICA, William 

Walker and Alexander S. Finuie, agents, NE 

cor California and Sansom 
BANK CALIFORNIA, N W cor California and 

Sansom 
BANK CALIFORNIA BUILDING, NW cor Cal 

and Sansom 

BANK EXCHANGE, George F. Parker propri- 
etor, SE cor Mont and Wash 
Bank Joseph, billiard table maker with J. Strahle 

& Co., dwl 17 Sumner 
Banks Charles W., auditing department Wells, 

Fargo & Co.'s fast freight office, dwl 12Haight 
Banks Cyrus, (colored) messenger Commissary De- 
I partment U. S. A., dwl 111 Prospect Place 
Banks James, barkeeper with Henry Smith, dwl 

557^ Stevenson 
anks James, fireman steamer Alameda, Cent. P.R. 

R., dwl 318 Davis 
ujBanks Thomas C, exchange and bill broker, 14 

Merchant's Exchange, dwl 724 California 
Banks William, (Banks & Galvin) dwl 1419 Wash 
Banks William Oscar, draftsman with S. C. 

Bugbee & Son. dwl 1419 Washington 
panks &. Galvin, ( William Banks and Garet Gal- 
vin) merchant tailors, 518 Sacramento 
Bankson Eyrick, laundryman.dwl 148 Minna 
(Jann James, malster with Matthew Nunan, dwl 

209 Eighth 
Bann J. J., market, cor Dolores and Sixteenth 



set 



Bannahan Lizzie Miss, dressmaker, dwl 207 Minna 
Barman Bridget, (widow) dwl 1422 Jackson 
Bannan John, boatman Vallejo Street Wharf, dwl 

2114 Powell 
Bannan Joseph, laborer, dwl NW cor Nineteenth 

and Sanchez 
Bannen Hugh, laborer, dwl 214 Prospect Place 
Banner Peter, (of Banner Bros., Virginia City, 

Nev., Nevada City. Cal., and New York) office 

408 Market, dwl 109 Montgomery 
Bannerot Eugene A., machinist with Garcin & Per- 

riam, dwl 232 Jessie 
Bannett Harris, private boarding, 235 Kearny 
Baunett Louis, jeweler with William Baehr & Co., 

dwl 235 Kearny 
Banning .John, inspector, dwl 1223^ Folsom 
Bannister Alfred, accountant London & S. F. Bank, 

dwl 810 Leavenworth 
Bannister D. F., dwl 800 Kearny 
Bannister Frederick, seaman, dwl 32 Stewart 
Bannister Joseph, porter, dwl 425 Fremont 
Bannister R., farmer, dwl 114 Pacific 
Batmon Charles, waiter, Grand Hotel 
Bannon John, dwl 411 Sansom 
Bannon Michael, liquor Baloon, 720 Third 
Bannon Patrick, tanner, dwl SE cor Columbia and 

Eighteenth 
Bannon Philip, watchman, dwl 218 Eighth, rear 
Bansch August, laborer with Hermann Rossbach, 

dwl 757 Mission 
Bansch Maria Mis., midwife, dwl 757 Mission 
Banser John, laborer with Hancock & Kelso 
Bansteen C. B., bricklayer Bricklayers' Pro.Ass'n, 

234 Sutter 
Bantle George, clerk, 113 Sutter 
Banz John, shoemaker, dwl 320 Capp 
Baptis John H., (Harris & B) dwl 208 Leidesdorff 
Baptist Robert F., (colored) porter. 33 Kearny 
Baptista Jose, barkeeper Luzitania House, SW cor 

Drumm and Oregon 
Baptiste A., deckhand stm Petaluma, Vallejo Street 

Wharf 
Baptiste F., deckhand stm Petaluma, Vallejo Street 

Wharf 
Baptiste J., ranch hand, dwl Vallejo nr Van Ness 

Avenue 
Baptiste Louis, dwl Garibaldi House 
Baque Dominique, dwl 1609 Powell 
Baquet Pierre, tailor with Eugene Boucher, 537 

Sacramento 
Bar Jacob, butcher with Smith & Mann, dwl First 

Avenue nr Railroad Avenue 
Barabino Carlo, packer with Cutting & Co., dwl 

5 Robbins Place 
Barabino James, packer with Cutting & Co., dwl 

5 Robbins Place 
Barailhe John, wagonmaker with ThomasD. Lamer, 

dwl E s Valencia nr Sixteenth 
Baraty Francis, (Car ran 8f B.) dwl 241 Stev 
Barbaste Antoine, laundry ,!838 Clay 
BARBAT JOHN, physician and apothecary, 910 

Pacific 
Barbata Federico, fisherman, dwl 27 Clay 
Barbe Jean, ranch, W s Baker bet Bush and Pine 
Barbee John, moneybroker, office 506 Montgomery, 

dwl 1090 Union 
Barber Enos W., (J. H Lawton $ flo.) dwl 741 

Market 
Barber George, laborer, dwl 227 Second 
Earlier George, laborer with Superintendent of Pub- 
lic Streets, dwl 66 Natoma 
Barber Henry P., attorney at law, office and dwl 

240 Montgomery 
Barber James B., porter with Wilmerding & Kell- 
ogg, dwl 118 Oak 
Barber" John, waiter Colorado Steam Navigation 

Co's steamer Newbern 
Barber John A., (colored) plasterer, dwl 58 Ber- 
nard 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street, Dress Trimmings. 



WATKINS' YO-SEMITB ART GALLERY, 26 Montg. St., opp. Lick House Entrance. 



84 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY 



Baiber John N., bookkeeper Charter Oak Life Ins. 

Co., dwl Buss House 
Baiber Mary E., (widow) furnished rooms, 112 

Mason 
Barber Philip, (colored) jobber, dwl 13 Virginia 

Place 
Barber Robert L., (Bisley $r B.) dwl 327 Pine 
Barber Thomas 11., pilot office U. S. Court Build- 
ing, dwl 1222 Pacific 
Barber William, blacksmith with J. H. Lawton & 

Co., dwl 741 Market 
Barber William, mariner, dwl W s Long Bridge 
Barber William, (Doyle & B.J attorney-at-law, 

office 323 California, res San Rafael 
Baiber William B.,with E. H. Brush, dwl E s Ken- 
tucky nr Sixteenth 
Barber William J., scrollsawyer with L. & E. Em- 
anuel, dwl XW cor Berry and Fourth 
B;;rber William M., blacksmith, dwl W s Capp bet 

Twenty fifth and Twenty-sixth 
Baiber Zachary T., conductor Market Street R.R., 

dwl Seventeenth nr Mission 
Barbier Adele Mme., proprietress Hotel de France, 

SI 6 Pacific 
Barbier Armand, special policeman, dwl 919 How- 
ard 
Barbiere Catarina, nurse female department Italian 

Hospital 
Barbier Eugenie, (widow) teacher, dwl fi48 Minna 
Barbier Eunice Madame, dressmaker, dwl (il2 Cal 
Barbier Paul L.. (Barbier & Barrett) dwl 7 1 1 Com 
Barbier & Barrett, (Paul. L. Barbier and Edward 

J. Barrett) proptrs Veto Saloon, 623 Kearny 
Barcello Angelo, fisherman, dwl 10 Washington 
Barcellos Jose, proprietor Luzitania House, SW 

cor Drumra and Oregon 
BARCKHAUSEN JULIUS, agent German Gen- 
eral Benevolent Society, office 732Washington, 
dwl E s Franklin bet Turk and Tyler 
Barclay David, superintendent laborers Custom 

House, dwl 784 Folsom 
Barclay John, laborer with Whitney & Freese, 

SE cor Stewart, and Mission 
Barclay Robert, baker, dwl 215 Main 
Barclay Robert, cook bark Amethyst, llincon Wharf 
Barclay Robert H., body maker with Kimball Man- 
ufacturing Co., dwl (31 California 
Barcovich George, upholsterer with Goodwin & Co., 

dwl 179 Jessie 
Barden Patrick, carpenter, dwl N s Eleventh Av- 
enue nr P., SouthS. F. 
Bardenhagen Henry, clerk with Nicholas Wiebalk, 

dwl SWcorBu'sh and Polk 
Bardenwerper Charles P.. drayman, 208 Front, dwl 

W s Eleventh bet Howard and Folsom 
Bardt William, with Eggers & Grotb, dwl 531 

O'Farrell 
Bardwell Charles, boxmaker Union box factory, 

dwl II Quincy 
Bardwell John L., (Bardwell & Co.) dwl Frank's 

Building, Brenbam Place 
Bardwell & Co., (John L. Bardu-cll) bag factory, 

Hi.") Clay 
Bare Edward, furrier with F. P. Muller & Co., dwl 

362^ Clementina 
Bare Gustave, furrier with Abram Moll, dwl 362$ 

Clementina 
Bareilles Thomas, milkrancb, SE cor Octavia and 

Lombard 
Barelli Alexander, merchant tailor, dwl 713 Broad- 

wav 
Barenton Edward, confectioner with Salomon &. 

Co., dwl 1114 Stockton 
Barera Louis, drayman, dwl 44 Tehama 
Barese Madame, dwl 731 Vallejo 
Barghorn August, cook, dwl New Atlantic Hotel 
Bargon Martin, tailor, 425 Pine 
Bargone James, workman with D. Ghirardelli, dwl 
2218 Mason 



Bargone Leonardo, porter with Pascal, Dubedat & 

"Co., dwl 2218 Mason 
Bargstieam George G., harnessmaker with Main <& 

Winchester, dwl 226 Second 
Bargstieam Hans, mariner, dwl 10 Folsom 
Baril Hubert, salesman with P. Sainsevain, dwl845 

Howard 
Barindeau Edward, cook Occidental Hotel 
Bark William, vocalist Alhambra Theater, dwl 1024 

Montgomery 
Balkan Adolph. auvist and oculist, (and Biers & B) 

office and dwl 722 Montgomery 
Barker Abner H., real estate, office 434 California, 

dwl 205 Post 
Barker Alfred Z. T., painter with John Center, dwl 

WsShotwell bet Fifteenth and Sixteenth 
Barker Benjamin F., carpenter, dwl 519 Sac- 
Barker E. L.. drug dealer, dwl 411 Brannan 
Barker Elizabeth B., (widow) dwl 14 Stanley 

Place 
Barker Erastus H., miner, dwl 915 Broadway 
Barker Frank, carpenter, dwl N s Sixteenth Av-' 

enue bet Q and P, South S. F. 
Barker George L., artist, dwl 102 Post 
Marker G. Frederick, clerk, dwl 14 Stanly Place 
Barker Grace, (widow) dwl S s Folsom bet Juni- 
per and Eleventh 
Barker Henry L., traveling agent, dwl 309 Capp 
Barker Henry N., trunkmaker, dwl Xs Cortland 

Avenue bet San Jose and San Bruno Roflds 
Barker Isaac Jr., dwl 309 Capp nr Nineteenth 
Barker Jacob, trunkmaker with H. Behrendt & 

Co., dwl li'.i Welsh 
Barker James, pressman with Tay, Brooks & 

Backus, dwl E s Mason nr Market 
BARKER JAMES L.. manufacturer's agent hard- 
ware, 414 Market, res Oakland 
Barker John, seaman, clwl SW cor Drutflm and Or- 
egon 
Barker John IL, storekeeper P.M.S.S America, dwl 

206 Brannan 
Barker Joshua, bookkeeper with Coghill, Lyons & 

Co., res Oakland 
Barker Timothy* L., (Wellman, Peck & Co.) dwl 

Lick House 
Barker Thomas, dwl X s Boyd nr Chester 
Barker William, boilermaker Union Iron Works, 

dwl 2 12 Fremont 
Barkbardt Gustav, cutler with M. Price, dwl 31 

Morton 
Barkhaus Charles, captain schooner Caroline Mea- 
de, in, dwl 2015 Mason 
Barkhaus Diederich, [F. IP. & l>. Barkhaus) dwl 

III Turk 
BARKHAUS P. W. & D., books and stationery, 

Mo Kearny 
Uarkhans Frederick W. (F. W. & D. Barkhaus) 

dwl mi) I Sutter 
1 lark haus Peter, liarkeeper with John G. Druhe, 

junction California and Market 
Barking Edward H., Blecutter, dwl Hit) Minna 
Barking John, Glemaker, dwl 460 Minna 
Barklage William, (Geils & B.) N\V cor Spring 

and Summer 
Barklev Andrew J., printer, dwl 1016 Pine 
Barkiey Charles J., student, dwl 1016 Pine 
Barklev George T X., clerk Oriental Bonded Ware- 
house, dwl SE cor Union anil Leavenworth 
i; irklev William, dwl S s Union nr Leavenworth 
Harks Thomas, molder Golden State Iron Works, 

dwl 21 Fulton 
Barlage Henry, cabinetmaker with George O.Whin 

nev & Co., dwl 3 Cusbman 
Barlage Henry, Jr., clerk, -J27 Montgomery, dwl 3 

Cusbman 
Barli Alessandro, cutter with Michael Short, dwl 

Broadway bet Powell and Stockton 
Barling Ellen F., (widow) nurse, dwl -.21 Tehama 
Barlow A. F., dwl 424 Sanson) 



HUNTINGTON, HOPKINS & CO., Agents Jessop & Sons' Steel, Cor. Bush and Market. 




P. VAN SCKAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny St., Table and Pocket Cutlery 



Barlow Carrie Miss, teacher Washington Grammar 

School, dwl 909 Clay 
Barlow Charles, (R. G. Dun & Go. J res New York- 
Barlow Ebenezer, (colored) bootblack, dwl 730 Pac 
Barlow Elisha T., dwl E s Channel opp Eleventh 
Barlow Martin, longshoreman, dwl NE cor Front 

and Pacific 
Barlow William, laborer with P. M. S. S. Co. 
Barman Charles, cigarstand, 118 Fourth, dwl 321 

Minna 
Barman Henry, waiter, 132 Stewart 
Barman M., groceries and liquors, SW cor Mission 

and Fifteenth 
Barman Jonas, real estate, dwl 321 Minna 
Barman Jonas S., clerk with M. Barman, dwl SW 

cor Mission and Fifteentli 
Barnam C. S. Mrs., furnished rooms, 809 Stockton 
Barnard Edward, special policeman, dwl 20 Ellis 
Barnard Edward, mate bark Dublin, pier 17 Stew 
Barnard Frank, coal, 213 Jackson, dwl 418 Eddy 
Barnard George, drayman with Thomas H. Selby 

& Co., dwl 531 Linden 
BARNARD ISAAC D., real estate and general 

business agent, office 232 Mont, dwl Russ House 
Barnard Matthew, shoemaker, dwl 528 Stevenson 
Barnard Moses S., cooper, dwl 1226J Folsom 
Barnard Thomas G., contractor and builder, dwl 32 

Rincon Place 
Barnes Charles A., plasterer, dwl SW cor Howard 

and Twenty-fourth 
Barnes Charles E., U. S. mail agent S. F. post- 

otlice, dwl 8 Hinckley 
Barnes David, attorney at law, dwl 320 Sansom 
Barms E. B. Miss, teacher Denman Grammar 

School, dwl 932 Howard 
Barnes George, watchman Alms House 
Barnes George Ed., editor, dwl 1005 Powell 
Barnes Henry L., laborer, 84 California Market, 

dwl Hinckley nrDupont 
Barnes James, blacksmith, dwl 110 William, rear 
Barnes John, frnitstand, NW cor Stewart and Mis- 
sion, dwl 106 Stewart 
Barnes Joseph, mariner, dwl 606 Third 
Barnes Robert L. C, clerk witlk Charles Wittram, 

dwl 745 Market 
Barnes William, carpenter, 913 Market 
Barnes William H. L., (Barnes # Bowie) dwl SW 

cor Fillmore and McAllister 
BARNES & BOWIE, [W. H. L. Barnes and 

Henry P. Bowie) attorneys-at-law, office 433 
. California 
Barnett Joseph, peddler, dwl 448 Natoma 
Barnett Joseph P., merchant, dwl 931 1 Howard 
Barnett Morris S., graindealer, dwl Cosmopolitan 

Hotel 
Barnett Solomon N., peddler, dwl 63 Shipley 
Barnett Wolfe, watchmaker, dwl 808 Union 
Barney Benjamin A., with William B. Hooper dz. 

Co., dwl SW cor Ellis and Van Ness Avenue 
Barney James M., ( William B. Hooper 8? Co.) res 

Ehrenberg, Arizona Territory 
Barney John, "tailor with Samuel Figel, 3 Mont 
Barney Sophia A., dwl 802 Howard 
Barnhart Charles, laborer, 22 Fremont, dwl 48 

Louisa 
Barnheisel S. Henry, salesman, 24 Sansom, dwl 546 

Bryant 
Barnhisel E. R., carrier Alta, dwl W s Mission bet 

Twelfth and Thirteenth 
Barnum Edward, bookkeeper, dwl 331 Mout 
Barnum Harry, clerk, dwl 845 Dnpont 
Baron Abraham, tailor, 35 Pacific 
Baron Adolph, shoemaker, dwl 5 Ranseb 
Baron Bertram, blacksmith with John Duprey, dwl 

528 Broadway 
B:u- 0l ? Hemy, hairdraper with A. I. Korn, dwl 259 

Jf. ssie 
±>aron Jean, blacksmith with John Duprey, dwl 

528 Broadway 



Baron Oscar, seaman, dwl 32 Stewart 

Baron Samuel, clerk with S. Rosenberg & Co., dwl 
27 Pacific 

Baron William, shipcarpenter, dwl E s Middle bet 
California and Pine 

Baronio Peter, cook with Flynn & Co., dwl Vallejo 
nr Dupont 

Baroteau Alphouse, packer with E. Guittard & Co., 
dwl 3 Washoe Place 

Barquin Francois, liquor saloon, 1021 Market 

Barr Hannah K., (widow) dwl 318 Oak 

Ban- John, machinist with S. F. Gas Co., dwl 264 
Minna 

Barr John D., umbrella and parasol manufacturer, 
323 Bush, dwl 409 Clementina 

Barr Neil, molder Fulton Foundry, dwl S s Twen- 
ty-third nr Harrison 

Barr Sarah A. Miss, teacher Girls' High School, dwl 
916 Washington 

Barr William H., mariner, dwl N s Bay bet Leav- 
enworth and Hyde 

BARRA EZEKIEL I., liquors and cigars, NW cor 
First and Minna 

BARRAS HALL, NW cor First and Minna 

Barraillac Charles, basketmaker, 118 Fifth 

Barrat August, butcher Miners' Restaurant, dwl 635 
Pacific 

Barredt Moses, peddler, dwl 920 Dnpont 

Barrell Samuel, stockbroker, 446 California, dwl 
156 Third 

Barrett Alfred, watchmaker, 13 Second, dwl 236 
Seventh 

Barrett C. H., dwl 424 Sansom 

Barrett Charles, carpenter H. C. League, 128 
Kearny 

Barrett Daniel, engineer, dwl 40 Clementina 

Barrett Dominick, upholsterer with Goodwin & Co., 
dwl Clinton nr Brannan 

Barrett Edward, laborer, dwl 607 1 Natoma, rear 

Barrett Edward, helper Union Iron Works 

Barrett Edward, laborer Laborers Pro. & Ben. 
Ass'n., 814 Howard 

Barrett Edward, shoemaker, 15 Stevenson 

Barrett Edward J., (Barbier Sf B.) dwl 623 
Kearny 

Barrett Francis A., carpenter with E. K. Howes & 
Co., dwl Seventeenth Avenue nr J, South S. F. 

Barrett George, hostler with James S. Kennedy, 
dwl 230 Third 

Barrett George, malster Mason's Brewery, dwl S s 
Francisco bet Mason and Powell 

Barrett Hannah, (widow) dwl 517 Stevenson 

Barrett James, laborer, dwl 310 Jessie 

Barrett James, painter, dwl 112 Dora 

Barrett James, (Small & B.J and supervisor Tenth 
Ward, dwl 318 Clementina 

Barrett John, collector, dwl 782 Harrison 

Barrett John, laborer, dwl W s Kansas nr Nevada 

Barrett John, laborer with Whitney & Freese ^ 

Barrett Kuowlton, watchman U. S. Branch Mint, 
res Oakland 

Barrett Mary A., (widow) seamstress, dwl 202 
Second 

Barrett Mary T., (widow) saleswoman with Sam- 
uel Hill, dwl 905 Bush 

Barrett Michael, coachman, dwl 17 Sherwood 
Place | 

Barrett Michael, Imp. Calkers Ass'n, 713 Mission 

Barrett Patrick, papercarrier, dwl 216 Bitch 

Barrett Richard, porter with Forbes, Brothers & 
Co., dwl 805 Sansom 

Barrett Richard T., picturefrainemaker with B. Mc- 
Quillan, dwl 425 Stevenson 

Barrett Robert, brickmaker, dwl 122 Gilbert 

Barrett Wallace C, lumbersurveyor, office 128 Stew- 
art, res Oakland 

Barrett W. C, carpenter, dwl 22 Turk 

Barrett William, laborer, dwl W s Van Ness Ave- 
nue ur Turk 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street, Combs and Brushes. 



WATKINS' YO-SEMITE AKT GALLERY, 26 Montg. St., opp. Lick House Entrance. 



86 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY 



Barrett William F., molder City Iron Works, dwl 
19 Clementina 

Barrett William G, cashier S.F. Gas Co., dwl NW 
cor Pine and Taylor 

BARRETT & SHERWOOD, (Robert Sherwood, 
successor) importers and dealers watches, dia- 
monds, jewelry, etc., 517 Montgomery 

Barrette Madame, "(widow) pianist, dwl 589 Market 

Barrie David, conductor Central R. R., dwl Clinton 
nr Brannau 

Barrielles Jean, cook Miners' Restaurant, dwl Gra- 
ham Place 

Barringer Elizabeth E., dressmaker, 830 Market 

Barringer Peter, carpenter, dwl 830 Market 

Barrington Charlotte Miss, dressmaker with Mrs. 
E. Lawrence, dwl N s Twenty-fourth bet Jer- 
sey and Sanchez 

Barrington Francis, seaman, dwl 37 Pacific 

Barrington George, ( Werner & B.) dwl 1706 Polk 

Barrington John, clerk S. F. Post Office, dwl 557 
Xaioma 

Barrington William B., storekeeper with Dickson, 
De Wolf & Co., dwl Ns Jersey nr Sanchez 

Barris Hiram D., market, 9:28 Post 

BARROILHET HENRY, (Bclloc FreresJ and 
consul for Chili, office 521 Mont, dwl SE cor 
Pine and Leavenworth 

Ban-on Adolph, shoecutter with S. W. Rosenstock 
& Co., dwl 5 Rausch 

Banon Cornelius, ( 'Veering & B.J dwl SW cor 
Georgia and Shasta 

Barron Cornelius J., paperhanger and painter, 815 
Market 

Barron Edward, capitalist, office 400 Montgomery, 
dwl 510 Powell 

Barron House, Edouard Boulogne, proprietor, 1008 
Dupont 

Barron John, housepainter, dwl 2 Francisco 

Barron Michael, carpenter California Planing Mill, 
dwl E s Mission bet Nineteenth and Twentieth 

Barron William, carpenter, dwl Sheppard Place nr 
Mason 

Barron William, groceries and liquors, SW cor Clay 
and Powell 

Barron William R., carpenter, dwl Sheppard Place 
nr Mason 

Barron William R., conductor Omnibus R. R., dwl 
fil3 Mission 

BARRON & CO., (Thomas Bell) commission mer- 
chants, office N\V cor Cal and Sanson) 

BarrowCharles F.. clerk, 421 Mont, dwl 523 Kearny 

Harrow James, molder, dwl 520 Mission 

Barrow Samuel, office 521 Front 

Barrows Daniel P., painter, dwl 73 Natoma 

Barry Augustus, clerk Sander's Hotel 

Barrv Augustus W., driver Market St. R. R., dwl 1 
Willow 

Barry B. V., .salesman with J. S. Wall & Co., dwl 
1814 Market 

BARRY CHARLES E., searcher records, office 
619 Mont, dwl 1010 Jackson 

Barry Daniel, clerk with S. F. Gas Co., dwl S s 
Eleventh Avenue bet N and P, South S. F. 

Barry Daniel, laborer with P. M. S. S. Co. 

Barry David, fruit dealer, dwl W s Gordon nr Har- 
rison 

Barry David, laborer, dwl W s Washington Ave- 
nue bet Mission and Howard 

Barry David, laborer Cent. P.R.R., dwl 531 Fourth 

Barry David, sailmaker with John E. Courtenay & 
Co., dwl W s Washington Avenue bet Mission 
and Howard 

Barry Edward, carriagemaker, dwl S s Ridley nr 
Valencia 

Barry Edward, molder Union Iron Works, dwl 16 
Anthony 

Barry Edward, real estate ageut, office 415 Mont, 
dwl 1904 Stockton 

Barry Emma H, (widow) dwl 923 Pacific 



Barry James, carpenter North Pac. Trans. Co's S.S- 

John L. Stephens 
Barry James, foreman with Nelson & Doble, dwl 

211 Taylor 
Barry James, machinehand with Thomas McMa- 

hon, dwl N s Tehama bet Tenth and Eleventh 
Barry James, yardman Occidental Hotel 
Barrv James P., carpenter, dwl N s Natoma nr 

Tenth 
Barrv James H., printer with Spauldiug & Barto, 

dwl 1306 Jackson 
Barrv James J., watchman City Hall Park, dwl 

11 l± Fifth 
Barry John, bootcrimper with Buckiugham&Heeht, 

dwl Ninth nr Harrison 
Barry John, carpenter H. C. League, 128 Kearny 
Barry John, coachman, dwl 325 Folsom 
Barry John, conductor Omnibus R. R. 
Barry John, housepainter, dwl 361 Clementina 
Barry John, laborer, dwl 15 Hinckley 
Barry John, laborer, dwl 23 Natoma 
Barry John, laborer, dwl 24 Freelon 
Barry John, laborer, dwl S s Sacramento bet Fil- 

more and Steiuer 
Barry John, laborer with De Vries & Chase 
Barry John, molder Union Iron Works, dwl 16 

Hinckley 
Barry John, painter, dwl 110 William 
Barry John, shoemaker, dwl W s Gordon nr Har 
Barry John, storekeeper, dwl 16 O'Farrell 
Barry John C, expresswagon, 300 Kearny, dwl 660 

Jlinna 
Barry John E., baker with R. Stein, dwl 238 Fifth 
Barrv John H., clerk Western Union Telegraph 

Co., dwl 211 Taylor 
Barrv John T., (Lyons S? B.J dwl 1526 Geary 
Barry Mark, salesman, 606 Mkt. dwl 200 Stockton 
Barry Martin, tailor with John O'Donnell, dwl Ns 

Bush bet Laguuaaud Buchanan 
Barry Mary, (widow) laundress, dwl Ns Francisco 

bet Dupont and Kearny 
Barry Matthew, peddler, dwl S s San Bruno Road 

nr Gerard 
Barry Michael, carpenter, dwl 39 Natoma 
Barry Michael, laborer Golden Gate Park, dwl cor 

Ellis and Laguna 
Barry Michael, laborer with Hancock & Kelso 
Barry Michael, tailor with Timothy Canty, dwl 

536 Commercial 
Barry Owen, laborer, dwl S s Ash nr Octavia 
Barry Owen, laundry man City and County Hospital 
Barry P., (widow) dwl 28 Ritch, rear 
Barrv Patrick, boilermaker, and extraman Hook 

and Ladder Co. No. 2, S. F. F. D., dwl 110 

Williams 
Barrv Patrick, deckhand steamer El Capitan, dwl 

206 Pacific 
Barry Patrick, groceries and liquors, 235 Jessie 
Barry Patrick, laborer, dwl E s Harrison bet Twen- 
ty-third and Twenty-fourth 
Barry Patrick, laborer with Smith, Brown & Co,, 

E s Potrero Avenue nr Sixteenth 
Barry Patrick, policeman City Hall, dwl E s Ivy 

nr Franklin 
Barry P. Oliver, clerk, dwl 25 Sixth 
Barrv Richard, laborer S. F. &. P. Sugar Refinery, 

dwl 260 Clara 
Barry Richard, sailmaker with William C. Wood, 

dwl Washington Avenue nr Mission 
Barry Robert, bookkeeper, dwl 21 Prospect Place 
Barry Robert, laborer with Whitney & Freese 
Barry Robert, ropemaker, dwl S s Sixteenth nr 

Guerrero 
Barry Robert, tailor, Trinity Court 
Barry Sarah J., (widow) dwl 1306 Jackson 
Barry Teresa, (widow) seamstress, dwl 1 "Nome 

Barry Theodore A., (Barry £ Patten) dwl 709 
Geary 



HUNTINGTON, HOPKINS & CO., Wholesale Hardware and Iron, Cor. Bush and Market. 



C. P. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Yankee Notions. 



SAN FRANCISCO []$] DIRECTORY 



87 



Barry Thomas, carpenter California Planing Mill, 

dwl 435 Pine 
Barry Thomas, driver N. B. & M. R. R. dwl 259 

Tehama 
Barry Thomas, extraman Hose Co. No. 5, S. F. F. 

D., dwl S s Market het Tenth and Eleventh 
Barry Thomas, laborer, dwl 259 Tehama 
Barry Thomas, messenger Wells, Fargo & Co.'s 

Express 
Barry Thomas, shoemaker witli S. W. Rosenstock 

& Co., dwl 2 Eddy Place 
Barry Thomas T., salesman with Keane, O'Connor 

& Co., dwl 531 Bush 
Barry Vinton B., grocer, dwl 1814 Market 
Barry William, actor, dwl 845 Dupont 
Barry William, carpenter, dwl 28 Pitch, rear 
Barry William, coachman, dwl 217 Pitch 
Barry William, foreman Omnibus R. R., dwl 

630 Jessie 
Barry William laborer, dwl 231 First 
Barry William, laborer, dwl 41 Minna 
Barry William, shipcarpenter, dwl 21 Rausch 
Barrv William H., clerk with McDonald & Gavan, 

dwl 21 Rausch 
Barry William J., apprentice with W. K. Vander- 

slice & Co., dwl 35 Valparaiso 
Barry William McGill, naval architect, dwl 200 

Stockton 
BARRY & PATTEN, /'Theodore A. Barry and 

Benjamin A. Patten) wines and liquors, 413 

Montgomery 
Barsotti Vicene, peddler, dwl 1002 Pacific 
Barstean August, laborer and extraman Hook and 

Ladder Co. No. 2, S. F. F. D., dwl 625 Vallejo 
Barstow Alfred, U. S. postal agent, office 7 Mont- 
gomery Block, dwl 615 Lombard 
Barstow Amanda, dressmaker, dwl 138 Fourth 
Barstow Anson, weigher Custom House 
Barstow George, (Barstow. Stetson & Houghton) 

dwl 927 Pine 
Barstow John L., miner, dwl American Exchange 
Barstow Joseph, manufacturer, dwl 138 Fourth 
Barstow Simon F., compositor, dwl 2 Stanlv Place 
BARSTOW, STETSON & HOUGHTON, '(George 

Barstow, Edward Gray Stetson, and li. E. 

Houghton) attorneys at law, office 315 Cal 
Barteau Philip, laborer, dwl 711 Lombard 
Bartelloni E., molder with Pietro Mezzara, 533 

Jackson 
Bartels Adolph, clerk with John H. Schroeder, dwl 

330 Vallejo 
Bartels Conrad, musician, dwl 500 Union 
Bartels Friedrich, waiter, dwl 18 Sansom 
Bartels Henry, clerk, dwl 39 Jackson 
Bartels Henry, cook bark Legal Tender, 27 Market 
Bartels Henry, expresswagon,300 Commercial, dwl 

927 Greenwich 
Bartels Peter H., clerk with Peter N. Butt & Co., 

dwl SE cor Kearny and Pacific 
Bartels Richard, clerk, SE cor Third and Howard 
Bartet Auna Madame, teacher French, dwl 715 

Green 
Bartet Jean Baptiste, clerk with Roth & Videau, dwl 

715 Green 
Barth Charles H, quartermaster's clerk, dwl 2237 

Jackson 
Barthen Frank, cigarmaker, dwl 11 Cedar Avenue 
Bartholames John, w r atchman, dwl S s Boyd nr 

Chesley 
Bartholomew Henry G., expresswagon, cor Frout 

and Pine, dwl E s Devisadero bet Clay and Sac 
Bartbrop Edward, (Casey $ B.) dwl 424 Geary 
Bartlett Benjamin L., U. S. Internal Revenue 

Ganger, dwl 679 Mission 
Bartlett Charles H., paperbanger, dwl 409 Bran 
Bartlett Columbus, (Bartlett ~& Pratt) dwl 1515 

Leavenworth 
Bartlett- Cornelia Miss, dwl 917 Post 
Bartlett E., capitalist, dwl Russ House 



Bartlett EarJ, (BartteU & Bergin) dwl Point Lo- 

bos Road nr Fifteenth Avenue 
Bartlett Frederick, apprentice Union Box Factory 
Bartlett James, piledriver with E.C. Boobar & Co. 
Bartlett James H., carpenter, dwl 3118 Tehama 
Bartlett Job C. drayman Commercial Flour Mills, 

dwl 122 Eddy 
Bartlett Mary A.', (widow) dwl 34 Oak Avenue 
Bartlett Nathaniel, packer Golden Age Flooring 

Mills 
Bartlett Pliny, (Hallett, B. & Dalton) res Oakland 
Bartlett Robert, coachtrimmer, dwl 731 California 
Bartlett Robert B., porter, 206 San, dwl 'd'di Moss 
BARTLETT WASHINGTON, attorney at law, 
office 636 Sacramento, and secretary Chamber 
of Commerce, dwl 850 Market 
BARTLETT WILLIAM C, Bulletin Editorial 

rooms, 517 Clav, res Oakland 
Bartlett William S., exchange teller California 

Trust Co., res Oakland 
BARTLETT WHITE LEAD AND ZINC CO., 

office 208 California 
Bartlett & Bergin, (Earl Bartlett and Michael 
Bergin) attorneys at law, office 35 Mont Blk 
BARTLETT & PRATT, {Columbus Bar//,// and 
Leonidas E. Pratt) attorneys at law, office 636 
Sacramento 
Bartley Francis, boilermaker, dwl 125 Dora 
Bartley John, laborer with Whitney & Freeee 
Bart ling William, (Bartling 8? Kimball) res Four- 
teenth het Castro and Brush. Oakland 
BARTLING & KIMBALL. (William Bar/Jin? 
and Henry Kimball) bookbinders and blank- 
book manufacturers, 505 Clay 
Bartlow William, (colored) bootblack, S s Merch- 
ant nr Kearny, dwl N s Pacific nr Stocktou 
Bartman A., carpenter Pioneer Woolen Mills 
Bartman John C, musician, dwl 1519 Dupont 
Bartman Ferdinand, carpenter Pioneer Woolen 

Mills 
Barto Harrison, (Spanldiug 4* BJ dwl 908 How 
Barto Mary, (widow) bakery, 1218 Powell 
Bartol Lo'uis, butcher, 206 Broadway, dwl 329 

Broadway, rear 
Bartola Antonio, tinsmith, dwl 814 Pacific 
Bartola Pietro, tinsmith, dwl 814 Pacific 
Bartolacci Sebastauauio, laborer, dwl 51J3 Vallejo 
Bartolomew Elizabeth, (widow) dwl 1437 Pine 
Barton Alfred, shipcarpenter with James H. Love, 

dwl International Hotel 
Barton Benjamin F., (B. F. Barton & Co.) dwl 23 

Kearnv 
BARTON "B. F. & CO., proprietors Pioneer Salt 

Works, depot 211 and 213 Sacramento 
Barton Charles C, porter, 111 Front, dwl 136 Ship- 
ley 
Barton David, gardener with Milo Hoadley, dwl 

NW cor Bush and Lyon 
Barton George, engineer, dwl 418 Brannan 
Barton James, bootmaker, 813 Battery 
BARTON JOHN, president Union Pacific Salt 

Co., 218 Sacramento, dwl 15 Laurel Place 
Barton John C, (Barton & Rutter) res New York 
Barton Joseph, boxmaker, dwl 22 Turk 
Barton Joshua H., steward San Quentiu Prison, 

dwl 181 Jessie 
Barton Thomas S., clerk with N. B. EdgerlyA Co., 

dwl cor Fourth and Perry 
Barton Willard T., clerk, dwl 706 California 
Barton William, painter, dwl 1232 Union 
Barton William, rigger and stevedore, dwl W s 

Stockton bet Francisco and Bay 
Barton William II., stockbroker, office 19 Merch- 
ants' Exchange, dwl N s Jackson nr Franklin 
BARTON & RUTTER, (John C. Barton and 
Robert A. Rutter) importers and dealers gnus, 
pistols, cutlery, etc., 609 Clay 
Bartone Peter, currier with Simon Hoffmann, dwl E 
s Mission nr Twelfth 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 116 SaDsom Street, Ladies' and Children's Woolen Goods- 



WATKINS' YO-SEMITE ART GALLERY, 26 Moatg. St., opp. Lick House Entrance. 



Baruch Frank, cabinetmaker, dwl 375 Jessie 
Baruch Isaac, merchant, dwl 108 Seventh 
Baruch Paulina, midwife, dwl 252 Minna 
Barut Raymond, market. 1402 Stockton 
Baruth Ernest, (Ernest Baruth & Co.) dwl 900 

Post 
Baruth Ernest & Co., (Henry Hol/ings) groceries 

and liquors, NW cor Post and Hyde 
Baruth S. & Co.,(H. Goldsmith) cloaks and man- 
tillas, 400 Kearny 
Baruth Simon, (S. Baruth & Co.) dwl 400 Kearny 
Barz August, (Barz& Suhl) dwl 119 Commercial 
Barz & Suhl, (August Barz and Chris/tan F.Suhl) 

wagonmakers and blacksmiths, 114 Sac 
Basch Arthur, salesman, 121 Sansom, dwl 225 Bush 
Bascfa Hugo, barber, dwl 277 Minna 
Bascom Louis- S., clerk with F. E. Wilke, 418 

Montgomery, dwl 814 California 
Baselini Alexander, interpreter City and Comity 

Hospital 
Basel li Regina. (widow) dwl 25 Geary 
Basford Jacob K. , mouevbroker, office 304 Mont, 

dwl 917 Geary 
Bash Henry, general business agent, 540 Kearny, 

dwl 773 Folsom 
Bash Hyman, tailor, 202 Bush, dwl 3 Shipley 
Basliam Frederick, plaster modeler, 952 Mission, 

dwl E s Larkin bet Sutter and Post 
Baskerville John, morticer with L. and E. Emanuel, 

dwl 4 lOBrannan 
Baskerville Richard D., hairdresser, dwl 34 Fifth Av 
Bass Chester, (colored) hairdresser, 531 Pacific, dwl 

919 Broadway 
BASS, NEWMAN & CO., (Thomas J. Bass and 
James Newman) paints, oils, and glass, 735 
Market 
Bass Thomas J., (Bast, Netcman dt Co.) dwl E s 

Fillmore bet Bush and Pine 
Bass William, shipcalker, bds 312 Beale 
Baseauicb Antonio, laborer Portland Boiler Works, 

dwl 1110 Stockton 
Basschaozt Peter, steward schooner Greyhound, 27 

Market 
Basse Thomas, commission merchant, dwl 331 Mont- 
gomery 
Bassey Lewis, seaman North Pac. Trans. Co.'s S.S. 

John L> Stephens 
Basser Ferdinand, distiller, dwl 25J Welsh 
Bassett A. C, assistant superintendent Southern P. 

R. R. Co., dwl 906 Market 
Bassett Alonzo, stonecutter with W. Crauley, res 

Oakland 
Basset! Charles F. & Co., produce commission, 208 

Washington, dwl N s Mission opp Twelfth 
Bassett Daniel, second assistant engineer with P.M. 

S. S. Co. 
Bassett Frank W., plumber, dwl NW cor Eleventh 

and .Minna 
BASSETT JOSEPH, wholesale flour and grain, 221 

and 223 Clay, res Fruit Vale, Alameda Co 
Bassetl Martin L., carpenter, dwl NW cor Jersey 

and Church 
Bassett Nathaniel, doorkeeper California Theater, 

dwl NW cor Eleventh and Minna 
Bassett William H.. doorkeeper California Theater, 

dwl NW cor Eleventh and Minna 
Bassini Bernardo, gastitter with S.F. Gas Co., dwl 

1815 Hyde 
Bassity James, plasterer, dwl 1J3 Jones 
Bassiiy Matthew F., plasterer, dwl 207 Minna 
Basteia Frank, laborer California Sugar Refinery, 

dwl 509 Eighth 
Baeten John, hostler with II. Kelling & Co., dwl 

421 Broadway 
Bastheim Joseph, (Einstein Bros. & Co.) dwl 828 

O'Farrell 
Bastian Henry, contractor, dwl 411 Pacific 
Bastian Jacob, (Mesaiier \ II.) dwl 721 Sansom 
Bastian Philip, (Bliven 4- B,) dwl 711 Lombard 



Bast on Aimer F^, teamster with Miller & Hall, dwl 
N s McAllister bet Buchanan and Webster 

Baston Joseph G., sawyer with Hobbs, Gilmore & 
Co., dwl Park Hotel 

Bataille Pierre, laborer, dwl 433 Broadway 

Batavia Philip, hairdresser and wigmaker, 641 
Kearny, dwl 751 Clay 

Batchelder David F., special policeman, dwl 429 
Sixth 

Batchelder Hiram, carrier Alta California 

Batchelder John R., carpenter with A. A. Snyder, 
dwl 512 Hyde 

Batchelder L. L. , stevedore, dwl 1026 Clav 

Batchelder Nathaniel, carpenter, dwl 446 Braunan 

Batchelder Timothy, captain bark Oakland, pier 1 
Stewart, res Oakland 

BATCHELOR EDWARD P., attorney at law, 
office 10 Mont Block, and justice of the peace, 
804 Montgomery, dwl Cosmopolitan Hotel 

Bate William H., patternmaker, dwl 211 Stevenson 

Bateman Henry, carpenter H. C. League, 128 
Kearnv 

BATEMAN HENRY C, Catholic bookseller, sta- 
tioner and bookbinder, 203 Kearny 

Bateman James, shoemaker, 204 Commercial 

Bateman J. C, miner, dwl Cosmopolitan Hotel 

Bates A. C, miner, dwl 538 Sacramento 

Bates A. Caroline Miss, teacher University school, 
dwl LOW Powell 

BATES ASHER B., attorney at law and register 
in bankruptcy, office 10 Court Block, 636 Clav, 
dwl 705 Bush 

Bates Cicero M., physician and health officer Board 
of Health, office 521 Jackson, dwl 206 Powell 

Bates Dudley C, bookkeeper with Edward F. Hall 
&Co., d'wl 920 Bush 

Bates Eugene J. clerk with Charles Langley & Co., 
dwl 764 Harrison 

Bates Felix P. W.. millwright with Edwin O. Hunt, 
dwl 673 Harrison 

Bates George, principal University school, N s Post 
bet Stockton and Powell, dwl 1001 Powell 

Bates John, seaman, dwl Ns Oregon bet Drumm 
and Davis 

BATES JOSEPH C, attorney at law, office 434 
California, dwl 708 Pine 

Bates J. W„ (widow) dwl 764 Harrison, rear 

Bates Marshall A. K., clerk Merchants Mutual Ma- 
rine Iiis. Co., dwl 705 Bush 

Bates .Morris S., cashier with Williams, Blanchard 
& Co., dwl 705 Bush 

Bates S. P.. captain ship Lookout, Rincon Wharf 

Bates William, street contractor, dwl SW cor Har- 
rison and Chesley 

Bateson James H., tailor, 5 Clementina 

Batiste Frank, laborer, dwl 213 Broadway 

Batres Luis, dwl 11 Kearny 

Batsere John, cook Union Club, dwl N s Bryant nr 
Bryant Avenue 

Battams William, salesman with Locke Sz. Monta- 
gne, dwl Lick House 

Batten Sansom, (Batten <£ Mullen) dwl S s Califor- 
nia nr Baker 

Batten & Mullen, (Sansom Batten and Michael 
Mullen) stone cutters, N s Geary nr Cemetery 
Avenue 
BattenaB., drayman, dwl 1210 Powell 

Battersby James, watchmaker, dwl 709 Mission 
Battersbv Robert, mining engineer, office 645 Mar- 
ket. 'dwl 24 Third 
Battery Street D. S. Bonded Warehouse, Ge 

Bode proprietor, NW cor Battery and Filbert 
BATTEUX DANIEL, liquor saloon, 31 Kearny, 

dwl 11 Carlos Place 
Battiste Joseph, cook Grand Hotel 
Battiste Louis, cook, 647 Commercial 
Battler C. W.. carpenter H. C. League, 128 Kearny 
Battles Albert, cabinetmaker with Chr. Schreiber & 
Co-, bds Sacramento Hotel 



HUNTINGTON, HOPKINS & CO., Agents Jessop & Sons' Steel, Cor, Bush and Market. 



C. P. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Clothing, etc. 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY 



89 



Battles John, proprietor "Rallies Honse, 23 Vallejo 

Battles Luke, cashier Delmonico's Restaurant, dwl 

17 Anthony 
Battles William W., merchant, dwl 819 Post 
Battlot Peter, tailor, dwl 536 Broadway 
Batturs Edward T„ bookkeeper with Frank G Ed- 
wards, dwl 521 Leavenworth 
Batty. John, carpenter with N. P. Langland, dwl N s 

Post bet Broderick and Baker 
Batty William J., coupe, Plaza 
Bauch Albert, seaman, dwl 32 Stewart 
Bauch Peter G., custom house broker, 500 Battery, 

dwl 719 Union 
Baudin John P., carpenter H. C. Lengue, 128 Kearny 
Bauer Abraham, (Bauer Bros. J dwl 1102 Pine 
Bauer Brothers, (Abraham, Moses and Samuel) 

fancy goods, 410 Kearny 
Bauer Carl, laborer with Ruhlan Brothers 
Bauer Charles, laborer, dwl S 6 Twentieth bet 

Dolores and Church 
Bauer Charles, (Charles Bauer & Co.) dwl 256 

Stevenson 
Bauer Charles, (Valentine & B.) dwl 1117 Mission 
Bauer Charles & Co., native wines and liquors, SE 

cor Kearny and Commercial 
Bauer Edward, laborer with Taylor & Bendel, 407 

Clay 
Bauer Emil, clerk, dwl 1042 Polsom 
Bauer Emile, ( White & B.) dwl 2109 Jones 
Bauer George, boarding, 9 Belden 
Bauer Henry, upholsterer with John C. Bell, dwl 

1511 California 
Bauer John, cooper Mason's Brewery, dwl Stockton 

bet Union and Green 
Bauer John, driver Broadway Brewery, dwl 118 

Virginia 
Bauer John, (Chapman & B.J dwl cor Fillmore 

and Haight 
BAUER JOHN A., treasurer City and County, 
office 3 City Hall first floor, and manufactur- 
ing chemist and druggist, 101 Post, dwl 620 
Greenwich 
Bauer Joseph, liquor saloon, 1042 Folsom 
Bauer Leonard G., soapmaker, dwl 432 Green- 
wich 
Bauer Leopold, folder Occidental Laundry, dwl 

Fillmore nr Greenwich 
Bauer Louis, cutler, 830 Market. 
Bauer Moses, (Bauer Bros. J dwl 1102 Pine 
Bauer Peter, dwl 705 Vallejo 
Bauer Peter, blacksmith, dwl 1325 Stockton 
Bauer Samuel, (Bauer Bros. J dwl 1102 Pine 
Bauer Simon, porter City of Paris, dwl 439 Bush 
Bauer William, confectioner, dwl 266 Stevenson 
Bauerle Johannes, carpenter with Leonard F. 

Haussler, res Alameda 
Baugh Theodore E., proprietor U. S. Court Bldg,N 

E cor Battery and Wash, dwl 123 Stockton 
Baugh William W., clerk, dwl 320 Sansom 
Bautiof Charles, ( Werner & Go. ) dwl 20 Belden 
Baulsir Nimrod, blockmaker with Thomas F. 

Mitchell, dwl 1332 Washington 
Baum Benjamin, carpenter, dwl 108 Tehama, rear 
BAUM CHARLES, customhouse broker and Con- 
sul Argentine Republic, office 510 Battery, dwl 

1705 Powell 

Baum David A., clerk Liverpool and London and 
Globe Insurance Co., dwl 18 Prospect Place 

Baum Gustave, furniture, 740 Washington, dwl 709 
Pacific 

BAUM J. & CO., (Henry & Morris Shrier) man- 
ufacturers, importers and jobbers clothing, 222 
Sansom 

Baum John, cabinetmaker, 605 California 

Baum Julius, (J. Baum Jj- Co. J dwl 1111 Van Ness 
Avenue 

Baum Simon, bookkeeper, 222 Sansom, dwl 339 
Eddy 

Baumau A., jeweler, dwl 515 Vallejo 



Banman Edward, engineer Yolo Mills, dwl 1211 
Dupout 

Banman Emma Miss, (Banman Sisters) dwl 1108 
Stockton 

Banman George, (Plan: 8? B.J dwl 531 Natoma 

Banman John." carpenter H. C. League, 128 Kearny 

Banman Joseph, gun and lockmaker, 510 Broadway 

Banman Lena Miss, (Banman Sisters j dwl 1108 
Stockton 

Banman Louis F., confectioner with George Haas 
&■ Co., dwl 231 Jessie 

Baumau Robert, curriey with C. O'Donuell, dwl 
W s Gilbert nr Brannan 

Baumau Sisters, (Miss Emma ami Miss Lena Bau- 
mau) millinery, 1108 Stockton 

Banman Frederick' bookkeeper, dwl 2017 Mason 

Bauman John, musician, dwl 29 Morton 

Baumberger James, bookkeeper with Breeze &. 
Loughran, dwl 627 Commercial 

Baumeister Frederick, (Hunt & B.) dwl 538 How 

Baumeister Joseph, carpenter, dwl 15115 Powell 

Baumeister John A., (Baumeister & Co.) dwl 1038 
Howard 

Baumeister & Co., {John A. Baumeister and John 
C. Beck/er) saloon, NW cor Rush and Kearny 

Baumgardner S. J., commission agent California 
Cracker Co., dwl 1024 Bush 

Baumgardner E. M. Mrs., vice-principal Denman 
Grammar School, dwl 51 1 Sutter 

Baumgart Philip, waiter Woodward's Gardens 

Baumgart Solomon, peddler, dwl 122 Virginia 

Baumgarten Anton, [M. Ullmann & Co.) dwl 630 
Sacramento 

Baumgarten Carl, (M. Ullmann & Co ) res Pesfch, 
Hungary 

Baumgarten Christian, seaman, dwl 37 Pacific 

Baumgarten Joseph, cashier with M. Ullmann &, 
Co.. dwl McAllister nr Polk 

Baumgartner Valentine, (Heerdink & Co.) dwl 6)7 
Minna 

Baun Jasper J., butcher, dwl NW cor Fifth and 
Folsom 

BAUR OTTO, San Francisco Restaurant, 324 
Montgomery, dwl 43 Second 

Baurhyte Isaac S., assistant engineer steamer Amer- 
ica, dwl 251 Bluxome,rear 

Baurhvte Robert H, (widow) dwl E s Pierce nr 
Ellis 

Bauscher Jeremiah D., bookkeeper with B. C. Horn 
&C<>., res Oakland 

Bauser Ferdinand, brewer, dwl Fifth Avenue, 
South S. F. 

BAUSM AN WILLIAM, editorial department Morn- 
ing Call, dwl 552 Minna 

Banten Nicholas J., (Nicholas J. Banteu & Co.) 
dwl NE cor Brannan and John 

Bauten Nicholas J. & Co., (William Murhe) groce- 
ries and liquors, NE cor Brannan and John 

Bautier Alphonse, printer with Thomas D. Lamer, 
dwl S s Seventeenth nr Valencia 

Bautz Leon, (Angclad? B.) dwl 607 Sansom 

BAUX F. A., real estate, office 411* California, res 
Oakland 

Bavaria Brewery, Jacob Gundlach & Co.. proprie- 
tors, 620-622" Vallejo 

Baw Frank, molder with W. T. Garratt & Co., dwl 
Fulton nr Lacuna 

Bawden William G., (Bawden & Forbes) dwl Cos- 
mopolitan Hotel 

Bawden & Forbes, ( William G. Bawden and J. S. 
Stuart Forbes,) job printers, 317 California 

Bax Samuel, cook, dwl 238 Stewart 

Baxter Charles E. A., clerk with J. C. Merrill & 
Co., dwl 1109 Howard 

Baxter Edward H.. salesman with Crane & Brig- 
bam, dwl 1109 Howard 

Baxter Hall W., bookkeeper with Crane & Brig- 
ham, dwl S s Ellis bet Fillmore and Steiner 

Baxter James, engineer with E. C. Boobar & Co. 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street, Suspenders and Neck Ties. 



WATKINS' YO-SEMITE ART GALLERY, 26 Montg. St., opp. Lick House Entrance. 



90 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY 



Baxter James E., laborer, dwl 503 Washington 
Baxter John T., carpenter, dwl 13 Ridley 
Baxter John T. Jr., market, N s Sixteenth nr Guer- 
rero, dwl 13 Ridley 
Baxter Joseph, seaman, dwl 238 Steuart 
Baxter Joseph P., special policeman, dwl 515 Sac 
Baxter Lydia L., (widow) dwl 1109 Howard 
Baxter Mary, (widow) dwl 6 Downey 
Baxter Matthew, laborer with C. O'Donnell, dwl 

716 Brannan 
Baxter Patrick, laborer with Flint, Peabody & Co., 

dwl 20 Harrison Avenue 
Baxter William S., clerk S. F. Assayiug and Refin- 
ing Works, dwl 111 | Minna 
Bay City Laundry, offices 602 Market and 228 Mont 
BAY CITY SODA WATER CO., office 89 Stev 
Bay District Agricultural Association, office 37 Mer- 
chants' Exchange 
Bay District Horticultural Society, office and read- 
ing room, 622 Clay 
Bay Park Addition Homestead Association, office 

328 Montgomery 
Bav Park Homestead Association, office 328 Mont 
BAY SUGAR REFINERY, SW cor Battery and 

Union 
Bay View Chemical Works, Sixteenth nr Folsom, 

office NW cor Bush and Powell 
BAY VIEW DISTILLING CO., (Robert Cushins 
and Andrew A. Louderback) cor Nineteenth 
Avenue and H, South S. F., office 313 and 315 
Battery 
Bay View Nursery, A. Brocq, proprietor, cor Twen- 
ty-first Avenue and J, office 619 Sacramento 
BAY' WAREHOUSE, estate of A. K. Van Damme, 
proprietor, W s Sansom bet Lombard and 
Greenwich 
Bayerque E. M. Madame, (widow) dwl 819 Miss 
Bayerque Romain, with Pioche & Bayerque, dwl 

* 806 Stockton 
Bayless Frederick, seaman, dwl 12 Steuart 
Bay less Joseph, boxmaker with Hobbs, Gilmore & 

Co., dwl Geneva nr Brannan 
Bayless Thornton J., bookkeeper, dwl 204 Mont 
Bayless William H., architect, dwl E s Geneva bet 

Brannan and Townsend 
BAYLEY CHARLES A., proprietor Bayley's Sam- 
ple Rooms, 659 Clav, dwl 1214 Powell 
Bayley Charles H., clerk, 310 Cal, dwl 1214 Pow 
Bayley George B., bookkeeper Bank California, res 

Oakland 
Bayley Thomas, piledriver with E. C. Boobar & Co. 
Bayley Thomas, seaman, dwl 225 Clay 
BAYLEY WILBUR P., photographer, 618 Wash- 
ington and 1102 Stockton, dwl 1405 Taylor 
Bay lie Frederick, laborer with Whitney & Freese 
Bajiv Charles A., (Bayly & Clan-son) dwl' 822 

Bush 
Bavlv Pauline, (widow) midwife, dwl 163 Tehama 
BAYLY & CLAWSON, (Charles A. Bayly and 
Joseph W. Claw son) apothecaries, 512 Kearny 
Bayly. — See Bailey and Baily 
Bay ma Joseph Rev., Professor Mathematics, and 

President St Ignatius College 
BAYNE JAMES, gasometer' builder City Gas 

Works, dwl N s Sierra nr Maryland 
Bayreuther Clara Miss, millinery and dressmaking, 

774 Mission 
Bayreuther E. Mrs., millinery and dressmaking, 

774 Mission 
Bayreuther Gustav, tinsmith, dwl 774 Mission 
Bays Henry, shipwright, dwl 8 Liberty 
Bazin Victor, tailor, dwl E s Mission bet Twelfth 

and Thirteenth 
Bazzaoizi Martin, broker, dwl Bay View r 
Bazzurro Frank, (Breda & Co.) dwl 504 Clay 
Beach Anson B., drayman with Richard Perry, dwl 

SE cor Bush and Polk 
Beach Carrie A., (widow) dwl SW cor Howard 
and Eighteenth 



BEACH CHILPON, books and stationery, 5 Mont 

Masonic Temple, dwl Grand Hotel 
Beach Dennis, (Beach, Monteitk & Co.) res Albany, 

Oregon 
Beach George H., salesman with Mayrisch Bros & 

Co., dwl 517 J Jessie 
Beach Henry H., clerk with Wellman, Peck & Co., 

dwl 117' Sixth 
Beach Henry Martin, commission merchant, dwl 

813 Stockton 
Beach Horace, dwl 534 Bush 
BEACH JOHN C, proprietor Adams House, 535 

and 537 Sacramento 
Beach, Monteitli & Co., (Dennis Beach, Thomas 

Monteith, Henry Myers and Alexander S. 

Knox,) produce commission, and proprietors 

Albany City (Oregon) Flour Mills, 120 Clay 
Beach Thomas P., cashier North Pac. Trans. Co., 

dwl 905 Market 
Beacon George H., conductor N. B. & M. R. R., 

dwl 325 Minna 
BEADLE DONALD, shipping and commission 

merchant, 119 Washington, dwl 623 Third 
Beahan John, butcher, dwl E s Boardman Place nr 

Braunau 
Beahan Thomas M., porter, dwl E s Octavia nr 

Rose 
Beakley J. Sloat, homoeopathic physician, office and 

dwl 230 Kearny 
Beal Frauk, porter," 110 Sutter 
Beal George, clerk Chief Quartermaster's Depart- 
ment Cal, 703 Market, dwl 510 Mason 
Beal Luciau, laborer with Wood Preserving Co., 

dwl Montgomery Hotel 
Beal Samuel, bedding manufacturer, 575 and 577 

Mission, dwl 40 Silver 
BEALE STREET SAWING AND PLANING 

MILL, Richardson, Dell & Co. proprietors, 

NW cor Beale and Mission 
BEALE STREET WAREHOUSE, NE cor Beale 

and Bryant, James Byrnes & Co. proprietors 
Beale Street Wharf, foot Beale 
Beale Thomas, insurance agent, dwl N s Chestnut 

bet Taylor and Jones 
Beale William, laborer, dwl 238 Steuart 
Beals Charles W., pressman with J. H. Carmany 

& Co.. dwl 1506 Taylor 
Beals C. K. Mrs., teacher Girls' High School, dwl 

923 Powell 
BEALS HENRY CHANNING, Editor Commercial 

Herald and Market Review, office 409 Wash- 
ington, dwl 1506 Taylor 
Beals John P., music printer with M. Gray, res 

San Mateo 
Beals Joseph, steward Moses Taylor, U. S. N. Z. & 

A. M. S. S. Line 
Beam Francis, real estate agent, dwl 1233 Mission 
Beam Joel M., cook with Henry Scott, dwl 815 Mont 
Beam Peter G., passenger agent Erie Railroad, dwl 

Lick House 
Beaman Henry, laborer, dwl S s Chestnut nr Filmore 
Beaman Joseph, milkman, dwl Black Point, 
Beamish George, whipmaker, 519 Sacramento 
Beamish John, bootmaker with Buckingham & 

Hecht, dwl Polk nr Market 
Beamish John, shoemaker with S.W. Rosenstock & 

Co., dwl Oak nr Van Ness Avenue 
Beamish Percy, merchaut, dwl 127 Kearny 
Bean Charles," milkman with E. 11. Knight, dwl 

2221 Greenwich 
Bean David, dravman with Cross & Glvnn 
Bean Edwin P., (E. F. Bean & Co.) dwl 336 

Turk 
BEAN E. F. & CO., Pacific Coast Advertising 

Agency, office 410 Montgomery 
Bean George W., sailmaker with Harding & Brann, 

dwl 921 Union 
Bean John, cook Mechanic's Hotel, dwl 500 Bdwy 
Bean Joseph, carpenter, dwl 658 Howard 



HUNTINGTON, HOPKINS & CO., Importers Hardware and Iron, Cor. Bush and Market. 



C. P- VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Importers and Jobbers. 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY 



91 



Bean Joseph W., carpenter California Planing 

Mill, dwl 174 Minna 
Bean Moses W., captain bark Naraniissie, dwl 921 

Union 
Bean Redmond, stevedore, dwl 569 Howard 
Bean William, clerk, dwl 230 O'Farrell 
Bean William, clerk, dwl 641 Vallejo 
Bean William, drayman with Cross & Glynn, dwl 

4 Helen 
Beane J. Whidden, dwl 532 Howard 
Beane L. W., carpenter H. C. League, 128 Kearny 
Beanston George, secretary Board of Education, 

dwl 339 Minna 
Beanston Peter, blacksmith with Pollard & Car- 

vill Manufacturing Co., dwl S s Hollis nr Ellis 
Beard Charles C, ex-deputy sheriff, dwl 704 

Howard 
Beard George, keeper County Jail 
Beard George, longshoreman, dwl N s Greenwich 

bet Montgomery and Sansom 
Beard H., helper with McAfee, Spiers & Co. 
Beard Isaac, blacksmith Bay View and Potrero 

R.R., dwl Potrero 
Beard Joseph R., broker, office 15 Montgomery 

Block, dwl 704 Howard 
Beardslee Cyrus, carpenter, dwl 430 Union 
Beardslee Martha A. Mrs. , saleswoman with Wilcox 

& Gibbs S. M. Co., dwl 339 Jessie 
Beardsley Irving W. , butcher with Michael O'Con- 
nor, dwl NE cor Ninth and Stevenson 
Beardsley James Jr., engineer, dwl 662 Minna, 

rear 
Beardsley John H., bookkeeper Pacific Bank, dwl 

828 California 
Beardsly Sophia, ( widow) dwl 316 O'Farrell 
Bearsing Henry, mate, dwl 39 Jackson 
Bearwald Benjamin, metermaker Union Brass 

Foundry, dwl 528J Tehama 
Bearwald George, expresswagon, NE cor Kearny 

and Post, dwl 115 Dora 
Bearwald Jacob, printer with Edward Bosqui &. 

Co., dwl 115 Dora 
Bearwald Tobias, furs, 104 Kearny, dwl 528* Te- 
hama 
Beasley William, laborer, dwl SW cor P and Thir- 
teenth Avenue, South S. F. 
Beath J. M., civil engineer, dwl 527 Post 
Beaton Angus, shipwright, dwl 129 Tehama 
Beaton John, carpenter with Middlemas & Boole 
Beaton Peter, shipcarpenter with Middlemas & 

Boole, dwl 129 Tehama 
Beatteay James, carpenter, dwl 34| Zoe 
Beatty David, carpenter, dwl N s Pine »r Steiner 
Beatty Henry, waiter with E. J. Foster 
Beatty Hugh, hackdriver with Bouton & Sou, dwl 

14 John 
Beatty John, gardener Industrial School 
BEATTY JOHN, Patcbeu Stables, 38 Sixth, dwl 

473 Jessie 
Beatty L., dwl What Cheer House 
Beatty Patrick, foreman mattressmaker with N. P. 

Cole & Co., dwl 531 O'Farrell 
Beatty Samuel, bootmaker with Buckingham & 

Hecht, dwl 5 Oak 
Beatty Samuel G., (Gunnison & B.J attorney-at- 

law, office 604 Merchant, dwl SE cor Ellis and 

Mason 
Beauchamp Frederick, clerk with Thomas Collin- 

son, dwl 14 Lafayette 
Beauchamp Julia Mrs., dwl Sacramento bet Fill- 
more and Webster 
Beauchamp Stephen, varnisher with P. Liesenfeld, 

dwl 541 Market 
Beauchamp Stephen, upholsterer, dwl 227 Second 
Beaujardin, Theodore G., teacher music, dwl 823 

Broadway 
Beaumont Charles A., liquor saloon, SE cor Fourth 

and Bryant 
Beaumont Henry, attorney-at-law, office 712 Mont 



Beaumont W. H, laborer Pacific Rolling Mill, dwl 

Potrero Point 
Beauregard John, laborer with Graves & Co., W s 

Long Bridge 
Beauregard Napoleon, machinist Pacitic Rolling 

Mill, dwl cor Shasta and Michigan 
Beaver George W., mining, office 414 California, 

res Oakland 
Beaver Samuel E., assistant cashier U.S. Assistant 

Treasurer, dwl 246 Third 
Bebau Michael, tailor, dwl 1817 Kearny 
Behau Rocco, restaurant, dwl 1311 Kearny 
Bebergall Jacob, salesman with Gustave Baum, 

dwl 740 Washington 
Bebo Thomas, (BnltJirtzard & Bebo) dwl E s Mis- 
sion nr Twenty-fourth 
Becher Henry, cook Russ House, dwl S s Ash nr 

Buchanan 
Bechler Joseph, driver with Dewing, Palmer & 

Oakley, dwl 119 Commercial 
Bechtel Max, bookkeeper with Kleinclaus, Fauss 

& Co., dwl 835 Clay 
Bechtulf Michael, carpenter, dwl 524 Bryant 
Beck Adolphus G., accountant and teacher book- 
keeping, 432 Montgomery 
Beck Anthony H, musician, dwl 809 Union 
Beck August, cook, dwl S s Francisco bet Stockton 

and Dupout 
Beck Bartholomew, dwl 1407 Stockton, rear 
Beck Charles, laborer, dwl NE cor Francisco and 

Larkin 
Beck David S., merchandise broker, dwl 18 Stanly 

Place 
Beck David S. Jr., clerk with Jones & Co., dwl 18 

Stanly Place 
Beck Eugene B., salesman with Jones & Co., dwl 

38 Stanly Place 
Beck Francis E., salesman, 524 Mkt, dwl 432 Mont 
Beck George, machinist Uniou Iron Works, dwl 

668 Mission 
Beck Henry, tanner, dwl San Bruno Road nr Four 

Mile House 
Beck Henry, whitener, dwl Hotel Rhein 
Beck Henry, (Dielle & B.J dwl 417 Sutter, rear 
Beck Jacob, bricklayer, dwl 531 Seventeenth 
Beck Jacob, wines and liquors, 65 Fourth, dwl 726 

Vallejo 
Beck James G., housepainter and whitener, 351 

Jessie 
Beck John, brewer Philadelphia Brewery, dwl 228 

Second 
Beck John, laborer, dwl S s Twentieth nr Harrison 
Beck John, saloon, 810 Clay 
Beck John P., shoecutter with Orrin Jones, dwl 418 

Mission 
Beck Mary, (colored), dwl 139 Spear 
Beck Nathaniel A., tannery, SE cor Nineteenth and 

Folsom 
Beck Nicholas P., local policeman, and boardingand 

lodging, 156 Stewart 
Beck William, tinsmith with J. Armstrong, dwl N 

E cor Spear and Howard 
Beck William J., cook, dwl 8 Lick 
BeckedortfG. H. C, dwl 38 Russ 
Becker Albert, mason, dwl 20 Jansen 
BECKER BROTHERS, (Charles H. % DiedrichJ 

groceries, SE cor Turk aud Larkin 
Becker Caspar, tannery, San Bruno Roadnr Twen- 
ty-eighth 
Becker Casper, (Becker & EngelhardtJ dwl cor Ivy 

Avenue and Buchanan 
Becker Charles, carpenter, dwl 39 Jackson 
Becker Charles H., (Becker Bros. J dwl SE cor 

Turk and Larkin 
Becker Diedrich, (Becker Bros. J dwl SE cor Turk 

aud Larkin 
Becker Frank, porter, 21 Battery, dwl Pacific nr 

Leavenworth 
Becker Frederick W., cigars and tobacco, 705 Davis 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street, Straw Hats and Trimmii.fea. 



W ATKINS' YO-SEMITE ART GALLERY, 26 Montg. St., opp. Lick House Entrance. 



92 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY 



Becker Frederick W., foreman City Paving Co., 

dwl 112 Silver 
Becker George, saloonkeeper, dwl 1320 Stockton 
Becker George J., liquor saloon, SW cor Fourth and 

Berrv 
Becker Henry, (Becker 8? Jacoby ) dwl 725 liar 
Becker Joseph, china and glassware, SW cor Du- 

pont and Sutter 
Becker Joseph, sawyer with Hohbs, Giltnore & Co., 

dwl Hi Hinckley 
Becker Jost, special policeman, dwl Hinckley Place 
Becker Louis, baker with Adam Winkle, dwl 715 

Pacific- 
Becker Lnka, waiter with Boghiscich &. Brown, 

506 Washington 
Becker Martin H. W., clerk with H. Doscher & 

Co.. dwl 225 Fifth 
Becker Moritz, furrier, 185 Jessie 
Becker Nicholas, porter with Rothschild & Ehrenp- 

fort, dwt NE cor Gough and O'Farrell 
Becker Otto F., (Bitter & B.J dwl Prescott House 
Becker Peter, shoemaker, 1105 Dupont, dwl 515 

Green 
Becker I'eter, (Fisert & B.J dwl 234 Sutter 
Becker Philip, saloon, 910 Kearny 
Becker William, willowbasketmaker, SE cor Post 

aa<l Kearny, dwl cor Pine and Quincy 
Becker William, (Becker & Go. J dwl 1U2 Mission 
Becker &, Co., i William Becker and Peter Miller) 

groceries and liquors, 100 Mission 
Becker & Engelhardt, (G. Becker and W. Engel- 

It'inlt) proprietors Capital Saloon, NW cor Pine 

and Kearny 
Becker & Jacoby, (Henry Becker and Julius Ja- 
coby) dry goods, 348 Third 
Becket Solomon, (colored) cook with P. M. S. S. 

Co., dwl 161 Perry 
Beckett Henry, backdriver Sander's Hotel 
Beckhusen Henry G., with Henry Voirath, dwl 4 

Willi. i m 
Beckler John C, (Bavmeister & Go. J dwl 528 Bush 
Beckman August, boatman, dwl 39 Jackson 
Beckman Frederick, beersaloon, 138 Fourth 
Beckman Frederick, foreman with W. G. Weir, 

dwl 8 Folk 
Beckman Frederick", seaman, dwl 103 Sacramento 
Beckman John, butcher, dwl Fifth Avenue bet K 

ami L, South S. P. 
Beckmann Enos, clerk with Richard Draper, dwl 

139 Market 
Beckmann Jacob, showcasemaker with Teubner & 

Hoffman, dwl 139 Minna 
Beckmann J. N., (Beckmann & Thorn Wohrden) 

dwl Grant Avenue nr Mission 
Beck ni;. nn John, groceries and liquors, 512 Geary 
Beckmann Peter W., clerk with F. Joost, dwl NE 

cor Twenty -sixth and Mission 
Beckmann William, clerk with Matthias Wilkins, 

dwl NE cor Chestnut and Mason 
Beckmann & Thorn Wohrdeu. (J. N. Beckmann 

and H. Thorn Wohrden) groceries and liquors, 

cor Minna and Ninth 
Beckwith James, teamster with S. F. Transfer Co., 

dwl 350 Jessie 
Beckwith J. C, carpenter with P. M. S. S. Co. 
Beckwith John W., policeman City Hall, dwl 505 

Tehan a 
Beckwith Seth L., (Beckwith & Vice) dwl 105 

Hives 
Beckwith & Vice, (Seth L. Beckwith and Thomas 

Vice J hoatbuilders, N s Clark bet Druuim and 

Davis 
Bedarf Ferdinand, laborer, dwl Jefferson nr Gov- 
ernment. Reservation 
Bedell William, engineer Risdon Iron Works, dwl 

Es Mission Avenue nr Seventeenth 
Bedford John, seaman stmr Salinas, Wash St Wharf 
Bee Barlow B., miner, dwl 12 Jessie bet Seventh 

and Eighth 



Bee Emil, (Bee Freres J dwl 1133 Dupont 

Bee Freres. (Emil and Theodore) merchant tailors, 

1133 Dupont 
Bee F. A. Col., office 414 Market, dwl Lick House 
Bee F. M., student Heald's Business College, dwl 

521 Folsom 
Bee Julius F., hardware, 340 Third 
Bed Louisa S. Mrs., adjuster U. S. B. Mint, dwl cor 

Market and Eliis 
Bee Theodore, (Bie Freres) dwl 1133 Dupont 
Bee Theodore C, messenger Mayor's otiice, dwl 

528 Broadway 
Beeban Isaac, porter, dwl 1000 Pacific 
Beebe George W., packer with Cutting & Co., dwl 

632 Minna 
Beebe J. J., printer, dwl 411 Sansom 
Beebe Joseph, dentist, dwl 2? Minna 
Beebe Robert F., patternmaker Golden State Iron 

Works, dwl 71 Natoma 
Beebe Ruth, (widow) dwl 1410 Pine 
Beebe Wallis, dentist, dwl 71 Natoma 
Beebe Wdliam S., packer with Cutting & Co., dwl 

3 Buchanan Place 
Beebee Georgiana L., (widow) dwl 20 Hawthorne 
Beecher Albert, lastmaker with Joseph Leveque, 

dwl 274 Minna 
Beecher Henrv, cook Russ House 
Beeching Robert, general agent California Prison 

Commission, 302 Montgomery, dwl 1016 Taylor 
Beedy W. P., carpenter H. C. League, 128 Kearny 
Beeaau Louise Miss, chambermaid Occidental Hotel 
Beenau Edward, trackman Market Street R. R. 
BEEHIVE BUILDING, NE cor Wash and Dup 
Beekinan Charles W., seaman, dwl 49 Sacramento 
Beer Gottlieb, bookkeeper with Weil & Co., dwl 

1024 Lark in 
Beer Julius, ( Weil & Co.) res New York 
Beermann Louis, boarding and lodging, W s Long 

Bridge 
Beers Herbert M., (H. M. Beers & Go. J dwl 716 

Howard 
Beers H. M. & Co., (Duncan D. Maynard) manu- 
facturers and retail boots and shoes, 238 Kearny 

and 720 Market 
Beers John B., dentist, office 109 Montgomery, dwl 

437 Tyler 
Beers John H., carpenter H. C. League, 1 28 Kearny 
Beers W., carpenter H. C. League, 128 Kearny 
Beeson Frederick P., drayman with J. M. Goewey 

& Co., dwl S s Pine bet Fillmore and Sterner 
Beevan Isaac, porter 421 Sacramento 
Beez Frederick, (Beez <$• De Longe) dwl 708 

Pine i 
Beez & De Longe, (Frederick Beez and John B. 

De Longe) shoemakers. 315 Bush 
Beffa Angelo, liquor saloon. 930 Kearny 
Begen Joseph, clerk with T. H. Hatch' &. Co., dwl 

W s Polk nr Clay 
Beggs Henry, bookkeeper S. F. Gas Co., dwl 847 

Howard 
Beggs James, engineer S. F. Gas Co., dwl 817 How 
Beggs Thomas, pipelayer S. F. Gas Co., dwl 122 

William 
Begley James, laborer, dwl 1 Lick 
Begley Peter, laborer, dwl 304 Beale 
Begner J. Alfred, sign and ornamental painter, 230 

Mission 
Begne Bidau Joseph, real estate, dwl 924 Dupont 
Beguelin Henry, machinist, dwl 059 Market 
Beguhl Adolph, painter, dwl cor California Avenue 

and Montcalm, B. H. 
Behan James, painter, dwl N s Twenty third nr 

Columbia 
Behan James G. compositor Morning Bulletin, dwl 

N s Minna nr Second 
Behan John, butcher with David L. McPherson, 

dwl 6 Geneva 
Behan Timothy, barkeeper, cor Fourth and How- 
ard, dwl 803 Howard 



HUNTINGTON, HOPKINS & CD., Importers Hardware and Iron, Cor. Bush and Market. 



C. P. VAN" SCHA.S.CK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Trunks and Valises. 



SAN FRANCISCO [BJ DIRECTORY 



93 



Behlow Charles J., (H. Liebes <$• Co.) dwl 810 

Filbert 
Behlow Emil, furcutter with H. Liebes & Co., 

dwl 810 Filbert 
Behlow William, upholsterer with Plum, Bell & 

Co. 21 Post 
Behm William, seaman, dwl 37 Pacific 
Behn Walter, bookkeeper with Taylor & Bendel, 

dwl 632 Broadway 
Behnemann D., dwl 333 Bush 
Behnemann Henry, (Behnemann Sf Co.) dwl SW 

cor Taylor & O'Farrell 
BEHNEMANN & CO., (Henry Behnemann and 

E mil Schneider) groceries aud liquors, SW cor 

Taylor and O'Farrell 
Behnke John, cabinetmaker, dwl 909 Folsom 
Behnken John, expressman, dwl W s South Park Av 
Behr Herman H., physician, office 040 Market, dwl 

646 Bryant 
Behr John, clerk with Nicholas Bruns, 617 Davis 
Behr Otto, porter with Henry Brickwedel & Co., 

dwl 213 Minna 
Behre Frederick, laborer with Spruance, Stanley 

& Co., dwl 418 Larkin 
Behre Robert L., clerk with Doyle & Barber, dwl 

E s Larkin nr Turk 
Behrendt H. & Co., ( Michael Long) trunkmakers, 

King bet Third and Fourth, salesroom 51 i Mkt 
Behrendt Herman, (H. Behrendt Sf Co.) dwl J 432 

Pine 
Behrens D., laborer, dwl NW cor Eighth and Bryt 
Behrens Dietrich, su^arbaker Cal. Sugar Retinery, 

dwl W s Decatur bet Seveuth aud Eighth 
Behrens Edward, tailor, dwl 11 Pacific 
Behrens George II., cigars and tobacco. 3 Third, dwl 

333 Sixth 
Behrens H. C. F., physician, office 605 Clay, dwl 

235 Seventh 
Behrens James, importer wines and commission 

merchant, office 122 California, dwl 89 Chestnut 
Behrens Johannes, boatman, dwl 39 Jackson 
Behrens John F., barkeeper, 44 Steuart 
Behrens John G.. cabinetmaker with Goodwin & 

Co., dwl 1227 Dupout 
Behrens Joseph, groceries and liquors, SE cor Turk 

and Polk 
Behrens T., dwl 218 Pacific 
Behrens William, shipchandler, dwl 785 Folsom 
Behrens — see Beirins v 

Behring William, conductor, dwl Mont House 
Behrle Louis, laborer, dwl 433 Broadway 
Behrle Louis, engineer with Bavaria Brewery, dwl 

620 Vallejo 
Behrmann Frederick, bakery, 336 Third 
Behrmann Henry, cabinetmaker with L. & E. 

Emanuel, dwl 208 Tehama 
Behrmann Mary Mrs., midwife, dwl 2G8 Tehama 
Beier Henry, clerk with Casper Dix, dwl NE cor 

Filbert and Fillmore 
Beighle George, clerk with Schlueter & Volberg, 

dwl 708 Pine 
Beilhes John, hairdresser with Frank Lacua, 532 

Jackson 
Bein Joseph, real estnte, dwl Montgomery House 
Beine John, laborer California Sugar Refinery, 

dwl cor Eighth and Brannan 
Beinert David, boots and shoes, N s Sixteenth bet 

Valencia and Mission 
BEIRXE PATRICK, proprietor Empire Hotel, 311 

and 313 Pacific 
Beirs Charles, harnessmaker. dwl Niantic Hotel 
Beisel Jacob, tannery, E s Mississippi nr Mariposa 
Beisuer Herman, seaman, dwl 238 Steuart 
Bejar Concepcion, fruits aud confectionery, 145 Post 
Bek Jacob, wines and liquors, 524 Commercial, dwl 

720 Vallejo 
Bekeart Frank, tinsmith with John G- Lacy, dwl 

340 Third 
Bekmann John, dwl 1432 Stockton, rear 



Belan Otto, candymaker with Rotger & Weber, dwl 

1317 Kearny 
Belando John, "laborer with Belando & Ca, dwl 

1208 Powell 
Belando Peter, {Belando & Co.) dwl 1208 Powell 
Belando ifc Co., ( Peter Belando and Manuel Mor- 

tie) wood and coal, 1210 Powell 
Belasco Abram, trader, dwl 174 Clara 
Belbeck Henry T., carpenter, dwl What Cheer 

House 
Belcher Frederick P., drayman with Francis Till- 
man, res Oakland 
Belcher Robert H., expresswagon, 538 California, 

dwl KU5 Union 
BELCHER SILVER MINING CO., (Gold Hill, 

Nev.) office 419 California 
Belcour Jules, chancellor with Consul-general of 

Fiance, dwl 427 Grove 
Belden Edwin S., shorthand reporter with Marsh & 

« ts'oounie, res Oakland 
Belden F. C, liquorbroker, dwl 725 California 
Belden Henry K., bookkeeper Hartford Fire Ins. 

Co., dwl 321 Geary 
Belden Joseph W., bookkeeper Odd Fellows' Sav- 
ings Bank, dwl 1020 Geary 
Belden Josiah, real estate, office 523 Montgomery, 

res San Jose 
Belden M. S., (widow J dressmaker, dwl 312 Post 
Beldon E. Mrs., dressmaker, dwl 400 Geary 
Belding John, bricklayer, dwl Ss Twentieth nr Fol 
Belding Orin, mining, dwl 105 Mason 
Belduke Joseph, blacksmith, dwl 25 Ellis 
Belender Charles, foreman varnisher with George 

O. Whitney & Co., dwl 110 Turk 
Belexon John, sailmaker, dwl 6 Moise 
Beley Jacob, teamster, dwl Greenwich nr Pierce 
BelfilsPeter, laborer with G. Venard, dwl 625 Front 
Belgrave Richard B., receiver N. B. <& M. R. R., 

dwl 733 Harrison 
Belin Anna Miss, dressmaker, dwl 810 Washington 
Belinge F. A. A., resident physician St. Mary's 

Hospital 
Belknap David P., ( Winans & B.) attorney at law, 

office 604 Merchant, dwl 428 Sutter 
BELL ALEXANDER D., Secretary Pacific Pneu- 
matic and Metropolitan Gas Cos, office 304 

Piue, dwl 1102 Taylor 
Bell Amorv F., (Mitchell & B.) dwl S s Sacramento 

bet Steiner and Pierce 
Bell Charles, seaman, dwl 504 Davis 
Bell Charles, waiter Grand Hotel 
Bell Charles H., porter, 509 Sacramento, dwl E s 

Fifth nr Folsom 
Bell Daniel P., entry clerk with Tobin, Davissou 

& Co. 
Bell David, machinist yEtna Iron Works, dwl 

214 First 
Bell David B., fish, 32 Grand Central Market, dwl 

502 Stevenson 
Bell F. A. Mrs., dwl Grand Hotel 
Bell F. Vinton, bookkeeper with G. M. Josselyn & 

Co., dwl 1721) Turk 
Bell George H.. (Bell & Co.) dwl NE cor Mont- 
gomery and Broadway 
Bell George W., (colored) porter, dwl 1407 Mason 
Bell H., carpenter, dwl 22 Turk 
Bell Hannah, (widow) dressmaker, dwl 530 Third 
Bell Henry, gasfitter, dwl W s Seveuth bet Brannan 

aud Townsend 
Bell Henry, porter with Jacob Schreiber, dwl 521 

Turk 
Bell Henry, waiter Grand Hotel 
Bell Henry S., dwl N s Greenwich nr Polk 
BELL JAMES, (Falkner.B.& Co.) ree London 
Bell James, seaman bark Amethyst. Rincon Wharf 
Bell James H., (colored) hairdresser, dwl 518 

Powell, rear 
Bell James R., propertyman Bella Union Theater, 

dwl cor Kearny and Broadwav 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street, Laces and Embroideries. 



WATKINS' YO-SEMITE ART GALLERY, 26 Montg. St., opp. Lick House Entrance. 



94 



SAN FRANCISCO [ B ] DIRECTORY. 



Bell Jennie Miss, teacher Eighth Street Primary 

School 
Bell John, [Plum, B. & Co.) dwl Occidental Hotel 
Bell John, plumber with J. H. O'Brien & Co., dwl 

30 Post 
Bell John, sail maker, dwl Es Jones bet Clay and 

Sacramento 
Bell John B.j hairdresser with George Held, dwl 

227 Second 
BELL JOHN C, carpets, upholstery and furniture 

ware-rooms, .5:24 Market, and 21 Sutter, dwl 50:2 

Greenwich 
Bell John I)., driver Central R. R., dwl 421 Sixth 
Bell John P., attorney at law, office 609 Sacra- 

mento, dwl 138 Seventh 
Bell John S., stockraiser, dwl 810 Greenwich 
Bell John W., clerk New York department Wells, 

Fargo & Co.'s Express, dwl 508 Third 
Bell Joseph W.j clerk, dwl 514 Stockton 
Bell Lizzie Mrs., dwl 325J, Bush 
Bell Maria W. Mrs., dwl 514 Stockton 
Bell Otto, roofer, cor Fourth and Market, dwl 512 

Fourth 
Bell Peter, painter, dwl 163 Jessie 
BELL PHILIP A., (colored) editor and proprietor 

Elevator, office and dwl 616 Battery 
Bell Robert, hay and grain, and wood and coal, 

917 Market, dwl Eddy bet Filmoreand Steiner 
Bell Robert, seaman, dwl 112 Stewart 
Bell Samuel L., carpenter H. C. League, 128 

Kearny 
BELL THOMAS, (Barron & (Jo.) dwl 606 Stock 
Bell Thomas, laborer with Whitney & Freese 
Bell Thomas, longshoreman, dwl W s Gilbert nr 

Bryant 
Bell Thomas, porter, 112 Sanson), dwl 11 Garden 
Bell Thomas, seaman, dwl S s Clark nr Drunim 
Bell W. A., engineer with S. F. Laundry Associa- 
tion, dwl N\V cor Fillmore and Turk 
Bell William, carpenter with P. M. S. S. Co. 
Bell Willi uii, carrier Evening Post, dwl 506 Mkt 
Bell William, clerk with Cutting & Co., dwl 141 

Natoma 
Bell William, laborer with P. M. S. S. Co. 
Bell William, machinist Union Iron Works, dwl 

10| Zoe 
Bell William, seaman brig Tanner, pier 17 Stenart 
Bell William, shipcarpenter, dwl II s Greenwich nr 

Polk 
Bell William, shipcarpenter, dwl E s Kentucky nr 

Napa 
Bell William, stonecutter, dwl 728 Market 
Bell William H., news depot, 4 Sixth, dwl 519 

Stevenson 
Bell William H., State stamp inspector, office 321 

California, dwl 514 Valencia 
Bell & Company, (George H. Bell) books, stationery 

ami periodicals, 639 Kearny 
Bella Felix, carpenter, dwl 12 Lewis 
Bella Union Theater, Samuel Tetlow proprietor, 

803 and 805 Kearny 
Bellamler Erric, silversmith with Koehler & Ritter 
Belle Edward O., dentist, office and dwl 408 Pine 
Belle Vne House, lOlS Stockton 
Bellemere Adolphus, varnisher with Christian 

Sohreiber & Co., dwl 111 Powell 
Bellemere Augustus/ Fronlier&B.) dwl 410 Kearny 
Bellermann Emil, clerk with Jacob Gundlach & 

Co., res Oakland 
Belleville Jean, newspaper carrier, dwl 734 Vallejo 
Bellevue M. Co., (Placer Co.) office 409 Cali- 
fornia 
Belle w Henry J., tanner, dwl Ws Folsom bet Fif- 
teenth and Sixteenth 
Bellevv George, capitalist, dwl 773^ Folsom 
Bellew James H., upholsterer with Goodwin & 

Co., dwl 17 Ohio 
Bellew John, boarding, 17 Ohio 
Belliere Eugene Madame, (widow) dwl 232 Post 



Bellingall Peter W., deputy surveyor Port San 
Francisco, res Oakland 

BELLINGHAM BAY COAL CO., P. B. Corn- 
wall, agent, E s Spear bet Folsom and Harrison 

Bellingham Robert, shoemaker with M. Gueriu & 
Son, dwl Ns Vallejo bet Leavenworth and Hyde 

Bellisle Francis N., foreman carpenter S. P. R. R., 
dwl W s Bryant bet Twenty-fourth and Twenty- 
fifth 

Bellman Vincent, ropemaker San Francisco Cord- 
age Factory, dwl E s Tenn bet Sierra and Nev 

Bellnier Frederick, dwl 723 Natoma 

Bellmer John H. C, (Fletcher & B.) dwl 38 
Ellis 

Bellnow Louis, roofer, and extraman Engine Co. 
No. 3, S.F.F.D., dwl S s Sutter nr Jones 

Belloc Benjamin, ( Belloc Freres) res Paris 

BELLOC FRERES, (Irence and Benjamin) bank- 
ers, and agents General Transatlantic Co., 524 
Montgomery 

Belloc Hypolvte, clerk with Belloc Freres, dwl Oc- 
cidental Hotel 

Belloc Irence, (Belloc Freres) res Paris 

Bellov Peter, seaman, dwl 37 Pacific 

Bellows Edward St. John, bookkeeper U. S. Assist- 
ant Treasurer's office, dwl 28 Stanlv Place 

Bellows Henry N., purser P. M. S. S. "Co., dwl 28 
Stanly Place 

Bellville Eli, broommaker with Van Laak & Gilles- 
pie, dwl 456 Natoma 

Bells Philip, waiter, dwl 304 Third 

Belodo Victoriano B., porter with Bross & Dittes, 
dwl 317' Union 

Belson F. P., truckman, 411 Front, dwl Pine bet 
Fillmore and Steiner 

Belstedt John, engineer California Sugar Refinery, 
dwl W s Decatur bet Bryant and Brannan 

Belt Alfred M., freight clerk North Pac. Trans. Co. 
S.S. John L. Stephens 

Belt Thomas W., bookkeeper Brooklyn Hotel 

Belton Philip M., clerk S. F.& P. Sugar Refinery, 
dwl Ss Sheridan nr Tenth 

Belus T. A., laborer, dwl 132 Steuart 

Belz John, tailor, bds 333 Bush 

Bemas James, magazine keeper California Powder 
Works, bds 421 Bush 

Bemis Charles C, U. S. Inspector Boilers, office 11 
U.S. Court Building, dwl 449 Bryant 

Benard Auguste F., liquors and cigars, NE cor Fifth 
and Howard 

Benchel Gottlieb, tailor, dwl 1718 Mason 

Benchlev Frederick P., bookkeeper Pacific Oil and 
Lead Works, dwl 1019 California 

BENCHLEY L. B., vice-president Pacific Rolling 
Mill Co., office 3 Front, dwl 1019 California 

Bend Stephen, laborer Cal. P. R. R. Co.'s steamer 
Sacramento 

Bendel Hermann, (Taylor & B.) dwl 1024 Stockton 

Benden Harriet C (widow) furnished rooms, 233 
Sixth 

Bender A. S., civil engineer, dwl 137 Montgomery 

Bender Charles, importer and dealer leather and 
shoe findings, 132 Sutter 

Bender Jacob A., bricklayer, dwl 1413 Clay 

Bender Joseph, bricklayer Bricklayers' Protective 
Association, 234 Sutter 

Bender Josiah P., bricklayer, dwl 40 Clarence 
Place 

Bender Louis, cook Muh's Hotel, dw 7 l 433 Bdwy 

Bender William, pantryman Lick House 

Bendit Benno, hairdresser witu Edouart Wrede, 
dwlllOSDupont 

Bendit Herman, firemarshal policeman, dwl 1025 
Dupont 

Bendit Isaac, (H. Isaac & Co. J dwl 533 Tehama 

Bendit Samuel, furniture, 1019 Dupont, and clerk 
with Goodwin & Co., dwl 1025 Dupont 

Bendt William, barkeeper, dwl 129 Jackson 

Benedict Charles V., clerk, dwl 521 Stevenson 



HUNTINGTON, HOPKINS & CO., Wholesale Hardware and Iron, Cor. Bush and Market. 



C. P. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708. 712, 714 & 716 Kearny St., Rubber Goods and Umbrellaa 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY 



95 



Benedict Clarence W., clerk with Sumner Whitney, 

dwl 113 Page 
Benedict Cornelius W., musician, dwl 521 Stev 
Benedict Courtlaud S., (Benedict & Go.) dwl W b 

Valencia bet Fourteenth and Fifteenth 
Benedict, Jacob, refiner S.F. Assaying and Refining 

Works, dwl S s Castro bet Fifteenth and Six- 
teenth 
Benedict Max, seaman, dwl 531 East 
Benedict Newton, (Benedict & Co.) 302 Mont 
Benedict S. W., mate ship Revere, pier 9 Stewart 
Benedict William A., master mariner, dwl 521 Stev 
Benedict & Co., (Newton Benedict) insurance and 

patent agents, 302 Montgomery 
Benedict & Co., (C. 8. Benedict) gent's furnishing 

goods, 3 Second 
Beneke Diedrich, clerk with Francis Scanlin & Co., 

NE cor Jackson and Davis 
Benest John, bagsewer with Reynolds & Ford, dwl 

East bet Jackson and Pacific 
Benfield Conrad, master mariner, dwl 9 Crook 
Benliam Calhoun, attorney-atlaw, office SW cor 

Sansom and Jackson, dwl SW cor Mason and 
. O'Farrell 
Benham John A., U. S. mail agent post office, 

dwl American Exchange 
BENICIA CEMENT CO., George F. Bragg & Co. 

agents, office 116 Front 
Bening Henry, waiter, 337 Bush, dwl 5 Hardie 

Place 
Benjamin Abraham F., clerk with Jacob Benjamin, 

dwl 1355 Post 
Benjamin Charles, (colored) hairdresser P.M. S. S. 

Co., dwl 129 Silver 
Benjamin Charlotte, (widow) dwl 745 Market 
Benjamin C. V. Miss, principal Powell Street Pri- 
mary School, dwl 1107 Stockton 
Benjamin F., dwl What Cheer House 
Benjamin F. M. Miss, teacher Pine and Larkin 

Sr.reet Primary School, dwl 32 Jessie nr Seventh 
Benjamin Frederick, mining superintendent White 

Pine, office 412 California, dwl 737 Harrison 
Benjamin Frederick A., mining engineer, office 412 

California, dwl 1355 Post 
Benjamin H. A., capitalist, dwl Russ House 
Benjamin Jacob, public administrator City and 

County, office 430 California, dwl 1355 Post 
Benjamin Joseph R., laborer, dwl 227 Second 
Benjamin Lambert, clerk, res Oakland 
Benjamin Lucien, jobber, dwl 9 John 
Benjamin Moses H., stockbroker, office 430 Cali- 
fornia, dwl 1355 Post 
Benjamin Myers, tailor, 204 Brannan 
Benjamin Orson O, clerk Security Life Ins. Co., 

dwl 32 Jessie bet Seventh and Eighth 
Benjamin Thaddeus, clerk with Jacob Benjamin, 

dwl 1355 Post 
Benjamin William, cabinetmaker with N. G. Nor- 

den. dwl 412 Post 
Benjamin William K., (Waters & Co.) dwl 32 

Jessie bet Seventh and Eighth 
Benkelmann Adam, liquor saloon, cor Railroad Av- 
enue and N, dwl N s Fifteenth Avenue bet P 

and Q, South S. F. 
Benker Christopher, watchman S. F. Stock Brew- 
ery, dwl 1 Chestnut Alley 
Benn George, teamster with James Dunn, dwl 117 

Bernard 
Benn James, maltster, dwl 209 Eighth 
Benn Thomas, maltster, dwl 209 Eighth 
Benn Thomas, porter, dwl 9 Garden 
Benn Walter, miller, dwl 409 Fourth 
Benn William, shipping clerk, dwl 141 Natoma 
Benner Frederick, shoemaker, dwl 255 Clemen, 

tin a 
Benner Frederick M., melter U. S. B. Mint, res 

Oakland 
BENNER GEORGE L., boatbuilder, 12 Howard, 

dwl 324 Beale 



Bennerscheidt Bruno, brassfinisber Union Brass 

Foundry, dwl 111 Natoma 
Bennerseheidt Charles, brassfinisber Union Brass 

Foundry, dwl 535 Folsom 
Bennet Antonio, goldbeater, dwl 508 Mission 
Bennet Charles A., clerk with Henry W. Bennet, 

21 Third 
BENNET HENRY W., apothecary, 21 Third 
Bennet James, carpenter, dwl 563 .Mission 
Bennet Samuel, laborer, dwl 1336 Pacific 
Bennett Alfred, (Bennett.& Co.) dwl 452 Sixth 
Bennett Alfred E., carpenter Enterprise Planing 

Mil], dwl 1119 Leavenworth 
BENNETT ALVIN P., agent S. B. Whipple, 

office 315 Mission, bds Grand Hotel 
Bennett C. D., bookkeeper California Trust Co., 

dwl 118 Post 
Bennett Charles, bookkeeper, dwl 783 Market 
Bennett Edward, dwl 23 Kearny 
Bennett Fred., Riggers' and Stevedores' Ass'n, 429 

Pacific 
Bennett Frederick, groceries and liquors, NW cor 

Welsh and Zoe 
Bennett George, bookkeeper, dwl 516 Filbert 
Bennett George, boxmaker, Union Box Factory, 

dwl 1310 Montgomery 
Bennett George W., salesman, 26 Kearny, dwl 222 

Minna 
Bennett George W., shoecutter with Orriu Jones, 

dwl 216 Dupont 
Bennett Gilbert L., tinsmith, dwl 613J Stockton 
Bennett H. Mrs., teacher music, dwl 452 Sixth 
Bennett H. C, U.S. Pension Agent and secretary 

Chinese Protection Society, uffice 423 Wash- 
ington, dwl 1108 Clay 
Bennett Henry, (Bennett & Co.) dwl 152 Sixth 
Bennett Herbert W., teacher music, dwl 731 Cal 
Bennett James, seaman, dwl 32 Stewart 
Bennett James C., {Bennett & Go.) dwl Es Iowa nr 

Mariposa 
Bennett John, carpenter H. C. League, 128 Kearny 
Bennett John R., porter with T. H. Hatch & Co., 

dwl 1310 Montgomery 
Bennett Joseph, California Dry Dock Co., Hunter's 

Point 
Bennett Mary, (widow) laundry, 555 Bryant 
Bennett Mary E. Miss, teaclier Valencia Street 

Grammar School, dwl Folsom bet Nineteenth 

and Twentieth 
Bennett Miles W., bookkeeper U. S. Assistant 

Treasurer's office, dwl 611 Folsom 
Bennett Morris, laborer, dwl 1606 Bush 
Bennett Morris, laborer, dwl Fort. Point 
Bennett Nathaniel, attorney-at-law, office 605 Clay, 

dwl 831 Howard 
Bennett N. T., master steamship Moses Tavlor U. 

S. N. Z. & A. M. S. S. line 
Bennett O. D., carpenter H. C. League, 128 

Kearny 
Bennett Peter B., fish, 31 and 32 Washington Mar 

ket, dwl 715 Vallejo 
BENNETT R. H. &. CO., commission merchants, 

304 Davis 
Bennett Robert H., {E. H. Bennett & Co.) res 

Oakland 
Bennett Samuel Jr., bookkeeper, dwl E 8 Mission 

bet Sixteenth and Seventeenth 
Bennett Stephen, housemover with John Mablstedt 

& Co., dwl 357 Mission 
Bennett Thomas, barkeeper with John Uzovich, 

NW cor Davis and Oregon 
Bennett Thomas, painter with Donovan & Hayes, 

219 Davis 
Bennett Thomas, physician, office 17 Post, dwl 716 

Pine 
Bennett William, (colored) bootblack, dwl Dupont 

nr Broadway 
Bennett William, first-assistant engineer with P. 

M. S. S. Co. 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street, Pocket Cutlery and Scissors. 



WATKINS' YO-SEMITE ART GALLERY, 26 Montg. St., opp. Lick House Entrance. 



96 



SAN FRANCISCO [H] DIRECTORY 



Bennett William, student Heald's Business College, 
dwl 5 Stockton 

Bennett William, physician, dwl 452 Sixth 

Bennett William, (Bennett & Cooksey) dwl 411 Pac 

Bennett William P., salesman, 628 Market 

Bennett & Co., [Henry and Alfred Bennett) pain- 
ters and whiteners, 225 Fifth 

BENNETT & CO., {James C. Bennett, John Tay- 
lor and Robert K. Pattridge) proprietors Pa- 
cific Glass Works, cor Iowa and Mariposa, office 
514 Washington 

BENNETT & COOKSEY, ( William Bennett and 
John A. Cooksey) liquors. 420 Pacific 

Benning Henry, waiter, dwl 153 Third 

Benoit Amadee, apprentice Union Iron Works, dwl 
631 Sacramento 

Benoit Rouget, barkeeper with Gilliat Leon, dwl 
1017 Dnpont 

Benrimo Joseph, broker, dwl 745 Clay 

Beiisabot Jacob, clerk, dwl 49 Jessie 

Bensen Henry, clerk with D. Brommer, NE cor 
Sixth and' Bryant 

Bensen Martin, driver with Henry Brader, dwl 1415 
Stockton 

Bensinger Daniel, bakery, W s Howard nr Twen- 
tieth 

BENSLEY JOHN, President Pacific Oil and Lead 
Works Co.. office 3 Front, dwl 313 Jones 

Benson Alexander, helper with Pollard & Carvill 
Manufacturing Co., dwl 813 Howard 

Benson Andrew, longshoreman, dwl W s Sansom 
bet Filbert and Greenwich 

Benson Benjamin O, pilot, dwl 1811 Leavenworth 

Benson Benjamin F. M., clerk with Samuel J. 
Clarke, Jr., dwl NW cor Stockton and Bdwy 

Benson Charles, second mate schooner Three Broth- 
ers 

Benson Charles A., master mariner, dwl 564 £ 
Bryant 

Benson George, timber receiver Central Pacific R. 
R.,dwl 28 Jessie 

Benson Henry C. Rev., editor California Christian 
Advocate, office 711 Mission, res Santa Clara 

Benson James, dwl 803 Stockton 

BENSON JAMES A., secretary Odd Fellows Sav- 
ings Bank, 325 Montgomery, dwl 622 Sixth 

Benson James A., drayman, SE cor Clay and Drumm, 
dwl 1 Dodge nr Turk 

Benson John, cook bark Whistler, 1 Howard 

Benson John, teamster with Diggins & Son, dwl Ns 
Suiter bet Oevisadero and Broderick 

Benson John, real estate, dwl 803 Stockton 

Benson Lucy, (widow) dwl 411 Powell 

Benson Peter, blacksmith with Pollard & Carvill 
Manufacturing Co., dwl Hayes Valley 

Benson Peter, seaman, dwl 12 Washington 

Benson Simon J., captain schoouer Kosta Sacra- 
mento, dwl 18 Spear 

Benson William, dwl 32 Rauscb 

Benson William H., waiter Miner's Restaurant, dwl 
257 Minna 

Bensuee John, laborer National Mill, dwl 42(5 Clem 

Bent Cornelius, clerk, dwl 240 Fremont 

Bent Edward F., cashier with Pope & Talbot, 318 
California, dwl 304 Third 

Bent James R., conductor Front Street M. & O. 
R.H., dwl 108 O'Farrell 

Bent John G., clerk with Rockwell, Cove & Co., 
dwl 304 Third 

Bent Silas E., wheelwright with Pollard & Carvill 
Manufacturing Co., dwl 741 Market 

Bent William, engineer's storekeeper P. M. S. S. 
China 

Bentham Henry, machinist Union Iron Works, dwl 
50 Clementina 

Benthock H., laborer California Sugar Refinery, 
dwl cor Eighth and Brannan 

Bentley Edward, surgeon U. S. A., Black Point 

Bentley Horace, (colored) porter, dwl 1106 Wash 



Bentley William, seaman, dwl 20 Washington 
Benten Frederick, cabinetmaker, 632-631 Third 
Benton Helen M., (widow), dwl Es Howard bet 

Twenty-fifth and Twenty-sixth 
Benton J. E. Mrs., teacher drawing City Female 

Seminary, res Oakland 
Benton Joseph A. Rev., professor Biblical literature 

Pacific. Theological Seminary, 502 Montgomery, 

dwl 1032 Pine' 
Benz John, branpacker with J. Murteristein &. Co. 
Ben zing John, bootmaker, 800 Greenwich 
Bepler Alexander, liquor saloon, 200 Fifth 
Beppler John, market, SE cor Dupont and Filbert 
Hera Antouia, furnished rooms. 55 Second 
Beran Emanuel, bootmaker, dwl 1608 Powell 
Beranger F., fireman steamer Petaluma, Vailejo St 

Wharf 
Berans Thomas, carpenter with P. M. S. S. Co. 
Berand Andrew, (Beraud Bros.) dwl 20 Third 
Beraud Brothers, ( Felix, Frank F. and Andrew) 

bakery, 26 Third 
Beraud Felix. (Berand Bros. J dwl 26 Third 
Beraud Frank F., (Berand Bros. J dwl 26 Third 
Berbora Nicholas, (Jacob Cusich <& Co. J dwl £03 

Union 
Bercher Rudolf, carpenter, dwl 1019 Market 
Berdel George, porter, dwl 112 Powell 
Berel Jacob, second hand clothing, 743 Pacific 
Bereud August, seaman, dwl 37 Pacific 
Beresford John, storekeeper Russ House 
Beretta John, apprentice machinist Union Iron 

Works, dwl 50 Clementina 
BERETTA WILLIAM, collector Italian Benevo- 
lent Society, 430 Jackson, dwl 414 Green 
Berg Carl F., physician and surgeon, office and dwl 

004 Kearny 
Berg Charles, mining, dwl 39 Jackson 
Berg Edward, waiter Martin's Restaurant, dwl 612 

California 
Beig Frederick, (Moyer & B.) dwl 452 Clementina 
Berg Hector, seaman, dwl 26 Sacramento 
Berg John, bookkeeper Frank's Saloon, dwl 816 

.Montgomery 
Berg John A., clerk with E. J. Swordstream, dwl 

358 Fourth 
Berg Julius, shoemaker with Utschig & Hanson, 

dwl 266 Stevenson 
Berg Maurice A., gilder with M.D.Nile, dwl Gerke 

Alley bet Filbert and Greenwich 
Berg R. B., seaman, dwl 12 Washington 
Berge E. O.. Riggers' and Stevedores' Ass'n,429 Pac 
Berge Erick O., groceries aud liquors, NE cor 

Green and Calhoun 
Bergen Patrick, cook with Flynn & Co., dwl N s 

Natoma nr Fifth 
Bergen T. Adrian, bookkeeper with Onesti & Biagi, 

'dwl 14(16 Powell 
Bergen Tunis, clerk, dwl 533 Geary 
Bergenham Alexander, seaman, dwl 409 Drumm 
Berger Gabriel, contractor, dwl 111 Franklin 
Berger Henry, clerk with Cantos & Hoss, dwl SW 

cor Stockton and O'Farrell 
Berger Julius, (A. Edward Cohn & Co.) dwl 225 

Montgomery 
Berger William", engineer German Hospital 
Bergerin Peter, laborer Central Pacific R. R., dwl 

■..'6 Bitch 
Bergerot John, private school, 738 Vailejo 
Bei-L'cs James, seaman ship Germauia, Rincoa Whf 
BERGGREN AUGUST, exchange broker, 336 

Montgomery, dwl 1111 Stockton 
Bergh Hector, seaman, dwl 32 Steuart 

Berghauser John, dwl NE cor Taylor aud Broadway 
Berghofer Conrad, butcher, dwl 542 Folsom 
Bergholte William, beer saloon, NW cor Fom tit and 

Mission, dwl 12S4 Fourth 
Bergiu James J., broker, dwl 1312 Jackson 
Bergin James J., soap manufacturer, dwl 2123 

Mason 



HUNTINGTON, HOPKINS & C J., Importers Hardware and Iron, Cor. Bush and Market. 



C P VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Glassware and Toys. 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY 



97 



Bergin Michael, (Bartletl. & B.J attorney at law, 

office 35 Montgomery Block, dwl 1009 Powell 
Bergin Patrick, clerk, dwl 618 Natoma 
Bergin Thomas I., {McAllisters & B.J attorney at 

"law, office 528 California 
Bergin Timothy, hostler with P. Farrell 
Bergin William, tailor, dwl 537 Mission 
Bergin — See Bergen 
Bergmann Abraham, confectioner with Schroder & 

Albrecht, dwl 1107 Pacific 
Bergmann Jacob, bookkeeper, 21 Battery, dwl 759 

Clay 
Bergmann Samuel, butcher with John Robl, dwl 

331 Kearny 
BERGOLD CHARLES, Philadelphia Restaurant, 

108 Pine, dwl 90S Pine 
Ber^old Edward, clerk, 408 Pine, dwl 908 Pine 
BERGSOX OLE, carpenter and builder, 111 Leides- 

dorff, dwl 318 Fulton bet Franklin and Gough 
Bergst J. E. L., barber, 928 Market, dwl 913 Market 
Bergstedt Andrew P., shoemaker with Breeze & De 

Lont;e, dwl W s Taylor nr Post 
Bergstein Henry, medical student with Levi Lane, 

'•dwl 13-28 Polk 
Bergstein Louis, drygoods. 1328 Polk, and SE cor 

Sixth and Folsom 
Bergstrom Gustav, tailor, dwl 1118 Dupont 
Bergstrom John, organ bnilder, dwl W s Lundy 

Lane Bernal Heights 
Bering John P., salesman with J. M. Eckfeldt & Co., 

and secretary Pacific Wiie Mill, dwl 520 

Chestnut, 
Berk Maurice G., cigars and tobacco, 332 Mont- 
gomery, dwl 711 California 
Berka John, driver with Francis Korbel & Bros., 

dwl 571 Bryant 
Berke Peter, m'older, dwl 535 Howard, rear 
BERKOWITZ MEYER, manufacturer cloaks, 

mantillas, etc., 618 Kearny, dwl 18 Harriet 
Berkowitz Morris, clerk with Meyer Berkowitz, 

dwl 18 Harriet 
Berlack Morris, clerk with Solomon H.Lichtenstein, 

dwl 710 Kearny 
Berlemann Henry, second engineer steamer Pioneer, 

Jackson St Whf, dwl NVV cor Mont and Lomb 
Berlin Charles, carpenter, dwl 39 Jackson 
Berlin Patrick, cook U. S. Hotel, 304 Beale 
Berlin William, foreman with Whitney &. Freese, 

dwl XW cor Franklin and Lilly 
Berliner Abraham, tailor, dwl 20 Howard Court 
Berliner Herman N, (Diamant & B.J dwl 326 Min 
Bermann Otto, salesman, 20 Mont, dwl 119 Stock 
Bermingham Edward, compositor Examiner, dwl 

W s Montgomery bet Jackson and Kearny 
Bermingham Edmund R., clerk County Recorder's 

Office, (mid Doherty & B.J dwl SE cor San- 

som and Pacific 
Bermingham John, shipping and forwarding, office 

with John Rosenfeld, bds Russ House 
Bermingham Thomas, dwl Xew Franklin House 
Bermingham Thomas Jr., harnessmaker, dwl New 

Franklin House 
Bermister Jacob, carpenter H. C. League, 128 Kearny 
BERNA FREDKBICK, proprietor Kentucky Liv- 
ery Stables, 420 Pacilic, dwl 1715 Dupont 
Bernal Jeroniuia, (widow) real estate, dwl SE cor 

Church and Seventeenth 
Bernard Amos, carpenter and builder, 15 Priest, 

dwl 578 Union 
Bernard B., milkranch, W s San Bruno Road nr 4 

Mile House 
Bernard Bady, laborer, dwl 2219 Mason 
Bernard Barney, upholsterer with John C. Bell 
BERNARD CHARLES, coffee and spice manufac- 
turer, 707 Sansom, dwl 312 Oak 
Bernard Charles A., house and sign painter, NE cor 

Clay and Montgomery 
Bernard F., carpenter and builder, 2 Morse 
Bernard Felician, french laundry, 724 Filbert 



Bernard Florence, expressman, cor Broadway and 

Davis, dwl 149 Shipley 
Bernard Frederick, cutter California Shoe Factory, 

dwl 250 Tehama 
Bernard Isaac, varieties, N 8 Sixteenth bet Valencia 

and Mission 
Bernard J. Frank, porter, 108 San, dwl Clara Lane 
Bernard Johannah, (widow) dwl 607 Natoma, rear 
Bernard John, apprentice with Carl Hinz. dwl cor 

Seventh and Tehama x 

Bernard John, seaman, dwl 13 Oak Avenue, rear 
Bernard Jules, clerk with Mansbach & Bine, dwl 

1120 Stockton 
Bernard Julius, furniture, 1120 Stockton 
Bernard Louis, teamster, dwl 231 Second 
Bernard Mary, (widow) dwl 202 Tehama 
Bernard Michael D., porter, 210 Hat, dwl 1323 Mont 
Bernardi Maurice, waiter Campi's Restaurant, dwl 

519 Clay 
Bernardo Joachim, hairdresser, bds 116 Jackson 
Bernas Amaris, laundry, 822 Pacific 
Bernede Jule, washer Occidental Laundry, dwl 

N s Filbert bet Gough and Octavia 
Bernhamer Henry, California Market Restaurant, 

7 Summer, dwl 8 Central Place 
Bernhard Beruhard, hairdresser with John Stable, 

dw T l 215 Prospect Place 
Bernhard John J., seaman, dwl 409 Drumm 
Bernhard Samuel H., (Griffith, Ellis & B.) dwl 

462 Jessie 
Bernhofts H. S., seaman brig Hesperian, foot Fre- 
mont 
Bernis Building, 626 California 
Bernis G., proprietor California House, 626 Cal 
Bernius Frederick, special policeman, dwl 226 

Brannan 
Bernstein Abraham, expresswagon, cor California 

and Kearny 
Bernstein Bernhard, cigarmaker with William 

Seidel, dwl 17^ Fourth 
Bernstein David, tailor, 779 Folsom 
Bernstein Elias, furniture, 225 and 249 Third, dwl 

249 Third 
Bernstein Gerson, floral depot, 106 California Mar- 
ket, dwl 253 Minna 
Bernstein Henry, tailor, dwl 907 Bryant 
Bernstein Joseph, furnishing goods, 824 Market, 

dwl 117 O' Farrell 
Bernstein Julius, salesman with Louis Bernstein, 

dwl 34 Ellis 
Bernstein Julius C, expresswagon, 539 California, 

dwl 228± Perry 
Bernstein Louis, furnishing goods, 824 Market, dwl 

119 O 'Farrell 
Bernstein Louis, dry and fancy goods, 42 Fourth, 

dwl 34 Ellis 
Bernstein M. C. & Co., (WilliamL.Ryckman) fur- 
niture and bedding, 517 California 
Bernstein Morris C, (M. C. Bernstein & Co.) dwl 

626 Vallejo, rear 
Bernstein Solomon, dry goods, 1004 Stockton, dwl 

1201 Powell 
Bernzott Frank, shoemaker, 619 Post 
Bernzott Michael, butcher with F. Reinle, dwl SE 

cor Hayes and Octavia • 
Beronio G., (G. & P. Beronio) dwl 215 Broadway 
Beronio G. & P., proprietors Roma Hotel, 215 

Broadwav 
Beronio P., (G. & P. Beronio) dwl 215 Broadway 
Berr Jules, merchant, dwl Gailhard's Hotel 
Berretta Peter, fisherman, dwl 537 Vallejo 
Berry Alexander, master mariner, d\vll6Rauscb 
Berry Charles, drayman with Joseph Bunker 
Berry Daniel, laborer, dwl 316 Beale, rear 
Berry E. Mrs., clairvoyant, dwl 589 Market 
Berr'v Edward, machinehand Beale Street Planing 

Mill, dwl 435 Pine 
Berry Edward, milkranch, San Bruno Road nr 

toll gate 



JONES PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street, Best Paper and Linen Collars, 

7 



WATKINS' YO-SEMITE ART GALLERY, 26 Montg. St., opp. Lick House Entrance. 



98 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY 



Berry Edwin W., compositor Spirit of the Times, 

dwl IS First 
Berry Fulton G., (Badlam <£• B.) dwl 2212 Howard 
Berry George A. B., agent, dwl 30 O'Farrefl 
Berry George W., teaineter with Benjamin "F. Gil- 
man, dwl 22 Eleventh 
Berry (iideon M., deputy sheriff City Hall, dwl 406 

Eddy 
Berry Henry W.^mariner, dwl 109 Montgomery 
Berry House, William L. Berry proprietor, 18 First. 
Berry Isaac, (colored) jobber, dwl 13 Virginia 

Place 
Berry .fames, seaman, North Pac. Trans. Co.'s S. S 

California 
Berry James, ship carpenter, dwl 44 De Boom 
Berrv John, foreman with James Donnelly, dwl 

228 First 
Berry John, (Gviswold & B.) dwl 25 Silver 
Berry John B., laborer, dwl 814 Sansom 
Berry John D., carpenter H. C. League, 128 Kearny 
Berry Judith B. Mrs., furnished rooms, 109 Mont 
Berry Julia A. Mrs., furnished rooms, 225 Fourth 
Berry Louis, (colored) whitening, 5 Powell, dwl 2 

Virginia Place 
Berry Lucretia S., (widow) dwl 1419 Taylor 
Berry Michael, laborer with Chas. E. Haseltine 
Berry Peter, molder Empire Foundry, dwl 535 

Howard 
Berry Richard, watertender North Pac. Trans. Co.'s 

S. S. California 
Berry Susan, (colored) (widow) stewardess, dwl 

909 Washington 
Berry Thomas, carpenter California Mill, dwl 209 

Perry 
Berry Thomas, carpenter, dwl 17 Fourth 
Berry Thomas, steward North Pac. Trans. Co.'s 

S. S. John L. Stephens 
Berry Washington L., assayer, dwl 823 Mission 
Berry William, captain brig Hidalgo, pier 9 Steuart 
Berry William, cook North Pac. Trans. Co.'s S. S. 

Orizaba 
Berry William, seamau, dwl W s Drumm bet Jack- 
son and Oregon 
Berry William D., compositor Pacific Observer. 

dwl 18 First 
Berry William L., (Berry & Bushnvll) and proprie- 
tor Berrv House, 18 First 
Berry W. O". M., (Berry & Place) dwl 1716 Turk 
Berry & Bushnell, (William L. Berry ami Rev. D. 

E. Buxlniell) proprietors and publishers Pacific 
Observer, 645 Market 

BERRY & PLACE. ( W. O. M. Berry and, James 

F. Place) importers wood-working machinery, 
steam-pumps, water-wheels etc., 112 and 114 
California 

Berry man Frederick M., bookkeeper wkh William 
Kerr, dwl 704 Powell 

Berrv man Henrv, bookkeeper with James R. Dovle, 
dwl 614 O'Farrell 

Berson A. & Son, (Adolpk ami Gnsiave Berson) 
carpets and upholsterers, 712 Washington 

Berson Adolph, (A. Berson $? Son) dwl 828 
Washington 

Berson Genevieve A. Mrs., laundrv, 828 Whbq 

Berson Gustave, (A. Berson & Son) dwl 822 
Washington 

Bert Bernard, (Henry Schroder & Co.) res Bor- 
deaux, France 

Bert Edward G. Jr.. treasurer Metropolitan Theater, 
dwl Shotwell bet Twenty-first and Twenty- 
second 

Bert E. G., lessee and manager Metropolitan 
Theater, dwl 545 Minna 

Bert Frederick W. , bookkeeper Morning Call, dwl 
W s Shotwell bet Twentieth and Twenty-first 

Beit— See Burt 

Berteling Louis A., optician with Thomas House- 
worth & Co., dwl 317 Bush 

Bertels Henry, drayman, dwl 927 Greenwich 



Bertha Joseph, ice cream maker with Miley & Per- 

rin, dwl 738 Washington 
Berthelot Charles L., porter with John Flanagan 

& Co., dwl 608 Minna 
Bertheleon Charles, seaman bark Northwest, pier 

1 Steuart 
Berthier Jules, drayman, 102 Sansom, dwl 409 Turk 
Berthold Adam, teamster, dwl 825 Kearny 
Berthold Louis, butcher, 206 Broadway, dwl 329 

Broadway 
Bertin Alexander, (Berlin & Co.) dwl 1626 Stock 
Bertin & Co., (Alexander Bertin ami Henry 

Abondin) dyeing and scouring, 1626 Stock 
Bertody Charles, physician, office and dwl 1005 

Stockton 
Bertolocb Joseph, restaurant, W s Ohio nr Bdwy 
Berton Charles, machinist with Garcin & Periam, 

dwl Twenty-second nrFolsom 
BERTON FRANCIS. (Hentsch & BJand consul for 

Portugal and Switzerland, dwl Union Club 
Berton J., president Mining Bureau and vice-con- 
sul for Frai ee, office 331 Montgomery, res Sac- 
ramento City 
Bertorel Louis, fruitstand, SE cor Sac and Kearny 
Bertram F. & Co., liquor saloon, NW cor Howard 

and Steuart 
Bertram Frederick, proprietor Western House, 132 

and 134 Steuart (and F. Bertram & Co.) 
Bertram Thomas, stoves and tinware, 982 and 984 

Folsom, dwl 7 Garden 
Bertrand Alfred, barkeeper, dwl 710 Dupont 
Bertram! Alphonse, carbuiider with Kimball Manu- 
facturing Co., dwl 1030 Kearny 
Bertrand Andrew, furrier, 501 Kearny 
Bertrand Begue, (D. Sier & Co.) dwl 645 Com 
Bertrand Joseph, cook, 228 Kearny 
Bertrand Rosina, (widow) dwl 325 Jessie 
Bertz Jacob, (Baldwin, Pike & B.) dwl 308 Sutter 
Berwick Thomas, sailmaker with William C. Wood, 

dwl S s Lombard bet Leavenworth and Hyde 
Berwick W. B., watchman Moses Taylor, U. S. N. 

Z. & A. M. S. S. Line 
Berwin Henry, clerk with A. Mundt, 613 Kearny 
Berwin Morris. (P. Berwin & Bro.) res New York 
BERWIN P. & BROTHER, (Morris Berwin) 

importers and jobbers hats and caps, 106 Battery 
Berwin Pincu6, (P. Berwin & Bro.) dwl 828 

Post 
Besby Henry, saloon, dwl 343 Grove 
Besby Martin, shoemaker, dwl 909 Folsom 
Besciieiuen William, watchmaker with George C. 

Shreve & Co., dwl 832 Broadway 
Beschormanu Adolph, upholsterer with Schlueter 

& Vol berg, dwl SE cor Mason and Geary 
Beschorman Augustus H., upholsterer, dwl SE 

cor Mason and Geary 
Beschorman Otto, upholsterer, dwl SE cor Mason 

and Geary 
Beschormanu Charles, barkeeper, 501 California, 

dwl 422 Greenwich 
Besse Joseph O., salesman City of Paris, dwl 4 

Highland Terrace 
Besse Samuel H., (Fried & B.) dwl 100* Second 
Besse Seth, seaman bark Legal Tender, 27 Market 
Bessemer Henry L., chemist and perfumer, 14 

Mary 
Bessey R. W., (widow) ladies' and children's cloth- 
ing. 638 Howard 
Besson Felix, waiter, dwl 532 Merchant 
Bessor Ellen, (widow) boarding and lodging, W s 

Drumm bet Jackson and Oregon 
Best John, (Johnson & B.) dwl 1817 Leavenworth 
\W*\ Samuel, miner, dwl 650 Mission 
Best William, stairbuilder with Benjamin II. Free- 
man, dwl 516 Leavenworth 
Bester John H., Louisiana Saloon, 536 Jackson, 

dwl 3 Medau Place 
Besterfeld Oscar, ironer Occidental Laundry, dwl 
N s Filbert bet Gough and Octavia 



HUNTINGTON, HOPKINS & CO., Agents Jessop & Sons' Steel, Cor. Bush and Market. 



C. P. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Furnishing Goods, 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY 



99 



Besthorn Herman, porter, 640 Market, dwl 90 

Everett 
Beston James, nigtit watchman Metropolitan Thea- 
ter, dwl E s Drumm bet Jackson and Oregon 
Beston Thomas, hatdresser, dwl 806 Kearny 
Bestor Henry T., architect, office 328 Montgomery, 

dwl NE cor Steiuer and Pine 
Betaux Louis, foreman with Prosper May. dwl 

1018 Powell 
Betche Charles, blacksmith with John G. lis, dwl 

Hinckley nr Dupont 
Betebenna Robert, carpenter, dwl Montgomery 

House 
Betge George, laborer with Henry Bnrmeister, dwl 

507 PUbert 
Betge Robert J., bookseller, dwl Grand Hotel 
Betger Charles E., jeweler with California Jewelry 

Co., dwl 736 Green 
Betger Edward, bootmaker, dwl 740 Vallejo 
Bethel Thomas W., melter Eureka Foundry, dwl 

32 Tehama 
Betje William, captain schooner Pinole, dwl 32 Steu 
Betkowski Peter, express wagon, 300 Bush, dwl 23 

Silver, rear 
Betkowsky John, baker with E. A. Engelberg, 

dwl 418 Kearny 
Bettencourt Jose, farmhand, dwl SW cor Drumm 

and Oregon 
Bettendge James A., printer Alta California, dwl 

6-21 Howard 
Betteridge William, printer, dwl 549 Howard 
Bettinan Moses, Chemical Olive Soap Works, 

S b Brazilian nr Eighth, office 311 Commercial, 

dwl 508 Eddy 
Betts Ch., teamster Cal. Sugar Refinery, dwl cor 

Ninth and Brannau 
Betts Peter M., [Beits & Bro.) dwl 617J Minna 
Betts William M..,(Betts & Bro.) dwl 23 Jessie 
Betts <fe Brother. (William M. and Peter M. Betts) 

carriage springmakeis, 216 and 218 Fremont 
Betz Jacob, brewer with W.A.Fraederich, dwl 1428 

Mission 
Betz Joseph, cigarmaker, dwl 621 California 
Betz Peter, carpenter H. C. League, 128 Kearny 
Betzel Louis, (Betzel cy Colin J dwl 537 O'Fanell 
Betzel & Cohn, (Louis Betzel and Louis Gohn) 

manufacturers boys' clothing, 109 Sansom 
Beuchel Ernst, chainmaker with Ebeling & Schus- 

sler, dwl 1718 Mason 
Beucler Aulalie, (widow) ladies' nurse, 1717 Mason 
Beunau A. V. Miss, teacher Bush Street Cosmo- 
politan School, dwl 228 Bush 
Beutler Frank B., salesman with George W. Clark, 

dwl 12 Harlan Place 
BEUTLER JOHN B., professor music, dwl 762 

Mission 
Bevau James, waiter with John Reagan, dwl 8 

Bernard 
Bevau James O., laborer, dwl E s Treat Avenue 

bet Twenty-first and Twenty-second 
Bevans Isaac, apprentice S. F. Brush Factory, dwl 

470 Jessie 
Bevans Isaac, carpenter H. C. League, 128 Kearny 
Bevans Owen, laborer, dwl NW cor Valencia *ud 

Fourteenth 
Bevans Thomas P., druggist, dwl 1313 Vallejo 
Bevell Richard M., purser with P. M. S. S. Co., 

dwl 29 Park Avenue 
Bevens C, barkeeper, dwl SW cor Dupont and 

Broadway 
Beveridge Horatio, clerk with Falkner, Bell& Co., 

dwl 1616 Washington 
Beverson Bros., (Charles and Carsten) groceries 

and liquors, NW cor Fifth and Natoina 
Beverson Carsten, (Beverson Bros.) NW cor Fifth 

and Natoma 
Beverson Charles, (Beverson Bros ) dwl 568 Miss 
Beverson Henry, teamster witu Peter Sesser, dwl 

913 Harrison 



Bevier C, carpenter H. C. League, 128 Kearny 
Bevins William M., printer with S. F. Co-operative 

Printing Co., dwl SW cor Tyler and Webster 
Bewley William J., canvasser S. F. Directory, dwl 

43 Second 
Beyea James L., bookkeeper Pacific Iron Works, 

dwl 4 Vernon Place 
Beyer Adolph, baker with A. E. Swain, 636 Market 
Beyer Louis, hairdresser, 801 Battery, dwd 625 

Vallejo 
Beyer Louis, Jr., hairdresser with Louis Beyer, dwl 

625 Vallejo 
Beyerle John E., coppersmith with John G. lis, dwl 

700 Broadway 
Beyersdorf John, engineer steamer Monterey, 

Washington street Wharf 
Beyersdorf Louis,barkeeper 7 Merchants' Exchange, 

dwl 224 Third 
Beyersdorfer William, boottitter, dwl Rassette Place 

No. 2 
Beyreiss Godfrey, framemaker with S. & G. Gump, 

dwl Prescott House 
Bezzini Daniel, waiter Campi's Restaurant, dwl 519 

Clay 
Biagi Domenico, (Onesti & B.) dwl 923 Washington 
Bianchi Carlo, (Bianchi &, VuneoJ dwl Green bet 

Kearny and Dupont 
Bianchi Enrico, waiter Campi's Restaurant, dwl 

519 Clay 
Bianchi Eugenie, teacher music, dwl 726 California 
Bianchi Joseph B., (Joseph B. Bianchi & Co.) dwl 

5 s Polk Lane 

Bianchi Joseph B. & Co., (Se.rafino Giudici) car- 
penters and jobbers, 1214 Stockton 

Bianchi & Cuneo, (Carlo Bianchi and Augustine 
CtineoJ marble works, 3 Powell 

Bianchini Ainadeo, laborer with Brignardello, 
Macchiavello & Co. 

Bibb Daniel H, bookkeeper with Berry & Place, 
dwl 737 Howard 

Bibbins Tracy L., (Brandon & B.) dwl 1507 Leav 

Bibe Mary, (widowj dwl W s Twelfth bet Howard 
and Folsom 

Bibeau Alfred, shoemaker with I. M. Wentworth 

6 Co., dwl cor Twenty-fourth and Mission 
Biber Edmund, jeweler with Frontier & Bellemere, 

dwl 429 Bush 

Biber George, clerk, dwl 813 Washington 

Bicard Alexander, painter, dwl 428 .Broadway 

BICHAKD NICHOLAS, coalyards, 16 and 18 How- 
ard, dwl 365 First 

Bickel C, (widowj dwl 20 Haiglit 

Bickford Chauncy A., cook, dwl NW cor Broad- 
way and Maxwell 

Bickford John, watchmaker, 309 Sixth 

Bickmore George, carpenter, dwl 61 Clem, rear 

Bicknell Freeman, shoemaker with F. X. Kast, 
dwl SW cor Howard and Sixth 

Bicknell James N., steward, 1019 Jackson, dwl 8 
Auburn 

Biddle E. W., dentist, office 142| Fourth, dwl 435 
Geary 

Biddle Frederick W., bookkeeper with Casebolt & 
Kerr, dwl 850 Market 

Biddolph James, machinist Golden State Iron 
Works, dwl 619 Mission 

Biden A. E., (widow) teacher painting and lan- 
guages, 1014 Post 

Bidenbei g Peter, mariner, dwl 637 Pacific 

Bidleman A. L. P. Mrs., matron California Labor 
and Employment Exchange, 637 Clay, dwl 1114 
Market 

Bidleman Enoch G., bookkeeper with E. Martin & 
Co., dwl 742 Washington 

Bidleman Joseph, stockbroker, dwl 742 Wash 

Bidleman William A., clerk with E. Martin & Co., 
dwl W s Ninth bet Folsom and Harrison 

Bieber Julius, bookkeeper, 201 Bush, dwl 1007 
Harrison 



JOIOJS, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street, Dress Buttons in great variety. 



WATKINS' YO-SEMITB AET GALLERY, 26 Mcratg. St., opp. Lick House Entrance. 



100 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY 



Bieber Morris, salesman, 201 Bnsh, dwl 1007 Har 
Biedenbach August, liquor saloon, NE cor Third 

and Mission, dwl 642 Mission 
Biederman Charles, clerk with H. P. Wakelee, dwl 

430 Post 
Bielanberg Peter, boatman, dwl 637 Pacific 
Bielawski Casimir, draftsman U. S. Surveyor Gen- 
eral's office, dwl 242 Stevenson 
Bieler Adolpb., tailor, dwl GJl Mission, rear 
Bielski Max, (Max Bielski Jf- Co.) dwl 1012 Stock 
Bielski Max & Co., (Joseph Jacoby) butter, cheese, 

eggs, etc., 29 Occidental Market 
Bieu Joseph, machinist and locksmith, 220 Battery, 

dwl 305 Tyler 
Bienenfeld Elias, fancy goods, 1229 Stockton 
Bier Charles, cabinetmaker with Christian Schrie- 

ber & Co., bda Mechanics' Home 
Bierbrauer Carl, laborer with Gcetjen & Co., dwl 

123 Sacramento 
Bierbrauer John, cabinetmaker with Kragen & 

Geishaker, dwl S s Morton nr Kearny 
Bierce Albert S., sweep cellar U. S. Branch Mint, 

res Oakland 
Bierce Ambrose G., office Sau Francisco News Let- 
ter, res Sau Rafael, Marin Co. 
Bierman Edward, tailor with Louis Weinberg, dwl 

11 Pacific 
Bierschwale Charles, carpenter, 731 Mission 
Bierstadt Albert, landscape painter, dwl Occidental 

Hotel 
Bieskman Frederick, laborer, dwl 20 Page 
BIESTA FEDERICO, editor and proprietor 

L'Eco Delia P atria, office 637 Washington 
Bigbv Terrence, hostler N. B. & M. R. R.,"dwl 829 

Folsom 
Bigelow C. P., bricklayer Bricklayers' Protective 

Association, 234 Sutter 
Bigelow Daniel, machinist, dwl W s Dora bet. Har- 
rison and Bryant 
Bigelow Edwin, bricklayer Bricklayers' Protective 

Association, 231 Sutter 
Bigelow Elijah, real estate, office 313 California, res 

Oakland 
Bigelow Francis H., compositor Evening Bulletin, 

dwl 315 Ritch 
Bigelow George H., insurance agent, dwl 2421 Bu- 
chanan 
BIGELOW HENRY H., general manager Home 

Mutu i Ins. Co., 433 California, dwfW s First 

Avenue bet Fifteenth and Sixteenth 
BIGELOW JONATHAN E., special agent Home 

Mutual Life Ins. Co., dwl 2015 Howard 
Bigelow Louis, driver City R. R. 
Bigger Alexander, cabinetmaker with George O. 

Whitney & Co., dwl 25 Dupont, rear 
Bigger Alexander, mariner, dwl W s Stevenson bet 

Nineteenth and Twentieth 
Biggers Jane P., (widow) dwl 508 Ellis 
Biggi A. & Co., (Guiseppe Fontana) watchmakers 

and jewelers, 1106 Dupont 
Biggi Angelo, {A.JBigei # Co.) dwl 1106 Dupont 
Biggi Filippo, liquor saloon, 727 Montgomery, dwl 

713 Broadway 
Biggins Maria, housekeeper, dwl E s McCormack 

bet Pacific and Broadway 
Biggio Andrea, clerk with B. Sbarboro & Bro.,dwl 

1014 Washington 
Biggs Abel R., salesman, 308 Cal, dwl 314 Bush 
Biggs A. G., dwl What Cheer House 
Biggs John E., liquor saloon, cor San Bruno road 

<ind Twenty-seventh 
Biggs Thomas, teacher, dwl 423 Bush 
Biggs William, engineer, dwl 448 Clementina 
Biggy John, expressman, dwl 759 Mission 
Biggy Terrence, hostler, dwl N s O'Farrell bet De- 

visadero and Broderick 
Bieler John, miner, dwl Mver's Hotel 
BIGLEY BROTHERS, [John and Daniel) groce- 
ries, NE cor Clay and Davis 



Bigley Daniel, (Bigley Bros.) dwl 307 Eddy 
Bigley George, clerk -with Bigley Bros., dwl 307 

Eddy 
Bigley John. (Bigley Bros.) dwl 707 Larkin 
Bigley Peter, longshoreman with Charles E. Hasel- 

line 
BIGLEY T. &. Co., shipwrights, calkers and spar- 
makers, 13 and 15 Spear 
BIGLEY THOMAS, (T. Bigley & Co.) dwl 832 

Mission 
Bignami C. Mrs., dressmaker, dwl 11 Stockton 
Bignami Louis, barkeeper, dwl 11 Stockton 
Bigne Vincent, with J. P. Manceit, dwl E s Valen- 
cia nr Ridley 
Bigwood George, blacksmith, dwl W s Columbia 

nr Twenty- fifth 
Bigwood Joseph, blacksmith. N s King nr Second 
Bitay Anthony F., clerk, dwi N s Ridley nr Miss 
Biles Louis, mariner, dwl 14 Union Place 
Bilfinger August, dwl 623 Broadway 
Billfiuger Mary, (widow) dressmaker, dwl 623 

I '.roadway 
Bill Conrad, waiter, dwl 236 Sutter 
Bill Conrad, upholsterer, dwl 673 Broadway 
Bill George, clerk with John Dreyer, dwl N s Shasta 

bet Illinois and Michigan 
Bill Philip, capitalist, dwl 29 Ritch 
Billheck H, dwl What Cheer House 
Billers Henry S., liquor saloon, 351 Third 
Billinghaus Ray, hostler, dwl 639 Geary 
Billings David JR., (Billings & Oberman) dwl 1142 

Folsom 
Billings Edward P., collector, dwl 316 Third 
Billings Frederick, real estate, office 43 Mont Block 
Billings George E. , salesman, 11 Montgomery, dwl 

1704 Polk 
Billings Jennie Miss, seamstress, dwl 783 Market 
Billings John F., carpenter, dwl 1704 Polk 
Billings A Oberman, (David R. Billings and Wil- 
liam Oberman) produce com., 210 Drumm 
Bills Allie R., teacher Home Institute, dwl 218 

Eddy 
Bilty Theodore G., {Mohrhardl & B.) dwl 1309 

Powell 
Binder George J., bookkeeper with Christian 

Schreiber & Co., dwl 439 Minna 
Bine John, dwl 438 Broadway 
Bine Solomon (Mansbach & B.) dwl 722 Folsom 
Bineaud Leon, wigmaker with B. Puyoou, dwl 

Lafayette House 
Binet Francis, machinist City Iron Works, dwl Wil- 
liam Tell House, Pacific 
Binet Joseph, shoemaker, 704 Pacific 
Bingenheimer Christopher, cooperage, 7 Drumm, 

dwl N s Geary nr Larkin 
Bingham E. B., passed-assistant surgeon U. S. 
Navy, office U.S. Naval Rendezvous, Govern- 
ment House, res Oakland 
Bingham W. Frank, clerk with Dewey & Co., 338 

Montgomery 
Binnand George, merchant, dwl 1417 Mason 
Binning L., laborer California Sugar Refinery, dwl 

Bryant bet Seventh and Eighth 
ilinnyes C, laborer California Sugar Refinery, dwl 

cor Ninth and Brannau 
Binswanger Lewis, gents' furnishing goods, 513 

Kearny 
Bionet Merle, seaman barkentine Occident, 1 How 
Birbora John, waiter, dwl 803 Union 
Birbora Nicola, fruits, cor Sansom and Washington, 

dwl 803 Union 
Birce Frank A., clerk with Pope & Talbot, dwl 

565 Howard 
Birch Henry, longshoreman, dwl 727 Davis 
Birch Thomas J., clerk, dwl 861 Folsom 
Birch William, sash and blind maker with Richard- 
son, Dell & Co., dwl 217 Clara 
Birch William A., clerk with Francois A. Rouleau, 
dwl 913 Sacramento 



HUNTINGTON, HOPKINS & CO., Wholesale Hardware and Iron, Cor. Bush and Market. 



C. P. VAN RCHAA.CK & CO., 708, 73 2, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Fancy Goods. 



SAN FRANCISCO B] DIRECTORY 



101 



Birchoff F., carpenter H. C. League, 128 Kearny 

Bird Albert B., furnished rooms, 147 Third 

Bird Allen T., train baggage-master C.P.R.R. Co., 
dwl E s Powell nr Market 

Bird Ann S., (widow) dwl 1436 Pine 

Bird Eliza Mrs., dressmaker, 254 Beale 

Bird George, gold and silver plater, 639 California, 
dwl 1505 Dupont 

Bird Henry D., carpenter, dwl SW cor Sanchez 
and Army 

Bird .lames, ironmolder, dwl 520 Mission 

Bird Lawrence, brickmason, dwl Fort Point 

Bird Margaret, (widow) dwl 439 Clementina 

Bird Marion F., bricklayer Bricklayers' Protective 
Association, 234 Sutter 

Bird Michael, weigher, dwl 16 Natoma 

BIRD NELSON J., physician, office and dwl 230 
Kearny 

Bifd Patrick, laborer, dwl 504 Taylor 

Bird Robert, jeweler with Henry A. Callender, dwl 
315 Montgomery 

Bird Thomas, draftsman, 432 Montgomery 

Bird Thomas, painter with Ballinger & Rosewell, 
dwl 1018 Clay 

Bird William, molder, dwl 256 Tehama, rear 

Bird William, tailor, dwl 1018 Clav 

Bird.— See Burd 

Birdsall George, liquor saloon, 526 Third, dwl 729 
Harrison 

Birdsall George Jr., liquor saloon, 129 Clay, dwl 120 
Welsh 

Birdsall John, painter, dwl S s Ash nr Fulton 

Birdsall William, driver City R. R. 

Birdsall William, piledriver with E.C. Boobar & Co. 

Birdsall Wyatt, engineer, dwl 1246 Montgomery 

Birdsall Zephaniah, driver with Wells, Fargo & 
Co., dwl 920 Clav 

Birdsall.— See Burtse'll 

Birge James J., dentist, office and dwl 410 Kearny 

Birge Richard B., seaman, dwl 238 Stewart 

Birgham A., (E. Guittard & Go.) 511 Commercial 

Birgle Charles, (Birgle & SpilkerJ dwl Ns Missouri 
bet Santa Clara and Sixteenth 

Birgle & Spilker, (Charles Birgle and Edward 
SpilkerJ tannery, N s Missouri bet Santa Clara 
and Sixteenth 

Birmingham Michael, shoemaker with S.W. Rosen- 
stock & Co., dwl 242 Clara 

Birmingham — See Bermingham 

Birnie Henry, seaman, dwl 238 Stewart 

Birrill Andrew, real estate, dwl 710 Vallejo 

Birriti John, machinist, dwl 50 Clementina 

Birtz J., dwl 308 Stockton 

Bisagno Bartolomeo, (Bisagno Bros.) res Chiavari, 
Italy 

Bisagno Brothers, (Louis and Bartolomeo) impor- 
ters and jobbers hardware, crockery, cutlery, 
etc., 420 Battery 

Bisagno Louis, (Bisagno Bros.) dwl 924 Pacific 

Bisanct Jose, iisherman, dwl Oregon nr Davis 

Bischoff Anton, clerk, 408 Folsoui 

Bischoff Diedrich, clerk with N. Boschen, dwl NE 
cor Fifth and Minna 

Bischoff Fred., (J. H. Alders & Go.) dwl SW cor 
Powell and Vallejo 

Bischoff Hermann, bottler, dwl 228 Bush 

Bischoff Louis, cook, 408 Pine 

BISHOP AMASA W., attorney at law, (and Bish- 
op & Sherman) office 608 Market, dwl 8 Mason 

Bishop Benjamin F., jeweler with California Jew- 
elry Co., dwl 212 Post 

Bishop" Charles, freight clerk C. P. R. R., dwl 240 
Ritch 

Bishop Charles, carpenter H.C. League, 120 Kearny 

Bishop D. M. & Co., (Eugene Wie^and and Rich- 
ard Wilson) publishers S. F. Quarterly Trades 
Guide and Merchants Directory, office 521 Clav 

Bishop Duncan M., (D. M. Bishop & Co.) dwl 754 
Washington 



Bishop Edgar, (Bishop cfc Co. ) dwl 505 Sutter 
Bishop George, machinist Metropolitan Theater, dwl 

331 Bush 
Bishop Gurdon, miner, dwl 5 Florence 
Bishop Henry, clerk with Henry Brunjes, 430 

Brannan 
Bishop Henry, driver with M. A. Mercer, dwl N s 

McAllister nr Larkin 
Bishop Henry, liquoisaloon NW cor Clay and East, 

dwl 539 Minna 
Bishop James W., sawyer with Benjamin F. Gil- 
man, dwl 1021 Mission 
Bishop J. H., carpenter H. C. League, 128 Kearny 
Bishop John R., clerk, dwl 225 Sutter 
Bishop Lester, farmer, dwl SE cor Twenty-fourth 

and Harrisou 
Bishop Margaretta Mrs., dressmaker, NW cor Post 

and Stockton 
Bishop N. G., carpenter, dwl 5 Harrison Avenue 
Bishop Oliver H., drayman with Hanson & Moore, 

dwl cor Eleventh and Folsoui 
Bishop Peter, mate schooner Page, Hathaway's 

Wharf- 
Bishop R. B., foreman machine shop S. P. R. R., 

dwl 734 Sixteenth 
Bishop Richard, piledriver with E. C. Boobar & 

Co., NW cor Howard and Steuart 
Bishop Richard, teamster, dwl 421 Fifth 
Bishop Richard, (Roche, B. & Kendrick) dwl 421 

Vallejo 
Bishop Thomas B., (Bishop & Mathews) dwl 536 

Second 
Bishop William A., teamster, dwl 421 Fifth 
BISHOP & CO. (Edgar Bishop, A. S. Peterson 

& L. W. Palmer) groceries, 716 Market 
BISHOP & MATTHEWS, (Thomas B. Bishop 

and William Matthews) attorneys at law, office 

414 California 
BISHOP & SHERMAN, (Amasa W. Bishop and 

Edwin A. Sherman) editors and proprietors 

Masonic Mirror, office 608 Market, and job 

printers, 15 New Montgomery 
Bisio Augusto, seaman Colorado Steam Navigation 

Co.'s steamer Newbern 
Bissell William A., freight auditor S. P. R. R. Co., 

dwl 127 Kearny • 
Bissell Andrew, furnished rooms, 1023 Sutter 
Bissinger Adolph, bookkeeper, 7 Sausom, dwl 1107 

Nau Vess Avenue 
Bistrup William, tailor, dwl 552 Stevenson 
Biswick Ophemio, (John Constantine & Go.) dwl 

1406 Vallejo 
Biter Anne Mrs., dwl 71 Tehama 
Biter Willard. assistant apothecary City and County 

Hospital 
Bither George W., clairvoyant physician, office 631 

Sacramento 
Bitter Hermine, (widow) dwl 405 Geary 
Bitter William, (Bitter <$■ Becker) dwl Prescott 

House 
BITTER & BECKER, (William Bitter and Otto 

F. Becker) proprietors Prescott House, SW cor 

Kearny and Pacific 
Bitz John, tailor, dwl 934 Kearny 
Bivens Mary, (colored) (widow) dwl 16 Scott Place 
Biveus Robert, rigger, dwl 311 Main . 
Bizzio Agostino, cook with Cadenasso & Tubino, 

515 Merchant 
Bjerremark Charles, porter, 221 Gal, dwl 1133 Clay 
Bjorkman Ellen, (widow) dwl 154 Shipley, rear 
Blach Charles, physician, office 230 Kearny, dwl 

631 Post 
Blach Nathan, peddler, dwl 1304 Jackson 
Black Adam, shoemaker with James S. Swain, dwl 

Mission bet Eighth and Ninth 
Black Alexander, plumber, dwl 23 Ellis 
Black Alexander, laborer, dwl 318 Folsom 
Black Amanda Mrs., furnished rooms, 631 Sac 
Black Ann Mrs., dwl 707 Stockton 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street, Sewing and Embroidering Silks. 



W ATKINS' YO-SEMITE ART GALLERY, 26 Montg. St., opp. Lick House Entrance. 



102 



SAN FRANCISCO [ B ] DIRECTORY. 



Black David, watchman P. M. S. S. Co.'a Wliarf 
BLACK DIAMOND COAL MINING CO., P. B. 

Cornwall agent, Rinoon Point Wharf, Spear het 

Folsom and 1 tarrison 
Black Edwin, painter, dwl 8 Second Avenue 
Black George, bricklayer Bricklayers' Protective 

Assn, 234 Sutter 
Black George, civil engineer, office 622 Clay, dwl 

N s Eddy bet Devisadero and Broderick 
BLACK HENRY M., carriagemaker, 1120 aud 

1122 Market, dwl 14 Rush 
Black Hester Mrs., furnished rooms, 814 California 
Black Hugh, uigbtwatchman Metropolitan Theater, 

dwl 424 Sansom 
Black John, dwl What Cheer House 
Black John, driver Market Street R. R., dwl cor 

Sixteenth and Second Avenue 
Black John, porter, 308 Pine, dwl 22 Turk 
Black John, spinner Mission and Pacific Woolen 

Mills, dwl cor Seventeenth and Alabama 
Black John, watchman P. M. S. S. Co., dwl 327 

Beale 
Black John S., master mariner, dwl 305 Fremont 
Black John W., collector with Thomas H. Selby & 

Co., dwl 37 Clementina 
Black Joseph, blacksmith, dwl 663 Howard 
Black Marv Mrs., furnished rooms, 506 Market 
Black Patrick W., gatekeeper New U. S. B. Mint, 

dwl 2 Harriet 
Black Peter R., shipjoiner, dwl 116 Natoma 
Black P. J., farmer, dwl Ss Eddy bet Scott and 

Pierce 
Black P. W., clerk, dwl 2 Harriet 
Black Richard, carpenter, dwl 444 Sixth 
Black Robert, painter, dwl E s Miss nr Nineteenth 
Black Robert Jr., carpenter H. C. League, 128 

Kearny 
Black Robert H., liquor dealer, dwl 506 Market 
Black Robert M., (Love dt B.) dwl Lick House 
Black William, marble cutter, dwl 543 Stevenson 
Black William A., porter with Bryant & Cook, res 

Alameda 
Black William K, carpenter, dwl 663 Howard 
Black William W., liquor saloon, NE cor New 

Montgomery and Howard, dwl 17 Hubbard 
Blackburn Isaac, book agent, ^Iwl 549 Howard 
Blackburn Leslie F., Alhambra liquor saloon, 323 

Bush, dwl 735 Broadway 
Biackman Cassias H., salesman with Wilmerding 

& Kellogg, dwl 214 Stockton 
Biackman J. 1)., teacher Heald's Business College, 

24 Post 
Biackman William H., cook, dwl 1 127 Folsom 
Blackner Nicholas, hackdriver, dwl Bartol nr 

Broadway 
Blackwedel Henry, laborer, dwl 407 Pacific 
Blackwell Horatio S., tinsmith with T. Bertram, 

dwl 226 Fifth 
Blackwell John W., cook Metropolitan Restaurant, 

dwl 312 Tehama 
BLACKWOOD WILLIAM, commission merchant, 

room 13, 109 California, dwl NW cor Bryant 

aud Oak Avenue 
Blaikie Andrew, draftsman, dwl 2510 Webster 
Blaikie James L., real estate agent, office 507 Mont- 
gomery, dwl 7 Pratt Place 
Blaikie Richard T., shipbuilder, office 507 Mont- 
gomery, dwl S s Sutter nr Webster 
Blaikie Sarah, (widow) dwl S s Sutter bet Webster 

and Filmore 
Blain Joseph, cook with D. J. Harrison & Co., 745 

Market 
Blain Rodman P., bookkeeper with E. Stevens & 

Co., dwl NE cor Leavenworth and Sacramento 
Blair Archibald, civil engineer, dwl 307 Tyler 
Blair Chauncey S., patternmaker Golden State Iron 

Works, dwl 18 Verona Place 
Blair David B., (McFarlane, B. # Co.) dwl Union 

Club and Oakland 



Blair Frank, messenger U. S. B. Mint, dwl Bush 

nr Dupont 
Blair James, shoemaker, dwl SW cor Second and 

Tehama 
Blair James, soapmaker with C. McCormick & Co., 

dwl 8 Zoe, rear 
Blair James A. W., shoemaker with John Sullivan, 

dwl 826 Broadway 
Blair John B., cabinetmaker with Cb. Scbreiber & 

Co., dwl 1011 Stockton 
Blair Joseph F., machinist Pacific Iron Works, dwl 

610 Howard 
Blair Livingston, gasfitter, dwl 443 Bush 
Blair Matthew, (Blair & Chase) opp San Jose R. 

R. Depot 
Blair Robert, machinist with W. D. Hooker, dwl 

8 Zoe 
Blair Samuel, mariner, office pier 10 Steuart, dwl 

47 Tehama • 

Blair Thomas M., sergeant at arms S. F. Stock and 

Exchange Board, and agent Pacific Hall, dwl 

518 Bush 
Blair William, laborer with Hancock & Kelso, 414 

Beale 
Blair & Chase, (Matthew Blair and W.W.Chase) 

hay, opp San Jose' Railroad Depot 
Blaisdell Jay P., bootmaker, dwl 53 Clementina 
Blaisdell Solon G., harnessmaker with J. C. John- 
son & Co., dwl 120 Fourth 
Blaisdell— See Blasdell 
BLAKE CHARLES E., dentist, office 17 Post. 

dwl 34 Tyler 
Blake Christian N., carpenter, dwl 1128 Green- 
wich 
Biake Edward, drayman with George Williams, 310 

Front, dwl 734 Harrison 
Blake Elizabeth, (widow) dwl 121 Shipley 
BLAKE FRANCIS, (Blake, Bobbins & Co.) res 

Oakland 
Blake George, cook, dwl 820 Jackson 
Blake George, sailmaker, dwl NE cor Montgomery 

and Broadway 
Blake George M., clerk with A. Hayward, dwl 

1124* Folsom 
Blake George W., salesman, 321 Montgomery, dwl 

Rnss House 
Blake Greenleaf A., teamster with Edward Ken- 
nedy, dwl NE cor Oak and Franklin 
Blake Henry, clerk with C. Herold, SW cor Welsh 

and Zoe 
Blake Henry C, real estate agent, office 415 Mont, 

dwl 29 Oak Avenue 
Blake Henry H., (H. H. Blake & Co.) dwl 810 

Leavenworth 
BLAKE H. H. & CO., general agents Continental 

Life Insnrance Co., office 302 Montgomery 
Blake James, laborer, dwl 142 Clara 
Blake James, physician, office and dwl 426 Sutter 
Blake James, sailmaker with Ware Branson, dwl 

1002 Montgomery 
Blake James L. , carpenter, dwl N s Ridley nr Miss 
Blake John, bootmaker, 974 Folsom 
Blake John, bricklayer, dwl 121| Gilbert 
Blake John, carpenter with J. O'Brien, dwl 27 Fifth 

Avenue 
Blake John, laborer with Donovan & O'Dounell, 

5 and 7 Sixth 
Blake John, tailor, 413 Sutter 
Blake John J., salesman with W. A. H. Godfrey, 

dwl 671 Harrison 
Blake John O., pressman Women's Cooperative 

Printing Union, dwl 1716 Stockton 
Blake John R., (colored) porter, dwl 914 Pacific 
Blake Joseph, dwl 1009 Powell 
Blake Joseph, seaman, dwl 423 East 
Blake Maggie R., (widow) dressmaking, 910 Wash- 
ington 
Blake Maurice B., attorney at law, office SW cor 

Montgomery and Jackson, dwl 641 Folsom 



HUNTINGTON, HOPKINS & CO., Importers Hardware and Iron, Cor. Bush and Market. 



C P. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, "White Shirts. 



SAN FRANCISCO [J3] DIRECTORY 



103 



BLAKE MAURICE C, Judge Municipal Criminal 
Court, chambers, rooms 16 and 17, 729 Mont- 
gomery, dwl Ns Dorland bet Church and San- 
chez 
Blake Michael, blacksmith with Omnibus R. R.,' 

dwl 58 Everett 
BLAKE PHILIP .HENRY, homestead secretary, 
and real estate agent, office 511 California, dwl 
Point Lobos Road nr Toll House 
BLAKE, ROBBINS& CO., (Francis Blake, Char- 
les F. Robbins, James Moffiti and James W. 
Tow tie) importers and jobbers book, news, 
writing and wrapping paper, 51C Sacramento 
and 510 Commercial 
Blake Robert, seaman, dwl 37 Pacific 
Blake Sumner C, stationery and photographs, 707 

Montgomery, dwl 1502 Leavenworth 
Blake Theodore A., (Goodyear & B.) dwl 216 

Bush 
Blake Walter, house painter, dwl 788 Harrison 
Blake William, painter with Wilson & Moulton, 

516 Davis 
Blake William G., hairdresser with Heider & Hil- 

berer, dwl 9 Harlan Place 
Blake William H., (colored) hairdresser with Isaac 

G. Cary, dwl 58 Bernard 
Blakeley Francis, carpenter, dwl 109 Powell 
Blakeley John, laborer S.F. Gas Co., dwl 163 Min 
Blakeley Richard, carpenter, dwl 215 Stevenson 
Blakelv Calvin, carpenter with Excelsior Mill Co., 
dwl Rutledge Avenue nr California Avenue, 
Bernal Hights 
Blakely Edward, chemist S. F. Gas Co., dwl 131 

Perry 
Blakelv William II., expressman, dwl -16 Silver 
Blakeman Henry, proprietor Six Mile House, San 

Bruno Road 
Blakeney Thomas J., (Snow <$• Moos J dwl 1717 

Clay 
Blakev John, pressman wnth Francis & Valentine, 

dwl 510 Vallejo 
Blakiston John S., sailloft, 8 Clay 
Blakwadel John C, groceries and liquors, SW cor 

Montgomery and Union 
Blauc Alexander, real estate, dwl 117 Dora 
Blanc Callist, laundry man, dwl 11 Virginia 
Blauc Cesarine Mrs., laundry, 11 Virginia 
Blanc Floriau, laborer with G. Venard, dwl 631 Pac 
Blanc Henri, pressman Courrier de San Francisco, 

dwl 1216 Powell 
Blanc Henry, tailor, dwl 521 Geary 
Blanc Madame, clairvoyant, dwl 906 Folsom 
Blanc Maurice, laundry man, dwl 293 Clementina 
Blanc Paul, laborer with A. Laronche & Co., 825 

Dupont 
Blanc Stewart, bootmaker, 705 Battery, dwl 517 

Tehama 
Blanch Bernard, coachmaker with Kimball Manu- 
facturing Co., dwl 274 Minna 
Blauchard Adrien, salesman with Justinian Caire, 

dwl 102S Dupont 
Blanchard Frank, coachman, dwl 165 Perry 
Blauchard Francis G., coachman with Pope & Tal- 
bot, dwl 10 Guy Place 
Blanchard Frank H., (Bam & B.) res Oakland 
Blanchard Henry P., (Williams, B. & Co.) dwl 

NE cor Sacramento and Leavenworth 
Blanchard J., carpenter H. C. League, 128 Kearny 
Blanchard Jules, hardware and crockery, 44 Fourth, 

dwl 373 Jessie 
Blanchard Lott, messenger Custom House, res Oak- 
laud 
Blanchard Lucy A. Mrs., nurse, dwl 711 Taylor 
Blanchard William E., brakeman Southern Pacific 

R. R., dwl 711 Taylor 
Blauche Barney, woodworker with H. M. Black & 

Co., dwl 423 Minna 
Blanche E., (widow) preserver funeral wreaths, 
dwl 1045 Howard 



Blanchette Louis, bootmaker, 42 Sixth, dwl SE cor 

Sixth and Mission 
Blanchfield Edward J., butcher with Gleason Bros., 

dwl 228 Oak 
Blanchfield Thomas, laborer, dwl 230 Oak 
Blanckeart Victor J., (Smith & B.) dwl 517 Pine 
Blanckeuburg Theodore, bookkeeper with E. K. 

Howes & Co., dwl 1706 Mason 
Blanco Peter, seaman, dwl S s Merchant bet East 

and Drumm 
Blanding Lewis, assayer, dwl Buss House 
Blanding William, attorney -at-law, office 507 Mont, 

res Oakland 
Blaney Edward W., student-at-l.iw with Clark 

Churchill, dwl 507 Ellis 
Blaney George, seaman, dwl 106 Jackson 
Blaney James E., (Conway & B.) dwl 102 Fourth 
Blaney John, painter, dwl 507 Ellis 
Blaney John H., bookkeeper with Sullivan, Kelly 

& Co., dwl 530 Jessie 
Blanev Patrick, niessman Moses Tavlor U. S. N. 

and A. M. S. S. Line 
Blaney Patrick, seaman, dwl 501 First 
Blauey William, carpenter H. C. League, 128 

Kearny 
Blantry Samuel, potmaker S. F. Glass Works, dwl 

5 Clarence Place 
Blank Charles, boatman, dwl 39 Jackson 
Blank Charles, driver with James H. Bullard, 228 

Clay 
Blank Charles C, baker with Clark &. Foote, dwl 

325 Capp 
Blank Johu, boatman, dwl 39 Jackson 
Blanken Herman, clerk with C. L. Wilhelm, dwl 

115 Sixth 
Blanken Jacob, fireman Pioneer Woolen Mills, 

dwl 707 Houston 
Blankenhorn Frederick, Germania Brewery, NW 

cor Masou and Broadway 
Blankenhorn Gottleib, with F. Blankenhorn, dwl 

1501 Mason 
Blankenstein Henry, clerk with David Samuels, 

dwl 845 Dupont 
Blankman Henry, cook, 113 Leidesdorff, dwl cor 

Mission and Sixth 
Blankman II . G., dwl Grand Hotel 
Blansfield James, laborer, dwl 25 Baldwin Court 
Blasdell George E., bagmaker National Mills, dwl 

54 Third 
Blasdell G. W., contractor, dwl 1038 Mission 
BlasdellSamuelF.,lio l uidatinq; clerk, Custom House, 

dwl 34 Tehama 
Blasdell— see Blaisdell 
Blasre Raphael, dressmaker, 726^ Howard 
Blass Charles, laborer with Eberhart & Lachmau, 

SE cor First and Market 
Blass Mark, trader, dwl 435 Fifth 
Blass Michael, waiter, 416 Kearuy, dwl 229 Sutter 
Blasse Edward, clerk, 431 Montgomery 
Blaszkower Marks, salesman, 225 Montgomery, 

dwl 337 Clementina 
Blatchly Ambrose, civil and mining engineer, office 

Miners' Foundry, 247 First, dwl 37 Second 
Blath Siegmuud, bookkeeper Patent Brick Co., dwl 

227 Ritch 
BLATTNER JOHN J., contractor, dwl 425 Third 
Blattuer Nicholas, hackmau Oakland Ferry, dwl 

Bartol nr Broa dway 
Blauvelt Richard D. Jr., deputy recorder City and 

County, dwl 325 Fremont 
Blecher William, cook, 626 Market, dwl 158Natoma 
Blen Louis W., shipchandler, dwl W s Treat Ave- 

uue bet Twenty-third and Twenty-fourth 
Blen Rosa, (widow) dwl 262 Jessie 
Blennerhassett John, shoemaker with Antoine C. 

Royer, dwl 751 Howard 
Blennerhasset Richard, shoemaker with Antoine 

C. Royer, dwl 538 Howard 
Blethen Charles A., dwl What Cheer House 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street. Braids of all kinds. 



WATKINS' YO-SEMITE ART GALLERY, 26 Montg. St., opp. Lick House Entrance. 



10-1 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY. 



Blethen E. G. Miss, teacher Eighth Street Primary 
School, dwl 227 Tyler 

Blethen E. O., clerk with Brittan, Holbrook & Co., 
dwl 227 Tyler 

Blethen James H., captain steamer Nevada, U. S N. 

Z. & A. M. 8. S. Line, dwl 227 Tyler 
Blethen Robert W., painter, dwl 519 Sacramento 
Bley Abraham, clothing and gents' furnishing 

goods, 54 Third, dwl 1011 Mission 
Blittens Thomas V., master mariner, dwl 2004 Pow 
Bligh Catherine, (widow) dwl 528 Union 
Blimer Edward, paperhauger, dwl 4 Vallejo Place 
Blinn Cliarles H., clerk forwarding department 

Wells, Fargo & Co., dwl 32? Geary 
Blinn Cyrus A., carpenter H. C. League, 128 Kearny 
Blinn Granville, captain bark Jennie Pitts, pier 17 

Stewart 
Blinn Samuel P., (Adams, B. & Co.) dwl 542 Sec 
Blinn W. J., carpenter with P. M. S. S. Co. 
Bliss Benjamin B., salesman with Thomas W. Mc- 

Collam, dwl 630 Howard 
Bliss George D., wholesale butcher, dwl 1597 Pac 
Bliss Theodore II., stevedore, dwl N s Filbert bet 

Montgomery and Sansom 
Bliss Thomas, longshoreman with Charles E. 

Haseltine, 36 Steuart 
Bliven A. P., captain brig Tanner, pier 17 Steuart 
Bliven James I., (Bliven & Bastian) dwl 704 Fol 
Bliven Samuel, merchant, dwl 630 Post 
Bliven S. N., student Heald's Business College, 

dwl 630 Post 
Bliven & Bastian, (James I. Bliven and Philip 

Bastian) proprietors Gabel &. Co.'s California 

Axle Grease Factory, 390 Francisco 
Blix August, clerk with Charles J. Janson, dwl 48 

Everett 
Bloch Abraham B., gents' furnishing goods, 1107 

Dupont 
Bloch Isaac F., merchant, office 12 Bush, dwl 826 

Larkin 
Bloch John, dry goods, 2 and 3 Virginia Block, dwl 

615 Green 
Bloch Leon, clerk with John Bloch, dwl 615 Green 
Bloch William, boots and shoes, 1010 Dupont 
Blochman Abraham, (Blochman & Cerf) 220 San 
Blochman E., winegrower, dwl 4 William 
Blochman E. Mrs., milliner and millinery, 36 

Kearny, dwl 420 O'Farrell 
Blochman Emanuel, merchant, dwl 420 O'Farrell 
Blochman & Cerf, (Abraham Blochman and Moses 

Cerf) commission merchants, 21 Battery 
BLOCK ABRAM, president Oda Fellows' Savings 

Bank, (and A. Block & Co., San Juan) office 

115 Battery, dwl 108 Taylor 
Block Bernard, clerk with Glazier &? Seligsberg, 

dwl 809 Leavenworth 
Block Daniel, merchant, dwl 530 Ellis 
Block Emanuel D., (E. D. Block & Co., Oakland) 

dwl SW cor Jones and Pine 
Block James N., bookkeeper, 115 Battery, dwl 108 

Taylor 
Block John, laborer S. F. «fe P. Sugar Refinery, 

dwl cor Union and Sansom 
Block John, tailor, 12 Geary, dwl 324 Mason 
Block Maurice, salesman with Ackerman Bros., dwl 

513 Post 
Block Robert M. C, foreman dredger Winnemucca 

C. P. R. R. Co., dwl 1105 Powell 
Blocket Edward, painter, dwl 589 Market 
Blodes Theodore, hairdresser with Samuel Brodek, 

dwl 1237 Folsom 
Blod^ett Edwin A., porter with Brittan, Holbrook 

& Co., dwl 640 Mission 
Blob H. F. B., clerk S. F. Chronicle, dwl NE cor 

Hyde & Green 
Blohm" Henry, cook, 324 Mont, dwl 218 Broadway 
Blohm Henry, waiter with F. William Kamps, NE 

cor California and Davis 
Blohm John, laborer, W. K. Dietrich, dwl 619 Pac 



Blohm Peter, (Blohm & Gerkcn) dwl NE cor Mis- 
sion and Beale 
Blohm William, seaman, dwl Hinckley nr Kearny 
BLOHM & GERKEN, (Peter Blohm and Clan's 

Gerkeu) groceries and liquors, NE cor Mission 

and Beale 
Blohme Herman, (Grolheer & B.) dwl NW cor 

Sutter and Polk 
Blohme T., clerk with W. A. Asmussen, dwl NW 

cor Eighth and Bryant 
Blois Antoine, stonecutter, dwl 1021 Market 
Blom John, calker with Middlemas & Boole, dwl 

428 Vallejo 
Blondell Thomas, drayman with Forsaith, Tyler & 

Shaw, dwl N s Fulton nr Lag-una 
Blondin John, carpenter with Grader & Johnson, 

dwl 1511 Dupont 
Blondin L., calker with P. M. S. S. Co. 
Blondin William, calker with P. M. S. S. Co. 
Blondon Z., laborer, dwl 834 Vallejo 
Blonigeu Joseph, groceries and liquors, 722 Pacific, 

dwl Filbert nr Fillmore 
Blonquist Olof, watchmaker with George C. Shreve 

& Co., dwl 812 Stockton 
Blood James, boatman, dwl N s Francisco bet 

Stockton and Dupont 
BLOOD J. H., attorney-at-law, notary public and 

commissioner deeds, office and dwl 23 and 24 

Montgomery Block 
Blood Levi L., bookkeeper with Edward Kennedy, 

dwl 625 Green 
Blood Mary L. Mrs., dwl 815^ Folsom 
Blood William, sailmaker with Harding & Brann, 

dwl 110 Virginia 
Blood. William F., clerk, 403 Cal, dwl 1309 Cal 
Bloom Amelia, milliner with Mrs. G.W. M. Cowles, 

dwl 115 Third 
Bloom Hermann, tanner with W. Bloom, dwl Cen- 
ter House, Sixteenth and Folsom 
Bloom Isaac, broom manufactory, N s Oregon bet 

Drumm and Davis 
Bloom Louis J., tailor, 1132 Market 
Bloom Mary Mrs., furnished rooms, 119 Third 
Bloom Samuel, tanner, dwl NW cor Sixteenth and 

Howard 
Bloom Wolf, woolfactor and tanner, cor Nineteenth 

and Folsom, dwl 25 Harriet 
Bloomer Hiram G.. signpainter, NE cor Clay and 

Montgomery, dwl 1012 Taylor 
Bloomer Hiram R., ornamental and portrait painter, 

NE cor Clay and Montgomery, dwl 1012 Taylor 
Bloomer J. G., operator Fire Alarm and Police Tel- 
egraph, Brenham Place, dwl 538 Ellis 
Bloomer Theodore H., bookkeeper with R. B. 

Swain & Co., dwl 1012 Taylor 
Bloomfield Homer, engineer Metropolitan Gas Co., 

dwl Occidental Hotel 
Bloomfield James T., newspapers and periodicals, 

804 Washington, dwl 322 Green 
Bloomfield Mary, (widow) dwl 212 Francisco, rear 
Bloomingdon Adolph, hostler Ocean House 
Bloor George W., printer with J. H. Carmany & 

Co., dwl 10 Prospect Place 
Bios Joseph A., porter with Kittle & Co., dwl 7 

Nineteenth 
BLOSSOM WILLIAM H., Pantheon Saloon, 321 

California, dwl SW cor Folsom and Twelfth 
Blow Walter W., clerk with Haggin & Tevis, and 

secretary City Gas Co., res Oakland 
Blown Samuel, carpenter H.C. League, 128 Kearny 
Blue Anchor, Louis J Schrocder proprietor, 7 and 9 

Washington 
Blue Robert, laborer, dwl 3 Beale Place nr 

Main 
Blum Henry, bakery, dwl 1817 Powell 
Blum Herman, dwl 906 Market 
Blum Isidor, salesman with George O. Whitney & 

Co., dwl Cosmopolitan Hotel 
Blum Jacob, peddler, dwl 1325 Pacific 



HUNTINGTON, HOPKINS & CO., Agents Jessop & Sons' Steel, Cor. Bush and Market. 



C. P. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Smokers' Articles. 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY. 



105 



Blum Jacob, (merchant, Dixon, Cal.) office 220 

California, dwl 593 Ellis 
Blum John, Imp. Calkers' Ass'n, 713 Mission 
Blum Leon, (J. Schweitzer & Co.) dwl 620 Larkin 
Blum Moses, (merchant, Vacaville) office 220 Cali- 
fornia, dwl816 0'Earrell 
Blum Pol, salesman with Michael Levy, dwl 1-123 

Stockton 
Blum Simon, expresswagon, 227 Sansom, dwl S s 

Brannan bet Gilbert and Seventh 
Blumbertr Julius F., commission merchant, office 

331 Montgomery, dwl 1005 Natoma 
Blume Louis, sackdealer, dwl 922^ Folsom 
Blumel Julius, gunsmith with Villegia & Slotterbek, 

dwl E a Columbia bet Twenty-fourth and 

Twenty-fifth 
Blumel L., "tailor, dwl E s Columbia bet Twenty- 
fourth and Twenty-fifth 
Bluraenberg Joseph H., real estate, dwl 311 Pine 
Blnmenberg's Building, SW cor Pine and Sansom 
Blumenthal Edward A. B., waiter with D. J. Har- 
rison it Co., dwl 752 Market 
Blurnenthal Henry, butcher, dwl S s Twenty-third 

or Columbia 
Blumenthal Henry M., nightwatchman U. S. B. 

Mint, dwl 5 Caroline 
Blumenthal J. «fe Co , dry goods, 214 Third 
Blumenthal Julius, (J. Blumenthal & Co.) dwl 752 

Howard 
Blunt John P., clerk, 106 Sansom, dwl 610 Powell 
Blunt Phineas U., assistant storekeeper Custom 

House, dwl 610 Powell 
Blunt William G-., machinist, dwl 610 Powell 
Blute Michael, beater Pacific Rolling Mill, dwl Po- 

trero Point 
Bluxome Isaac, (Bluxome & Cassebohm) dwl 1312 

Folsom 
Bluxome Joseph, physician, office and dwl 306 

Stockton 
BLUXOME & CASSEBOHM, (Isaac Bluxome 

and William Cassebohm) merchandise brokers, 

and coal and iron, 316 California 
Bly Leander A., machinist with Excelsior Mill Co., 

dwl 811 Mason 
Blyman Edward, upholsterer with Frank G. Ed- 
wards 
Blyth Henry, (Henry Blyth& Son) dwl 405 Fol 
Blyth Henry, Jr., (Henry Blyth & Son) dwl 1614 

Post 
BLYTH HENRY & SON, (Henry Blyth Jr.) 

lumber, SW cor Market and Spear, and 115 

Spear 
Blyth John, barber with A. Morgenstern 
Boag John, spinner with Dana & Codington 
BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS City Hall, office 

New City Hall 
BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS Funded Debt 

1855, office City Hall 
BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS Laguna Survey, 

office 603 Washington 
BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS Montgomery Av- 
enue, office 1, 2 and 3 Montgomery Block 
BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS Montgomery 

Street South, office 415 Montgomery 
BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS S. F.'F. D., office 

23 Kearny 
BOARD OF" EDUCATION, room 22 City Hall, 

second floor 
BOARD OF ENGINEERS U. S. A., for the Pa- I 

cific Coast, office 533 Kearnv 
BOARD OF EQUALIZATION, office 3 City Hall, 

second floor 
BOARD OF FISH COMMISSIONERS, office 

401 California 
BOARD OF HEALTH, office 521 Jackson 
BOARD OF PILOT EXAMINERS, office 34 

Merchants' Exchange 
BOARD OF POLICE COMMISSIONERS, office 

Room 11 City Hall, first floor 



BOARD OF PORT WARDENS, office 525 Front 
BOARD OF REGENTS University California, 

office 320 California 
BOARD OF RELIEF, (Masonic) office Masonic 

Temple 
BOARD OF SAILOR BOARDING-HOUSE 

COMMISSIONERS, (Marine Board) office 607 

Front 
BOARD OF S. F. PARK COMMISSIONERS, 

office 320 California 
BOARD OF STATE HARBOR COMMISSION- 
ERS, office 414 Montgomery 
BOARD OF SUPERVISORS, room 3 City Hall, 

second floor 
BOAKD OF SUPERVISORS, clerk of, office 4 

Citv Hall, second floor 
BOARD OF TIDE LAND COMMISSIONERS, 

office SW cor Clay and Kearnv 
BOARD OF UNDERWRITERS.* (Boston) Joseph 

S. Bacon a^enf, office 428 California 
BOARD OF UNDERWRITERS FIRE, (San Fran- 
cisco) Charles D. Haven, sec, office 416 Cal 
BOARD OF UNDERWRITERS, MARINE. (San 

Francisco) Gustave Touchard, president, C. T. 

Hopkins, secretary, office 318 California 
BOARD OF UNDERWRITERS, (New York) 

C. V. S. Gibbs, secretarv, office 316 California 
BOARD OF UNDERWRITERS, (Philadelphia) 

A. T. Fletcher, a<;ent, office 318 California 

Boardman , mining operator, dwl 30 Kearny 

Boardman E. M. Miss, teacher -Rincou Grammar 

School, dwl 534 Bush 
BOARDMAN GEORGE O, Manager iEtna Ins. 

Co., office 14 Merchants' Exchange, res Menlo 

Park 
Boardman Joseph, real estate, dwl W s Boardman 

Place nr Brannan 
Boarman Lewis, waiter Grand Hotel 
Boas Judah, exchange broker, 422 Montgomery, 

dwl 27 Stone 
Bobbet Leon, brassfinisher with W. T. Gamut & 

Co., dwl 504 Fell 
Bobenriethy John, driver with Gluck & Hansen, 

dwl SE cor Fulton and Webster 
Boberg Gustave, cook, dwl 531 East 
Bobst Cyrus E., salesman, dwl 909 Bush 
Bobst Thomas S., goldsmith, dwl 1025 Mission 
Bobues John, merchant, dwl Winkle Alley 
Boccardo Luigi, laborer with Brignardello, Macchi- 

avello & Co., dwl 704 Sansom 
Bochencashen Adolph, clerk, dwl 906 Stockton 
Bochlofsky Frederick, cook 333 Bush, dwl Prescott 

House 
Bock Henry, barber, dwl 921 1 Folsom 
Bock Henry, gilder with H. G. Hoefer, dwl "434 

Vallejo, rear 
Bock Jacob, tailor with C. C. Hastings- & Co., dwl 

745 Howard 
Bock James, tailor with C. C. Hastings & Co., dwl 

745 Howard 
Bock Joseph, baker with B. Stuinpf, dwl 226 Pacific 
Bock Joseph, tailor, dwl 338 Bush 
Bocken Henry, Pioneer Restaurant, 645 Washing- 
tan, dwl 811 Union, rear 
Bocker John, basketmaker with Victor Navlet, dwl 

Jessie nr Sixth 
Bockman Henry, porter with Pacific Refinery Co. 
Bockmann Diedrich H., porter, 1 Battery, dwl 213 

Maine 
Bockmann Frederick, waiter, 520 California 
Bockner William, laborer with William K. Dietrich 
Bocqueraz A., (Shea, B. & McKee) dwl 1910 Stock 
Bocqueraz Peter, laborer, dwl 1204 Powell 
Bode Adolphus W., machinehand with Cole & Has- 
kell, dwl 600 Third 
BODE GEORGE C. , proprietor Battery Street U.S. 

bonded warehouse, foot Battery, dwl 1260 Cal 
Bode Henrv, carpenter, dwl NW cor Fell and 

Polk " 



JONE3, PULLMAN & CO., 118 Sansom Street, Porte Monnaies and Reticules. 



WATKINS' YO-SEMITE ART GALLERY, 26 Montg. St., opp. Lick House Entrance. 



106 



SAN FRANCISCO [ B ] DIRECTORY 



Bode Henry, liquor saloon., SE cor Fourth and 
Branuan 

Bode Henry, barkeeper with Cbarlea Omer & Co., 
dwl N\'V cor First aii(i Rnmnan 

Bode Louis, carbuilder with Daniel Hughes, dwl 
N s Fell bet Polk and Van Ness Avenue 

Bode William, steward, dwl NE cor Battery and 
Pacific 

Bodecker Louis, musical director Theater Comique, 
dwl 402 Green 

Bodecker William, musician, dwl 402 Green 

Boden John F., court room clerk Fourth District 
Conrt, dwl 807 Union 

Boden John H., (John H. Boden & Co.) dwl 705 
Greenwich 

BODEN JOHN H. & CO., (Julius Quinchard) 
custom house brokers, 504 Battery 

Boden Penelope, (widow) dwl 705 Greenwich 

Bodtish William EL, attorneyat-law, office 612 
Clay, dwl 257 Clara 

Bodkin E. & S., dressmakers, 1070 Howard 

Bodkin Eliza, (E. & S. Bodkin) dwl 1070 Howard 

Bodkin Sarah, (E. $• S. Bodkin) dwl 1070 Howard 

Bodkin Thomas, plasterer, dwl 119 Shipley 

Bodwell Harry H, (Atwood & B.) dwl E s Bart- 
lett bet Twenty-fourth and Twenty-fifth 

Bodwvll Joseph R., cutter with F. X. Kast, dwl 
1318 Dupont 

Boecbe John, distiller Bay View Distillery 

Boeck Christian, cook, dwl Hotel Rhein 

Boege Jergin, shoemaker with Gustave Muhl, dwl 
Alaska Hotel 

Boegler Frederick, drayman with Strauss & Frank, 
dwl 111) Taylor, rear 

Boehl George, haruessmaker with Main & Winches- 
ter, dwl 423 Bush 

Boehme Frederick, musician, dwl 431 Vallejo 

Boehme — See Bohm 

Boell Charles L., job printer with M. Weiss, dwl 
417 Filbert 

Boell Edward A., carpenter with Cole & Haskell, 
dwl 778 Harrison 

BOER BEREXD H., wines and liquors, 209 Jack- 
sou 

Boerau William P., boatman, cor Brannan & First 

Boericke Frank E., (Boericke & Tafel) res Phila- 
delphia. Pa. 

Boericke William, manager Homoeopathic Pharma- 
cy. ".'34 Sutter, dwl 13 Monroe 

BOERICKE & TAFEL, (Frank E. Boericke and 
A. J. Tafel) proprietors Homoeopathic Phar- 
macy, SM Sutter 

BOESCH EMIL, manufacturer lamps, spinning 
and turning metals, etc., 1003 Kearny and 606 
Pacific, dwl NE cor Broadway and Kearny 

Boese Diedericb, painter and paperhanger, dwl 
NW cor Dupont and Pacific 

Boese Henry J., market, SE cor Davis and Clark, 
dwl 2110 Mason 

Boese Julius, butcher, dwl 2110 Mason 

Boetcher Diedrich, (Boetcher & Brown) dwl NW 
cor Pacific and Dupont 

Boetcher & Brown, (Diedrich Boetcher and William 
Brown} liquor saloon, NW cor Pacific and 
Kearny 

Boetefuhr Frank, porter, dwl New Atlantic Hotel 

Bofer William, (William Bofer &■ Co.) 610 Sac 

BOFER WILLIAM & CO'., (Adolph Marquard) 
importers and retail hardware, 610 Sac 

Bofinger Jacob, gold and silver plater, 648 Sacra- 
mento (and Sanders & B.) 

Bogau Charles, tanner with I. W. Davidson &, Co.. 
dwl 6-~'0 Sixth 

Bogau Philip, longshoreman with Charles E.Hasel- 
tine, dwl 327 Beale 

BOGARDUS JOHN P., editor and proprietor 
Figaro ; office 532 Merchant, (and Bogardus & 
Woodson) dwl N s Delgardo Place nr Hyde 

Bogardus William H., machinist, dwl 325 Folsom 



Bogardus & Woodson, (John P. Bogardus and 
Joseph A. Woodson) publishers and proprietors 
Pacific Law Reporter, office 310 Washington, 
Bogart Edwin V., stagedriver, dwl 710 Kearny 
Bogart J., piledriver with E. C. Boobar & Co. 
Bogart John M., (John M. Bogart & Co.) res Oak- 
land 
Bogart John M. & Co., flour and produce, 206 Davis 
Bogart Joseph N., laborer, dwl 345 Third 
BOGART ORLANDO EL, President Noonday S. 
M. Co., office 402 Montgomery, dwl 1512 Miss 
Bogasch Charles, clerk with John Sneider, dwl 6 

Charles Place 
Bogel C. H., groceries and liquors, SW cor Wash- 
ington and Waverly Place 
Bogel Theodore, (Beat/field, B. & Co., and B. Le- 

fevre <& Co.) dwl 1015 Jackson 
Bogel William, gardener, E s Cemetery Avenue bet 

Post and Sutter 
Boger William, waiter, 27 Kearny, dwl 15 Morton 
Boggan Owen, groceries and liquors, NE cor Bush 

and Buchanan 
Boghiscich B. N, (Boghiscich & Brown) res Oak- 
land 
Boghiscich & Brown, (B. N. Boghiscich and Jo- 
seph Brown) coffee saloon, 506 Washington 
Bogle Joseph H., special policeman, dwl (il Clem 
Bogle William H, special policeman, dwl 418 Post 
Bogner Bernard, engraver, 648 Sacramento, dwl 

Berry nr Dupont 
Bogner Charles, tailor, 11 Sutter, dwl 11 Berry 
Bogorn Philip, seaman North Pac. Trans. Co. 's 

S. S. Senator 
Bogue Felix, miner, dwl W 8 Capp nr Nineteenth 
Bogue Hugh, hostler with Cutting & Co., dwl cor 

Bryant and Riucou Place 
Bogue Michael, milk ranch, dwl Ss Jessie bet Dia- 
mond and Douglas 
Bohan James, gardener, dwl 20 Oak Avenue 
Bohan William, pilot N. P. Trans. Co.'s S. S. Ori- 

flamme 
Bohannan John, compositor Monitor, dwl 571 Stev 
Boben Benjamin F., policeman Citv Hall, dwl 536 

Ellis 
Boben F. E., dwl What Cheer House 
Bohen George T., surveyor Union Ins. Co., 416 

Cnlifornia, dwl 617 Pine 
Bohen John, hostler with Hasbrouck & Clavburgh, 

dwl 6 William 
Bohen Michael, laborer, dwl 15 Geary 
Bohen Patrick, laborer, dwl Helvetia Hotel 
Bohen Timothy, laborer Laborers' Pro. and Ben. 

Ass'n, 814 Howard 
Bohen William, laborer, dwl 520 Mission 
Bohennen Ann, (widow) dwl 571 Stevenson 
Boble William, clerk with Henry Doscher, Third 

Street Wharf 
Bolder Henry, carpenter, dwl 317 Bush 
Bohlin^ Heniy, clerk, 2 Stenart, dwl 23 Market 
Bohls Henry, clerk, NW cor Seventh and Miuna 
Bohm Peter, seaman, dwl 37 Pacific 
Bohm William, manufacturing jeweler, 604 Mer- 
chant, dwl Ws Valencia bet Nineteenth aud 
Twentieth 
Bohm. — See Boehm 
Bohu Andrew, conductor Central R. R., dwl E s 

Devisadero bet Sutter and Post 
BOHN BROTHERS, (John and Christian) tin- 
smiths, 1218 Dupont 
Bonn Christian, (Bonn Bros.) dwl 1603 Dupont 
Bolm Henry, carpenter bark Legal Tender, dwl 39 

Jackson 
Bolm Jacob, tailor, dwl SW cor Dupont and Bdwy 
Bohn John, clerk, dwl 567 Minna 
Bolin John, tinware, 112 Seventh (and Bohn Bros.) 

dwl 1603 Dupont. 
Boice John, piledriver with E. C. Boobar &. Co., 
Boice Joseph C. W., tinsmith with Brittan, Hol- 
brook &. Co., dwl 263 Third 



HUNTINGTON, HOPKIN3 & CO., Wholesale Hardware and Iron, Cor. Bush and Market. 



DORYILLE LIBBY. 






FRANK H. SWETT. 



Publishers, Importers, 

jR^TSTJO) DEALERS IN 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, 



J±.TSTJD 



OHOOL FUBH1TU 



T> P 



No. 3 NEW MONTGOMERY STREET, GRAND HOTEL BUILDING, 
SAINT FRANCISCO. 



HOMOEOPATHIC 




PHARMACEUTISTS AND PUBLISHERS. 



234 Sutter St., Young Men's Christian Association Bldg,, San Francisco, 

Homeopathic Medicines, Homcsopathic Books, 

MEDICINE CASES for Physicians and Families. This is the only establishment 
on the Pacific Coast exclusively devoted to Homoeopathy. 



RECENTLY PUBLISHED, ONE VOLUME, 8VO. 1100 pp. 
THE PACIFIC G0A8T 

BUSINESS DIRECTORY, 

FOR 1871-3. 

Containing the Names, Business and Post Office Address of over Forty Thousand 
Merchants, Manufacturers and Professional Men, 

In the States of California, Oregon and Nevada, the Territories of Washington, 

Utah, Arizona, Idaho, Montana and Alaska, and the Colony of 

British Columbia, 

With a Gazetteer of the Counties, Cities and Towns of the Pacific Coast, and the 

names of the Officers governing the same, Federal, State and 

Municipal, and Finances thereof. 

Also, Lists with appropriate references, of the Commercial, Agricultural, Manu- 
facturing, Mining, Railroad, Telegraph, Banking and Insurance 

Companies, 

Including the name and location of each Quartz, Grist, Saw and Woolen Mill in 
operation at the present time in the above States and Territories. 

TO WHICH IS ADDED 

AN EXHIBIT OF THE RESOURCES 

OF THE 

PACIFIC COAST, 

And a variety of other items of information, the whole forming one of 

The tost valuable Books of Reference for Business Men ever PilliM 



< — -«» » 



PRICE, FIVE DOLLARS. 

HEim? G. LA2TCLEY, 

Publisher, San Francisco. 

Copies will be sent Free by Mail on receipt of Price. 
_ 



C P. VAN" SCHAACK & CO., 708,712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Paper and Envelopes. 



SAN FRANCISCO [JS] DIRECTORY 



107 



Boido Domingo, boots and shoes, 1434| Stockton 
Boie George, packer Golden Gate Flour Mills, dwl 

11 Lewis 
Boiro Louis, salesman with Michael Levy, dwl 

Miorey Alley 
Boisnet Alphonse, cabinetmaker, 491 Brannan 
Boisse Eugeue, hairdressing saloon, 526 Commer- 
cial, dwl 535 Union 
Boisse Gaston, boatbuilder North Point Dry Dock, 

dwl SE cor Union and Stockton 
Boissey August, piledriver with E. C. Boobar & Co 
Boissean Jean Emil, shoemaker, 324 Uupont 
Boisson Felicite, laundry, 870 Folsom 
Boisson John, laundryman, dwl 870 Folsom 
Boitano Frank, expresswagou, dwl 514 Green 
Bokee David M., bookkeeper, dwl 1015 Leav 
Boker Frederick, seaman, dwl 112 Stewart i 

Bolado Joaquin, real estate, office 535 Clay, dw 

526 Sutter 
Bolan Martin, laborer, dwl 151 Natoma, rear 
Bolan Michael J., physician, office and dwl 704J 

Mission 
Bolan William, hotel cook, dwl 72 Tehama 
Boland Bridget, (widow) dwl 109 Shipley 
Boland James, (Steiger & B.) dwl 216 Leav 
Boland John, butcher, SE cor O'Farrell and Taylor 
Boland John H., salesman with Dake, McKown & 

Co., dwl 15 Kearny 
Boland Michael C. , harnessmaker with J. O'Kane, 

dwl 13 Sherwood Place 
Boland Robert, (Lee & B.J dwl 748 Harrison 
Boland William H., bookkeeper with Excelsior Mill 

Co., dwl 24 Minna 
BOLANDER HENRY N., State Superintendent 

Public Instruction, office 637 Kearny, dwl 1231 

Mission 
Bolden Stephen S., carpenter, dwl Vermont bet 

Bush and Mason 
Bolden John G., butcher, dwl 428 Broadway 
Boldt Frederick, seaman, dwl 39 Jackson 
Boldts Otto, seaman brig Orient, dwl 37 Pacific 
Bole James, bookkeeper with Forbes Brothers & 

Co., dwl 21 Sixth 
Bole John, teamster with William Kerr, dwl 909 

Battery, rear 
Bole John, laborer, dwl SW cor Broderick and 

O' Farrell 
Bolero Joseph, laborer, dwl 15 Washington 
Boley Susan, (widow) boarding, 54 Third 
Bolger John, boilermaker, dwl 260 Clementina 
Bolger John, plasterer, dwl 335 Shipley 
Bolger Miles, (widow) boarding and lodging, 512 

Mission 
Bolger Solomon, teamster, dwl 22 Folsom Avenue 
Bolger Thomas, bookkeeper with NcNally & Haw- 
kins, dwl 945 Howard 
Bolin George, bricklayer Bricklayers' Pro. Ass'n, 

234 Sutter 
BOLINGER WILLIAM A., (Pacific Lumber S? 

Mill Co. J office 306 Pine, dwl 852 Folsom 
Bolis Richard, laborer, dwl 12 Natoma, rear 
Boliter Margaret, (widow) nurse, dwl 309 Ritch 
Boll John, expresswagou, cor O'Farrell and Market 
Bolle Henry, wine manufacturer, dwl 412 Drumm 
Bolle Thomas & Co., groceries and liquors, NW 

cor Clay aud Stockton 
Bollear Paul, cooper, dwl 335 Ritch 
Bollenliayen Henry, clerk with Alexauder Gei'des, 

dwl 25 Fourth 
Boiler Frank J., market, 1230 Dupont, dwl 1231 

Dupont, rear 
Bolles Amos, traveling agent with Wheeler & Wil- 
son S. M. Co., 427 Montgomery 
Bolles Frederick, captain N. P. Tfans. Co.'s S. S. 

Oridamine, dwl 421 Harrison 
Bolles — See Bowles 

Boiling George K., musician, dwl 226 Mission 
Bollinger Gottlieb H., pastor German Methodist 

Episcopal Church, dwl 864 Folsom 



Bollinger John C, collector, office 608 Merchant, 

dwl 1509 Leavenworth 
Bollinger Joseph, porter, 321 Montgomery 
Bollinger Nicholas, butcher with Charles H. Aitken, 

dwl 406 Vallejo 
Bollinger William, bagsewer with J. & P. N. Han- 

na, dwl 912 Kearny 
Bollman Alexander, clerk with John Frauetta, 

dwl NW cor Geary and Hyde 
Bollman John, (John Bollman fy Co.) dwl NE 

cor Geary and Hyde 
Bollman John'& Co., (John Palmer J manufacturers 

cigarritos, 510 Broadway 
Bolsky Albert, waiter Nucleus House 
Bolster Thomas, driver with Lyon & Co., dwl NE 

cor Franklin and Linden 
Bolt Benjamin, laborer with Whitney & Freese * 
Bolte Henry, carpenter H. C. League, 128 Kearny 
Bolte Peter, boarding, N s Gilmore nr Kentucky 
Bolte W. L., bookkeeper with Getz Bros., dwl 919 

Jackson 
Bolton Adolph, insurance agent, dwl 429 Geary 
BOLTON JAMES R., real estate, office 618"Mer- 

chant.dwl NW cor Greenwich and Jones 
Bolton John H., bookkeeper with Miller ifc Lux, 

dwl 908 Broadway 
Bolton John S., machinist ^Etua Iron Works, dwl 

517 Post 
Bolton J. S. Mrs., saleswoman with H. A Deming, 

dwl 517 Post 
Bolton Robert, marbleworker with John Daniel & 

Co. 
Boltz Albert, chophouse, 250 Fourth 
Bolz Luis, seaman bark Oregon, pier 17 Stenart 
Bomeyer Frederick, carpenter, dwl 1 13 Silver 
BONA ANGELO, Squarza's Punches and Wines, 

etc., 118 and 120 Leidesdorff, dwl 222 Post 
Bona David, dwl 2 August Alley 
Bona John, tailor, dwl W s August Alley nr Green 
Bona Pietro, barkeeper, 118 Leidesdorff, dwl 1139 

Broadway 
Bonacina Bernard, woodcarver with Field & Frei, 

dwl 28 O'Farrell, rear 
Bonal Jean, bootmaker, dwl 734 Vallejo 
Bonaldi G. B., (Cacioppo Sf B.J dwl 819 Vallejo 
Bonavia Nicola, frescopainter with S. Buzzi, dwl 

572 Folsom 
BOND CHARLES R., secretary Fireman's Fund 

Insurance Co., office 401 Cal, dwl 1021 Wash 
Bond John, longshoreman with Charles E. Hasel- 

tine 
Bond Richard L., carpenter and builder, dwl 1114 

Pacific 
Bond Samuel D., hairdresser with Philip P. Lehn, 

dwl 349 Minna 
Bond Thomas H. I., carpenter and builder, dwl 1114 

Pacific 
Bondau A., laundryman, dwl 2111 Mason 
Bonds George, expresswagon, dwl W s Tennessee 

nr Butte 
BONDY ADOLPH, secretary S. F. & P. Woolen 

Factory, 115 Battery, dwl 1023 Powell 
Boner David, furniture and upholstery, 1604 Stock 
Bones J. W., carpenter H. C. League, 128 Kearny 
Bonesteel Charles A., salesman with John G. 

Hodge & Co., dwl 331 Kearny 
Bonestel Charles D., with Payot, Upham & Co., 

dwl 837 California 
Bonestell John T., (California Jewelry Co.) and 

manager, 131 Sutter, dwl 740 Pine 
BONESTELL LOUIS H„ manager John G. 

Hodge & Co., dwl 512 Stockton 
Bonfiglio John B., foreman with B. Ratto & Co., 

dwl 427 Pacific 
Bongert John M., drayman, dwl G21 Broadway 
Bouge Bernard, laborer Golden State Iron Works, 

dwl 13i Fi rst 
Bonifield James T., stevedore with Henry Blyth & 

Sou, dwl 1 Main Court * 



JOBTB3, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street, Perfumery and Fancy Soaps. 



WATKINS' YO-SEMITE ART GALLERY, 26 Montg. St., opp. Lick House Entrance. 



108 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY 



Bonifield Josiah 8., barkeeper, dwl 200 Stockton 
Bonis Marcellin, butcher, NW cor Dup and Morton 

l!"iiis Pierre D., veterinary surgeon, dwl 214 Stev 
Bonjlet Elisee, laundry, 529 Hayes, dwl 525 Hayes 
Bonn John, longshoreman with Cutis. E. Haseltine 
Bounafoux Caesar, cabinetmaker with Rolland & 

Mareot, dwl S s Vallejo bet Kearny and Dup 

Bonuai'd Eureka A. Miss, teacher Spring Valley 
Primary School, dwl 1409 Jackson 

Bonnard Francis A., compositor, dwl 1-409 Jackson 

Bonuard Marina Miss, teacher South Cosmopolitan 
School, dwl 1 409 Jackson 

Bonnefond Gustave J., bookkeeper French Mutual 
Benevolent Society, dwl 351 Minna 

Bonnefous Virgil, salesman with J. W. Davidson 
& Co., dwl 534 Bush 

Bdhneheimer Francis, tailor, dwl S s Page bet 
Webster and Fillmore 

Bonnell Allison C, cashier S.F. Bulletin Co., dwl W 
8 Capp nr Twenty-fifth 

Bonnell Edwin, bookkeeper Savings and Loan So- 
ciety, dwl 709 Taylor 

Bonnell Henry, clerk with Francois A. Rouleau, dwl 
W s Capp nr Twenty-fifth 

Bonnell John T., cabinetmaker, dwl 307 O'Farrell 

Bonnell Kate Miss, teacher Pine and Larkin Street 
Primary School, dwlW s Capp nr Twenty-fifth 

Bonner C. Mrs., dwl Grand Hotel 

Bonner John, laborer with Whitney &. Freese, dwl 
1 32 Stewart 

Bonner M., (widow) dwl 1114 Post 

Bonner William, fireman with P. M. S. S. Co. 

BONNET B., brickmaker and manager Imperish- 
able Block Pavement Co., (and Bonnet & 
Skinner) office 402 Montgomery, dwl W s Do- 
lores bet Twenty-first and Twenty-second 

Bonnet Emilie, ironer with Louis M. Gautier, 1719 
Powell 

Bonnet Lawrence, laborer with G. Venard, dwl 
625 Front 

Bonnet Paul, clerk, ]2fi Sutter, dwl 820 Geary 

Bonnet & Skinner, (B. Bonnet and Robert Skin- 
nerj manufacturers Imperishable Block Pave- 
ment, Berry nr Fourth, office 402 Montgomery 

BONNEY ALPHA, Jr., manufacturer woodwork- 
ing machinery, handsaws, etc., 221 Mission, dwl 
S s Twentieth bet Guerrero' and Dolores 

Bonney Helen I. Mrs., dwl Colton House, 220 Third 

Bonniiigton T. F., seaman, dwl 32 Stewart 

Bonuy George, (George C. Shreve Sf Co.) dwl Oc- 
cidental Hotel 

Bonstel Wdlis T., clerk with John G. Hodge & Co., 
dwl 538 Ellis 

Bonynge C. W., stockbroker, office 402 Montgom- 
ery, dwl 826 Sutter 

BOOBAR E. C. & CO., (Mandell L. Richard- 
son) piledrivers and contractors, 14 Howard 

Boobar Elijah C, (E. C. Boobar Jj- Co.) dwl NW 
cor Mission and Seventh 

Boobar James, piledriver with E. C. Boobar & Co. 

Boohen Patrick, groom with W. H. L. Barnes, dwl 
E s Buchanan nr McAllister 

Book Bernard, seamau ship Wildwood, pier 1 
Steuart 

Booker Frederick, seamau North Pac. Trans. Co. S. 
S. Orizaba 

Booker George E., clerk Spring Valley Water 
Works, dwl 64 Tehama 

Booker H. E., (widow) fancy goods, 14 Second, 
dwl 64 Tehama 

BOOKER W. LANE, H. B. M. Consul, agent 
Northern Assurance Co. and Royal Mail Steam 
Packet Co., office 319 Cal, dwl Union Club 

Bookstaver Charles H., clerk, dwl 54 Bernard 

Bookstaver Samuel J., market inspector, office 521 
Jackson, dwl 54 Bernard 

Bookstaver Walter, salesman, 325 Sansom, dwl 54 
Bernard # 

Bool Christine Mrs., midwife, dwl 280 Jessie 



Bool Nelson, tailor, dwl 280 Jessie 

Boole Frank A., clerk with Flint, Peabody & Co., 

dwl NW cor Twenjty-first and Diamond 
Boole George, laborer, dwl 227 Second 
Boole George, carpenter with Middlemas & Boole, 

dwl NW cor Diamond and Twenty-first 
Boole William A., (Middlemas & B.J dwl 5 Vas- 

sar Place 
Boom Perry, (colored) paperhanger, dwl NW cor 

Leavenworth aad Green 
Boomershine Jonathan, harnessmaker, dwl 1139 Fol 
Boone Andrew, (colored) cook, 5 Broadway 
Boone John L., ( Dewey & Co.) dwl S s Twentieth 

nr Dolores 
Boone William, (colored) steward, dwl 8 Ewer 

Place 
Boop John D., doorkeeper U. S. B. Mint, dwl 104 

Sixth 
Boos George! driver with Fred. Katz, 100 California 

Market 
Booth Adam, (Adam Booth & Co J dwl 1713 Mason 
Booth Adam & Co., (Rnfus Keyser) produce com- 
mission, 326 Davis 
Booth Andrew G., attorney at law, office 601 Mer- 
chant, dwl 759 Clay 
Booth Charles S., machinist Union Iron Works, 

dwl 11 Tehama 
Booth David, machinist Union Iron Works, dwl 

11 Tehama 
BOOTH H. J. & CO., (George W. Prescott and 

Irving M.Scott) proprietors Union Iron Works, 

NE cor Mission and First 
Booth George A., plasterer, dwl 22 Turk 
Booth Henry J., (H. J. Booth & Co.) res Europe 
Booth Hosea, dairymau with Nathan Simonds, dwl 

cor Twenty-fourth and Vermont 
Booth James, spinner Pioneer Woolen Mills 
Booth Jonathan, spinner Pioneer Woolen Mills, 

dwl E s Polk nr Francisco 
Booth Lucius A., real estate, office 402 Front, res 

Oakland 
Booth Michael, cigars and tobacco, 1000 Market, 

dwl Mission bet First and Second 
Booth Newton, ( W. W. Dodge & Co.) res Sacra- 
mento 
Booth Richard, cooper, dwl 222 Jessie 
Booth Robert, tanner with Christian Hellwig, dwl 

Ss Serpentine Avenue nr Harrison 
Booth Samuel, spinner with Mission and Pacific 

Woolen Mills, dwl W s Shotwell bet Nine- 
teenth and Twentieth 
Booth William, machinist with Joshua Heudy, dwl 

346 Union 
Booth William, merchant, office 133 Sansom, dwl 

42 Tehama 
Boothby Adolph, restaurant, 26 Steuart 
Boothby David N., clerk with George W. Stewart, 

and dealer in old envelops, 206 Davis, dwl 320 

Ellis 
Boothby Ezekiel, teamster, dwl Seventh Avenue 

bet L and M. South S. F. 
Boothbv William L., foreman with R. & J. Morton, 

dw'l 320 Ellis 
Boothman James, cooperage, 417 Commercial, dwl 

622 Jessie bet Seventh aud Eighth 
Bootz Adam, real estate, dwl Ws Fair Oaks bet 

Twenty-first aud Twentv-second 
BOOTZ HOTEL, Julius Osiander, proprietor, 435 

Pine 
Bopp August, market, 1717 Stockton 
Bopp Pierre, butcher with Emil Artigues, dwl 522 

Merchant 
Boquiest Charles V., (H. Brewster & Co.) dwl 546 

Tehama 
Borbeck John, cigars, 942 Kearny, dwl 931 Kearny 
Borchalt Augustus, laborer, dwl 1309 Green 
Borchalt John H., carpenter, dwl 1309 Green 
Borehard Marv, (widow) (R- Lehman & Co.) dwl 

1007 Washington 



HUNTINGTON, HOPKINS & CO., Agents Jessop & Sons' Steel, Cor. Bush and Market. 



C P. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 & 716 Kearny St., Rubber Goods and Umbrella* 



SAN FRANCISCO [13] DIRECTORY 



109 



Borchardt Herman, clerk with Ackerraan Brothers, 

dwl 424 Clementina 
Botchers Henry, clerk with- Christian Waller, dwl 

SE cor Oak and Gough 
Borchers J. C, physician, 'office and dwl 719 Clay 
Borchers John Henry, groceries, 533 First 
Borchers William, coppersmith with James Mack- 
en, dwl 231 Main 
Borchers William, captain schooner Felicity, dwl 

231 Main 
Borde Antoinette Mrs., laundry, 808 Stockton 
Borde Frederick, expresswayon, COD Sacramento, 

dwl 1016 Powell 
Borde Julian, tanner, Ss Precita Avenue bet How- 
ard and Mission 
Bordeaux Victor, restaurant, 520 Merchant 
Borden Hamilton, delivery department Wells, Far- 
go & Co.'s Express, dwl 112 Mason 
Borden Michael, bakery, 911 Folsom 
Bordes Dalwez, laborer with Jean Ortet, dwl 223 

Leidesdortt' 
Bordenave John, baker, 539 Broadway 
Bordenave Pierre, baker, dwl 734 Vallejo 
Bordweil George, architect, office 410 Kearny, dwl 

3 Fieelou 
Bordweil Wolcotf, millwright, dwl 530 Bryant 
Borel Alfred, (Alfred Bore) & Co.) res Switzerland 
BOREL ALFRED & CO., (Autoine Borel) bank- 
ers, NW cor Jackson & Montgomery 
Borel Autoine, (Alfred Borel & Co.) and Viee- 
Consul for Switzerland, dwl 1021 Leavenworth 
BOREL FRANCIS A., wholesale butcher, office 
535 Clay, (and Clay burg <£ Co.) dwl S s 
Santa Clara nr Hampshire 
Borel Joseph, barkeeper with Gamier & Faure, 

dwl 631 Pacific 
Borel Pierre, pantryman Miners's Restauraut, dwl 

1131 Dupont 
Borella Augelo, clerk with Eugene Brunier, dwl 

531 Vallejo 
Borein Margaret Miss, dwl 133 Perry 
Borger Christian, mining superintendent, dwl 36 

Eleventh 
Borgland Hans, carpenter, dwl 313 Beale 
Borgstrom Charles, shoemaker with Utschig & 

Hanson, dwl cor O'Farrell and Mason 
Borgstrom Jennie Mrs., millinery, 1118 Dupont 
Borgstrom Peter, tailor with George L. Reynolds 
Borhers William, carpenter, dwl 26 Oak Av, rear 
Borie Henry, salesman with F. Chevalier & Co. 
Boris C. Madame, french laundry, 610 Broadway 
Borker Solomon, with John McCombe, 502 Mont 
Borkhim Henry, regimental tailor, 30 Geary 
Borle Gustavus, carpenter, dwl 515 Jessie 
Borle Louis, mattressmaker with J. F. & H. H. 

Schafer, dwl 547 Jessie 
Born Charles, barber, dwl 535 Geary 
Bornan Henry, dairyman with Isaac Stone, dwl 

San Bruno Road 3| miles from City Hall 
Bornemann Ferdinand H., bookkeeper with Wil- 
merding & Kellogg, dwl S s Thirteenth bet 
Folsom and Howard 
Bornemann Francis G., cashier U. S. Assistant 
Treasurer's office, dwl S s Thirteenth bet Fol- 
som and Howard 
Bornemann H., artist with Bradley & Rulofson 
Bonier Adolph, machinist with Theodore Kallen- 

berg. dwl Swiss Hotel, 627 Commercial 
Bornhold E., barkeeper, dwl 228 Bush 
Bornstein Bertha Miss, teacher Market Street Pri- 
mary School, dwl 91 9 Post 
Bornstein J. & Co.,(iS'. Seligsohu) gents furnishing 

goods, 704 Market 
Bornstein Julius, [J. Bornstein Sj- Co.) dwl 112 

Fourth 
Bornstein Julius, merchant, dwl 919 Post 
Bornstein Louis, peddler, dwl 3 Clay Avenue 
Bordsteiu Max, gents furnishing goods, 112 Fourth 
Borrell John, master mariner, dwl 110 Berry 



Borren Korman, upholsterer, dwl 56 Clementina 
Borrow Louis, carpetlayer with A. Boson & Co., 

dwl E s Kearny bet California and Sac 
Borsch Nicholas, porter, 420 Market, dwl 182 Stev 
Borse Isaac, peddler, dwl 420 Clementina 
Borsone Louis, fisherman, dwl SW cor East and 

Merchant 
Bort Edward, seaman, dwl 32 Steuart 
Bortfeld Ernest, hilliardtablemaker with P. Liesen- 

feld, dwl 610 Greenwich 
Borth wick Charles, bookkeeper, dwl Slli. Folsom 
Borthwick Robert, porter with Wellmau, Peck & 

Co., dwl 31 Minna 
BORUCK MARCUS D., (Chase &■ B.) dwl 714 

O'Farrell 
Bosal August, baker with Swain & Co., dwl 115 

Natoma 
Boscache Daniel, tinsmith, dwl 814 Pacific 
Bosehen Nicholas, groceries and liquors, NE cor 

Fifth and Minna 
Boscher Oliver, seaman U.S. steamship California, 

dwl 112 Steuart 
Boscowitz Leopold, (Hutchinson. Kohl & Co. J 310 

Sansom 
Bose Charles M., clerk, dwl NE cor Greenwich 

and Taylor 
Bose H., laborer California Sugar Refinery, dwl 

NW cor Eight and Byrant 
Bose John, laborer, dwl E 8 Nebraska nr El Dorado 
Bosher Emil, clerk with Carl Zeile, dwl 528 Pac 
Bosky Ferdinand, nurse German Hospital 
Bosland Samuel, dwl 836 Market 
Bosland S. Mrs., dressmaker, dwl 836 Market 
Bosmotith Martin L., carpenter, dwl 145 Jessie 
Bosq Roman, grocer, dwl 1019 Sutter 
Bosq Romaine Mrs., (widow) laundry, dwl 1019 Sut- 
ter 
Bosquet Andrew, porter with A. P. Hotaling& Co., 

dwl 5 Vallejo Place 
Bosquet A. M. Madame, dyer and scourer,217 Fourth 
Bosqui Edward, (Ednard Bosqui fy Co. J dwl 814 

Lombard 
BOSQUI EDWARD & CO., printers, stationers, 

bookbinders and engravers, SE cor Clay and 

Leidesdortt' 
Boss Henry, cabinetmaker with G. Ueffinger & Co., 

dwl 34 Hayes 
Bosselman Henry J. C, hackman Plaza, dwl SW 

cor Kearny and Jackson 
Bosselmann Heinrich, seaman, dwl 37 Pacific 
Bossely Richard, laborer, dwl 1824 Powell 
Bost John W., civil eugineer and survevor. dwl 728 

Bush 
Bostwick Horace M., clerk with George I. Ives, 

dwl 814 California 
Boston Board Underwriters, Joseph S. Bacon 

agent, office 428 California 
Boston House, John W. Johnson, proprietor, S s 

Jackson bet Drumm and Davis 
Boston House, Miss Mary Kerrigan, proprietress, 

759 and 761 Mission 
Boston Joseph, (Gray, Jones & Co.) res Santa 

Cruz 
BOSTON LINE PACKETS .(Glidden & Williams 

line) agency 218 California 
Boston Mary, (widow) dwl 468 Minna 
BOSTON MASTIC ROOFIXG, N. P. Perine, 

proprietor, Townsend nr Fourth, office 638 

Market 
BOSTON RUBBER SHOE CO.; Hecht Bros. & 

Co, agents, 106 Sansom 
Bostrom Peter, seaman, dwl 37 Pacific 
Bostrou Peter, mate schooner Harry Drew, dwl 

N 8 Oregon bet East ami DruAm 
Bostwick John H., farmer, dwl 818 Lombard 
Bostwick Samuel W., prompter Metropolitan Thea- 
ter, dwl 3 Hardie Place 
Bostwick Sarah, (widow) furnished rooms, 3 Har- 
die Place 



JONES, PULLMAN" & CO., 116 Sansom Street, Silk and Velvet Ribbons. 



WATKINS' YO-SEMITE ART GALLERY, 26 Montg. St., opp. Lick House Entrance. 



110 



SAN FRANCISCO B] DIRECTORY 



Boswell John, carpenter, dwl 820 Washington 
BoBwell S. B., (Edward F. Hall & Co.) dwl 

Grand Hotel 
Bosworth A. J. Miss, saleswoman with Guillet & 

Klaas, dwl Es Torrens Conrt 
BoBworth Elisha C. (Stanton & B.) dwl 125 Ellis 
Bosworth George F., compositor Examiner, dwl 

1020 Montgomery 
Boswortb Henry M., organist and teacher of music, 

dwl 910 Ge'arv 
BOSWORTH WILLIAM, mining, office 432 Mont- 
gomery, dwl 125 Ellis 
Botcher Albert, groceries and liquors, SW cor Mc- 
Allister and Buchanan 
Botefuhr Frank, porter, 221 California, dwl New 

Atlantic Hotel 
Both Richard, cooper with Cutting & Co., dwl 222 

Jessie 
Bothe Lewis, confectioner witb Dexter & Co., dwl 

275 Stevenson 

Bothe Sophie, (widow) midwife, dwl 275 Stevenson 

Botbmann Frederick, express wagon, NEcor Fourth 

and Mission, dwl Ws Brannan Place nr Bran 

Botron Ferdinand, cabinetmaker, dwl 8 August 

Alley 
Bottaziui Louis A., printer with Spanieling & Barto, 

dwl 825 Jackson 
Bottcher Henry, seaman* dwl 39 Jackson 
Bolter Frank j., dwl S s Hinckley nr Dnpont 
Bottger John, groceries and liquors, SE cor Seven- 
teenth and Mission 
Bottle John, carpenter, dwl Ss Jackson betFilmore 

and Steiner 
Bottner Henry, teamster, dwl SW cor Battery and 

Greeu 
Botto Margaret, (widow) dwl 30 Lewis 
Bottomley Charles, driver Central Railroad, dwl 

W s Devisadero bet O'Farrell and Geary 
Botts Charles T., attorney at law, office 28 Mont- 
gomery Block, res Oakland 
BOUCHER EUGENE, merchant tailor, 537 Sac- 
ramento, dwl 53ti Fine 
Boucher James, porter, 32 Sansom, dwl 550 Stev 
Boucher Jefferson, laborer with Hancock & Kelso 
Boucher Thomas, boilermaker with McAfee, Spiers 

& Co. 
Boudan Alcide, laundry, dwl 2111 Mason 
Bouderigue Francis, lodging house, 724 Pacific 
Boudin Louis, upholsterer with Goodwin «fc Co., 
dwl E s Mission bet Twenty-fifth and Twenty- 
sixth 
Boudin & Glei/.es, (Louis Boudin and Benjamin 

Gleizex) bakery, 43b' Green, rear 
Boudolpbi Peter, waiter, dwl 1034 Clay 
Boudrye Felix, brickmaker, dwl 815 Broadway 
Boueche Manuele, laborer with J. P. Tenthorey & 

Co., dwl 558 Mission 
Bouffe Jean, waiter, dwl 536 Broadway 
Bouge Thomas, waiter Rues House 
Bon 1 1 Paul, laborer Metropolitan Gas Works, dwl 

32 Ranscb 
Boukofsky Edward, merchant, dwl 941 Howard 
Boukofsky M. Mrs., dwl 928 Harrison 
Boulanger John, furnished rooms, 438 Broadway 
Boulanger M. C.,coal yard, 1165 Howard 
BOULDIN THOMAS T., attorney-at-law, office 
Court Block, 636 Clay, dwl Relay House, cor 
Mission and First 
Boulin Pierre, dwl 517 Filbert, 

Boullet Joseph, (Boullet & Whipple) dwl 317 Clem 
Boullet, & Whipple, (Joseph Boullet and Edward 

Whipple) Club Rooms, 110 Sutter 
Boulogne Edonard, proprietor Barron House, 1008 

Dnpont 
Boulon Etienne, syrup manufacturer, dwl 613 

Union, rear 
Bounce James, barkeeper, dwl 919 Stockton 
Bonrdet John, clerk with Pardow & Preston, dwl 
730 Minna 



Bourdin Michael, boilermaker Portland Boiler 

Works, dwl DIM Folsom 
Bourgeois Alexandre, wagon manufacturer, 630 

Broadway 
Bourgeois Louis, cook, dwl 231 Second 
Bourguignon August, boots and shoes, 1034 Kearny 
Bourke Patrick, laborer, dwl 644 Filbert 
Bourn Richard A., shoemaker with Buckingham & 

Hecht, dwl 231 Minna 
BOURN WILLIAM B., capitalist and president 
Empire Mining Co., office 401 California, dwl 
1105 Taylor 
BOURNE ELISHA W., secretary Merchants' Mu- 
tual Marine Insurance Co., office 406 California, 
dwl 428 Bryant 
Bourne George M., phvsician, office and dwl 727 

Clay 
Bourne John B., stockbroker, dwl 1022 Jackson 
Bourne Richard M., clerk, dwl Grand Hotel 
BOUKQUIN CHARLES, surgeon dentist, and of 
the French Mutual Benevolent Society, dwl 
802 Washington 
Bourquin Emil, minstrel, dwl SE cor Leaven- 
worth and Filbert 
Bourquinon Ernst, shoemaker with Orrin Jones, 

dwl 10 Kearny 
Bousfield Daniel j., assayer with Hentsch & Ber- 

ton, dwl cor Twenty-second and Mission 
Bousquet A. M., (widow) dressmaker, 1028 Kearny 
Boutard Charles, laundry, 526 Hayes 
Boutelle Percy, dwl 537 Sacramento 
Boutelle William C, receiver Central R. R., dwl 

116 Taylor 
Boutes James F., barkeeper with Coon &. O'Reilly, 

dwl 919 Stockton 
Boutinon Simon (Boutinon Sf Bulland ) dwl 530 

Merchant 
Boutinon & Bulland, (Simon Boutinon and Be/wit 

Bulland) restaurant, 530 Merchant 
Boutou Daniel, (Boulon & Son) dwl Kill Stockton 
Bouton Francis G., (Bouton & Son) dwl 1011 Stock 
Bouton Nathan, machinist, dwl 3 McCormack 
Bouton &, Sou, (Daniel and Francis G. Bouton) 
livery stable, 1016 Stockton, and proprietors 
Occidental Hotel coaches 
Boutz Frederick, confectioner with Henry Blum, 

dwl 1817 Powell 
Bouvard N., commission merchant, dwl 253 Stev 
Bouvet Jules, french laundry, 716 Vallejo 
Bovee James S., mining engineer, dwl 1610 Bush 
Bovee William, clerk, dwl Niautic Hotel 
Bovee William H., real estate, office 526 California, 

dwl 115 Powell 
Bovee William H. Jr., operator Western Union 

Telegraph Co., 400 Mont, dwl 1515 Powell 
Bovostrello Francisco, laborer with Cadenasso & 

Tttbiuo, 515 Merchant 
Bow W. A., bagsewer with Reynolds & Ford, dwl 

401 Stewart. 
Bovver William L., arcbitect.carpenter and builder, 

107 Leidesdorff, dwl 625 Sutter 
Bow Frank, laborer, dwl N s Fulton nr Lagtina 
Bowcber James, ( IVood <Sc B.) dwl 608 Mission 
Bowden J. Miss., housekeeper, dwl 212 Chestnut 
Bowden John, laborer, dwl 2 Liberty 
Bowden Joseph, painter, dwl 1107 Filbert 
Bowden Samuel H. N., master mariner, dwl 148 

Silver 
Bowden William, housepainter, dwl 1113 Filbert 
Bowden William Jr., housepainter, dwl 1113 Fil- 
bert 
Bowdish M. S.. agent Challenge feed mill, office with 

Hawley & Co., dwl 295 Clementina 
Bowen A. G. M., accountant, office 406 Montgom- 
ery, dwl 725 California 
Boweii Alfred, ( Empey & B.) dwl 365 Union 
Bowen Archibald J., stevedore, dwl NE cor Mont- 
gomery and Alta 
Bowen Asa M., ex-deputy sheriff, dwl 720 Lombard 



HUNTINGTON, HOPKINS & CO., Wholesalo Hardware and Iron, Cor. Bush and Market. 



C. P. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Jewelry and Albums. 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY 



Hi 



BOWEN BROTHERS, (Pardon M. Bowen) 
wholesale and retail groceries and provisions, 
432 and 434 Pine bet Mont and Kearny, and 
W s Railroad Avenue bet Eleventh and Twelfth 
Avenue, South S. F. 
Bowen C. C. Miss, teacher Denman School, dwl 

824 Bush 
Bowen Charles H., buyer with Bowen Brothers, 

dwl 1139 Sutter 
Bowen Daniel, laundry man Cosmopolitan Hotel 
Bowen Daniel J., compositor Figaro, dwl Ns Na- 

toma nr Mary 
Bowen David, seaman, dwl 32 Steuart 
Bowen David C., seaman, dwl 106 .Jackson 
Bowen Dennis, hostler with N. Gray & Co., dwl 

442 Jessie 
Bowen E. J., seedsman, 240 Montgomery 
Bowen EiadsitL, (BowenSfBlocum) dwl 023 Sutter 
Bowen Ezekiel C., pressman U. S. B. Mint, dwl 

5 s Vallejo nr Leavenworth 

Bowen George H., miller Golden Gate Flour Mills, 

dwl E sDevisadero bet Turk and Eddy 
Bowen Henry, driver, dwl S s Ellis nr Filmore 
Bowen Henry R., fisherman, dwl 106 Jackson 
Bowen J., (widow) dwl 44 Louisa 
Bowen James B., packer with Stevens & Gray, 737 

Howard 
Bowen John, brassfinisher Union Brass Foundry, 

dwl 6 O'Farrell Alley 
Bowen John, butcher, dwl 910^ Folsom 
Bowen John, hostler, dwl 6 William 
Bowen John L., tinsmith with Osgood & Stetson, 

dwl 1309 Jackson 
Bowen John M., baker with California Cracker Co., 

dwl SE cor Front and Oregon 
Bowen Kate Miss, chambermaid Occidental Hotel 
Bowen Maria Miss, chambermaid Occidental Hotel 
Bowen Michael, laborer, dwl 915 Market 
Bowen Michael, laborer with Charles E. Haseltine, 

dwl 312 Main 
Bowen Pardon M., (Bowen Brothers) dwl 1139 

Sutter 
Bowen Reuben W., forwarder with A. L. Bancroft 

6 Co., dwl 37^ Langton 
Bowen R. P. Mrs., dwl 1100 Pine 

Bowen Thomas, with Bowen & Slocum, dwl 925 

Sutter 
Bowen & Slocum, (Eladsit J. Bowen and Lot D. 

Slocum) boarding and hack stables, 921 and 

923 Sutter 
Bower George, miner, dwl 31 Clara 
Bower Leopold, glue factory, dwl N s Moulton nr 

Webster 
Bowers — , salesman with John C. Bell, dwl 1509 

California 
Bowers Alonzo B., civil engineer, dwl 525* Howard 
Bowers Charles, speculator, dwl 927 Howard 
Bowers Hannah, (widow) saloon, 730 Pacific 
Bowers John T., insurance agent, dwl 1007 Jones 
Bowers Michael, cartman, dwl 949 Folsom 
Bowers Robert, painter, S s Oregon bet Drumm 

and Davis 
Bowers Warren O., chief engineer stm Pilot, dwl 

208 Kearny 
Bowery Consolidated Mill and M. Co., (Pioche 

Nev.) office 419 California 
Bowes John M., weigher, dwl 79 Jessie 
Bowhan Michael, laborer Laborers' Pro. and Ben. 

Association, 814 Howard 
Bowie Augustus J., (Bowie ^-Breeze) dwl NW cor 

Stockton and Sutter 
Bowie Augustus J. Jr., mining engineer, 302 Calif- 
ornia, dwl 438 Bryant 
Bowie George W., U. S, naval officer, office Cus- 
tom House, third floor, dwl Grand Hotel 
Bowie Henry P., (Barnes 4" B.) attorney at-law, 

office 438 Cal, dwl NW cor Sutter and "Stockton 
Bowie Wallace A., clerk with S. P. Taylor & Co., 

dwl 227 Second 



Bowie William D., ex-clerk County Recorder, dwl 

1520 Mission 
BOWIE & BREEZE, (Augustus J. Bowie and 
Charles K. Breeze) physicians and surgeons, 
office 622 Clay 
Bowlan James, " coachman Grand Hotel, dwl 9 

Everett 
Bowlen Thomas H., coachman with Bouton & Son, 

Occidental Hotel 
Bowles Frank, pa perh anger, dwl 219 Pacific 
Bowles G. R., carpenter H. C. League, 128 Kearny 
Bowles James, antiquarian bookstand, SE cor 

Leidesdorffaud Commmercial, dwl 627 Cal 
Bowles Richard, laborer Union Iron Works, dwl 

12 Natoma, rear 
Bowley Freeman, engineer Sonthern Pacific R. R. 
Bowley Henry L., bookkeeper, 9 Merchants' Ex- 
change, dwl 423 Hrvant 
Bowley Samuel C, {Chase & B.) dwl 423 Bryant 
Bowlin Frank, clerk, 328 Bush, dwl 631 Sacramento 
Bowling John, seaman, dwl 531 East 
Bowman Amos, geological survey, dwl 17 Rondel 

Place 
Bowman Arthur W., real estate office, 523 Mont- 
gomery, dwl 821 Bush 
Bowman 'Bernard, dwl SW cor Columbia and 

Twenty-fourth 
BOWMAN C. C, merchant, office 728 Montgomery 
Bowman Charles, clerk, dwl 523 Post 
Bowman Charles E., carpeuter. cor Powell and 

Eddv, dwl San Bruno Road, Paul Tract, 
BOWMAN CHARLES H, clerk California Pa- 
cific R. R. CO., dwl NW cor Eighth and Fol 
Bowman C. R., carpenter H. C. League. 128 Kearny 
Bowman Emma Miss, saleswoman, 12 Kearny, dwl 

S s Clara nr Fourth 
Bowman Frank E., machinehand California Plan- 
ing Mill, dwl 3 Liberty 
Bowman George E., conductor Omnibus R. R., dwl 

164 Tehama 
Bowman Henry, carpenter H. C. League, 128 

Kearny 
Bowman James N, secretary U. S. postal agent, 
office 7 Montgomery Block, dwl 714 Broadway 
Bowman James, dwl 901 Kearny 
BOWMAN JAMES F., editor, "dwl 1005 Clay 
Bowman J. E., milkman, dwl cor McAllister and 

Buchanan 
Bowman Joel K., hoarding, 164 Tehama 
Bowman John, engineer, dwl 132 Stenart 
Bowman John C, groceries and liquors, 523 Union 
Bowman John S.,(Liebes & B.) dwl 311 Stockton 
Bowman Jonas W., tanner, dwl E s Dora bet Har- 
rison and Bryant 
Bowman Joseph, dwl nr Odd Fellows Cemetery 
Bowman Michael, clerk, 432 Cal, dwl 915 Mission 
Bowman P. E., (widow) dwl 1119 Montgomery 
Bowman Samuel, driver Market Street R. R., dwl 

545 Linden 
Bowman William, bootmaker with I. M. Went- 

worth & Co., dwl SW cor Page and Octavia 
Bowman William F., milkman, 439 Hayes 
Bowne R. A., bootmaker with Buckingham & 

Hecht, dwl 233 Minna 
Bowne William F., real estate, office 311 East, dwl 

107 Powell 
Bowne William S., [Wright & B.) dwl 1105 Sac 
Bowren Townsend, driver steamer No. 4, S. F. F. 

D., dwl 44 Second 
Bowring George, porter with J. D. Arthur & Son 
Boyce Bros., [James E. and Charles A.) street 
car advertising agents, NW cor Wash and San 
Boyce Charles A., (Boyce Bros.) dwl 10 John 
Boyce Frank S., with Boyce Bros., dwl 10 John 
Boyce Henry, cagemaker, dwl 446 Braiman 
Boyce James E., [Boyce Bros.) res Montgomery, 

Alabama 
Boyce John, fireman S. F. & P. Sugar Refinery, 
dwl 412 Shipley, rear 



JONES, PULLMAN &■ CO., 116 Sansom Street, Yankee Notions. 



WATKINS' YO-SEMITE ART GALLERY, 26 Montg. St., opp. Lick. House Entrance. 



112 



SA'N FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY, 



Boyce John, laborer, bds 29 First 

Boyce John, laborer, dwl 550 Stevenson, rear 

Boyce Mums, seaman, dwl 104 Steuart 

Boyce Samuel, with Thomas Boyce, 30. Merchants' 

Exchange 
Boyce Shephard B., salesman, 9 Mont, dwl 19 Pow 
Boyce Thomas, advertising agent, office 30 Mer- 

' chants' Exchange, dwl 520 Bryant 
Boyce William, (colored) porter, dwl SE cor Mis- 

* biod and Fonrth 

Boyd Alexander, [Boyd & Davis) dwl 500 Sutter 
Boyd Colin RL, assistant register clerk Twelfth Dis 

' trict Court, dwl 553 Howard 
Boyd David, laborer Mechanics' Planing Mill, dwl 

Glover nr Leavenworth 
Boyd David, porter with Lowry cc Wightman, dwl 

Branch House 
Boyd E. T., plumber, and gas fitting, 840 Clay, dwl 

' 815 Bosh 
Boyd Frank, pilot, office U. S. Court Building, dwl 

W s Pi ingle's Court ur Greenwich . 
Boyden Frank L., driver S. F. Laundry, dwl NW 

cor Turk and Fillmore 
Boyd George, foreman Fashion Stable, dwl Cosmo- 
politan Hotel 
Boyd George W., captain ship Wildwc*d, dwl S s 

Columbia bet Dolores and Guerrero 
Boyd Harry C, clerk, 304 Mont, dwl 940 Folsom 
Boyd Henry, seaman North Pac. Trans. Co.'s S. S. 

John L. Stephens 
Boyd H'.'iiry C, proprietor Niantic Hotel, NW cor 

Clay and Sansom 
Boyd James, clerk, dwl S s Sacramento nr Franklin 
Boyd James, machinist, dwl 159 Silver 
Boyde James, seaman N. P. Trans. Co.'s S.S. Idaho 
Boyd James, stonecutter, dwl 1404 Hyde 
Boyd James L., stevedore with Whitney <fc Freese, 

dwl 1820 Stockton 
Boyd James T., (McCidlough & B.) attorney at 
law, office NW cor Kearny and Commercial, 
dwl SW cor Franklin and Sacramento 
Boyd J. Edmond, seaman ship Wildwood, pier 1 

Steoart 
Boyd John, cabinetmaker, dwl 747 Folsom 
Boyd John, drayman with C. Bernard, dwl 14 Wil- 
low Avenue 
Boyd John F., mining, office 419 California, dwl 127 

Kearny 
Boyd Joseph, tinsmith, dwl 1257 Montgomery 
Boyd Joseph C, clerk, dwl 142 Clara 
Boyd I diver, dwl NE cor Sacramento and Front 
Boyd Oliver Dean, deputy assessor Citv and Coun- 
ty, dwl 212 Chestnut 
Boyd Theodore C, clerk with E. E. Eyre, dwl 

Post nr Polk- 
Boyd Theodore C, wood engraver and stationer, 

' dwl 1718 Hyde 
Boyd Thomas W., machinist ^Etna Iron Works, 

* dwl 447 Tehama 

Boyd William, captain ship MarmionP.M.S.S. Co.'s 

Wharf, dwl cor Howard and Russ 
Boyd William, cook with John Reagan, dwl Ss 

Francisco nr Kearny 
Boyd William, manufacturer yeast powder and 

cream tartar, 416 Battery, res Oakland 
Boyd William A., brewer with Lyon & Co., dwl 

540 Folsom 
Boyd William P., salesman, 606 Market, dwl 17 

Perrv 
Boyd William W., driver Central R. R., dwl NW 

cor Sixth and Braunan 
BOYD & DAVIS, (Alexander Boyd and J. Z. 

Davis) capitalists, office 321 Front 
Boye Otto, (Otto Boye & Co.) dwl 341 Clementina 
Boye Otto & Co., (Ernest Schnutenhaus) oyster 

taloon, 7 Merchants Exchange 
Boyenvan Armand, cellarmaster with I. Landsber- 

ger &. Co., dwl SW cor Dupont and Bdwy 
Boyer Louis W., clerk, dwl 1220 Pine 



Boyer Urbain, laborer with G. Venard, dwl 631 

Pacific 
Boyer William, bootmaker, dwl 31 Russ, rear 
Boyer William, lamplighter S. F. Gas Co., dwl 34 

Kuss 
Boyes James, driver with Charles Nauman, dwl SE 

cor Folsom and Twenty-first 
Boyhan John, carriage trimmer with Pollard & Car- 

ville Manufacturing Co., dwl 445 Natoma 
Boyhan Patrick, .carriagetrimnier with Pollard & 

Carvill Manufacturing Co., dwl Berry House 
Boylan Bernard, cellarinan with I. Landsberger & 

Co., dwl 8 Auburn 
Boylan Joseph, clerk, dwl Ws South Park Avenue 
Boylan M. Mrs., (widow) dwl 813 Filbert, rear 
Boylan Matthew, laborer, dwl 523 Fulton 
Boylan Michael, metermau S. F. Gas Co., dwl 568 

Mission 
Boylan. — See Boylen 
Boyle Alexander, mate North Pac. Trans. Co.'s S.S. 

California 
Boyle Annie, (widow T ) furnished rooms. 212 Post 
Boyle Arthur, molder JEtna Iron Works, dwl 

Wheeler House 
Boyle Barney, workman T. H. Selby &. Co.'s 

Smelting Works. North Beach 
Boyle Daniel, laborer Pacific Rolling Mill, dwl Po- 

trero Point 
Boyle Daniel, painter, dwl 552 Mission 
Boyle David, inventor, dwl 440| Natoma 
Boyle Dennis, (Makoney, Foley & B.J dwl 448 

Natoma 
Boyle Edward, porter, 210 Cal, dwl 432 Tehama 
Boyle George S., dentist, office 429 Montgomery, 

" dwl 1821 Stockton 
Boyle Hannah Mrs., dwl 1821 Stockton 
BOYLE HENRY, mining secretary, office 10 Stev- 
enson Building, res Alameda 
Boyle James, foreman North Beach & Mission R. 

' R. Stables, dwl 236 Perry 
Boyle James, laborer, dwl E 8 Capp bet Twenty- 
fourth and Twenty-fifth 
Boyle James, plasterer, dwl 423 Bush 
Boyle John, carpenter H. C. League, 128 Kearny 
Boyle John, expresswagon, junction Market and 

Sacramento, dwl W s Steuart bet Market and 

Mission 
Boyle John, clerk with A. McBoyle & Co. 
Boyle John, gasfitter with David Bush, dw4 cor 

Minna and Second 
Boyle John, real estate agent, office 502 Montgomery, 

dwl SE cor Hayes and Pierce 
Boyle John, teamster, 1 Steuart, dwl 34 Steuart 
Boyle J. P., carpenter H. C. League, 128 Kearny 
Boyle Michael, heater Pacific Rolling Mill, dwl Po- 

trero Point 
Boyle Neal, laborer with Arthur M. Ebbets, dwl 

37 Minna 
Boyle Owen O., laborer Market Street R. R., dwl 

Valencia bet Fifteenth and Sixteenth 
Boyle Patrick, carpenter, dwl W s Ohio bet Vallejo 

and Broadway 
Boyle Patrick, laborer with Whitney & Freese 
Boyle Patrick, lumberman, dwl 17 Natoma 
Boyle Patrick, machinist, dwl 709 Brannan 
Boyle Peter, engineer, dwl 29 First 
Boyle Peter, laborer, dwl 234 Fremont 
Boyle Peter, laborer, dwl 433 Broadway 
Boyle Peter, laborer Union Iron Works, dwl 35 

First, 
Boyle Peter, molder Empire Foundry, dwl 55 

Natoma 
Boyle Robert, (Mallon <$• B.J dwd N s Green bet 

Hyde and Larkin 
Boyle Robert, farmer, Ocean Beach Road nr Ocean 

House 
Boyle S. J. Miss, teacher Hayes Valley Primary 

School, dwl Bush bet Laguna and Octavia 
Boyle Stephen, helper Pioneer Iron Works 



HUNTINGTON, HOPKINS & CO., Agents Jessop & Sons' Steel, Cor. Bush and Market.' 



C. P. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Yankee Notions. 



SAN FRANCISCO [BJ DIRECTORY* 



113 



Boyle Thomas, longshoreman, dwl 623 Davis 

Boyle Thomas, sbipjoiuer, dwl 1832 Bush 

Boyle Thomas J., cierk with Hamhleton & Gordon, 

dwl 18 Taylor 
Boyle William, clerk with A. McBoyle & Co. 
Boyle William, glasscutter with John Mallon, dwl 

N s Green bet Larkin and Hyde 
Boyle William, laborer, dwl N s Twenty-third bet 

Noe and Castro 
Boyle William, seaman, dwl 9 Broadway 
Boylen Charles, fruits, 1426 Stockton 
Boylen James, laborer, dwl 123 Spear, rear 
Boyling Thomas, captain ship Isaac Jeanes, pier 17 

Steuart, dwl 331 Seventh 
Boyne Ellen, (widow) dwl N s Vauderwater nr 

Powell 
Boyne George, mail clerk Alta California, dwl 3 

Codman Place 
Boyne Joseph, laborer, dwl 3 Codman Place 
Boyne Thomas, proprietor Union Sailor's Home, 45 

Vallejo 
Boynton B. R., proprietor Morton House, 117 Post 
Boynton Charles, carriage maker with M. W. Allen 

' & Co., dwl 549 Bryant 
Boynton G. P., carpenter H. C. League, 128 Kearny 
Boynton Lamour A., clerk U. S. Assistant Treas 

urer's Office, dwl 513 Minna 
Boynton Underbill, real estate agent, office 402 

Montgomery, dwl 776 Howard 
Boys Henry, boatman, dwl 39 Jackson 
Boysen Constance Mrs., hattrimmer with Fisher 

& Co., dwl 313 Masou 
Boysen Charles M., hatter with K. MeussdorfFer, 

" dwl 627 Green 
Boysen Frank, boatman, dwl 39 Jackson 
Boysen Hans, boatman, dwl 505 Filbert 
Boysen Julius, hatter, 514 Pine 
Boysen Peter S., drayman with Higgins & Collins, 

dwl W s Spear nr Mission 
Boyston John, barkeeper with Francis Kelly 
Bozzio Orlando, barkeeper, dwl 783 Market 
Bozzo Emanuele, coal, dwl 1422 Powell 
Braack Ernest, carpenter, dwl 39 Jackson 
Braasch Claus, porter, dwl New Atlantic Hotel 
Braceling Patrick, teamster with William Kerr, 

dwl 909 Battery, rear 
Brack Oswarld, bootmaker, 1506 Franklin 
Bracken Catherine, (widow) dwl Columbia bet 

Nineteenth and Twentieth 
Bracken George, clerk with C. E. McCusker& Co., 

dwl 225 Sixth 
Bracken John, proprietor Five Mile House, San 

Bruno Road 
Bracken Lawrence, expresswagon, SW cor Mission 

and Third, dwl 430 Seventh 
Brackenwagon Henrv, cabinetmaker with George 

B. May & Co., dwl 430 Vallejo 
Brackett James G. Jr., flourpacker with J. Mar- 

tenstein & Co. 
Brackett Jeremiah, piledriver with E. C. Boobar 

&Co. 
Brackett John, laborer with Charles E. Haseltine 
Brackett Joseph G., miller National Mills, dwl 1512 

Hyde 
Brackett Lawrence, expresswagon, cor Third and 

Mission 
Brackett William L., (Brackett & Keves) dwl 412 

Tavlor 
BRACKETT & KEYES, (William L. Brackett 

and Orson H. Keyes) proprietor Steuart Street 

Market, 50 Steuart 
Braconuier Louis, upholsterer, dwl 8 Lafayette 

Place 
Bradbury Alfred W., student Heald's Business Col- 
lege, dwl 1320 California 
Bradbury A. P., captain steamer Enterprise, dwl 

Coso House 
Bradbury Nathaniel F., carpenter Mechanics' Mill, 

dwl W s Van Ness Avenue nr Bush 



Bradbury V. Miss, teacher Pine and Larkin Street 

Primary School, dwl 1320 California 
BRADBURY WILLIAM B., sash, door, blind and 

molding manufacturer, Mechanics' Mill, SW cor 

Mission and Fremont, dwl 1416 Bush 
Bradbury William T., physician, dwl S s Twenty- 
second bet Shotwell and Folsom 
Bradbury's Building, 52 Second 
Braddock William, carriage painter, dwl 5 Beale 

Place nr Main 
Braddon James, carpenter, dwl 212 Steuart 
Bradeu Thomas, contractor, dwl SE cor Pierce and 

Eddy 
Brader Anna, (widow) dwl 740 Broadway 
Brader Christian, manufacturer, dwl 736 Bdwy 
Brader Henry, wholesale liquors, 621 Sausoni, dwl 

738 Broadway 
Brader Louis, salesmau with Henry Brader, dwl 

322 Third 
Brader Patrick, hostler Market St. R, R., dwl Har- 
riet bet Fifteenth and Sixteenth 
Brader Peter, soda bottler, dwl 29 Anthony 
Bradford C. H., office 413 California, dwl Grand 

Hotel 
Bradford George, painter, dwl Niantic Hotel 
Bradford George B., real estate agent, dwl 65 Te- 
hama 
Bradford George L., clerk with Cook <fe Co., dwl 

65 Tehama 
Bradford Gershon, commander U. S. steamer Marcy, 

dwl 839 Mission 
Bradford Henry L., waiter International Hotel 
Bradford James, seaman, dwl 238 Steuart 
Bradford Joseph F., salesmau with J. Brandenstein 

& Co., dwl 729 Natoma 
Bradford Mary, (widow) dwl 127 Kearny 
Bradford Peter, liquor saloon, 1012 Kearny 
Bradford Putnam F., miuer, dwl E s Shotwell bet 

Nineteenth and Twentieth 
Bradford Thomas H., mariner, dwl 65 Tehama 
Bradford Wallace, clerk with Plum, Bell & Co., 

dwl 1 Winter's Lane 
Bradford W. B., dwl 325* Bush 
Bradford William, carpenter and builder, 125 Fifth, 

dwl 376 Natoma 
Bradford Woodbury, printer, dwl 1 Winter's Lane 
Bradfort Robert, seaman North Pac. Trans. Co.'s 

S. S. John L. Stephens 
Bradigan James, laborer with Whitney & Freese 
Bradigau Nicholas, (I. (V. Davidson & Co. J dwl 

SE cor Clinton and Braunan 
Bradlee F. K., brakemau Southern Pacific R. R. 
Bradlee Stephen H., carpenter and stairbuilder, dwl 

S s Hollis nr Ellis 
Bradlee Stephen H. Jr., butcher with G. A. Raabe, 

dwl 1145 FoLom 

Bradley , dwl 204 Sutter 

Bradley Anson F., conductor City Railroad, dwl 

NE cor Fourteenth and Mission 
Bradley Benjamin, laundryman City and County 

Hospital 
Bradlev Bennett T., wharfinger Commercial Street 

Wharf, dwl 1421 Bush 
Bradley Bernard, painter, dwl S s Willow Avenue 

nr Buchanan 
Bradley Charles, lautadryman with S. F. Laundry 

Association, dwl NW cor Fillmore and Turk 
Bradley Cornelius, longshoreman with Charles E. 

Haseltine, dwl 249 Perry 
Bradley Daniel, laborer Central Pacific R. R., dwl 

163 Tehama 
Bradley Edward, laborer, dwl 163 Jessie 
Bradley Edward, seaman, dwl 112 Steuart 
Bradley Eliza, (widow) furnished rooms, 1014 

Stockton 
Bradley E. P. Mrs., teacher Denman Grammar 

School, dwl 34 Tehama . 
Bradley Francis, driver Market Street R. R., dwl 

S s Seventeenth nr Mission 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street, White Goods. 
8 



WATKINS' YO-SEMITE ART GALLERY, 26 Montg. St., opp. Lick House Entrance. 



114 



S#N FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY. 



Bradley George L., (Bradley & Cockrill) dwl 820 

Sutter 
BRADLEY HENRY VV., importer photographic 

and iiinlirotype materials, 618 and 620 Clay, 

fand Brad fey Sf Rnlofson) res Alameda 
Bradley James, teamster, 214 First 
Bradley J- B., capitalist, dwl Russ House 
Bradley John, barkeeper, dwl 589 Market 
Bradley John, hostler with Hasbrouck & Clayburgh, 

dwl 171 Jessie 
Bradley John, waiter Cosmopolitan Hotel 
Bradley John A., grocer, dwl S s Pacific nr Laguna 
Bradley John J., farmer, dwl 438 Uniou, rear 
Bradley Joseph, cooper Cal. Sugar Refinery, dwl 

S s Nineteenth nr Sanchez 
Bradley J. W., student Heald's Business College, 

dwl 108 Hyde 
Bradley Levi L., clerk, dwl 204 Montgomery 
Bradley Michael, driver Front Street M. & O. R. R., 

dwl 37 Austin 
Bradley Nicholas, plasterer, dwl '-219 Minna 
Bradley Otho I., blacksmith with Charles McArrou, 

dwl 3-27 Fifth 
Bradley Patrick, conductor N. B. & M. R. R., dwl 7 

Haywood 
Bradley Patrick, laborer Golden Gate Park, dwl 

Baker nr Geary 
Bradley Patrick, secondhand furniture, dwl 209 

Perry 
Bradlev Peter, expresswagon, SE cor Kearny and 

California, dwl 209 Perrv 
Bradley Richard B., (colored") caterer with Henry 

Smith, NVV cor Jackson and Stockton, dwl 9 

John 
Bradley Robert, lather, dwl 1920 Polk 
Bradley Samuel, patternmaker, dwl Es Minna bet 

Fourteenth and Fifteenth 
Bradlev Theodore, principal Boys' High School, 

dwl 34 Tehama 
Bradley Thomas, laborer, bds 29 First 
Bradley Thomas, laborer, dwl 116 Pacific 
Bradley Thomas W., (George IV. Sawindb Co.) dwl 

608 Broadway 
Bradley William, (Bradley & Joyce) dwl NE cor 

Fourth and Bryant 
Bradley William, laborer, dwl W s Lyons bet Post 

and Geary 
Bradley William, laborer, dwl 574 Bryant 
Bradley William, stonemason, dwl 532 Broadway 
Bradlev William, teamster, dwl Black Point 
Bradley William O., carrier S. F. Post Office, dwl 

16 John 
Bradley William P., driver Bamber & Co's Express, 

dwl 1012 Montgomery 
BRADLEY & COCKRILL, (George L. Bradley 

and Theodore G. Cockrill) importers and job- 
bers liquors, 521 Front 
Bradley & Joyce, (William Bradley and John 

Joyce) wood and coal. NE cor Verona and Third 
BRADLEY & RULOFSON, (Henry W. Bradley 

a ml William H. Rulofson) photographic art 

gallery, 429 Montgomery, cor Sacramento 
Bradrick Isaac, express wagon, SW cor Washington 

and Front, dwl 113 Dora 
Brad-haw George H, clerk, dwl 708 Leavenworth 
Bradshaw H. Bruce, clerk with Nelsou & Doble, 

dwl 474 Tehama 
Bradshaw Louis, carpenter II. C. League, 128 

Kearny 
Bradshaw Richard, blacksmith with Taber & Cun- 
ningham, dwl 656 Howard 
Bradshaw S. M. Co., (Silver Park District, Nev.J 

office 27 Merchants' Exchange 
Bradshaw Samuel C, (widow) dwl 708 Leav 
Bradshaw Turell T* real estate, office 206 Mont- 
gomery, dwl 200 Tvler 
BRADSTREET J. M. & SON, Improved Mer- 
cantile Agency, N. Y., (James R. Pickens, 
Superintendent) office 317 California 



Bradt Charles, driver with S. F. Transfer Co., dwl 
13 First Avenue 

Bradt John A., carpenter, dwl Seventeenth Avenue 
nr I, South S. F. 

Bradt John M, carpenter, dwl 424 Stevenson 

Brady Belle Miss, chambermaid Overland House 

Brady Benjamin, general merchandise, 311 Com- 
mercial, dwl 628 Vallejo 

Brady Caleb, fireman P. M. S. S. Co., dwl 541 First 

Brady Charles P., steward Ocean House, 409 Drumm 

Brady Daniel, stevedore, dwl 30 Hinckley 

Brady David, bootmaker with Mason & Taylor, dwl 
525 Pine 

Brady David, shoemaker, dwl 9 Minna 

Brady Dennis, laborer Golden Gate Park, dwl Ba- 
ker nr Geary 

Bradv Edward M., conductor Central R. R., dwl 
130 Turk 

Bradv Francis R., finisher Empire Foundrv, dwl 
521 Howard 

Bradv Henry J., attorney at law, office 12 Exchange 
Building, dwl 1425 Hyde 

Brady Hugh, milkman, dwl 517 Fulton 

Brady James, carrier S. F. Post Office, dwl 402 Green 

Brady James, hostler, dwl E s Mission bet Twenti- 
eth and Tweuty-tirst 

Brady James, housesmith with John R. Sims, dwl 
1324 Sacramento 

Brady James, laborer, dwl S s Greenwich bet Mont- 
gomery and Sansom 

Brady James, laborer, dwl S s Railroad Avenue nr 
Tenth 

Brady James, piledriver with E. C. Boobar <fc Co. 

Brady James, roofer with John Kehoe. dwl 9 
Vernon 

Brady James, seaman, dwl 12 Washington 

Brady James F., solicitor, dwl E s Howard bet 
Fifteenth and Sixteenth 

Brady James G., printer with Edward Bosqui & 
Co., dwl Larkin bet Green and Union 

Brady James J., (J. J. Brady & Co.) dwl Y!\ 
Sumner 

Brady J. J. & Co., (John C. Brady) oyster saloon, 31 
Occidental Market 

Brady John, blacksmith with W. S. Phelps & Co., 
dwl 1616 Mason 

Brady John, boilermaker Risdon Iron Works, dwl 
349 Tehama, rear 

Brady John, carpenter with Hancock & Kelso 

Brady John, l carpeuter, dwl 415 Powell 

Brady John, clerk, dwl 1 St. Charles Place 

Brady John, housepainter, dwl 318 Folsom 

Brady John, laborer, dwl 227 Fifth 

Brady John, laborer, dwl 160 Jessie 

Brady Johu, laborer, dwl W s Lyons bet Post and 
Geary 

Brady John, laborer with Hobbs, Gilmore & Co., 
dwl 2 California 

Brady John, seaman, dwl 32 Steuart 

Brady John B., clerk Alms House 

Brady John C„ (J. J. Brady & Co.) dwl 243 Perry 

Brady John J.,cooper with T. H. Hatch &. Co., dwl 
717 Tehama 

Brady John J., hotelkeeper, dwl 608 Third 

Brady John T., carpenter, dwl W s Folsom nr 
Twenty-third 

Brady John T., salesman with Charles Laugley & 
Co., dwl 720 California 

Brady, Kramer & Wilson, (Terrence Brady, Wil- 
liam Kramer and James Wilson) plumbers 
and gaslitters, 835 Washington 

Brady M. A. Miss, teacher Eighth Street Primary 
School, dwl cor Fourth and Clara 

Brady Martin, laborer, dwl 1324 Sacramento 

Brady Martin, tanner with C. O'Douuell, dwl 606 
Third 

Brady Matthew, laborer, dwl 660 Minna 

Brady Matthew, steward, dwl 351 Grove 

Brady Michael, dwl Es Boardmau Place nr Brau 



HUMNTTINGTOJN", HOPKINS & CO., Agents Jessop & Sons' Steel, Cor. Bush and Market. 



C. P. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Tobacco and Cigars. 



SAN FRANCISCO J3] DIRECTORY*. 



115 



Brady Michael, blacksmith with John R. Sinis.dwl 

1616 Mason 
Brady Michael, laborer, dwl 198 Stevenson 
Brady Michael, laborer, dwl 304 Beale 
Brady Michael, steward North Pac. Trans. Co.'s 

S. S. California 
Brady Michael T., miner, dwl 232 Clara 
Brady Nicholas, marblepolisher with T. Horgan, 

dwl 116 Stevenson 
Brady Nicholas, laborer Beale Street Warehouse 
Brady Owen, (Leuhart & B.J dwl 10!) Montgomery 
Brady Patrick, carpenter, E s Devisadero nr Geary, 

dwl Dolores bet Twenty-second and Twenty- 
third 
Brady Patrick, laborer, dwl 227 Second 
Brady Patrick, laborer, dwl E s Kate bet Bryant 

and Brannan • 

Brady Patrick, laborer, dwl S s Sierra nr Michigan 
Brady Patrick, laborer, dwl W 8 Lyons bet Post 

and Geary 
Brady Patrick, machinist, dwl 1325 Sacramento 
Bradv Patrick, porter with James Mears, dwl 1711 

Stockton 
Brady Patrick, tinroofer, dwl 21 Garden 
Bradv Patrick, waiter Cosmopolitan Hotel 
Brady Patrick P., (Bnady & NeelyJ dwl 625 Bush 
Brady Philip, blacksmith Union Iron Works, dwl 

9 Cleaveland 
Brady Philip, cartman,dwl E s Gilbert bet Brannan 

and Townsend 
Bradv Philip, coalpasser with P. M. S. S. Co., dwl 

541 First 
Brady Philip, laborer with Hancock & Kelso 
Bradv Philip, picturemounter with S. & G. Gump, 

dwl S s Liberty bet Valencia and Guerrero 
Brady Philip W.,"rodman with William P. Hum- 
phreys, dwl 507 Bryant 
Brady Richard, draymaii, 511 Front, dwl 919 Har 
Brady Rosina M., teacher Fairmouut School, dwl 

Jessie nr New Montgomery 
Brady Susan F., fruit and vegetables, 227 Fifth 
Brady Terrence, (Brady, Kramer & Wilson) res 

Oakland 
Brady Thomas, bricklayer, dwl 353 Clemeutina 
Brady Thomas, conductor Central R. R., dwl 762 

Brvant 
Brady Thomas, hostler Front St. M. & O. R.R., 

dwl Austin nr Gough 
Brady Thomas, laborer, dwl 2306 Larkin 
Brady Thomas, speculator, dwl 111 Welsh 
Bradv Thomas A. E., drayman with John H. 

Morris, dwl 1425 Hyde 
Brady Thomas H., wigmaker with Mrs. B. Spitz, 

dwl W s Dolores nr Twenty-third 
Brady Thomas T. A., driver Hose Co. No. 2, S.F.F. 

D., dwl N s Ellis nr Fillmore 
Brady William, fireman Cal. Pacific R.R. Co.'s 

Steamer Amador 
Brady William J., assistant foreman boilermakers 

Risdon Iron Works, dwl 24 Rausch 
Brady William J., blacksmith with C. P. R. R. Co., 

dwl 160 Jessie 
Brady & Leubart, (Owen Brady §• James M. 

Lenhart) proprietors coaches Lick House 
Brady &. Neely, (Patrick Brady and Robert G. 

Neely) liquor saloon, 713 Howard 
Braeg Richard, (J. Angeli & Go.) res Europe 
Braga Francisco, (John Cardoso & Go.) dwl 116 

Jackson 
Bragg Frank, machinist Southern P.R.R., dwl 322 

Main 
Bragg George F., (George F. Bragg $■ Co.) bds 

Lick House 
BRAGG GEORGE F. & CO., commission mer- 
chants and agents Benicia Cement Co., and Os- 
wego Starch Co., 116 Front 
Bragg George H., watchmaker, 12 Sixth 
Bragg Mary J. Miss, principal Mission Street Pri- 
mary School, dwl 322 Main 



Bragg Robert, carpenter with Middlemas & Boole 
BRAGG ROBERT, manufacturer steering wheels, 

322 Main 
Bragg Robert Jr., shipjoiner, dwl 322 Main 
Braghi Rinaldo, groceries and liquors, NE cor Sev- 
enth and Brannan 
Brabam Edward, stockraiser, dwl 704 Folsom 
Brahl Henry M., tailor, dwl 743 Howard 
Biain Charles, carpenter with P. M. S. S. Co. 
Brainard Henrv O, carrier Alta California, dwl 

419 0'Farrell 
Brainard Richard, (Carroll, B. & Go.) dwl 1214 

Howard 
Brakenwagen Henrv, cabinetmaker with Goodwin 

& Co., dwl 434 Vallejo, rear 
Braley George A., tobacco and fruit8,NW cor Davis 

and Jackson, dwl 316 Davis 
Bralich Frederick, barkeeper with John Pavlice- 

vich, dwl SW cor Pacific and Davis 
Bram H. C, seaman, dwl 19 Commercial 
Bramal Herman, salesman with Ernest Essmann, 

dwl 1301 Stockton 
Bramall George, secretary Grand Division Sons of 

Temperance, office SE cor Kearny and Califor- 
nia, dwl 1808 Taylor 
Braman Jason J., physician, office NE cor Hayes 

and Van Ness Avenue, d\vl318£ Hayes 
Brarue Patrick, waiter Lick House, dwl Bright bet 

Ceutral and Randolph 
Bramstedt John H..(John H.Bramstedt & Co.) dwl 

SW cor Folsom and Steuart 
Bramstedt John H. & Co., (Charles Kncfcs) liquor 

saloon, SW cor Folsom and Steuart 
Bramwell Aaron, groceries and liquors, NW cor 

San and Union, dwl SW cor San and Union 
Brauagau Henry, engineer, dwl 115 Second 
Brancoli China, shoemaker with Eugene Pardini, 

S s Pacific bet Dupont and Stockton 
BRANCH HOUSE, L. J. Ewellproptr, 424 San 
BRANCH MINT, (U. S.) office superintendent, 613 

Commercial 
Branch William, (Branch # Co.) dwl 1725 Leav 
Branch & Co., (William Branch and Samuel 

Swain) proprietors Georgia Restaurant, 434 

Pacific 
Brand Aristide, merchant, office 715 Sansom, res 

Alameda 
Brand Ernest, cigars and tobacco, 231 Bush, (and 

Brand & Ryhiner) dwl 28 Park Avenue 
Brand Henry, butcher, dwl SE cor Hyde and 

Geary 
BRAND HERMAN, manufacturer and importer 

cigais and leaf tobacco, 301 Bat, dwl 103 Eighth 
Brand Herman J., manufacturing jeweler, 605 Sac- 
ramento, dwl 609 Pine 
Brand James, clerk, 322 Cal, dwl 1012 Polk 
Brand John, (Montgomery Baths Go.) dwl 428 

Broadway- 
Brand John 6., cabinetmaker, dwl 28 Park Avenue 
Brand Leouhardt, (Elders & B.) dwl 428 Bdwy 
Brand Louis, boots and shoes, 818 Montgomery 
Brand Lucien, clerk with John Sauluier <fe Co., res 

Alameda 
Brand & Ryhiner, (Ernest Brand and Adolphe H. 

E. Ryhiner) cigars and tobacco, Grand Hotel 
Brandenberg CharTes, laborer with Whitney & 

Freese 
Braudensteiu Herman, (C/ayburgh Sf B.) dwl 313 

Turk 
Brandenstein Herman H., bookkeeper, 106 Sansom, 

dwl 121 Eddy 
Brandenstein J. & Co., importers and jobbers hard- 
ware and agricultural implements, SW cor Mar- 
ket and Fremont 
Brandenstein Joseph, (J. Brandenstein $r Co., 

and A. S. Roseubaum & Co.) dwl 121 Eddy 
Brandenstein M. & Co., (Lazard Godchaux) 

wholesale butchers, First Avenue South S. F., 

office 207 Battery 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street.. Laces and Embroideries. 



WATKINS' YO-SEMITE ART GALLERY, 26 Montg. St., opp. Lick House Entrance. 



116 



SA"N FRANCISCO [BJ DIRECTORY 



Brandenstein Meyer, (M. Brandenste.in & Co.) 

dwl7()'i OFarrell 
Brander Herman T., steward with John S. Blan- 
der, dwl 814 Jackson 
BRANDER JOHN 8., liquor saloou, 225 Clay, dwl 

13] Oak 
Brandhofer Michael, tailor, 614 California, rear 
Brandlin John, lumber stevedore, dwl ',' Oal.rear 
Braudlin Joseph, lumber stevedore, dwl 2 Cal, rear 
Brandon Henry, tinsmith with William Friel,dwl 

321 Jessie 
Brandon Joseph R., (Grey S? B.) attorney at law, 

office 604 Merchant, dwl'E s Bartlett nr Twen- 
ty-sixth 
Brandon Michael, hackman, dwl 610 Third 
Brandon Patrick, special policeman, dwl 610 Third 
Brandon William M., (Brandon & BibbinsJ dwl 

645 Mission 
BRANDON & BIEBIN8, {William M. Brandon 

mid Tracy L. BibbinsJ real estate, land locat- 
ing and business agents, office 402 Kearny 
Brandow Peter, miner, dwl 908 Broadway 
Brands James, ( Hinckley & Go. J res Oakland 
Brandsmuht William, seaman, dwl 26 Stenart 
Brandstetter George, shoemaker, dwl 39 Jackson 
Brandt. Adolph, (Adolph Brandt & Co. J dwl New 

Alaska Hotel 
Brandt Adolph & Co., (Charles Steinkampj liquor 

saloon, 901 Kearny 
BRANDT ALOIS, proprietor California Hide De- 
pot, 11 and 13 Broadway, dwl 914 Pine 
Brandt August, cabinetmaker, dwl 567 Mission 
Brandt August W., porter, 626 Market 
Brandt Bernard L. , house and sign painter; 220 

Battery, dwl 1015 Van Ness Avenue 
Brandt Charles, clerk, dwl SW cor Mission and 

Eleventh 
Brandt Eric A., ( Brandt & Conlon) dwl 648 How 
Brandt Frederick, (John P. Olsen & Co. J dwl E s 

Jasper Place 
Brandt Frederick, clerk with William H. Henken, 

417 Third 
Brandt George, sailmaker, dwl 110 Virginia 
Brandt Henry, compositor Abend Post, dwl Bootz 

Hotel 
Brandt Henry J., jeweler, dwl 609 Pine 
Brandt I. B. L., clerk with Joseph Napthaly, dwl 

SW cor Geary and Van Ness Avenue 
Brandt. John, restaurantkeeper, dwl 1111 Kearny, 

rear 
Brandt Louis, waiter wtth John Parrott, 620 Fol 
Brandt Maurice, salesman with Colman Bros., dwl 

818 Montgomery 
Brandt Otto, upholsterer with N. P. Cole & Co., 

dwl 567 Mission 
BRANDT OTTO &. CO., groceries and liquors, 

NE cor Market and Mason, dwl 10 Sixth 
Brandt Samuel, (colored) carpenter, dwl S a Greeu- 

wich nr Larkiu 
BRANDT & CONLON, (Eric A. Brandt and 

Helen Cordon) groceries and liquors, 131 Third 
Brandtjen John, clerk with Marcus Albers, dwl 335 

Fourth 
Branger Jean (H. Parker Sf Co.) dwl 1000 

Powell 
Brangon Richard M., (T.H. Hatch & Co.) dwl 

NW cor Pine and Hyde 
Brann Lorin, groceries and liquors, cor Illinois and 

Napa, dwl cor Missouri and Mariposa 
Brann Robert C, (Harding & B.) dwl 333 Jessie 
Brannan A. L. Mrs., dwl 317 First 
Brannan Charles, porter P. M. S. S. Co., dwl N s 

Brannan nr Second 
Brannan Daniel, laborer, dwl S s Tehama bet Eighth 

and Ninth 
Brannan James, clerk, dwl 731 K Clementina 
Brannan James, gardener, dwl 46 Louisa 
Brannan James, laborer S. V. Water Works, dwl 

W s Leavenworth bet Bernard and Broadway 



Brannan James, mattressmaker with Goodwin & 

Co., dwl S s Clay nr Broderick 
Brannan James E., salesman with Dake, McKown 

& Co., dwl 536 Natoma 
Brannan Jessie, carpenter, dwl 202 Second 
Brannan J. F., carpenter H.C. League, 128 Kearny 
Brannan John, actor Buckley's Varieties 
Brannan John, laborer, dwl 16 Howard, rear 
Brannan John, laborer, dwl Ss Santa Clara nr Utah 
Brannan John, seaman barkentine Webfoot, 1 How 
Brannan John, seaman, dwl 32 Stewart 
Brannan John E., collector, dwl 1404 Leavenworth 
Brannan John H., liquors, N s Brannan nr Second 
Brannan Lawrence, blacksmith-helper P. M. S. 8. 

Co., dwl 46 Louisa 
Brannan Martin, superintendent Empire Foundry, 

dwl 4(13 Bryant 
Brannan Martin J., tannery, cor Twenty-sixth and 

York, dwl SE cor Fifteenth and Howard 
Brannan Michael, laborer Laborers' Pro. and Ben. 

Ass'n, 814 Howard 
Brannan Patrick, horseshoer, Ws Webb nr Cali- 
fornia, dwl SW cor Guerrero and Sixteenth 
Brannan Patrick T., glassblower, dwl Ss Mariposa 

nr Mississippi 
Brannan P. B., carpenter PL C. League, 128 Kearny 
Brannan Richard, stonemason, dwl 1521 Mission 
BRANNAN SAMUEL, real estate, office 420 Mont- 
gomery, res Calistoga 
Brannan Samuel Jr., commission merchant, dwl 

317 First 
Brannan Thomas, (Clark & B.) dwl SE cor Twelfth 

and Howard 
Brannan Thomas, shoemaker with John Irwin, dwl 

435 Clementina, rear 
Brannan Timothy, cook, dwl 527 Howard 
Brannan Timothy, stableman, dwl 43 Stanly Place 
Brannan William, carpenter H. C. League, 128 

Kearny 
Brannan William, laborer, dwl 313 Bryant, rear 
Brannan William, longshoreman with Charles E. 

Haseltine 
Branning August, laborer with Whitney & Freese 
Branscheid William, (G-. Weber & Co.) dwl 820 

Pacific 
Branson Ware, sailloft, 52 Clay, dwl 1610 Pacific 
Brant John H., dravman, NE cor Davis and Sacra- 
mento, dwl 329' Eddy 
Brant James W. C, clerk, dwl 1917 Polk 
Brash George A., manufacturing and retail confec- 
tioner, 522 Kearny 
Brask Charles, liquor saloon, S s Jackson bet 

Drnmm and Davis, dwl NW cor Jackson and 

Drurnni 
Braslin John, stonecutter, crwl 7 Ewer Place 
Brassel Patrick, laborer with Whittier &. Fuller, 

dwl 127 Clara 
Brastow Solomon D., traveling agent Wells, Fargo 

& Co.'s Express, dwl 518 Bryant 
Braton Thomas, contractor Golden Gate Park 
Brattigan John, hostler Omnibus R. R., dwl 410 

Tehama 
Brane August, seaman barkentine Melancthon, 1 

Howard 
Brauer Alois, (Frederick Hess fy Co.) dwl 722 

Union 
Brann Adolph, porter, 324 Sansom, dwl 1517 

Stockton 
Brann Augustus F. H., machinist with Joseph Bieu, 

dwl 9 William 
Braun Charles I., teacher German, dwl 141 Miuua 
Brann C. H. F., cashier with B. Davidson & Co., 

res Oakland 
Braun Emil, engraver with Frontier & Bellemere, 

res Oakland 
Braun Engelbrecht F., bookkeeper, 322 California, 

dwl 330 Sutter 
Braun Gerdes, dwl N s Bryant nr Dora 
Braun John, carpenter, dwl Myer's Hotel 



(HUNTINGTON, HOPKINS & CO., Importers Hardware and Iron, Cor. Bush and Market. 



C. P. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny St., Table and Pocket Cutlery 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY 



117 



Braun Robert, blacksmith with Giuseppe Massone, 

dwl SE cor Broadway and Powell 
Brauuschweiger Hermann, (Brauuschu-eiger $• 

Schlicter) dwl W s Fourth nr Berry 
Brauuschweiger & Schluter, (Hermann Braitn- 

schweige.r and Claus H. SchliUcrJ groceries 

and liquors, YV s Fourth nr Berry 
Bravermau Louis, (Braverman Sc Levy) dwl 322 

Mason 
Braverman Max. watchmaker with Braverman & 

Levy, dwl 528 Pine 
BRAVERMAN & LEVY, (Louis Braverman and 

John Levy J importers and retail watches, jew- 
elry, diamonds, silverware, etc., 119 Mont 
Braws Annie Miss, hairdresser, dwl 613 Uuion, rear 
Braws Mary Miss, hairdresser, dwl 613 Union, rear 
BRAY BROS., ( Watson A. Bray) commission 

merchants, and agents Alviso Flour Mills, 226 

Clay 
Bray Henry T., carpenter and builder, N s Oregon 

bet Davis and F'ront 
Bray John, (Bray & Co.) dwl 321 O'Farrell 
Bray John, farmer, dwl 710 Kearny 
Bray YY r arren L., whitener with James C. Sellers, 

dwl 31 Second 
Bray Y\ T atson A., (Bray Bros.) res Fruit Vale, Al- 
ameda County 
Bray & Co., (John Bray and Samuel T. Kennedy ) 

wood and coal, 706 Bush, aud cor Main and Fol 
BRAYTON ALBERT P., (Goddard # Co.) res 

Oakland 
Braynard Harriet, (widow) dwl 6 Jessie bet Sev- 
enth and Eighth 
Brazil Antoine, longshoreman with Charles E. 

Haseltine 
Brazil Patrick, porter, 23 Front, dwl 271 Clara 
Breal August, butcher, dwl YV s Fifteenth Avenue 

bet Q and R, South S. F. 
Brearley M. M. Mrs., furnished rooms, 645 Clay 
Breck Charles E., lumber surveyor, dwl Ss Har- 
rison bet Main and Beale 
Breck Mary A. Mrs, dwl 411 Powell 
Breck Robert, clerk, dwl 850 Market 
BRECK SAMUEL, major, Ass't Adjutant General 

U. S. A., office 703 Market, dwl 627 Third 
Breckman J. F., delivery clerk S. P. R. R. 
Brede Henry A., mill hand with Eisen Bros., dwl 

12 Stevenson 
Bredhotf Heury, (Bredhoff & Suhling) dwl 1508 

Powell 
Bredhoff & Suhling, (Henry Bredhoff and Henry 

Suhling) liquor saloon, 423 East 
Bree John.brassfinisher with YV. T. Garratt <fc Co., 

dwl 542 Mission 
Bree Thomas, actor Bella Union Theater 
Breed Edward A., bookkeeper with Kimball Manu- 
facturing Co., dwl 6 Brenham Place 
Breed Henrv L., stockbroker, office 302 Sansom, 

dwl 1014" Stockton 
Breeu John, boilermaker Union Iron Works, dwl 

304 Beale 
Breen John, cooperage, 106 Washington, dwl 628 

Post 
Breen John H.,brassfinisher Union BrassFoundry, 

dwl 552 Mission 
Breen Michael, carpenter H. C. League, 128 Kearny 
Breen Michael J., carrier Alta California, dwl 431 

Bryant 
Breen Peter, paperhanger with George W. Clark, 

dwl 910 Pine 
Breen Timothy, porter with Moulton & Co., dwl 

1323 Pacific 
Breese Joseph C, salesman with Snow& Roos, dwl 

22 John 
BREEZE CHARLES K., (Bowie $>• B., and Breeze 

c\- LoughranJ physician and surgeon, office 622 

Clay, dwl 718 O'Farrell 
Breeze James, saddler, dwl 609 Pine 
Breeze Juliana, (widow) dwl 407 O'Farrell 



Breeze Louis A., commission merchant, dwl 407 

O'Farrell 
Breeze Thomas, (Murphy, Grant & Co.) dwl 718 

O'Farrell 
BREEZE & LOUGHRAN, (Charles K. Breeze 

and, Thomas LoughranJ produce commission, 

SYV cor YVashington and Davis 
Breheney James, "roceries, Ns Braivnan nr Second 
Breid Frank, patternfinisher with Tay, Brooks & 

Backus, dwl Muh's Hotel 
Breidenbach Frank, porter, 308 Pine, dwl 317 Bush 
Breidenstein Leonhardt, manuf jewelry boxes and 

fancy articles, 615 Montgomery, dwl 1209 Kearny 
Breier EL, laborer, dwl NYV cor Eighth and Bryant 
Breig John, (C. A. Reiners& Co. fdwl 546£ Bryant 
Breiiing Francis, (Bengler & B.) dwl 229£ Minna 
Breiling Jacob, (Breiiing Sf Bro.) dwl 965 Mission 
Breiiing John, (Breiiing & Bro.) dwl 965 Mission 
Breiiing & Bro., (John and Jacob) meat market, 

965 and 967 Mission 
Breithaupt Felix, brewer Broadway Brewery, dwl 

631 Broadway 
Brekle Frederick, brewer Golden Citv Brewery, 

dwl 1431 Pacific 
Brekle George, proprietor Golden City Brewery, 

dwl 1431 Pacific 
Brema M., hostler Citv R. R. 
BREMEN BOARD UNDERYVRITERS, office 421 

Battery 
Bremen Thomas, fireman P. M. S. S. Constitution, 

dwl E s Clinton bet Brannan and Townsend 
Bremer Heimann, (Schonfeld cfc B.) dwl 14 Eddy 
Bremer Henry, meat market, N s Bryant nr Sixth, 

dwl 917 Bryant 
Bremer Joseph, (Bremer & Bro.) dwl 608 Sutter 
Bremer YVilliam, driver with Lyon ife Co., dwl 145 

Jessie 
♦Bremer William, ship carpenter, dwl 39 Jackson 
Bremer YVilliam H., (Bremer & Bro.) dwl 610 

Sutter 
Bremer & Bro., (Joseph and William H. Bremer) 

importers leaf tobacco and manufacturers cigars, 

310 Sacramento 
Bremley John, waiter Moses Taylor, Australia S.S. 

Line 
Brendel Ernst, spinner with Dana & Codington, 

dwl 239i Perry 
Brendel Frederick YV., clerk, 416 Kearny, dwl St. 

Mary Place nr California 
BRENHAM CHARLES J., secretary North Pac. 

Trans. Co., office 217 San, (andHolladay& B.) 

dwl SW cor Howard and Sixteenth 
Brenisch Louis, laborer California Sugar Refinery, 

dwl E s Kate bet Seventh and Eighth 
Brennan Augustus, laborer, dwl 232 Fremont 
Brennan Daniel, foremau with Matthew Nunan, 

dwl 733 Tehama 
Brennan James, contractor, dwl 452 Jessie 
Brennan James, salesman, dwl 536 Natoma 
Brennan Jesse, carpeuter with William Kreger, dwl 

Second bet Howard and Folsom 
Brennan John, dwl 434 Stevenson 
Brennan John, (Kennedy, O'Neill Sf B.) dwl 118 

Third 
Brennan John, shoemaker, 4 Trinity 
Brennan John C, expressman, cor Kearny and Sac- 
ramento, dwl 16 Harlan Place 
Brennan John J., janitor Lincoln School, dwl 16 

YVilliam 
Brennan Joseph L., waiter, 416 Kearny, dwl St. 

Mary Place nr California 
Brennan Luke, laborer, dwl 23 Y 7 allejo 
Brennan Marlin, porter, 21 Battery, dwl 5 Lafay- 
ette Place 
Brennan Martin, boarding, NW cor Battery and 

Green 
Brennan Michael, capitalist, dwl 12 Anthony 
Brennan Michael, laborer, dwl 81 Everett 
Brennan Michael, porter, dwl Lafayette Place 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street, Straw Hats and Trimmings. 



WATKINS' YO-SEMITE ART GALLERY, 26 Montg. St., opp. Lick House Entrance. 



118 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY 



Brennan Michael C, bricklayer, dwl 211 Clara 

Brennan Patrick, dwl -434 Stevenson 

Brennan Patrick .T., gilder with P. H. Rosenbauin 

& Co., dwl 536 Natoma 
Brennan Patrick T., glassblower Pacific Glass 

Works, dwl Mariposa, Potrero 
Brennan Richard P. Rev., secretary Archbishop 

Alemany, dwl <>28 California 
Brennan Thomas E., clerk with Libby & Swett, 

dwl 16 William 
Brennan Thomas F., expressman, SE cor Bush and 

Kearny, dwl 44 Moss 
BRENNAN THOMAS W., Old California Ex- 
change, NE cor Kearny and Clay, dwl 931 

Howard 
Brenner B. M., teacher music, dwl 520 Valencia 
Brenner Charles M., teacher mnsic,dwl 520 Valencia 
BRENNER WILLIAM H., groceries and liquors, 

NW cor Pacific and Jones 
Brenney Augustus, stevedore with Whitney &. 

Freese 
Brereton James, collector S. F. Gas Co., dwl 640 

Second 
BRERETON ROBERT M., consulting engineer 

San Joaquin and King's River Canal Co., 320 

California, dwl Occidental Hotel 
Breslaner Flora Mrs., dressmaker, 310 Kearny 
Breslauer Henry, (H. Y. Fitch & Co.) dwl 705 

OFarrell 
Breslauer Lipman, hides and wool, office 222 Cal 
Breslaner Napoleon, tailor with G. Forrest Walter 

&. Co., dwl 361 Minna 
Breslauer Theodore, merchant, dwl 310 Kearny 
Breslin Daniel, laborer S. F. Gas Co., dwl' 70 

Tehama 
Breslin Patrick, brassfinisher with Firmin, McCar- 
thy & Co., dwl 70 Tehama 
Bi'eslin William, laborer S.F.Gas Co., dwl 5 Verona 
Breslin William, (Carlin S? B.) dwl 217 Beale 
Bresnahan Cornelius, expresswagon, 202 Bush, dwl 

Gilbert nr Brannan 
Bresnahan Stephen, teamster with Haste & Kirk, 

dwl 548 Natoma 
Bresnahan Timothy, bootfitter with Buckingham & 

Hecht. dwl 153' Minna 
BRESSE LOUIS, restaurant, 607 Sacramento, dwl 

2L1 Ellis 
Bretschneider August, woodcarver with Krageu & 

Geishaker, dwl 20 Minna 
Bretschneider Charles, woodcarver, dwl 20 Minna 
Bretschneider Frederick, malater Bavaria Brewery, 

dwl NE cor Jackson and Stockton 
Brett John R., mining superintendent, dwl 1018 

Hyde 
Bretteville Le Normand de, teacher French and 

German, dwl NE cor Green and Powell 
BREUIL EDMOND, consul-general for France, 

office 434 Jackson, dwl 114 Ellis 
Brew Nathaniel, shipwright, dwl 27 Clara 
Brew Nicholas, carpenter with P. M. S. S. Co. 
Brewer Charles, workman with T. H. Selby & Co., 

dwl N s Francisco bet Taylor and Mason 
Brewer George, marblecutter, dwl SE cor Pacific 

and Sausom 
Brewer George W., broker, office 320 Montgomery, 

dwl S s Twentieth nr Guerrero 
Brewer Jacob, mechanic, dwl 110 Geary 
Brewer John, carpenter, dwl 214 Broadway 
Brewer John H., attorney at law, office 43 Mont- 
gomery Block, res Oakland 
Brewer Maggie Miss, actress Bella Union Theater 
Brewer William, special policeman, dwl 204 Mont 
Brewster D. E.. freight clerk steamer Nebraska, 

Australia S. S. line 
Brewster Ferdinand F., U. S. Internal Revenue 

Gauger, dwl 507 1 Leavenworth 
Brewster H. & Co., ( William Coleman and Charles 

V. Boquiest) rag depot, 874 Folsom 
Brewster Harry, ( H. Brewster &' Co.) 874 Folsom 



Brewster J. Mrs., furnished rooms, 107 Leidesdorff 

Brewster John, paints and oils, 529 Kearny, dwl 
S s Post or Laguna 

BREWSTER ROLLA E., mining, office 312 Mont- 
gomery, dwl 816 Powell 

Brewster William, rigger, 10 Howard, rear, dwl 912 
Vallejo 

Brewton James G., (Brewton & Vandewater) dwl 
1029 Clay 

Brewton John C, inspector lamps, dwl SW cor 
Stockton and Sacramento 

Brewton & Vandewater, ('James G. Brewton a?id 
William H. Vandewater J liquor saloon, 536 
Jackson 

Brezil William, laborer, dwl 312 Fifth, rear 

Brian Thomas S., barkeeper with Charles A. Peter- 
son, 10 Sacramento 

Briant William, conductor Front Street, M. & O. 
R. R., dwl 29 Austin 

Briant — see Bryant 

Brice James, blacksmith P. M. S. S. Co., dwl 214 
Seventh 

Brice James, butcher, dwl 113 Welsh 

Brice S. Smith, oiler with P. M. S. S. Co 

Brice Thomas, coalpasser with P. M. S. S. Co. 

Brice William, bootmaker, dwl 612 Post 

Briceland John M., physician, office and dwl 942 \ 
Harrison 

Brickette John, confectionery, 944 Market 

Bricklayers' Protective Association, James Carnell 
secretary, 234 Sutter 

Brickley James, carpenter and builder, dwl 729^ 
Clementina 

Brickley Peter, fruits, dwl N s Haight nr Webster 

Brickley Peter, peddler, dwl E s Ninth nr Harrison 

Brickns Thomas, (colored) whitener, 345 Third 

BRICKWEDEL CHARLES H., proprietor Con- 
stitution Hotel, NW cor First and Brannan 

Brickwedel H., (Henry Brickwedel &Co.) dwl 512 
Franklin 

BRICKWKDEL HENRY & CO., (Martin Henck- 
e/ij importers and jobbers wines and liquors, 
_ 208 and 210 Front 

Brickwedel John, liquors, NW cor Post and Ceme- 
tery Avenue, dwl S s Post bet Broderick and 
Baker 

Brideson William, expresswagon, SW cor Pine and 
Sansom, dwl 1617 California 

Bridge Matthew, mason aud builder, dwl SW cor 
Larkin and Jackson 

BRIDGE WILLIAM E., proprietor St. Lawrence 
Stable, 212 Sutter 

Bridgeman Jane Miss, dressmaker with Mrs. E. 
Lawrence, dwl 1521 Powell 

Bridgeman John, drayman, NE cor Front and Clay, 
dwl 122 Olive Avenue 

Bridges Edmund R., clerk, dwl E s Howard bet 
Eleventh aud Twelfth 

Bridges Mary, (widow) dwl E s Howard bet Elev- 
enth and' Twelfth 

Bridges Richard E., bookkeeper, 5 Front, dwl 1509 
Howard 

Bridget H., seaman, dwl 19 Commercial 

Bridgewater Francis, with S. F. Laundry Associa- 
tion, dwl NW cor Fillmore and Turk 

Bridgewood George, clerk with Ansbro & Co., dwl 
W s Main bet Folsom and Harrison 

Bridgewood Joseph, oiler Cal. P. R. R. Co's steamer 
Amador 

Bridgewood Samuel, engineer S. F. F. D., dwl S s 
Lombard nr Kearny 

Bridgewood Samuel Jr., clerk with Haggin &. 
Tevis, dwl 324 Main 

Brien August, butcher, dwl Fifteenth Avenue bet 
U and K 

Brien James, cooper with Thomas F. Neagle, dwl 
Vassar Place 

Brien John, laborer, dwl 427 Fourth 

Brien William, laborer, dwl 24 Minna 



HUNTINGTON, HOPKINS & CO., -Wholesale Hardware and Iron, Cor. Bush and Market. 



C. P. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Clothing, etc. 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY. 



119 



Brien "William, seaman, dwl 37 Pacific 

Brier Herman, laborer California Sugar Refinery, 

dwl cor Eighth and Bryant 
Brierlv John, spinner Mission and Pacific Woolen 

Mills 
Brigaeits Gerard J., sawyer California Planing 

Mill, dwl Bourbon Place nr Ellis 
Brigaerts Joseph H., boxmaker with Benjamin F. 

Gilman, dwl Bourbon Place nr Ellis 
Briggs Albert D., pressman with John F. Brown, 

dwl 4?3£ Greenwich 
Briggs Alfred W., packer with J. A. Folger & Co., 

dwl 1409 California 
Briggs Charles, porter, 337 Bush, dwl 515 Bush 
Britrsjs Charles 0.,shipcarpenter. dwl 417 O'Farrell 
BRIGGS EDGAR, Tide Land Commissioner, office 

SW cor Kearny and Clay, dwl 33 Erie 
Briggs Edward K., carver with W. G. Weir, dwl 

S s Hickory nr Gough 
Briggs George, restauraut, 1134 Market, dwl 535} 

Stevenson 
Briggs George, carver with G. Ueffinger & Co., dwl 

1011 Market 
Briggs James, rigger, dwl 238 Steuart 
Briggs J. E.', carpenter H. C. League, 128 Kearny 
Briggs Joseph D., ( Charles W. Feldman & Co.) 

dwl 15 Morton 
Briggs Lucy, (widow) dwl 24 Silver 
Briggs Margaret, (widow) dwl 1409 California 
Briggs O. W. Rev., furnished rooms, 137 Mont 
Briggs S. M., laborer, dwl 227 Second 
Briggs Spencer R., salesman, 326 Sansom, dwl S 8 

Grove nr Van Ness Avenue 
Briggs T. G., (widow) dressmaking, 1318 Powell 
Briggs William C, engraver metals, 620 Merchant, 

dwl 605 Vallejo 
Briggs William R., club rooms, 224 Montgomery, 

dwl Cosmopolitan Hotei 
Brigham Calvin O., (Brigham & Batch) res cor 

Oak and Eleventh, Oakland 
Brigham Charles A., (Brigham $ Hawes) dwl S 8 

Berry nr Third 
Brigham William H., f Crane & B.) res New York 
RRIGHAM & BALCH, (Calvin 0. Brigham and 

Stephen, M. Batch) dealers butter and cheese, 

SE cor Front and Washington 
Brigham & Hawes, (Chartes H. Brigham and 

Elisha Haices) stonecutters. NE cor Third and 

King, office 326 Montgomery 
Bright John, cook N. P. Trans. Co.'s S. S. John 

L. Stephens 
Bright John, laborer with DeVries & Chase, dwl 

231 Pacific 
Brignardello Giacomo, ( Slempelmann & Go.) dwl 

703 Stockton 
Brignardello Giovanni B., employee with Brignar- 
dello, Macchiavelloct Co., dwl 2 Dupout 
Brignardello Louis, workman with Ravenna, Ghir- 

ardelli & Co., dwl 1313 Dupont 
BRIGNARDELLO, MACCHIAVELLO & CO., 

( Giovanni Brignardello, Battista Macchiavello 

and N. Larco) manufacturers maccaroni, ver- 
micelli, ship bread, etc., 706 Sansom 
Brignardello Nicola, bookkeeper with Brignardello 

Maechiavello & Co., dwl 701 Stockton 
Brignardello Santiago, (Stempelmann & Co., and 

Brignardello df Brother) dwl 703 Stockton 
Brignardello & Brother, (Santiago Brignardello) 

importers Italian Marble, 5 Main, and Marble 

Saw Mill. 33 Main 
Brill Henry, boot and shoemaker, dwl W s Michi- 
gan nr" Shasta 
Brill Jacob, woodcarver with N. G. Norden, dwl 

28 Harrison 
Brill John, porter with Sroufe, Sweeney & Co., 

dwl 218 Pacific 
Brimigion Samuel, teamster with F. & A. M. Cook, 

dwl 521 Fulton nr Laguna 
Brincatt Salvo, poultry aud game, 517 Merchant 



Brinckmann Frederick, clerk with Charles Schrader, 

NW cor Fifth and Stevenson 
Brinckmann Frederick, clerk with D. C. Von Sta- 

deu, dwl 100 Steuart 
Brin Victor, laborer with G. Venard, dwl 503 Green 
Blind Caleb, (Brind $• Co.) 16 Fourth 
Brind & Co., (Caleb Brind and Luther E. Sage) 

confectioners, 16 Fourth 
Brindeau Adrien, shoemaker, dwl 17 Virginia 
Brink Marcellus, foreman with A. Lamott, dwl 716 

California 
Brink William, laborer, dwl Ss Townsend bet 

Seventh and Eighth 
Brinkmann Henry, cigars and tobacco, 926 Kearny 
Briukson Alexander, laundryman Russ House 
Briody Hugh, barkeeper with James H. McCahe, 

dwl 255 Clementina 
Briody John, lamplighter S. F. Gas Co., dwl 828 

Stockton 
Briody John J., gasfitter and extraman Engine Co. 

No. 5, S. F. F. D., dwl 828 California 
Briody Margaret, (widow) real estate, dwl 413 

Broadway 
Brion Frederick, saloonkeeper, dwl 1123 Dupont 
Brion J., saloonkeeper, dwl SW cor Dupont and 

Broadway 
Brisac Felix, local a°-ent Liverpool, London & Globe 

Ins. Co., dwl 1015 Pine 
Brisac V. G. Madame, teachet', dwl 1015 Pine 
Brisacher Leopold, merchant, dwl 703 Hyde 
Brisk Julius, gents' furnishing goods, 544 Third 
Brisland Michael, carpenter, dwl 964 Mission 
Brissic Edward, seaman, dwl 32 Steuart 
Bristol Andrew, (colored) stove fitter with David 

W. Ruggles, dwl 129 Silver 
Bristol Henry C, cooper, dwl 125 Tehama 
Bristol Levi, driver Front Street, M. & O. R. R., 

dwl 5 Stockton 
Britch Peter, seaman North Pac. Trans. Co.'s S. S. 

California 
BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INSUR- 
ANCE CO., Balfour, Guthrie & Co., agents, 
office 308 Sansom 
BRITISH BENEVOLENT SOCIETY OF CALI- 
FORNIA, rooms 730 Montgomery 
Britt John, hoiisemover, dwl W s Eighth bet Bryant 

and Harrison 
Britt John, laborer, dwl N s Twenty-fifth nr York 
Britt Patrick, laborer with P. M. S. S. Co., dwl 2 

California, rear 
Britt William, laborer with P. M. S. S. Co., dwl 

NE cor First and Frederick 
Brittau John W., (Brittan, Holt/rook & Co.) res 

Redwood City, San Mateo county 
Brittan William H., blacksmith with Pollard & 

Carvill, dwl S s Twenty-second nr Guerrero 
BRITTAN, HOLBROOK & CO., (John W. Brit- 
tan, Charley Holbrook, A. I). McDonpld, John, 
F. and Charles Merrill) importers and jobbers 
stoves and metals, 111 and 113 California, aud 
17 and 19 Davis 
BRITTAN'S BUILDING, SW cor Davis and Cal 
Britton Auu, (widow) dwl 589 Market 
Britton George W., cashier with Goodwin & Co., 

dwl 1309 Taylor 
Britton John, laborer with Hobbs, Gilmore & Co., 

dwl 726 Clementina 
Britton Joseph, (Britton & Bey) dwl SE cor Tay- 
lor and Union 
Britton Patrick, laborer, dwl E s Hartford nr 

Eighteenth 
BRITTON & RE Y, ( Joseph Britton, J. J. Rey and 
Henry Steinegger) lithographers, 529 Commer- 
cial, cor Leidesdorff 
Brizzolara Louis, wood and coal, 340 Broadway, 
(and Brizzolara & Cutrocks) dwl S s Wet- 
more Place 
Brizzolara & Cutrocks, (Louis Brizzolara and 
John Cutrocks) wood and coal, 1015 Wash 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street, Combs and Brushes. 



WATKINS' YO-SEMITE ART GALLERY, 26 Montg. St., opp. Lick House Entrance. 



Broad Charles, brewer, dwl 1222 Bush 

Broad Charles E., graiuer, dwl NE cor Pine and 
Hyde 

Broad" Edward, plumber with G. & W. Suook, 
dwl 1818 Powell 

Broad John, carpenter H. C. League, 128 Kearny 

Broad Robert, carder Pioneer Woolen Mills, dwl 
1818 Powell 

Broad William, laborer, dwl 624 Commercial 

Broadhorst John. silkspinner with Cal. Silk Manufac- 
turing Co., dwl cor Railroad Avenue and Four- 
teenth Avenue, South S. F. 

Broadway Block, NW cor Broadway and Kearny 

BROADWAY BONDED WAREHOUSE, James 
Scott proprietor, SW cor Battery and Bdwy 

Broadway Brewery, Joseph Albrecht proprietor, 
637 Broadway 

BROADWAY HOTEL, Daniel Hartuett proprie- 
tor, 212 Broadway 

Broadway Wharf, foot Broadway 

Brocas John W., (Brocas & Perkins) dwl 864 
Mission 

Brocas & Perkins, (John W. Brocas & Charles 
C. Perkins) general commission merchants, 
310 Washington 

Brock C. F., carpenter H. C. League, 128 Kearny 

Brock Julien, seaman schooner Bobolink, 1 How 

Brock Oscar W., barkeeper, dwl 130 Second 

Brock Theodore, porter N. P. Trans. Co.'s S. S. 
Pelican 

Broekhage J. Frederick, clerk with Francois A. 
Rouleau, res Oakland 

Brockhoff Brothers, (Charles and William) groc- 
eries and liquors, NW cor Bryant and Twenty- 
fourth 

Brockhoff Charles, (Brockhoff Bros.) dwl N W cor 
Twenty-fourth and Bryant 

Brockhoff William, (Brock'hoJ Bros.) dwl NW cor 
Twenty-fourth and Bryant 

Brocklebank Manuel T., real estate agent, office and 
dwl 316 Pine 

Brockman Charles, conductor Central R.R. 

Brockman Christian, seaman, dwl 26 Sacramento 

Brockman Nicholas, groceries and liquors, SW cor 
Jones and Geary 

Brockmann Henry, liquors. 1007 Battery 

Brockliss A. R., student Heald's Busiuess College, 
dwl 765 Mission 

Brocq Alfred, proprietor Bay View Nursery, cor 
Twenty-first Avenue and J., South S. P., office 
and dwl 619 Sacramento 

Brocq J. Mrs., florist and depot Bay Nursery, 619 
Sacramento 

Brod Mary J., (widow) dwl 575 Bryant 

Brode H., carpenter H. C. League, 128 Kearny 

Brodek Gustave, clothing, 902 Kearny, dwl 910 
Howard 

Brodek Henry, photographer, dwl 414 Ellis 

Brodek Philip, printer Morning Call, dwl 414 Ellis 

Brodek Samuel, hairdressing saloon, 602 Market, 
dwl 235 Kearny 

Broder John, messenger with M. Gray, dwl 781 
Stevenson 

Broder Patrick, laborer S.P.R.R. 

Broderick Isaac, expresswagon, cor Washington 
and Front 

Broderick Jacob, baker N. P. Trans. Co.'s S.S. Ori- 
zaba 

Broderick James, tinsmith with Freeman & Wrin, 
dwl Fair Avenue, Bernal Heights 

Broderick John, boilermaker, dwl S s Sheridan bet 
Ninth and Tenth 

Broderick John, laborer, dwl S s Fulton nr Van 
Ness Avenue 

Broderick John, machinist, dwl 409 Main 

Broderick John E., bookkeeper with Badlam & 
Berry, dwl 9 Garden 

Broderick Michael A., clerk with McGinnes & Tor- 
pey, dwl SE cor Fifteenth and Howard 



Broderick Patrick, coachman Occidental Hotel, dwl 

N s Liberty nr Guerrero 
Broderick Thomas, waiter Russ House, dwl 14 

Harlan Place 
Broderick T. J., boots and shoes, 24 Third, dwl 549 

Howard 
Broderick William, machinist, dwl 9 Garden 
Broderick William, salesman, 116 Montgomery, dwl 

9 Garden 
Broderick — see Brodrick 
Broderson B. J., wharfinger East Street Wharf, 

dwl 627 Commercial 
Broderson John, seaman North Pac. Trans. Co.'s S. 

S. Idaho 
Broderson William, porter with T. Lemmen Meyer, 

dwl 268 Clara 
Brodick Henry, photographic printer with H. W 

Vanghan, dwl N s O'Farrell bet Jones and 

Leavenworth 
Brodie James, foreman machinists' Fulton Foundry, 

dwl S s Pine bet Fillmore and Webster 
Brodie James R., pressman with Joseph Wiuterbnrn 

& Co., dwl 116 Silver 
Brodie John, tinsmith with Tay, Brooks & Backus, 
■ dwl W s Bryant bet Twenty-third and Twenty- 
fourth 
Brodie Patrick, laborer, dwl S s Stevenson bet 

Eighth and Ninth 
Brodie 8. H, attorney-at-law, office 407 California, 

dwl NW cor Stockton and Broadway 
Brodie Thomas, carpenter H.C. League, 128 Kearny 
Brodie William, machinist, dwl 129 Second 
Brodigan Hugh, saloon, and hackman, 406 Pacific 
Brodigan Nicholas, morocco dresser with J. W. 

Davidson &. Co., dwl S E cor Clinton and 

Brannan 
Brodrick Richard, commission merchant, office 6 
• Merchants' Exchange, dwl 632 Sutter 
Brodwolf George, tailor, 135 Post, dwl 6 Pratt 

Court 
Brodwolf Michael, tailor, dwl 135 Post 
Broemmel Berthold, clerk with John A. Bauer, dwl 

Morton House 
Brogan Charles, printer, dwl 1324 Jackson 
Brogan Michael, real estate, dwl NE cor Broadway 

andLarkin 
Brogan' s Building, E s Third bet Howard and 

Clementina 
Broins Federick, tailor, dwl 542 Green 
Brokaw Abram, hay and grain, 1535 Mission, dwl 

1434 Mission 
Brokaw Henry V., merchant, dwl 716 Mission 
Broking J. T., carpenter H. C. League, 128 Kearny 
Brolly John O, waiter U. S. Restaurant, 507 Clay, 

dwl 8 Natoma 
Bromberger Marcus, speculator, bds 235 Kearny 
Bromberger Simon, {Rosenthal, Feder & Co.) dwl 

632 Market 
Bromel Hermann, clerk with Ernest Essmann, dwl 

215 Green 
Bromide Tunnel Co., (White Pine) office 10 Ste- 
venson's Building 
Bromley Edward R., clerk with Cent. P. R. R. Co., 

dwl 330 Brannan 
Bromley George A., laborer New U. S. B. Mint, 

dwl 330 Brannan 
Bromley George S., machinist Risdon Iron Works, 

dwl 1023 Green 
Bromley George T., contractor, dwl 330 Brannan 
Bromley Seth, barkeeper steamer Chiu-du-Wan, 

dw'l 158 Tehama 
Bromley Washington L., notary public and com- 
missioner deeds, office 329 Montgomery, dwl 

1023 Green 
Bromley William P., captain Cal. P. R. R. Co.'e 

steamer Julia, dwl 1221 Clay 
Brommell B., dwl Morton House 
Brommer Carsten, laborer, dwl 128 Howard 
Brommer Claus, (Spreckels & Co.) dwl 108 Eleventh 



HUNTINGTON, HOPKINS & CD., Importers Hardware and Iron, Cor. Bush and Market. 



C. P. VAN 8CHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Trunks and Valises. 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY 



121 



Brommer Diederich, groceries and liquors, NE cor 
Sixth and Bryant 

Brommer Henry, groceries and liquors, NE cor 
Franklin and Hayes 

Brommer John, milk ranch, Black Point 

Bromwell B. T. F., clerk with R. H. Magill, res 
Oakland 

Bromwell Lewis L., adjuster Phoenix and Home 
Insurance Cos., 424 California 

Broner Pietro, laborer with John Jury &, Brothers, 
dwl 526 Merchant 

Bronn John A., boarding, SE cor Stock and Filbert 

Bronsdon Piiiueas, contractor, dwl 17 Moss 

Bronstein Meyer, butcher, dwl 709 O'Farrell 

Brooke H., carpenter with Cole & H-askell, dwl 
Bluxome bet Fourth and Fifth 

Brooke Jos-eph, salesman with Cutting & Co., dwl 
431 Miuna 

Brookes Samuel M., portraitpainter, studio 611 Clay, 
dwl Twenty-seventh, Bernal Hights 

Brookintjs Joseph, cook, 410 Pine, dwl 814 Cal 

BROOKLYN HOTEL, Kelly & Wood, proprie- 
. tors, 210 and 212 Bush 

BROOKLYN LIFE INSURANCE CO., (Mm, ml) 
New York. A. J. Bryant & Co, general agents, 
office 240 Montgomery 

Brooks A., bds 333 Bush 

Brooks Albert M., clerk S. F. Post Office, dwl 58 
Natotna 

Brooks Allen, finisher Pioneer Woolen Mills 

Brooks A. Simon, seaman, dwl 32 Steuart 

Brooks Benjamin H., entry and adjusting clerk Cus- 
tom House, dwl NW cor Chestnut and Jones 

BROOKS BENJAMIN S., attorney at law, office 
3, 4 and 5 Exchange Building, dwl 631 Har 

Brooks Birdseye, laborer Occidental Laundry, dwl 
N s Filbert bet Gough and Octavia 

Brooks Charles, windmill maker with Atwood &. 
Bodwell, dwl 213 Mission 

Brooks Charles O, proprietor Melodeon Saloon, 428 
Kearny, and Theater Comique, dwl309 Chestnut 

BROOKS' CHARLES WOLCOTT, consul for Ja- 
pan, office 22 Montgomery, dwl Grand Hotel 

Brooks Edward, dwl 710 Kearny 

Brooks Edmund. ( Reid & B.) dwl 1117 Wash 

Brooks E. L. B., attorney -at law, office 803 Mont- 
gomery, dwl 313 Jessie 

Brooks Elisha, teacher, dwl 1215 Pacific 

Brooks Frank, dresser with I. M. Wentworth & 
Co., dwl cor Gough and Page 

Brooks Frank H., clerk, dwl 20 Ellis 

Brooks Frank W., capitalist, office 22 Montgomery, 
dwl Grand Hotel 

Brooks George, baker Lick House 

Brooks George, builder, dwl E s Kearny bet Lom- 
bard and Chestnut 

Brooks George, photographer, dwl 1028 Market 

Brooks George, shoemaker with Orrin Jones, dwl 
423 Bosh 

Brooks G. W., solicitor International Hotel 

Brooks Henry, agent Wilcox & Gibbs' Sewing Ma- 
chine Co., dwl 481 Jessie 

Brooks Henry, dyer, Santa Clara nr Mission Creek 

Brooks Henry, laborer, dwl Bluxome ur Fourth 

Brooks Henry B., (Toy, B. &■ Backus) dwl 766 
Folsom 

Brooks Henry E., porter with Bradley & Cockrill, 
dwl 924 Jackson 

Brooks Henry S., miner, dwl W s Guerrero nr 
Seventeenth 

Brooks John K., carpenter, dwl N s Fifteenth Av- 
enue nr R, South S. F. 

BROOKS JOHN L., merchant tailor, 710 Mont 

Brooks Joseph H., clerk with W. E. Loomis, dwl 
540 Washington 

Brooks Margaret, (widow) furnished rooms, 30 
Stone 

Brooks Max, commission merchant, 119 Clay, dwl 
31] Turk 



Brooks Norman C, shipping agent, dwl 120 O'Far- 
rell 

Brooks Orion, teacher Heald's Business College, 
dwl 1028* Folsom 

Brooks Patrick, hostler City R. R. 

Brooks Robert, spooler Pioneer Woolen Mills 

Brooks Romulus, cash boy with Bowen Bros., dwl 
14 O'Farrell 

Brooks Samuel, cigarmaker with Christ. Volkmar, 
dwl California nr Kearny 

Brooks Samuel L., bricklayer, dwl 612 Fourth 

Brooks Samuel T., atto'rney-at-law, office 504 
Kearny, dwl 902 Kearny 

Brooks Stephen S.. real estate agent, office 425 
Kearny, dwl 804 Bush 

Brooks Thaddeus R., commissioner Laguna Survey, 
(and Brooks & McGregor) dwl 712 Howard 

Brooks Thomas H., bookkeeper, 117 Battery, dwl 
103 Leavenworth 

Brooks Thomas W., grocer, dwl 111 Morton 

BROOKS W. H. J., searcher records, office 
621 Clay, dwl 317 Geary 

Brooks William, clerk, dwl 631 Harrison 

Brooks William, clerk, dwl 28| Freelon 

Brooks William, shoemaker with F. X. Kast.dwl E 
8 Trinity nr California 

Brooks William H., porter, dwl NE cor Clay and 
Drum in 

Brooks William P., carpenter, dwl 2008 Powell 

BROOKS & McGREGOR, (T. R. Brooks and, 
Alexander E. McGregor) civil engineers, sur- 
veyors and draftsmen, office SW cor Washing- 
ton aud Montgomery, room 1 

Brophy James, deckhand, dwl 509 Davis 

Brophy John B., carpenter, dwl NW cor Twenty- 
second and Mission 

Brophy Michael, stableman, dwl 1588 Bush 

Brosau Michael, laborer, dwl 1 Haggin 

Brosman M., hostler City R. R. 

Brosnan John D., waiter Russ House, dwl 150 Te- 
hama 

Bross Frank, laborer, dwl 557 Fourth 

Bross George (Bross & Dittes) dwl 6 Pratt Court 

Bross Jacob, hairdresser with Bross & Dittes, dwl 
4 Harlan Place 

Bross & Dittes, (George Bross Sf Michael Dittes) 
Cochituate baths and hairdressing saloon, 215 
Sausom 

Brothersou William, porter with T. Lena men Meyer, 
dwl 268 Clara 

Brotherson William, seaman, dwl 104 Steuart 

Brotherton James, engineer ship Lookout, Rincon 
Point 

Brotherton Lillie Miss, teacher Spring Valley 
Grammar School, dwl 2015 Polk 

Brotherton Robert, clerk, 123 Montgomery, dwl 
Broadway nr Polk 

Brotherton Thomas W. Rev., pastor St. John 
Church, dwl 1508 Mission 

Brougham John, hairdresser, 918 Dupont 

Broughton Napoleon L., dwl 1026 Bush 

Brouthers Michael, hostler, dwl 248 Minna 

Browell James, shipcalker with Jeremiah Browell, 
dwl 217 Lombard 

BROWELL JEREMIAH, carpenter and builder, 
442 Jackson, dwl 217 Lombard 

Browell Jeremiah S., clerk with Edmund Scott, dwl 
217 Lombard 

Brower Andrew J., saloonkeeper, dwl 532 Green 

Brower Celsus, clerk Mustering and Disbursing 
Officer U. S. A., dwl 923 Howard 

Brower James, calker with P. M. S. S. Co. 

Brower Robert R., house and sign painter, S s Oregon 
bet Drunim and Davis, dwl 532 Green 

Brown A. & Co., butchers, 46 Washington Market 

Brown Aaron, teacher German and Hebrew, dwl 
319 Stockton 

Brown Abraham B., carpenter California Planing 
Mill, dwl 20 Russ, rear 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street, Suspenders and Neck Ties. 



WATKINS' YO-SEMITE ART GALLERY, 26 Montg. St., opp. Lick House Entrance. 



122 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY 



Brown Ada F. Miss, teacher music, dwl 129 Third 
Brown Adam, laborer, dwl 827 Folsom, rear 
Brown Agnes Mrs., proprietress Columbia Hotel, 

741 Market 
Brown Albert, master mariner, dwl 6 Kramer Place 
Brown Albert D.. dwl 423£ Greenwich 
Brown Alexander, (A. Brown, & Co) dwl 2506 

Webster 
Brown Alexander B., lumberman, dwl 219 Ritch 
Brown Alfred, clerk, dwl HI Eighth 
BROWN ALONZO F., Indian beads, fancy goods, 

etc., 304 Battery, dwl 1825 Bush 
Brown Alonzo Fitch, with Edgar O. Brown, dwl 3 

Chatham Place 
Brown Andrew, laborer with P. M. S. S. Co., dwl 

NE cor First and Frederick 
Brown Andrew D., liquor saloon, S 8 Jackson bet 

Drumm and Davis 
Brown Anne, (widow) lodgings, dwl 532 Folsom 
Brown Annie Mrs., teacher music, dwl 111 Eighth 
Brown Anthony T., butcher, dwl 214 Minna 
Brown Antyne, laborer C. P. R. R. Co.'s stm Julia 
Brown Archibald, tinsmith, dwl 216 Third 
Brown Arthur, clerk with W. J. Leaman, dwl 1602 

Powell 
Brown August, captain schooner Alfred, Washing- 
ton Street Wharf 
Brown August, seaman, dwl 510 Davis 
Brown Augustus, clerk, dwl 410 Kearny 
Brown Augustus F. H., machinist, dwl 9 William 
Brown Benjamin, baker with Clark & Foote, dwl 

314 Third 
Brown Benjamin, drayman with U. S. Drayman 
Brown Benjamin, farmer, dwl 314 Third 
Brown Benjamin B., decorative plasterer with 

William F. Kellett 
Brown Benjamin F., bakery, 509 Third 
Brown Benjamin W., (Smith. B. & Go.) dwl 759 

Market 
BROWN BRAINARD C, phonographic reporter 

Evening Bulletin, 517 Clay, dwl 14 Ellis 
Brown Bridget, (widow) dwl 313 Sixth 
BROWN BROTHERS & CO. (Morris and Lewis 
Brown and Baekr Sheideman) agents Oregon 
City Woolen Manufacturing Co., 24 and 26 San 
Brown Brown, carpenter, dwl 23 Ritch 
Brown Carrie Miss., milliner with Maria M. Why- 
land, dwl SW cor Miiin and Rincon Place 
Brown Catharine, (widow) dwl 115 Vallejo 
Brown Catharine, (widow 7 ) chair-seating, E s Mis- 
sion nr Sixteenth 
Brown Catherine E., (widow) dwl 564 Stevenson 
Brown Catherine K., (widow) dwl 373 Braunan 
Brown Charles, (Brown & Young-man) dwl 415 

Union 
Brown Charles, baggagemaster Saunder's Hotel 
Brown Charles, carpenter, dwl 25 Rausch, rear 
Brown Charles, carpenter, dwl 613 Bush 
Brown Charles, cook, dwl 115 Clark 
Brown Charles, cook Swain's Bakery, dwl 242 

Fifth 
Brown Charles, cook with Charles Brown, 417 East 
Brown Charles, driver with Goodwin & Co., dwl 

SE cor Mason and Green 
Brown Charles, framemaker Pacific Straw Works, 

dwl 52 Minna 
Brown Charles, housemover, dwl 444 Sixth 
Brown Charles, laborer, dwl 503 East 
Brown Charles, laborer with James O'Connell, dwl 

20 Mission 
Brown Charles, laborer with John H. Kessing, dwl 

5 Market 
Brown Charles, laborer with Whitney & Freese 
Brown Charles, laborer Pacific Glass Works, dwl 

Indiana, Potrero 
Brown Charles, liquor saloon and restauraut, 417 

East, dwl NW cor Jackson and Drumm 
Brown Charles, longshoreman, dwl 26 Sacramento 
Brown Charles, musician Buckley's Varieties 



Brown Charles, piledriver with E. C. Boobar & Co. 
Brown Charles, real estate, dwl W s Dolores bet 

Fifteenth and Sixteenth 
Brown Charles, sailmaker, dwl 12 Washington 
Brown Charles, seaman, dwl 12 Washington 
Brown Charles, seaman, dwl 37 Pacific 
Brown Charles, seaman, dwl 19 Commercial 
Brown Charles, seaman steamer Kalorama, Wash- 
ington Street Wharf 
Brown Charles, stoves and tinware, 724 Market, 

dwl 335 O'Farrell 
Brown Charles, waiter steamer Yosemite 
Brown Charles, waiter S. S. Moses Taylor, Aus 

tralia S. S. Line 
Brown Charles A., collector, office 331 Montgom 

ery, dwl N s Chestnut nr Kearny 
Brown Charles E., messenger Western Pacific R 

R., dwl 1629 Mission 
Brown Charles F., real estate agent, 302 Montgom 

ery, dwl 66 Clementina 
Brown Charles K., packer with Cutting & Co., dw 

112 Clinton 
Brown Charles M., expressman, cor Sixth and Fol 

som, dwl 13! I Shipley 
Brown Charles M., shipping and commission agent, 

SW cor Harrison and Spear, dwl 156 Perry 
Brown Charles O., laborer with Whitney & Freese 
Brown Charles P., laborer with Cutting & Co., dwl 

112 Clinton 
Brown Charles R., carpenter H. C. League, 128 

Kearny 
Brown Christian, longshoreman, dwl SW cor Clay 

and East 
Brown Christopher, captain schooner Phil. Sheri- 
dan, 39 Market 
Brown Christopher, seaman, dwl 32 Stenart 
Brown Daniel, captain schooner Maggie Johnson, 

dwl 134 Folsom 
Brown Daniel 11., bakery, NE cor Vallejo and Stock 
Brown Daniel T., baker with California Cracker 

Co., dwl W s Nevada bet Folsom and Harrison 
Brown David, carpenter, dwl 1228 Pacific 
Brown David, laborer with Graves & Co., Ws 

Long Bridge 
Brown David, printer, dwl 837 Mission 
Brown David A., (Henry & B.) res Oakland 
Brown David B., coopers' stock, 427 Davis, dwl 

137 Chestnut 
Brown David P., drayman, 310 Washington 
Brown David S., (Brown & Mahanny) dwl 837 

Mission 
Brown Denton D., civil engineer, dwl 612 Taylor 
Brown Dominic, musician, dwl 611 Union, rear 
Brown E. Mrs., teacher Hebrew, dwl 232 Sixth 
BROWN EDGAR O., real estate, office 535 Clay, 

dwl Grand Hotel 
Brown Edward, deckhand steamer Petaluma, Val- 
lejo Street Wharf 
Brown Edward, engineer, dwl Es Cook nr Point 

Lobos Road 
Brown Edward, laborer, dwl Columbia nr Nine- 
teenth 
Brown Edward, printer with A. L. Bancroft & Co. 
Brown Edward L., broommaker with Van Laak & 

Gillespie, dwl 627 California 
Brown Edward T., letter department Wells, Fargo 

& Co., dwl 508 Howard 
Brown Edwin T., bootmaker with I. M. Went- 

worth & Co., dwl 54 Third 
Brown E. F. Miss, teacher Broadway Grammar 

School, res Oakland 
Brown Elizabeth, (widow) boarding and lodging, 

115 Clark 
Brown Elizabeth, (colored) (widow) dwl Ss Lombard 

nr Gough 
Brown Elizabeth H., (widow) dwl 1 Meacham 

Place 
Brown Emily, (widow) dwl 450 Minna 
Brown Emilia J., furnished rooms, 226 Fifth 



HUNTINGTON, HOPKINS & CO., Importers Hardware and Iron, Cor. Bush and Market. 



C. P. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Boots and Shoes. 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY 



123 



Brown Emanuel, dress and cloak maker, 1104 

Stockton 
Brown Emmett, compositor Evening Bulletin, dwl 

286 Stevenson 
Brown Francis, seaman, dwl 112 Steuart 
Brown Frank, surveyor, dwl 7 Kearny 
Brown Frank Q., (Brown & Snijfen) dwl 528 

Bryant 
BrowuFrank S., musician, dwl 504 Greenwich 
Brown Frederick, dwl 73 Tehama 
Brown Frederick, coffeestand, 32 Steuart 
Brown Frederick, expresswagon, NW cor Steuart 

and Howard, dwl 201 Steuart 
Brown Frederick, surveyor, dwl 228 Bush 
Brown Frederick T., conductor Potrero and Bay 

View R. R., dwl W s Kentucky nr Sierra 
Brown Frederick W., waiter, dwl 16 Hinckley 
Brown Gabriel, mate ship Revere, pier 9, Steuart 
Brown George, conductor N. B. & M. R. R., dwl 

829 Folsom 
Brown George, driver with Knowland & Doe, dwl 

Clementina nr Fifth 
Brown George, metal roofer, 827 Folsom, dwl 300 

Fourth 
Brown George, painter, dwl 1032 Folsom 
Brown George, real estate agent, dwl 251 Third 
Brown George, seaman, dwl 19 Commercial 
Brown George, (widow) dressmaking, 40 Clara 
Brown George F., carpenter, dwl S s Twenty- 
second bet Mission and Capp 
Brown George F,, porter with Wilmerding & Kel- 
logg, dwl 1136 Pacific 
Brown George W., laborer, dwl 454 Sixth 
Brown Gideon H., dentist, office S s Folsom nr 

Fifth, dwl 844 Folsom 
Brown Grafton T., (G. T. Brown & Co.) dwl 727 

Clay 
BROWN G. T. & CO., lithographers, 540 Clay 
Brown Hamilton, porter with Brittan, Holbrook 

& Co., dwl 109 California 
Brown Harry, seamau, dwl 129 Jackson 
Brown Harvey S., land agent Central Pacific R. R., 

office, SW cor Market and New Montgomery, 

res Oakland 
Brown Henry, cook, dwl SW cor Wash and Front 
Brown Henry, cook steamer Reform, Jackson Street 

Wharf, dwl 9 Washington - 
Brown Henry, proprietor Brown's Hotel, S s Clark 

bet Drumm and Davis 
Brown Henry, seaman, dwl 112 Steuart 
Brown Henry, seaman steamer Salinas, Washington 

Street Wharf 
Brown Henry, seaman, dwl 504 Davis 
Brown Henry, special policeman, dwl Oregon nr 

East 
Brown Henry A., master mariner, dwl N s Precita 

Avenue nr Howard 
Brown Henry C, (Brown fy Wilson) dwl 70 

Minna 
Brown Henry D., salesman with Mitchell & Bell, 

dwl 126 Bernard 
Brown Henry J., expressman, SE cor Howard and 

Sixth, dwl 243 Clara 
Brown Hermann, seaman, dwl 423 East 
Brown Hugh, seaman, dwl 129 Folsom 
Brown Hyman, merchant, 410 Sacramento, (and 

Philip Brown & Bro.J dwl 621 Stevenson 
Brown Ireson C, house contractor, dwl 726 Guer- 
rero 
Brown Isaac W. W., meat market, cor Eighth and 

Clementina, dwl 35 Oak Avenue 
Brown I. W., butcher with Smith, Brown & Co., 

dwl NE cor Utah and Alameda Avenue 
Brown James, dwl 556 Natoina 
Brown James, baker Grand Hotel 
Brown James, (colored) dwl 12 Scotland 
Brown James, drayman, dwl 1001 Battery, rear 
Brown James, laborer, dwl 710 Kearny 
Brown James, laborer, dwl 908 Vallejo 



Brown James, machinist, dwl SE cor Eighteenth 

and Columbia 
Brown James, mattrassmaker with N. P. Cole & 

Co., dwl 227 Green 
Brown James, porter St. Marv's Cathedral, dwl 

628 California 
Brown James, repacker wjth E. T. Anthony & Co., 

dwl 906 Vallejo 
Brown James, rigger, dwl 1 Green Court 
Brown James, seaman steamship Donald, Wash- 
ington Street Wharf 
Brown James seaman, dwl 48 Sacramento 
Brown James, tinsmith with Locke & Montague, 

dwl 13 Baldwin Court 
Brown James A., clerk, 305 Mont, dwl 410 Kearny 
Brown James A., drayman, 315 Front, dwl 9 Riley 
Brown James A., drayman, dwl N s Pleasant bet 

Taylor and Jones 
Browne James C, hairdresser, 1109 Sutter 
Brown James F., carpenter California Planing Mill, 

dwl 627 California 
Brown James EL, carpenter, 524 Third, dwl W s 

Tennessee bet Solano and Mariposa 
Brown James H. carpenter, dwl W s Folsom bet 

Sixteenth and Seventeenth 
Brown James L., bricklayer, dwl E s Mission bet 

Twenty-first and Twenty-second 
Brown James P., glassblower, dwl 105 Hyde 
Brown James P., lastmaker with W. H. Wing, dwl 

105 Hyde 
Brown James S., salesman, 524 Market 
Brown James S., salesman with J. C. Bell, dwl 556 

Natoma 
Brown James W., furniture, 7 Fourth, dwl NE cor 

Mission and Fourth 
Brown J. B., Miss, teacher Powell Street Primary 

School, dwl 809 Mission 
Brown J. B., chief engineer North Pac. Trans.Co.'s 

S. S. Oriflamme 
Brown J. G., laborer Pacific Rolling Mill, dwl Po- 
trero Point 
Brown J. H., calker with P. M. S. S. Co. 
Brown John, dwl 707 Vallejo 
Brown John, dwl 424 Sansom 
Brown John, barkeeper, 311 Bush, dwl 546 Miss 
Brown John, boilermaker Union Iron Works, 

dwl W s Palmer nr Fairmount 
Brown John, clerk with Meigs & Gawley, dwl 

53 Clementina 
Brown John, deckhand steamer El Capitan, Oak- 
land Ferry 
Brown John, laborer, dwl 13 Baldwin Court 
Brown John, laborer, dwl 22 Mission, rear 
Brown John, laborer, dwl 211 Green 
Brown John, laborer Cal. P. R. R. Co.'s steamer 

Amador 
Brown John, laborer New U. S. B. Mint, dwl cor 

Gough and Hickory 
Brown John, laborer with Israel Richards, dwl 

Jones nr Francisco 
Brown John, liquor saloon, 938 Kearny 
Brown John, longshoreman, dwl 15 Washington 
Brown John, milkman, cor Mission and Colusa 
Brown John, seaman, dwl 26 Sacramento 
Brown John, seaman, dwl 32 Steuart 
Brown John, seamau, dwl 48 Sacramento 
Brown John, seaman, dwl 37 Pacific 
Brown John, seaman, dwl 104 Steuart 
Brown John, serman, dwl 409 Drumm 
Brown John, seaman, dwl 531 East 
Brown John, seaman, dwl SW cor Drumm and 

Oregon % 
Brown John, seaman bark Dublin, pier 17, Steuart 
Brown John, seaman bark Northwest, pier 1, Steuart 
Brown John, seaman steamer Donald, Washington 

Street Wharf 
Brown John, shipwright, dwl 508 Howard 
Brown John, shoemaker with James S. Swain, dwl 

Sutter nr Leavenworth 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street, Dress Trimmings. 



WATKINS' YO-SEMITE ART GALLERY, 26 Montg. St., opp. Lick House Entrance. 



124 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY 



Brown John, shoemaker with S. W. Rosentock & 
Co., dwl 35 Everett 

Brown John, teamster with James McDevitt, dwl 
W 8 Sansom nr Vallejo 

Brown John, waiter Lick House, dwl 54 Jessie 

Brown John A., clerk with Littletield, Webb & 
Co, dwl 1315 Broadway 

Blown John A., driver with S. P. Transfer Co, dwl 
1 82 Stevenson 

Brown John B., dwl 540 Folsom 

Brown John C, clerk with Charles Clayton & Co. 

Brown John D., civil engineer, office 302 Mont- 
gomery, dwl 754 Howard 

Brown John P., book and job printer, 534 Commer- 
mercial, dwl 423£ Greenwich 

Brown John H., butcher with Chris. Dunker, dwl 
NE cor Folsom and Beale 

Brown John K., captain steamer Alameda, Alameda 
Ferry 

Brown John L., carpenter, dwl Ss Twelfth Avenue 
bet N and P, South S. F. 

Brown John P., laborer, dwl 178 Minna 

Brown John R., carpenter, dwl 6 Fella Place 

Brown Joseph, dwl What Cheer House 

Brown Joseph, (Boghiscich & B.) dwl 506 Wash 

Brown .Joseph, harnessmaker, dwl 9 Garden 

Brown .Joseph, laborer Pioneer Woolen Mills, dwl 
N s Fr.mcisco ur Polk 

Brown Joseph, plasterer, dwl SW cor Vallejo and 
Davis 

Brown Joseph, printer with A. L. Bancroft & Co., 
dwl 917 Sutter 

Brown Joseph, waiter Cosmopolitan Hotel 

Brown Jo W., mate brig Hidalgo, pier 9, Steuart 

Brown Julia B. Miss, teacher Fourth and Clara 
Street School, dwl 809 Mission 

Brown Justis, engineer steamer Capital 

Brown J. William, capitalist, office 424 Montgom- 
ery, (and Plympton Roller Skate Co.) dwl 829 
Howard 

Brown J. W. W., market, cor Eighth and Clemen- 
tina, dwl 35 Oak Avenue 

Brown Lefranc, seaman ship Revere, pier 9, Steuart 

Brown Lewis, (Brown Bros, $ Co. and Toklas, 
Halm & B.) dwl 824 O'Farrell 

Brown L. L. Miss, saleswoman, 12 Kearny 

Brown L. M., carpenter H. C. League, 128 
Kearny 

Brown Louis, driver with Frederick Brown, dwl 
150 Steuart 

Brown Margaret, (widow) dwl 1629 Mission 

Brown Maria, (widow) nurse, dwl 1607 Jones 

Brown Mark, calker with P. M. S. S. Co. 

Brown Mark, teamster with James McDevitt, dwl 
W s Sansom nr Vallejo 

Brown Mary A. Miss, shoefitter with S. W. Rosen- 
stock &'Co., dwl 112 Clinton 

Brown Mary Jane Miss, seamstress with Jacob Zo- 
bel, dwl 158 Clara 

Brown Michael, night watchman S. F. Gas Co., dwl 
397 Eighth 

Brown Michael, spinner Pioneer Woolen Mills 

Brown Michael, teamster, dwl 138 Silver 

Brown Michael J., barkeeper, 332 Montgomery, dwl 
359 Minna 

Brown Morris, (Brown Bros. & Co.) dwl 822 
O'Farrell 

Brown Moses P., harnessmaker with Main & Win- 
chester, dwl 1825 Bush 

Brown Nathan, importer and jobber clothing, 108 
Battery, dwl S s Bryant nr Downey 

Brown Nellie Mrs., dwl 119 Third , 

Brown Nicholas, carpenter, dwl W s Bartlett bet 
Twenty-second and Twenty-third 

Brown Nicholas, laborer, dwl 3 Lick 

Brown Oscar, laborer with S. S. Butler, dwl 1009 
Kearny 

Brown Peter, cook, dwl N s Green bet Dupont and 
Stockton 



Brown Peter, deckhand steamer Reform, dwl 531 

East 
Brown Peter, housemover, dwl 1100 Powell 
Brown Peter, iroumolder, dwl 11 Jansen 
Brown Peter, miner, dwl 411 Pacific 
Brown Peter, seaman, dwl 531 East 
Brown Peter N., machinist California Theater, 

dwl 613 Bush 
Brown Philip, longshoreman, dwl SE cor Mont- 
gomery and Filbert 
Brown Philip, (Philip Brown & Bro.J res Marys- 

ville, California 
Brown Philip & Brother, (Hyman Brown) manu- 
facturers clothing, 125 Sansom 
Brown Raphael, bookkeeper, 24 Sansom, dwl 824 

O'Farrell 
Brown Richard, (Knox Sf B.) dwl S s Turk bet 

Pierce and Steiner 
Brown Richard, fruits and vegetables, 523 Fourth 
Brown Richard, laborer, dwl 254 Stevenson 
Brown Richard, longshoreman with Charles E. 

Haseltine 
Brown Richard, painter, dwl 8 Anthony 
Brown Richard, real estate, dwl 818 Green 
Brown Richard, real estate, dwl N s Greenwich nr 

Scott 
Brown Richard, soap factory, N s Alameda nr Po- 

trero Aveuue 
Brown R. N., commission merchant, dwl 2322 

Washington 
Brown R. Nelson, commission agent, dwl 641 Ste- 
venson 
Brown Robert, (colored) bootblack with Chester 

Bass, 531 Pacific 
Brown Robert, cook, dwl 152 Silver 
Brown Robert, porter with T. H. Hatch & Co., dwl 

1310 Montgomery 
Brown Robert, salesman with Keane, O'Connor 

&Co., dwl 409 Powell 
Brown Robert, seaman, dwl 32 Steuart 
Brown Robert, seaman brig Orient, 1 Howard 
Brown Robert, seaman schooner Bobolink, 1 How 
Brown Robert, steward What Cheer House 

restaurant 
Brown Rohert T., whitener, dwl W s Alabama bet 

Twentv-third and Twenty-fourth 
BROWN ROLAND G., agent Grover & Baker 

Sewing Machine Co., 116 Mont, dwl 705 Post 
Brown Rollo, carpenter with Amos R. Nichols, dwl 

6 Fella Place 
Brown Sadie Mrs., saleswoman with H. W. 

Vaughau, dwl 822 Mission 
Brown Samuel, laborer with Whitney & Freese 
Brown Samuel, special policeman, dwl 20 Stanford 
Brown Samuel, watchman Hathaway's Wharf, dwl 

5 s Brannan bet Second and Third 
Brown Samuel D., carpenter, dwl 612 Shotwell 
Brown Samuel E., foreman San Francisco News- 
Letter 

Brown Samuel H., clerk U. S. Internal Revenue 

Export Warehouse, dwl 227 Green 
Brown Samuel P., laborer, dwl 44 Spear 
Brown Sezekiah, clerk with William P. Brown, 

dwl 823 Clay 
Brown S. L. Miss, teacher Eighth Street Grammar 

School, dwl 215 Jones 
Brown Spencer R., steward, 320 Sansom 
Brown Stephen G., hairdressiug saloon, 202 Fourth 
Brown Sylvester B., drayman with James A. 

Brown, dwl 8 Cushmau nr Sacramento 
Brown Theodora M., (widow) dwl 708 Folsom 
Brown Theodore, clerk City and County Tax Col- 
lector's Office, dwl 424 Green 
Brown Theodore, florist Woodward's Gardens, dwl 

6 Ridley 

Brow T n Theodore A. P., clerk with Charles Baum, 
dwl 1628 Stockton 

BROWN THOMAS, assistant cashier Bank Cali- 
fornia, dwl 907 Sutter 



HUNTINGTON, HOPKINS & CO., Wholesale Hardware and Iron, Cor. Bush and Market. 



C. P VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Importers and Jobbers. 



SAN FRANCISCO B] DIRECTORY 



125 



Brown Thomas, calker, dwl Borland bet Dolores 

and Guerrero 
Brown Thomas, laborer, dwl 1 Jasper Place 
Brown Thomas, laborer, dwl 5 Market 
Brown Thomas, laborer P. M. S. S. Co., dwl 778 

Harrison 
Brown Thomas, longshoreman with Charles E. 

Haseltine 
Brown Thomas, porter. 129 Sansom, dwl S s Four- 
teenth Avenue nr R., South S. F. 
Brown Thomas, porter California Market, dwl 6 

Virginia Place 
Brown Thomas, Riggers' and Stevedores' Ass' n, 429 

Pacific 
Brown Thomas, salesman with Hooker & Co,, dwl 

919 Sutter 
Brown Thomas, seaman, 32 Steuart 
Brown Thomas, seaman steamer Kalorama, Wash- 
ington Street Wharf 
Brown Thomas, shipcarpenter, dwl S s Dorland nr 

Guerrero 
Brown Thomas A., (Brown & Otto) dwl Natoma 

bet Howard and Mission 
Brown Thomas C, laborer with P. M. S. S. Co. 
Brown Thomas J., tailor, dwl cor Scott and Port- 
land Avenue, Bernal Hights 
Brown Walter S., (Brown, Peabody S? Co.) dwl 

160(5 Leavenworth 
Brown Walter V., butcher with J. Y. Wilson & Co., 

dwl corner Buchanan and Bay 
Brown Ward, teamster with Elliott & Brother, dwl 

cor Tyler and Leavenworth 
Brown W. Hall, furnished rooms, 751 Clay 
Brown Willard B., compositor Police Gazette, dwl 

221 Tehama 
Brown William, (Boetcher & B.) dwl NW cor 

Pacific and Kearny 
Brown William, carpenter, dwl 158 Clara 
Brown William, carpenter with P. M. S. S. Co. 
Brown William, clerk with A. L. Bancroft &. Co., 

dwl 917 Sutter 
Brown William, clerk with Luke Curry, dwl 660 

Howard 
Brown William, clerk with Isaiah Choynski, dwl 

S s Market bet Third and Fourth 
Browu William, crockery, dwl 503* O'Farrell 
Brown William, dockmaster, dwl cor Sierra and 

Maryland 
Brown William, driver Central Railroad 
Brown William, driver with S. F. Transfer Co., 

dwl 742 Market 
Brown William, fisherman, dwl 5 Market 
Brown William, hempworker S.F.Cordage Factory 
Brown William, laborer, dwl 13 Baldwin Court 
Brown William, laborer with P. M. S. S.Co. 
Brown William, laborer, dwl Fort Point 
Brown William, longshoreman, dwl NW cor Com- 
mercial and East 
Brown William, longshoreman, dwl SE cor Broad- 
way and Front 
Brown William, machinist, dwl Irving House 
Brown William, mate, dwl 26 Sacramento 
Brown William, painter with J. W. Farren, dwl 21 

Fulton 
Brown William, Riggers' and Stevedores' Ass'n, 

429 Pacific 
Brown William, sawmaker, 222 Jackson, dwl 812 

Green 
Brown William, seaman, dwl 12 Washington 
Brown William, seaman, dwl 26 Sacramento 
Brown William, seaman, dwl 332 Main 
Brown William, seaman, dwl 409 Drumm 
Brown William, seaman bark Oak Hill, pier 3 

Steuart 
Brown William, shoemaker with L. Hertz, dwl 934 

Kearny 
Brown William, stainer with L. & E. Emanuel, 

dwl 1032 Folsom 
Brown William A., engineer, dwl 419 Fremont 



Brown William F., teamster, dwl 135 Shipley 
Brown William G., tinsmith with.G. Moenniug, dwl 

216 Third 
Brown William H., (Brown & McDonald), dwl 

41(i Minna 
BROWN WILLIAM H., contractor night work, 

office 220 Dupont, dwl 1220 Market nr Ninth 
Brown William H., salesman with Marcus C. Haw- 
ley & Co., dwl 1417 Hyde 
Brown William K., drayman with G. E. Sloss, dwl 

Harrison nr Fifth 
Brown William M., mining engineer, dwl 972 Har- 
rison 
Brown William P., groceries and liquors, SE cor 

Clay and Dupont' dwl 114 Bernard 
Brown William P., policeman City Hall, dwl 234 

Perry 
Browu Willie V., apothecary, 124 Tavlor, dwl 122 

Taylor 
Brown W. M., carpenter H.C. League. 128 Kearny 
Brown W. P., carpenter H. C. League, 128 

Kearny 
Brown W. Scott, (Brown $ Peabody) dwl 1606 

Leavenworth 
Brown & Mahanny, (David S. Brown and John 

A. Mahanni/) book and job printers, 320 Clav 
BROWN <& MCDONALD, (William H. Brown 

and John F. McDonald) fruits and vegetables, 

30 and 31 California Market 
Brown & Otto, (Thomas A. Brown and Richard 

Otto) photographers Third Street Gallery, 28 

Third 
BROWN & PEABODY, (W. Scott Brown and 

John E. Peabody ) commission merchants and 

agents manufacturers, and Cal. Silk Manufac- 
turing Company, 569 Market 
Brown & Suiffen, (Frank G-. B r o%on and Elijah 

Snijfen) market, 513 Bryant 
Brown & Wilson, (Henry 0. Brown and William 

H. Wilson) asphaltumroofer8, 614 Mission 
Brown &. Youngman, (Charles Brown and George 

Yonngman) oyster and qhop house, 518 Bat 
Brown's Hotel, Henry Brown proprietor, S s 

Clark bet Drumm and Davis 
Browne C. H., newsdealer, dvyl American Exchange 
Browne David S., painter, dwl 1018 Taylor 
Browne J. Mitchell, draftsman with J. Ross 

Browne, res Oakland 
BROWNE J. ROSS, Anglo-California Laud Re- 
clamation Co., office 45 aud 46 Montgomery 

Block, res Oakland 
Browne Samuel G., dwl 113 Eddy 
Browne Spencer C, clerk with Bartlett & Pratt, 

res Oakland 
Brownell Honora, (widow) dw' 20 Mission, rear 
Brownelle Charlotte S., (widow) dwl 545 Howard 
Browning August, gunsmith, 653 Washington, 

dwl NE cor Jackson and Leavenworth 
Browning George W., with Hain & Pollard, dwl 

14 Geary 
Browning Jacob, drayman, 111 Front, dwl SW cor 

Larkin and McAllister 
Browning Jeremiah, drayman, 111 Front, dwl SW 

cor Larkin and McAllister 
Browning John, (Browning & Klein) dwl NW cor 

Folsom and Twenty-second 
Browning John E., laborer, dwl Ninth nr Railroad 

Avenue. South S. F. 
Browning William, wines and liquors, 541 Clay, 

dwl 771 Folsom 
Browning & Klein, (John Browning and Ernst 

Klein) groceries and liquors, NW cor Folsom 

and Twenty-second 
Brownjohn John, piledriver, dwl 238 Steuart 
Brownlee John, house and sign painter, SW cor 

Washington and Front 
Browuson H. T., hostler with E. J. Foster 
Brownstein George, (E. Qosliiisky S? Co.) dwl 

1017 Post 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sarjsom Street, Ladies' and Cnildren's Woolen Goods- 



WATKINS' YO-SEMTTE ART GALLERY, 26 Montg. St., opp. Lick House Entrance. 



126 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY 



Brownstein Samuel, messenger, 31 Battery, dwl 

Kill-.' Lark in 
Brownstein George & Bro., merchants, (Red Blujf's) 

office 219 Battery 
Brownstone Isaac (of I. Brownstone & Bro., Santa 
Cruz and WatsonmlleJ office 121 Sausom, dwi 

1002 Lar kin 
Broze Francis, porter with F. Korbel &, Bros., 

dwl 559 Fourth 
Brubaker Effinger, drayman with Joseph Bunker, 

dwl 226 Bitch 
BRUCE DONALD, book and job printer, 535 and 

537 .Sacramento, dwl 1020 Larkin 
Bruce Henry, laborer with P. M. S. S. Co. 
Bruce Henry, longshoreman, dwl Goodsell Place 

lir Fust 
Bruce James H., captain schooner Sarah, dwl 1218 

Jackson 
Bruce John, painter with E. H. Gadsby, dwl 351 

Jessie 
Bruce Lewis P., painter, dwl 725 Broadway, rear 
Bruce Robert, carpenter, dwl E s Laguna nr Pine 
Bruce Robert, laborer with Whitney & Freese, SE 

cor Steuart and Mission 
Bruce Robert, niarbleworker with John Dauiel & 

Co.. dwl Laguna nr Pine 
Bruce Thomas, laborer, dwl 32 Spear 
Bruce Washington, shoemaker, dwl 359 Brannan 
Brace William, laborer, dwl Jersey bet Castro and 

Noe 
Bruce W'illiarn, seaman, dwl 32 Steuart 
Bruce William, seaman, dwl 48 Sacramento 
Brack Alexander A., physician, office and dwlNE 

cor Broadway and Powell 
Brucker Louis, gilder with M. D. Nile & Co., dwl 

8J3 Washington 
Bruckner George, laborer, bds 304 Beale 
Bruckner John, news agent, 314 Jackson 
Brad Etienne. brassfinisher with W. T. Garratt & 

Co., dwl cor Octavia and McAllister 
Bi'iiet/k Hei inaun Rev., pastor St. Peter's Church, 

dwl 728 Broadway 
Brueck W. A., student Heald's Business College, 

dwl 728 Broadway 
Bruer Jacob, carpenter, dwl 938 Howard 
Bruer John, foreman with Funcke & Wasserman, 

dwl SE cor Eighth and Brannan 
Bruggeman Henry, roofer, dwl 31 Langton 
Brujigemauu Henry, apprentice with J. G. H. 

Meyer, dwl SW cor Union and Dupont 
Bruggemann Henry, cutter with Isidor Eisenberg, 

dwl SW cor Union and Dupont 
Bruggy Patrick, laborer, dwl N 8 Bryant Avenue 

bet Eighth and Ninth 
Bruguiere John G., saddler with Tiburcio Carlos, 

dwl 527 Pacific 
Bruhu Haus, boatman, dwl 39 Jackson 
Brubus Heury, longshoreman, dwl S 8 Greenwich 

bet Montgomery and Sansom 
Bruhns Julius, haruessmaker, dwl cor Sansom and 

Greenwich 
Brnmagim John, helper S. F. Glass Works, dwl 533 

Natoma 
BBUMAGIM JOHN W., attornev at law,, office 36 

and 37 Montgomery Block, dwl 1315 Mason 
Brumtield William H." attorney at law, office 612 

Clay, dwl415Capp 
Braml Simon, porter, 220 Cal, dwl 404 Stockton 
Brumlev Charles R., smucter Golden Gate Flour 

Mills, dwl 13 O'Farrell 
Brumlev Chester R., ageut, dwl 13 O'Farrell 
Brumley C. Jerome, clerk with G. M. Josselvu & 

Co., dwl 13 O'Farrell 
Brumlev M. I. Miss, teacher Broadway Primary 

School, dwl 13 O'Farrell 
Brumal Charles, silversmith with Koehler & Rit- 

ter, 620 Merchant 
Brummer C. A., carrier Morning Call, dwl 337 

Bush 



Brummer Charles, laborer California Sugar Refinery, 

dwl cor Eighth and Bryant 
Brummer T., laborer, dwl NW cor Eighth and 

Bryant 
Brummet Jane Mis., dwl 36 Jessie 
Bran John, baker, dwl 715 Lombard 
Brune August, cigar manufacturer, 717 Sansom, dwl 

NW cor Broadway and Dupont 
Brune August, (Bridie & LemckeJ dwl 129 Fourth 
Brune Henry, (Brune Sf Warnken) dwl 1 15 Morton 
Brune & Lemcke, (August Brune and Olio LemckeJ 

hairdressing saloon, 129 Fourth 
Bruue & Warnken, (Henry Brune and John Warn- 

ken) liquor saloon, N~W cor Kearnv and Geary 
Braner Alois, (Fred. Hess <fc Co.) dwl 722 Union " 
Brunei- B. P., superintendent Pacific Rolling Mill, 

dwl Occidental Hotel 
Brnner John, bricklayer Bricklayers' Protective 

Association, 234 Sutter 
Brnner John, haruessmaker, 428 Pacific 
Bruner William H., physician, office 23 Post, dwl 

654 Folsom 
Branet E., jeweler with California Jewelry Co., 

dwl 133 1 J Dupont 
Brunier Eugene, dealer bottles, sacks and metals, 

1133 Dupont, dwl 539 Vallejo 
Bruning Charles, carpenter H. C. League, 128 

Kearny 
Bruning Christopher, miller with Eisen Brothers, 

dwl 12 Stevenson 
Bruning W T illiam. liquor saloon, 2 California 
BRUNIXGS MARTIN, trroceries and liquors, SW 

cor Mission and Third, dwl 724 Mission 
Brunje John A., clerk with Herman G. Sahnke,523 

Jackson 
Brunjes Diedrich, groceries and liquors, San Jose 

Road nr Five Mile House 
Brunjes Henry, groceries and liquors, 430 Brannan 
Brunjes John, clerk, dwl W s Mission nr Twenty- 
sixth 
Brunn Isaac R., (of Brunn & Roe, San Bernar- 
dino) office 316 Sacramento, dwl SW cor Ellis 

and Larkin 
Brunner Adolph, clerk, 622 Kearny, dwl 1027 Clay 
Brunner Jacob A., cigars and tobacco, 622 Kearny, 

dwl 1H27 Clay 
Brunner Louis, varieties, 314 Hayes 
Brunnotte Louis, tailor, dwl 7 August Alley 
Bruno Nicholas, fruits and confectionery, 405 Bdwy 
Bruns Christian, physician, office and dwl 2110 

Taylor 
Brans Conrad, laborer, dwl W s Bryant bet Twenty- 
third and Twenty-fourth 
Bruns Diedrich, cook Helvetia Hotel, dwl 348 

Clementina 
Bruns Diedrich, cook with Charles A. Schroder, dwl 

NW cor Powell and Vandewater 
Bruns Frederick, housesmith with John R. Sims, 

dwl 624 Pacific 
Bruns Frederick, president S. F. Stock Brewery, 

(and Frederick Br7itis Jj- Bro., Bruns $• Bro., 

and Francis Scaniin & Co.) dwl SE cor Mis- 
ion and Sixteeuth 
Bruns Frederick & Brother, (George Bruns ) gro- 
ceries and liquors, SW cor Folsom and ypear, 

and SE cor Mission and Sixteeeuth 
Bruns George, (Frederick Bruns «$■ Bro.) dwl SE 

cor Mission and Sixteenth 
Bruns Henry, cabinetmaker with L.&E. Emanuel, 

dwl 32 Silver 
Bruns Henry, clerk with John F. Ortmann, dwl 

815 Jackson 
Bruns Heury, grocer, dwl SW cor Folsom and 

Spear , 

Bruns Henry, groceries and liquors, NE cor Filbert 

and Masou • 

Bruns Henry, laborer, dwl 247 Spear 
Bruns Henry, milkrauch,dwl Old San Jose Road nr 

Thirtieth 



HUNTINGTON, HOPKINS & CO., Agents Jessop & Sons' Steel, Cor. Bush and Market. 



C. P VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Hats and Caps. 



Brans Hermann, store bookkeeper Custom House, 

dwl 125 Seventh 
Bruns Hermiua; (widow) dressmaker, dwl 770 

Howard 
Bruns Jolm, clerk with Frederick Bruns & Brother, 

dwl SVV cor Folsom and Spear 
Bruns John D., cabiuetmaker, dwl 603 Pine 
BRUNS N. &P., groceries and liquors, NW cor 

Third and Berry 
BRUNS NICHOLAS, groceries and liquors, 617 

Davie, fendN. & P. Bruns) dwl SE cor Guer- 
rero ana Camp 
Bruns Peter, (N. & P. Bruns) dwl 14 Hafrgin 
Bruns William, groceries and liquors, 422 Green 
Branson Henry, ruetalroofer with H. G. Fiske, dwl 

809 MarkeY 
Bruustet C lurries, seaman, dwl 12 Washington 
Brunt William N., (Brunt # ConahanJ dwl SE 

cor Sixteenth and Howai'd 
Bruut & Conahan/ William N. Brunt and Francis 

ConahanJ butchers, SE cor How and Seventh 
Bruntsch Curl, clerk with John H. Bodeu & Co., 

dwl 919 Jackson 
Brusco Gi icomo, cook with Cadenasso & Tubino, 

515 Merchant 
Brush Creek Gold and Silver Mining Co., office 

326 Davis 

Brush Albert, groceries and liquors, NE cor Tyler 
and Larkiu 

Brush Edward H., (Tomahs Bay Clam Co.) and 
oyster depot, E s Kentucky nr Sixteenth 

Brush George A., graiuer, NE" cor Clay and Mont- 
gomery, dwl NE cor Larkiu and Tyler 

Brush Reuben G., bookkeeper with R. B. Swain & 
Co., dwl 1410 Pine 

Brasher Joseph, laborer, dwl 9 Pinckney Place 

Brusher Joseph, Riggers' and Stevedores' Associa- 
tion, 429 Pacific 

Brusie James, collector, dwl E s Mission nr Twenty- 
second 

Brutscher Adam M., harnessmaker with Main & 
Winchester, dwl Mortou nr Dupont 

Bruun T. O., packer with Kohler, Chase & Co., 
dwl 430 California 

Bryan A. C, carpenter with P. M. S. S. Co., dwl 
288 Sixth 

Bryan Charles H., real estate agent, dwl N s 
Twenty-third bet Mission and Capp 

Bryan Dudley C, health inspector, office 521 Jack- 
son, dwl 810 Stockton 

Bryan Edward Jr., tinsmith with G. & W. Snook, 
dwl 112 Morton 

Bryan Edwin H., (Bryan & Co.) dwl 1805 Stock 

Bryan E. H., physician, office 224 Kearny 

Bryan Frank, clerk Hdqrs Mil Div Pac, 703 Mar- 
ket, dwl 30 Kearny 

Bryan Frederick, salesman with Alexander Rallies, 
dwl 555 Mission 

Bryan John M., stoves, tinware and manufacturer 
hydraulic pipes, 130 Third, dwl 40 Natoma 

Bryan Mark H., carpenter, dwl SE cor Sierra and 
Indiana 

Bryan O., laborer Pacific Rolling Mill, dwl Potrero 
Point 

Bryan P. O., carpenter, dwl 592 Stevenson 

Bryan Samuel, laborer with Whitney & Freese, 
SE cor Steuart and Mission 

BRYAN THOMAS, wiuesand liquors, 324 Sansom, 
dwl 1107 Folsom 

Bryan William, bookkeeper, dwl 308 Mason 

Bryan William, real estate, office 324 Sansom, dwl 

327 Ellis 

Bryan William H., civil engineer, office 331 Mont- 
gomery, dwl N 8 Sutter nr Taylor 

BRYAN WILLIAM J., druggist and apothecary, 
NW cor Third and Howard, (and William J. 
Bryan S? Co.) dwl 1203 Howard 

BRYAN WILLIAM J. & CO., apothecaries, NW 
cor Second and Howard, and Grand Hotel 



Bryan W 7 illiam J., with Tay, Brooks &. Backus, dwl 
' 304 Third 

Bryan & Co., (Edward H. Bryan and John T. 
Coe) collectors and house brokers, 523 Kearny 

Brvaus Edward, porter, dwl 124 Welsh 

BRYANT A. J. &. CO., general agents Brooklyn 
Life Insurance Co., office 240 Montgomery 

Bryant Alexander, ( W. S? A. Bryant) dwl Folsom 
bet Sixteenth and Seventeenth 

Bryant Andrew J., (A. J. Bryant & Co., and 
Spawn & B.) dwl 822 Sutter 

Bryant C. W., conductor City R. R. 

Bryant Daniel, laborer, dwl W s Columbia bet 
Nineteenth and Twentieth 

Bryant Daniel S., (Bryant # Cook) res Oakland 

Bryant George, shoeeutter with P. Kelly, dwl SE 
cor Lombard and Dupont 

Bryant George H., (Neville & Co.) dwl 1917 
Polk 

Bryant James E., (Center & B.) dwl'N s Fulton 
nr Octavia 

Bryant J. G. , physician, office and dwl 130 Fifth 

Bryant Jolm, compositor Examiner, dwl 20 Bernard 

Bryant John, cook Australia S. S. Line, dwl N s 
Braunau nr Second 

Bryant John, painter with W. G. Weir, dwl 22 
Hayes 

Bryant John, (Bryant, Strahan & Co.) dwl 20191, 
Howard 

Bryant Mahala M., teacher, dwl 20 Metcalf Place 

Bryant Robert, civil engineer, dwl 748 Folsom 

Bryant Samuel, (colored) waiter, dwl Green bet Polk 
and Larkin 

Bryant Sophronia, (widow) dwl 471 Clementina 

BRYANT, STRAHAN & CO., (John Bryant, 
Simon Strahan and E. Bruce Cooper) wood 
carving and turning, 30 and 32 California, and 
218 Steuart 

Bryant W. & A., box manufacturers, cor Seven- 
teenth and Shotwell 

Bryant Warren, (W. 8? A. .Bryant) dwl W s Fol- 
som bet Sixteenth and Seventeenth 

Bryant W. D., conductor, dwl 29 Austin 

Bryant William, boilermaker Uniou Iron Works, 
dwl 411 Pacific 

Bryant William F. , bookkeeper with David Con- 
rad, dwl American Exchange. 

Bryant William J., (colored) physician, office cor 
Pacific aud Stockton, dwl 903* Broadway 

Bryant William L., (William L. Bryant & Go.) 
dwl 1117 Bryant 

Bryant William L. & Co., gents' furnishing goods, 
21 New Montgomery 

BRYANT & COOK. (Daniel S. Bryant and David 
S. Cook) commission merchants, 306 Davis 

Bryant — See Briant aud Bryan 

Bryce Edward, driver Bamber & Co's Express, res 
Alameda 

Bryden George, drayman, 415 Front 

Bryden George, tinsmith, dwl 1246 Folsom 

Bryden James W., tinsmith with Brittau, Hol- 
brook & Co., dwl 566 Howard 

Brydges Marshal C, stoves aud tinware, 203 Sec- 
ond, dwl SE cor Third and Verona 

Bryn Frederick, captain scow Osceola, dwl 32 Fred- 
erick 

Bryngelson Peter, laborer, dwl cor Central and 
Ford 

BRYSON C. W., (Reed & J3.; dwl 527 Fourth 

Brysou James, groceries, SW cor Hyde and Post, 
' dwl 520 Oak 

Brysou William, boilermaker with McAfee, Spiers 
& Co., dwl 17 Natoma 

Buch Frederick, musician Alhambra Theater, dwl 
1412 Jackson 

Buch Jacob S., merchant, office 521 Front 

Buchanan Fiuley, bruslmiaker S. F. Brush Factory, 
dwl 29 Commercial 

Buchanan James, grainer, dwl 1104 Folsom 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street, Pocket Cutlery and Scissors. 



WATKINS' YO-SEMITE ART GALLERY, 26 Montg. St., opp. Lick House Entrance. 



128 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY 



Buchanan John, carpenter, dwl NW cor Jones and 
Bernard 

Buchanan John, collector Vallejo Street Wharf, 
dwl 571 Howard 

Buchanan John, laborer with Frederick Schmid, dwl 
52* Pacific 

Buchanan Joseph, office -with John McCombe, 502 
Montgomery, dwl E s Shotwell nr Nineteenth 

Buchanan Sarah A., (widow) dwl 511 Shotwell 

Buchanan William, brnsbmaker S. F. Brush Fac- 
tory, dwl 29 Commercial 

Buchanan William G., bootmaker with United 
Workingmen'sBoot and Shoe Co., dwl 519 Jessie 

Buche Conrad, trussmaker with J. H. A. Folkers & 
Bro., dwl 633 Mission 

Buchert George, shipcarpenter, dw T l SW cor Tay- 
lor and Chestnut. 

Buchholtz Henry, seaman, dwl 32 Steuart 

Buchholz Augustus, blacksmith with Barz & Suhl, 
dwl 530 Pacific 

Buchholz Henrv, cabinetmaker with Field & Frei, 
dwl 10 Gardiner 

Buchholz Henry, tinsmith with Charles Brown, dwl 
536 Jessie 

Bucbiuor Norman, laborer with superintendent of 
public streets, dwl 571 Stevenson 

Buchtenkirchen Adolph, salesman with Ernest Ess- 
mann, dwl 906 Stockton 

Buck Daniel, mining secretary, office 511 California, 
dwl Occidental Hotel 

Buck George, engineer Pacific Rolling Mill, dwl 
N s Sierra nr Maryland 

Buck George, expreeswagon, NW cor Montgomery 
and Clay, dwl 314 Third 

Buck H, laborer California Sugar Refinery, dwl 
cor Eighth and Bryant 

Buck Henry, gilder, 813 Washington, dwl Ns Val- 
lejo bet Dupont and Kearny 

Buck John, laborer California Sugar Refinery, dwl 
Rauech bet Seventh and Eighth 

Buck John, teamster, dwl Ns Bush bet Devisadero 
and Broderick 

Buck Johu, (Ohlandl & Go.) dwl Es Jersey nr 
Butte 

Buck Joshua S.. engineer, dwl 71 Clementina 

Buck Louis, merchant, dwl 7 Carlos Place 

Buck Minna, (widow) dwl cor Bran and Eleventh 

Buck William, captain schooner Onward, 1 Market 

Buck William, stairbuihler with N. P. Langlaud, 
dwl Fourth nr Freelon 

Buckarovich Peter, coffee saloon, NE cor Clay and 
Drunim 

Buckbee Charles A. Rev., pastor Fifth Baptist 
Chinch, dwl 2217 Howard 

Buckbee Johu R., dwl 408 Capp 

Buckbee Spencer C, clerk with P. D. Code & Co., 
dwl 2217 Howard 

Buckelew Ansel S., watch and chronometermaker, 
i'l I Sansom, dwl 43 Second 

BUCKEYE <;. A S. M. CO., (Lyon Co., Nev.J 
office 4d2 Montgomery 

Bnckhardt G., merchant, dwl 412 Sixth 

Bucking Diedrich, ( Lconhard <$• B., and Bucking 
& Co.) dwl 412 Drumm 

Bucking Frederick, cabinetmaker with Field & 
Frei, dwl NE cor Bitch and Brannan 

Bucking John,, (Bucking Sf Pihter) dwl 515 Bry- 
ant 

Bucking & Co., (Diederich Bucking and Christian 
Postel) groceries and liquors, NW cor Pacific 
and Taylor 

Bucking & Pilster, (John Bucking and Henry Pil- 
ster) groceries and liquors, 515 Bryant 

Buckingham A melius E., salesman, 223 Montgom- 
ery, dwl 717 Bush 

Buckingham Charles E., broker, dwl 331 Kearny 

Buckingham Thomas H., (Buckingham & Hecht J 
dwl 505 Van Ness Avenue 

Buckingham William H, clerk, dwl 410 Kearny 



Buckingham William P., clerk with Buckingham 

&. Hecht, dwl 505 Van Ness Avenue 
Buckingham & Hecht, (Thomas H. Buckingham 

and Isaac and Louis Hecht J wholesale boot 

manufacturers, NW cor Haight and Gough 
Buckley Alfred A., clerk- with McAllisters <fc Ber- 

gin, dwl 407 Natoma 
Bucklev Andrew, pressman with H. S. Crocker & 

Co., dwl 127 Shipley 
Buckley Andrew Jr., porter with John C. Morri- 
son Jr., dwl 127 Shipley 
Buckley Catherine M. A., ('widow) dwl 1103 Jack 
Buckley Cornelius, expresswagon, NE cor Folsom 

and Steuart 
Buckley Daniel, (Stewart & B.J dwl 219 Stevenson 
Buckley Daniel, coalpasser with P. M. S. S. Co. 
Buckley Daniel, miller, dwl 228 Jessie 
Buckley Daniel, seaman, dwl 238 Steuart 
Buckley David, carpenter H. C. League, 128 

Kearny 
Buckley David, porter with A. C. Dietz &. Co., dwl 

12 Anthony 
Buckley Edmund, plasterer, dwl 731 California 
Buckley Edward, proprietor Buckley's Varieties, 

SW cor Kearny and Sacramento, dwl SW cor 

Kearny and Clay 
Buckley Edward J., actor California Theater, dwl 

407" Clementina 
BUCKLEY EDWARD P., license collector City 

and Countv, office 7 City Hall, first floor, dwl 

2006 Poweil 
Buckley Edward R., bricklayer, dwl SW cor Har- 
rison and Chesley 
Buckley Ellen, (widow) furnished rooms. 407 Clem 
Bucklev Frank, carpenter, dwl W s Devisadero nr 

Turk 
Buckley J., dwl N s Point Lobos Road 
Buckley James, (James & William Buckley) dwl 

N s Green nr Polk 
Buckley James & William, brickyard, W s Polk 

n r Green 
Bucklev James E., bricklayer, and contractor and 

builder, dwl 344 Seventh 
Buckley Jane, (widow) saloon, SE cor Bay and 

Jones 
Buckley Jeremiah, laborer, dwl 231 First 
Buckley Jeremiah J., porter, 15 Sansoni, dwl S s 

Fell bet Scott and Devisadero 
Buckley John, carpenter, dwl 411 Sansom 
Buckley Johu, clerk, dwl 311 Bryant 
Buckley John, cook, dwl 925 Broadway 
Buckley John, laundry man with S.F. Laundry As- 
sociation, dwl NW cor Fillmore and Turk 
Buckley John, miner, dwl 407 Natoma 
Buckley John A., boilermaker, dwl 407 Natoma 
Buckley John H., cooper with Sweeney & Connor, 

dwl 925 Broadway 
Buckley John L., bookkeejier, 217 Battery, dwl 407 

Clementina 
Buckley Julia Mrs., actress California Theater, dwl 

407 Clementina 
Buckley M. B., salesman, 28 Kearny, dwl 14 Ellis 
Buckley M. E. Mrs., furnished rooms, 36 Geary 
Buckley Michael, blacksmith, dwl 37 Frederick 
Buckley Michael, blacksmith Union Iron Works 
Buckley Michael, clerk with William H. Freeborn, 

NE cor Kearny and Washington 
Buckley Michael, helper Union Iron Works 
Bucklev Michael, nightwatchman Central P. R. R., 

dw'l 321 Third 
Buckley Michael, porter with L. & M. Sachs & Co., 

dwl S s Ellis bet Scott and Devisadero 
Buckley Patrick, cooper S. F. & P. Sugar Refinery, 

dwl Rausch nr Folsom 
Buckley Patrick, laborer, dwl 925 Broadway 
Buckley Patrick, laborer, Jdwl S 8 Bush bet Baker 

and Lyons 
Buckley Patrick, laborer Laurel Hill Cemetery 
Buckley Thomas, seaman, dwl 32 Steuart 



HUNTINGTON, HOPKINS & CO., Importers Hardware and Iron, Cor. Bush and Market. 



C P VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Glassware and Toys. 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY 



129 



Buckley Timothy, hostler with John Parrott, 620 

Folsom 
Buckley Timothy, hostler with T. H. Hatch & Co., 

dw'11311 Pine 
Buckley William, (James & William Buckley) 

dwl N s Green nr Polk 
Buckley William E., messenger with Edward F. 

Hall & Co., dwl 731 California 
Bucklin John W., insurance agent, dwl 319 Stockton 
BUCKMAN BROTHERS, (George A. and Harry 

L.J Capital Saloon ,226 Montgomery 
Buckman George A., (Buckman Bros.) dwl 323 

Kearny 
Buckman Harry L., (Buckman Bros.) 226 Mont 
Buckmann D. Henry, porter with D.N.&E. Walter 

& Co.. dwl 309 Main 
Buckmann Henry, porter Pacific Refinery, dwl 14 

Valparaiso 
Buckmaster John J., lather, dwl 249 Stevenson 
Bucknall George J., dermatologist, office 523 

Kearny, dwl 812 Bush 
Bucknam Charles, salesman with J. W. Davidson 

& Co., dwl 308 Sutter 
Bucknam Clara, teacher Riucou Grammar School, 

dwl 830 Folsom 
Bucknam Ezra T., stoves and tinware, 22 Steuart, 

dwl 850 Folsom 
Bucknam Meldon, clerk steamer Salinas, Washing- 
ton Street Wharf 
Bnckner A. C. Mrs., hairdresser, dwl 589 Market 
Buckner Charles, cabinetmaker, 110 Sixth 
Buckner Charles, carpenter, 21 Geary, dwl 105 

Garden 
Buckner Emeline, ladies' hairdressing, 1023 How 
Buckner Thomas Jr., clerk with Charles Mayer, 

dwl 846 Folsom 
Buckstone Frank, carpenter, dwl 1316 Broadway 
BUDD WAYMAN C, stockbroker, office 440 Cal- 
ifornia, dwl 15 Guy»Place 
Budder Theodore, seaman, dwl 6 Natorna 
Buddington Walter, pilot, dwl 246 Third 
Budelmau William, solicitor Chicago Hotel, dwl N 

E cor Davis and Jackson 
Budge Richard F., Spanish interpreter and transla- 
tor, office and dwl 728 Montgomery 
Budzzileui Mary, (widow) tailoress, dwl 562 Mission 
Buehler Jacob M., pastor German Lutheran 

Church, dwl 953 Mission 
Buel Frederick Rev., agent California Bible So- 
ciety, 757 Market, res Brooklyn, Alameda Co. 
Buell Christian C, engineer Sanitarium Baths, dwl 

2114 Powell 
Buena & Co., (Chinese) cigar manufacturers, 723 

Sacramento 
BUENA VISTA PARK, \ mile south Masonic 

Cemetery 
BUENA VISTA VINICULTURAL SOCIETY, 

office 409 Battery 
Buerman Frederick, bookkeeper with F. Mandle- 

baum, dwl 2017 Mason 
Buesiug Ernest, druggist, dwl 129 Jackson 
Buessard Jules, (Buessard & Sclieggia) dwl 824 

Montgomery 
Buessard & Sclieggia (Jules Buessard and Charles 

Sckeggia) importers and wholesale and retail 

dealers French and native wines, 824 Mont 
Buetner Hermann, musician, dwl 1511 Mason 
BUFFANDEAU EMILE B., bookkeeper and 

general agent, office 526Merch, dwl 1223 Turk 
BUFFINGTON JOHN M.,mining secretary, office 

37 Merchants' Exchange, dwl 137 Silver 
Buffingtou William H, clerk with Albert Dibblee, 

dwl 137 Silver 
Bufford Henry L., agent Contra Costa Laundry 

Association, dwl W s Bartlett bet Twenty- 
second and Twenty-third 
Bufford James L., dwl 505 Sutter 
Bufford Samuel F., (IS. F. Laundry Association) 

dwl 505 Sutter 



Buffum A. C, physician, office 33 Kearny, dwl 

Rnss House 
Buffum John W., miner, dwl 637 Howard 
Bngan A., saloon, San Bruno Road 
Bugbee Charles L., (S. C. Bugbee& Son) res Oak- 
land 
Bugbee John S., (Scripture & B.) attorney at law 

and commissioner deeds for Massachusetts, office 

323 California, dwl 14 Hawthorne 
Bugbee S. C, ( S. C. Bugbee & Son) dwl 641 Har- 
rison 
Bugbee S. C. Mrs., president Ladies' Uuited Aid 

Society, office SW cor Sutter and Powell 
BUGBEE S. C. & SON, (Charles L. Bugbee) arch- 
itects, office 402 Montgomery, room 27 
Bugbee Sumner W., business agent, office 402 

Montgomery, dwl 641 Harrison 
Buhl John, dwl 218 Pacilic 
Buhler August, apothecary and chemist, cor Market 

and Taylor 
Buhler John F., shoemaker, 529 Jackson 
Buhlert Albert, deputy superintendent Odd Fellows' 

Cemetery, dwl E s Devisadero nr Geary 
Buhlert Julius, secretary Grocers' Protective Union, 

office 1 1 4 Kearny , dwl 735 Clay 
Buhlman Elize Mrs., dressmaker, dwl 433 Union 
Buhmerer Frederick, cabinetmaker with L. & E. 

Emanuel, dwl 113 Silver 
Buhr Benjamin, driver with Bulletti & Selna, dwl 

34 Second 
Buhrmeister Henry, bathman with F. Zeile. dwl 

528 Pacific 
Buhrmeister John, re-packer with E. T. Anthony 

& Co., dwl 229 Sutter 
Buick John, painter, dwl 1427 Geary 
Buist William, porter, 111 Battery, dwl 532 How 
Bujan A., saloon, San Bruno Road nr toll gate 
Buker Livy K., clerk, 304 Montgomery, dwl Hall 

Place nr Jackson 
Buking George E., cabinetmaker, dwl 638 Pacific 
Bulard D. B., (widow) dwl E s Webster nr Ellis 
Buldeman Adolph, cook, dwl NE cor Bush and 

Franklin 
Bulger John, boilermaker Union Iron Works, dwl 

260 Clementina 
Bulger John, groceries and liquors, 448 Clementina 
Bulger John, laborer with Graves & Co., W s Long 

Bridge 
Bulger John, lamplighter S. F. Gas Co., dwl -148 

Clementina 
Bulger Martin ( Deacon & B.) dwl 15 Rues 
Bulger Patrick, expresswagon, cor Sixth and Mar- 
ket, dwl S s Boyd nr Chesley 
Bulkeley L. E., attorney at law, office 603 Washing- 
ton, dwl 919 Stockton 
Bulkley Ichabod, clerk with C. A. Hooper & Co., 

dwl SE cor Fourth & Berry 
Bulkley Milton, (Sherwood, B. & Co.) dwl W 8 

Capp bet Sixteenth and Seventeenth 
BULL ALPHEUS, president Gould & Curry Silver 

M. Co., 22 Merchants' Exchange, dsslJNE cor 

Leavenworth and Francisco 
Bull James, tailor, 229 Third 
Bull John, carpenter H. C. League, 12aKearny 
Bulland Benoit, (Boutinon & B.) dwl 530 Merch 
Bullard G. C, carpenter H. C. League, J28 Kearny 
Bullard James A., bookkeeper with J. H. Bullard, 

dwl E s Hyde bet Filbert and Greenwich 
Bullard James H., produce commission, 228> Clay, 

dwl E s Hyde bet Filbert and Greenwich 
Bullard Margaret, (widow) furnished rooms,. 131 

Morton 
Bullard William P., clerk, 3 Front, dwl Es Hyde 

bet Filbert and Greenwich 
Bulles H. N., carpenter H. C. League, dwl 1025 

Mission 
Bullett Helen, housekeeper, 1325 Washington 
Bulletti Constantino, (Bulletti # Selna} dwl 1714 

Dupont 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street, Best Paper and Linen Collars. 
9 



WATKINS' YO-SEMITB ART GALLERY, 26 Montg. St., opp. Lick House Entrance. 



130 



SAN FRANCISCO [H] DIRECTORY 



BTJLLETTI & SELNA, (Constantino Bullet/i 

and Ubaldo Sebia) fruits, Pacific Fruit Market, 

Bullis Edward A., clerk with Sumner C. Blake, dwl 

till Union, rear 
Bullis H. M., carpenter H. C. League, 128 Kearny 
Bnllivuut Herbert E., porter, 31 Battery, dwl 12'3 

Garden 
Bullock Ezekiel, woodturner with Kimball Manu- 
facturing Company, dwl Silver nr Fourth 
Bullock Frank D., (Bullock & Jones) dwl 423 

Sutter 
Bullock Jobn H., millwright, dwl 1017 Mason 
Bullock L. L., ex-tide land commissioner, dwl 232 

Francisco 
Bullock Michael, seaman, dwl 32 Steuart 
Bullock William, dwl What Cheer House 
BULLOCK & JONES, (Frank D. Bullock and 
John L. Jones) gents" furnishing goods and 
merchant tailors, 421 Montgomery 
Bullwinkle John F., (Bvlhvinkle $? Co.) dwl NW 

cor Louisa and Haywood 
Bu'lwinkle <fe Co., (John F. Bullwinkle and Jake 
Mehrtens) groceries and liquors, NW cor Louisa 
and Haywood 
Bulmore Robert R., salesman with David Porter, 

dwl 1206 Jackson 
Bulow William, upholsterer, dwl 46 Second 
Bulson John, engineer tugboat Rabboni, dwl 1001 

Folsom 
Bnlsted John, laborer, dwl 262K Clementina, rear 
Bumat James, butcher with Alphonse Geautit, dwl 

1202 Dupont 
Bumm George S. , local policeman, 101 Montgomery, 

dwl 519 Ellis 
Bumm George W., (J. M. Crane & Co.) dwl 531 

Geary 
Bumpus Peleg, miner, dwl 810 Vallejo 
Bunce William, bookkeeper with Hobbs, Gilmore 

&. Co., dwl 1320 Sacramento 
Bundshu Charles, bookkeeper with Smith, Brown & 

Co., dwl 620 Vallejo 
Bundy James, farmer, dwl 116 O'Farrell 
Bundy John H., porter U. S. B. Mint, dwl cor Six- 
teenth and Utah 
Bundy Thomas, (colored) hogranch, dwl NE cor 

Sixteenth and Utah 
Bundy William, (colored) jobber, dwl 1021 Pacific 
Bnneman Henry, (Bnneman $■ Co.) dwl 802 Union 
Bunenian & Co., (Henry Bnneman and Jacob 
Tautphaus) wholesale wines and liquors, 407 
Commercial 
Bungart Joseph, painter, dwl 728 Market 
Bunker Alfred W., clerk Liverpool and London and 

Globe Ins. Co., dwl 611 Mason 
Bunker Cromwell, porkpacker with R. F. Bunker, 

dwl 1188 Broadway 
Bunker David, piledriver with E. C. Boobar & Co. 

NW cor Howard and Steuart 
Bunker Frederick H., butcher with R. F. Bunker, 

dwl 1 190 Broadway 
Bunker Frederick R., bookkeeper with John W. 

Brnmagim, dwl 1517 Stockton 
Bunker George F., draftsman with Deacon & 

Bulger, dwll3De Boom 
Bunker George H., carpenter, dwl 559 Bryant 
Bunker Harriet J. Miss, furnished rooms, "421 Post, 

rear 
Banker Henry E., melter and refiners' department 

U.S. B. Mint, dwl 223 First 
Bunker Henry S., (Bunker & Wheeler) dwl N s 

Mission bet Twelfth and Thirteenth 
Bunker James A., fisherman, dwl Boston House 
Bunker Joseph W., drayman, NW cor Front and 

Clay, dwl American Exchange 
Bunker Paul, delivery clerk with Pool &, Harris, 
dwl S s California bet Webster and Buchanan 
Bunker Robert F., porkpacker and curer meats, 74 

and 75 Califoruia Market, dwl 610 Leav 
Bunker Sarah E., (widow) dwl 13 De Boom 



collector Pacific Street Wharf. 
., Bulletin editorial rooms, dwl 



Bunker Thomas C 
dwl 621 Clay- 
Bunker William I 

114 Perry 

BUNKER & WHEELER, (Henry S. Bunker and 
Henry T. Wheeler) ship and customhouse brok- 
ers, 512 Battery 
Bunn Charles C, clerk, dwl 740 Howard 
Bunnell Edwin F., dentist, office 319 Kearny, res 

Fruit Vale 
Bunnell James S., auditing deparment Wells, 

Fargo &, Co.'s fast freight office, dwl 1594 j Bush 
Bunner Stephen, policeman City Hall, dwl 173 

Perry 
Buusen Andrew, laborer, bds 29 First. 
Bunting Edward P., seaman, bds 32 Steuart 
Bunting Joseph, merchant, dwl 407 Folsom 
Bunton Richard, porter Brooklyn Hotel 
Buuty Joseph A., (colored) bootblack with John 

Stable, dwl cor Sixteenth and Utah, Potrero 
Bunyan Dennis, glassblower Pacific Glass Works, 

dwl Mariposa, Potrero 
Bunyan Thomas, packer Pacific Glass Works, dwl 

Mariposa, Potrero 
Burbery William, decorative painter, dwl 806 Green 
Burbridge Samuel L., third officer N. P. Trans. Co's 

Co.'s S. S. Orizaba ' 
Burch Alexander, seaman, dwl 32 Steuart 
Burch Joseph, laborer, dwl Es Castro nr Eighteenth 
Burch Patrick, laborer with Charles E. Haseltine, 

36 Steuart 
Burch Ross, laborer, dwl 227 Second 
Burchal Henry, pianofortemaker, dwl 539 Howard 
Burcham John, farmer, dwl 208 Tyler 
Bnrchell Samuel, laborer, dwl 728 Market 
Burchert Rodolpb, carpenter H. C. League, 128 

Kearny 
Burckes Henry W., carpenter, dwl 10S Turk 
Burckes Samuel S., real estate,, dwl 12 Ellis 
Burckes Warren H., clerk with Payot, Upham & 

Co., dwl 108 Turk 
Burd Lawrence, bricklayer Bricklayers' Pro. Ass'n, 

234 Sutter 
Burdell Galen, dentist, office 629 Clay, res Petaluma 
Burdell Harvey/ Fenn& B.) res Napa Soda Springe 
Burdett Peter, butcher, dwl 730 Minna 
Burdick Edward F., clerk, 3U9 Sansome, dwl 322 

Tyler 
Burdick Jared C, (Petlit & Co.) dwl 209 Dmmrn 
Burdick John, piledriver with E. C. Boobar «fe Co., 

NW cor Howard and Steuart 
Burdick Joseph D.. agent with Chenery, Souther & 

Co., dwl Willow Avenue 
Burdick Stephen W., mate steamer Antelope 
Burdick William, manufacturer curtain rollers aud 

broom handles, W s Drumm nr California, dwl 

409 Brannan 
Burdon Thomas, bookkeeper with Moody & Farish, 

dwl W s Octavia bet Broadway and Vallejo 
Burfeind John, (Martin Burfeind & Bro.) dwl 

SW cor Francisco and Mason 
Burfeind Martin, (Martin Burfeind & Bro.) dwl 

2217 Mason 
Burfeind Martin & Brother, (John Burfeind) liq- 
uor saloon, SW cor Francisco aud Mason 
Burg Charles, boatman, dwl 39 Jackson 
Burt; Kmile, bookkeeper with John G. Nelson, dwl 

330 Minna 
Burgane Charles, gunsmith with Wilson A- Evans, 

dwl 709 Mission 
Burge Ann, (widow) dwl 17 Freelon 
Barge Robert K., blacksmith, dwl 617 Grove 
Burgev Jacob, barber, dwl Prescott House 
Binges Tristam, register clerk Probate Court, dwl 

731 Bush 
Burgess Charles A., salesman, 421 Montgomery, 

dwl 721 California 
Burgess Charles E., bookkeeper with Cyrus Adams, 

dwl 326 O'Farrell 



HUNTINGTON, HOPKINS & CO., Agents Jessop & Sons' Steel, Cor Bush and Market. 



C. P. ViN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Furnishing Goods. 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY 



131 



Burgess C. M., hostler Cliff House, dwl S s Point 

Lobos Road 
Burgess Henry, fishdealer, dwl S s Serpentine Av- 
enue nr Bryant 
Bnryess Hubert, teacher drawing Public Schools, 

dwl 1 15 Stockton 
Bargees James Edwin, cook with Berend H. Boer, 

dwl S s Sutter bet Kearny and Dupont 
Burgess Michael, laborer Ce"nt. P. R. R., dwl 318| 

Ritch 
Burgess Oscar O., physician, office and dwl 523 Fol 
Burgess Robert, laborer, dwl 327 Beale 
Burgess T., stablekeeper, Cliff House 
Burgess Thomas, laundryman with S. P. Laundry 

Ass'n. dwl SW cor Fillmore and Turk 
Burgess William, cook with M. Kibbe, dwl 51(3 

Montgomery 
Burgemeister August, tinware, 143 Second 
Bnrghgren Nels, tailor, dwl 742 Pine 
Burgon Kaspar, laborer, dwl 133 Broadway 
Burgon William, cook, dwl 16:2 Minna 
Burlians D. C, baguiaker with Neville & Co., dwl 

314 Post 
Burie Frank, lumberman with Pope & Talbot, dwl 

565 Howard 
Burk David, laborer, dwl Fort Point 
Burk J. J., bricklayer Bricklayers' Pro. Ass n, 234 

Sutter 
Burk John, laborer, dwl 54 First 
Burk Julia Mrs., dwl '2025 Polk 
Burk M.. policeman Alms House 
Burk William, laborer Front Street M. & 0. R.R., 

dwl SE cor Bush and Polk 
Burkardt & Newman, (Max Burkardt and Hen- 
ry Neictnan) publishers Humorist, 523 Kearny 
BURKARDT MAX, importer engravings and man- 
ufacturer frames, 545 Wash, (and Burkardt & 

Newman,) dwl 627 Commercial 
Burke Alfred I., stationer, dwl NE cor Filbert and 

Jones 
Burke Barbara, (widow) dwl NE cor Filbert and 

Jones 
Burke Bartholomew, laborer, dwl 28 Moss, rear 
Burke Catherine, (widow) dwl 150 Clara 
Burke C. D., (Lewis & B.J dwl Overland House 
Burke Charles I , contractor with Wood Preserving 

Co., dwl 351 Jessie 
Burke David, cabinetmaker, N s Folsomnr Sixth 
Burke David, laborer, dwl 214 Broadway 
Burke Edmund, dwlN s North Point nr Larkin 
Burke Edmund W., clerk with White & Bauer, 

dwl NE cor Jones and Filbert 
Burke Ethelbert, deputy-collector Custom House, 

dwl 722 Turk 
Burke Fanny, laundress with S. F. Laundry Ass'n, 

dwl SW cor Fillmore and Turk 
Burke Garret, carpenter, dwl 310 Eighth 
Burke Gilbert, hostler Fashion Stable, dwl 530 

Second 
Burke Henry, conductor Omnibus R.R., dwl 558 

Natoma 
Burke J., domestic Lick House 
Burke James, heater Pacific Rolling Mill, dwl Pot- 

rero Point 
Burke James, laborer, dwl 228 Clementina, rear 
Burke James, laborer, dwl 718 Clementina 
Burke James, packer with Harvey 6l Co., dwl N s 

Clementina nr Second 
Burke James, piledriver with E. C. Boobar & Co., 

NE cor Howard and Steuart 
Burke James, porter Spring Valley Water Works, 

dwl 20 Willow Avenue 
Burke James, tailor, dwl 1318 Kearnv 
BURKE JAMES C, liquor saloon, SE cor Fourth 

and Perry, dwl 421 Fourth 
Bm&e John, bellman Occidental Hotel 
Burke John, blacksmith, dwl 963 Folsom 
Burke John, cook, dwl 258 Jessie 
Burke John, dry goods, 634 Market, dwl 20 Mont 



Burke John, expressman, SW cor Fourth and Mar- 
ket, dwl 30 Langton 
Burke John, tilecutter Pacific File Works, dwl 9 

Minna 
Burke John, gardener, dwl 36 Garden 
Burke John, helper Risdon Iron Works, dwl 1208 

Mission 
Burke Johu, hostler Market Street R.R., dwl Val- 
encia bet Sixteenth and Seventeenth 
Burke John, laborer, dwl 909 Battery, rear 
Burke John, laborer New U. S. B. Mint, dwl 947 

Missiou 
Burke John, laborer, dwl S s Lombard bet Sausom 

and Montgomery 
Burke John, laborer with Reynolds & Ford, dwl 

S 8 Twentieth bet Church and Dolores 
Burke John, teamster with William Kerr, dwl 903 

Battery- 
Burke John, varnisher with J. Strahle & Co., dwl 

727 Minna 
Burke John, waiter, 640 Market, dwl 87 Stevenson 
Burke John E., U. S. mail agent, S. F. post office 
Burke John H., conductor Omnibus R.R., dwl 458 

Natoma 
Burke Johu H., musician, dwl E s Stockton nr Green- 
wich 
Burke John I., builder, dwl 7 Yerba Buena, rear 
Burke John P., machinist S.P.R.R., dwl 130 Dora 
Burke Joseph, carpenter with Union Foundry, dwl 

32j Harriet , 

Burke Joseph, molder Union Iron Works, dwl 32| 

Harriet 
Burke Julius, bootmaker, dwl 266 Stevenson 
Burke Martin, laborer, dwl 11 Vincent. 
Burke Martin J., (Madixnn fy Burke, and Madison, 

Burke & Co.) dwl 714 Leavenworth 
Burke Mary, (widow) dwl 445 First 
Burke Matthew, lumber stevedore, dwl 2 Cal, rear 
Burke Michael, (Gordon \ B.J dwl 150 Clara 
Burke Michael, dwl Ws Sixth nr Brannan 
Burke Michael, laborer, dwl 47 Minna 
Burke Michael, laborer, dwl 216 Mission 
Burke Michael, laborer, dwl 406 Capp 
Burke Michael P., baker with Malone & Wilson, 

dwl 61 g Shipley 
Burke Nancy, (widow) furnished rooms, 211 Fourth 
Burke Nicholas J., baker, dwl 515 Stockton 
Burke P., dwl What Cheer House 
Burke Patrick, laborer, dwl Ss Serpentine Avenue 

ur Capp 
Burke Patrick, laborer Union Iron Works, dwl 63 

Stevenson 
Burke Patrick-, teamster with Union Foundry, dwl 

4U0 Severn h 
Burke Richard, tauner with C. O'Dounell, dwl 606 

Third 
Burke Robert, policeman City Hall, dwl 1105 Mont 
Burke Stephen, coachman with James S. Kennedy, 

dwl N s Clementina nr Third 
Burke Thomas, carpenter, dwl 517 Vallejo 
Burke Thomas, drayman, and exlraman steamer No. 

6, S.F.F.D., dwl Ss Folsom bet Fifth and Sixth 
Burke Thomas, laborer, dwl 10 Houston 
Burke Thomas, laborer, dwl Ss Eleventh Avenue 

nr Q, South S. F. 
Burke Thomas, poulterer, dwl 939 Folsom 
Burke Thomas, ( Burke 8f King) dwl SW cor Fell 

and Fillmore 
Burke Thomas F., gasfitter with Thomas Day, dwl 

13)8 Kearny 
Burke William, carmaker with Kimball Manufac- 
turing Co., dwl 209 Tehama 
Burke William, laborer New U. S. B. Mint, dwl 

cor Russ and Natoma 
Burke William, policeman, City Hall, dwl 122 

Shipley 
Burke William, tackmaker, dwl 29 First 
Burke William A., pattern maker, dwl NE cor Clay 

and Jones 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street, Dress Buttons in great variety. 



WATKINS' YO-SEMITE ART GALLEEY, 26 Montg. St., opp. Lick House Entrance. 



132 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY 



BURKE WILLIAM F., importer, manufacturer 
and retail boots and shoes, NW cor Montgomery 
and Pine, dwl 1213 Clay 

Burke William F., musical instrument maker, 523 
Pine, dwl Ss Clay nr Jones 

Burke William G., mail clerk Evening Bulletin, dwl 
NE cor Joins and Filbert 

Burke William John, policeman City Hall, dwl 51? 
Vallejo 

Burke & King, ( Thomas Burke and Patrick King) 
house and sign painters, 1065 Market 

Burkelt Alexander, ( Sperry <fe Co.) res Stockton 

Burkhalter Erasmus, conductor N. B. & M. B. 11., 
dwl 829 Folsom 

Burkhardt Christian, Union Bakery, 1216 Pacilic 

Burkbardt Frederick, carpenter, dwl Ws Hon" Ave- 
nue bet Sixteenth and Seventeenth 

Burkhart II. E. Mrs, dwl 15 Sutter 

Burkhead William N., compositor Bulletin, dwl 2fig 
Kearny 

Barley Edward, farmer, dwl Ws Webster nr Ellis 

Burley John F., goldbeater, dwl 915 Sacramento, rear 

Burley Robert, carpenter with P. M. S. S. Co. 

Burley Robertson, shipwright, dwl 1 Welsh 

Bailing James W., (Burling & Bro.J dwl 1218 Fol 

Bulling William, (Burling fy Bro.j dwl 1335 Fol 

BURLING & BROTHER, (William and James 
II '. Burling J stockbrokers, office 428 California 

Burmeister Alrich, (Burmeistet <£• MehrtensJ dwl 
NW cor California and Leavenworth 

Bunneister CSns, tailor, 228 Brannan 

Burmeister Henry, laborer, dwl 235 Sutter 

Burmeister Henry .Occidental Restaurant, 536 Wash- 
ington, dwl 507 Filbert 

Burmeister Joseph, cabinetmaker with Chr. Schrei- 
ber & Co., dwl 1505 Powell 

Burmeister & Mehrtens, (A/rich Burmeister and 
August Mehrtens) groceries and liquors, NW 
cor California and Leavenw r orth 

Bnrmester F. H., carpenter H. C. League, 128 
Kearny 

Bnrmester Henry, carpenter, dwl Ss Borland bet 
Guerrero and Dolores 

Bnrmester John, clerk with Peter J. Postel, dwl 
SW cor Mission and Twenty-third 

Burmingham P. S., carpenter H. C. League, 128 
Kearny 

Burnap John, •groceries, crockery and hardware, 
425 Davis, dwl 420 Leavenworth 

Burnell Thomas, laborer, dwl 165 Tehama 

Burnell William A., drayman with Nathaniel F. 
Marsh, dwl 310| Ritch 

Burner Henry, painter with Frost & Richards, dwl 
W s Laskie nr Mission 

Burnett A. S., dwl 502 Powell 

Burnett Douglass, lawstudent with John M. Bur- 
nett, dwl 504 Powell 

Burnett Frederick A., barkeeper with M. Kibbe, 
dwl 415 Clementina 

Burnett George, cattle broker, dwl 532 Valencia 

BURNETT 6. G., apothecary and druggist, 330 
Montgomery, dwl 2506 Sacramento 

Burnett James, mariner, dwl 15 Clarence Place 

Burnett John, watchman Government Warehouse, 
Front Street Wharf 

Burnett John M., attorney-at-law, office 57 and 58 
Exchange Building, dwl 1901 Polk 

Burnett Joseph, driver Market St. R. R., dwl Val- 
encia nr Seventeenth 

Burnett L., clerk, dwl 783 Market 

Burnett Lizzie Miss, teacher Valencia Street Gram- 
mar School, dwl 1608 Bush 

Burnett Mary, (widow) dwl E s Leavenworth bet 
Union and Filbert 

Burnett Patrick, with J. Kearnv, dwl 27 Ritch 

BURNETT PETER H., president Pacific Bank, 
NW cor Sausom and Pine, dwl 610 Jones 

Burnett R. D., dwl 502 Powell 

Burnett Simon, tailor, dwl 412 Jones 



Burnett Thomas, boilermaker, dwl 227 Second 
Burnett Thomas, laborer, dwl 27 Ritch, rear 
BURNETT WELLINGTON C, City and County 

attorney, office 13 City Hall, third floor, dwl 60*0 

Sutter 
Burnett William, mechanical engineer, office cor 

Fremont and Natoma, dwl 1898 Broadway 
Burnett William, seaman, dwl 32 Steuart 
Burngard Thomas, seaman, dwl 32 Steuart 
Burnliam Charles, seaman, dwl 238 Steuart 
Burnham Henry, painter with Frost & Richards 
Burnliam James W., (James W. Burnham & Co.) 

dwl Ws Dolores bet Twenty-second and Twenty 

third 
BURNHAM JAMES W. & Co., (John L. and 

Henry Eckley) importers carpets, upholstery 

goods, oil cloth and paperbaugings, 618 Market 

and 17 Post 
Burnham Samuel S., wheelwright, dwl 222^ Ritch 
Burnham William F., upholsterer with Bardie & 

Fredericks, dwl 115 Sixth 
Burnham William S., sailmaker with Harding & 

Brann, dwl 1250 Montgomery 
Burnham Z. W., salesman with Sanderson & Horn, 

dwl Cosmopolitan Hotel 
Burnlioldt Benedict, waiter Thalia Verein, dwl 228 

Bush 
Burnlv Antonio, cook brig Willimantic.pier 9 Steuart 

Burns" , driver Front St. M. & O. R. R. 

Burns . driver Central R. R. 

Burns A. M., mariue surveyor, dwl 1021 Bush 
Burns Andrew, watchman with R. & J. Morton, dwl 

423 Hyde 
Burns Barbara, (widow) dwl 70 Jessie 
Burns Bernard, steward, dwl 311 Pacific 
Burns Bernard, stonecutter, dwl 421 Fifth 
Burns B. J., agent Stetefeldt Furnace Co., office 

41 1 ^ California 
Burns Bryan, laborer, aud extraman Steamer No. 7, 

S. F.'F. D., dwl Es Sixteenth bet Valencia 

and Guerrero 
Burns Catharine, (widow) dwl 24 Clinton 
Burns Christopher, laborer Union Iron Works, dwl 

136 Natoma 
Burns Cornelius, laborer Golden Gate Park, dwl 

N s Point Lobos Road 
Burns Daniel, foreman whipmaker with Main & 

Winchester, dwl 223 Stevenson 
Burns Daniel, painter, dwl 115 Second 
Burns David, miller with Sprague & Wainwright, 

dwl 32 Fremont 
Burns David, teamster, dwl 6 O'Farrell Alley 
Burns Dennis, longshoreman with Charles E. 

Haseltine, 36 Steuart 
Burns D. P., carpenter, dwl Sullivan nr Cortland 

Avenue, Bernal Heights 
Burns Edward, expresswagon, dwl 316 Capp 
Burns Edward, workman Pacific Iron Works, dwl 

1 Agnes Place nr Vallejo 
Burns Ellen Mrs., dwl 1910 Polk 
Burns Eugene, expresswagon, NW cor Jackson and 

Dupont, dwl 19 Stone 
Burns Francis J., engineer, dwl' W s Bryant Ave- 
nue bet Harrison and Bryant 
Burns Hannah, domestic, dwl 804 Geary 
Burns Henry, (Boh/J's & B.) dwl 240 Green 
limns Henry, boots aud shoes, 210 Third, res Oak- 
land 
Burns Henry, waiter, dwl 551 Mission 
Bnwis Henry J-, deputy sheriff, City Hall, dwl N e 

Dorland nr Church 
Burns Hillery, (colored) (Bums Sf Bro.) dwl 24 

Mary 
Burns Isidore, shipsmith, 20 Steuart, dwl 227 Geary 
Burns James, blacksmith, dwl 311 Pacific 
Burns James, horseshoe nailmaker with Patrick 

Brannan, dwl 10 William 
Burns James, laborer with De Vries & Chase 
Burns James, laundryman Cosmopolitan Hotel 



HUNTINGTON, HOPKINS & CO., Wholesale Hardware and Iron, Cor. Bush and Market. 



C P. VAN" SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, White Shirts. 



SAN FRANCISCO [13] DIRECTORY 



133 



Burns James, miner, dwl 814 Sanson) 

Burns James, seaman ship Germania, Rincon Wharf 

Burns James F., drayman, 112 Battery, dwl La- 

guna ur McAllister 
Burns James T., shoecutter with Orrin Jones, dwl 

15 Harrison 
Burns J. D., carpenter H. C. League, 128 Kearny 
Burns John, (Bums $- Go.) dwl h s Page nr La- 

guua 
Burns John, dwl E s Harrison bet Sixteenth and 

Seventeenth 
Burns John, boatbuilder with Martiu Vice, dwl 529 

Mission 
Burns John, boarding and lodging, S s Berry nr 

Third 
Burns John, clerk, dwl 114 Clinton 
Burns John, driver Market St. R. R., dwl 506 Hayes 
Burns John, fireman steamer Kalorama, Washing- 
ton Street Wharf 
Burns John, hostler with P. A. Fiuigau, dwl 210 

Mason 
Burns John, laborer, dwl 303 Howard 
Burns John, laborer, dwl 1432 Pacific 
Burns John, porter Moses Taylor, Australia S. S. 

Line 
Bums John, saddler, dwl 710 Kearny 
Burns John, teamster, dwl N s Twelfth Avenue nr 

N, South S. F. 
Burns John C, carpenter, dwl 661 Howard 
Burns John F., carpenter H. C. League, 128 Kearny 
Burns John H., policeman City Hall, dwl SW cor 

Broadway and Davis 
Burns John T., teamster, dwl N s O'Farrell nr La- 

guna 
Burns Joseph, dwl 903 Sacramento 
Burns Joseph, carman with Charles E. Haseltine, 

dwl 36 Steuart 
BuniB Joseph, hackdriver, dwl E s Bourbon Place 

bet Ellis and Eddy 
Burns Joseph A., carpenter, dwl Thirteenth Avenue 

nr M, South S. F. 
Burns K. Mrs., dwl 783 Market 
Burns Lewis, bricklayer, dwl 641 Washington 
Burns Margaret, (widow) dwl 257 Stevenson 
Burns Martiu, laborer, dwl 301 Beale 
Burns Martiu, laborer, dwl W s White bet Green 

and Vallejo 
Burns Marv Miss, real estate, dwl N s Natoma nr 

Tenth * 
Burns Michael, espresswagon, cor Montgomery 

and California, dwl 270 Clary 
Burns Michael, groceries and liquors, NE cor Sixth 

and Tehama, dwl 213 Sixth 
Burns Michael, laborer Laborers' Pro. and Ben. 

Association, 814 Howard 
Bums Michael, shoemaker with S. W. Rosenstock 

& Co.,dwl219Miuna 
Burns Myra, (widow) nurse, dwl 669 Mission 
Burns Owen, teamster, dwl 4 Carlos Place 
Burns Patrick, groceries and liquors, 327 Oak 
Burns Patrick, horseshoer, 670 Mission, dwl N s 

Fifteenth Avenue nr R, South S. F. 
Burns Patrick, janitor Geary Street Cosmopolitan 

School 
Burns Patrick, laborer, dwl E s Minna bet Four- 
teenth and Fifteenth 
Burns Patrick, laborer, dwl Park Avenue opp Bei- 

ual Hights 
Burns Patrick D., steward Grand Hotel, dwl W s 

Tenth bet Folsom and Harrison 
) Burns Peter, foreman stables Market Street R. R. 
Burns Peter, hostler, 681 Market 
Burns Peter, laborer, dwl 1007 Battery, rear 
Burns Peter, longshoreman with Charles E. Hasel- 
tine 
Burns Peter, porter, dwl 21 Anthony 
Burns Peter, soapdealer, dwl W s Alabama bet 

Twenty-second and Twenty-third 
Burns Richard, laborer, dwl 8 Anthony 



Burns Robert, steward What Cheer House, dwl 517 

Pine 
Burns Stephen, moroccodresser with C. O'Donnell, 

dwl W s Gunnison Avenue nr Precita Avenue, 

Bernal Hights 
Burns Sylvester, (colored) (Burns <fc BroJ dwl 

2 1 Mary 
Burns Thomas, blacksmith, dwl 29 First 
Burns Thomas, helper with David R. Coleman, dwl 

112 Tehama 
Burns Thomas, laborer, dwl S s Harrison bet Sev- 
enth and Eighth 
Burns Thomas, laborer, dwl N s Har nr Seventh 
Burns Thomas, laborer Pacific Rolling Mill, dwl 

Potrero Point 
Burns Thomas, seaman, dwl 146 Folsom 
Burns Thomas J., carpenter H. C. League, 128 

Kearny 
Burns Thomas W., barkeeper, 313 Montgomery, 

dwl 225 Bush 
Burns Tillman A., driver Front Street M. & O. 

R. R., dwl 10 O'Farrell 
Bums Timothy, waiter Lick House 
Burns William, architect, dwl 749 Market 
Burns William, carpenter with Hancock & Kelso 
Burns William, drayman, dwl 510 Broadway, rear 
Burns William, laborer with William Kerr 
Burns William, mate steamer Chin da Wan, res 

Sacramento 
Burns William, teamster, dwl E s Mission nr Twen- 
ty-ninth 
Burns & Brother. (Sylvester and Hillcry) hair- 
dressing saloon, 206 Montgomery 
Burns &. Co., ( 'John Bums and Michael Hag gerty) 

poultry dealers, 13 Union Market 
Burns — See Burties and Byrnes 
Buruside Charles H., fruits and confectionery, W s 

Valencia nr Nineteenth 
Buron Victor, laundry, Larkin bet Geary and 

O'Farrell 
Burr Alfred, engraver with George W. Shourds, 

dwl 664 Harrison 
Burr Amos, conductor S. P. R. R., dwl 36 Geary 
Burr Benjamin J., cutter with C. C. Hastings & 

Co., SW cor Montgomery and Sutter 
BurrC. F., insurance agent, dwl 814 California 
Burr Charles, dwl What Cheer House 
Burr Charles H., agent Champion Shoulderbrace, 

818 Market, dwl 769* Mission 
BURR CLARENCE C, (H C. Hudson # Co.) 

dwl NE cor Filbert and Van Ness Avenue 
Burr E. C, superintendent Eureka Smelting and 

Refining Works, dwl NE cor Filbert and Van 

Ness Avenue 
Burr Eli B., clerk Savings and Loan Society, dwl 

1214 Larkin 
BURR E. WILLARD, president Savings and 

Loan Society, office 619 Clay, dwl SE cor Van 

Ness Avenue and Filbert 
Burr George, housemover with John Malsted &. Co., 

dwl cor Pacific and Virginia Place 
Burr George E., extraman Hose Co No. 1, S. F. 

F. D., dwl 916 Montgomery 
Burr George W., molder Fulton Foundry, dwl 22 

Park Avenue 
Burr George W., dwl 769| Mission 
Burr Henry P., master mariner, dwl 664 Harrison 
Burr James, porter with Joseph E. Selleck, dwl 

1108 Montgomery 
Burr John T., bootmaker, 441 Bush 
Burr Levi, liquor saloon. S s Bay bet Kearny and 

Dupont 
Burr H. P. Miss, teacher Hayes Valley Grammar 

School, dwl 664 Harrison 
Burr Wachermann, housemover, dwl 815 Pacific 
Bun-ell Charles, physician, office 137 Montgomery, 

dwl 1322 Mission 
Burrell Edward, weigher U. S. B. Mint., dwl 

1322 Mission 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street, Sewing and Embroidering Silks. 



WATKINS' YO-SEMITE ART GALLERY, 26 Montg. St., opp. Lick House Entrance. 



134 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY. 



Barrel] Edward H., clerk with Wellman, Peck & 

Co., dwl 1322 Mission , 
Barrel] Jarai b, cook, dwl 710 Kearny 
Burrell M. A. Miss, teacher Valencia Street Gram- 

mar School, dwl 10 Howard Court 
Burrell — see Birrell 
Bonis Butler, bookkeeper with Joseph E. Selleck, 

dwl 418 Brannan 
Burr is .Tames, cook, dwl 3 Kent 
Bums William, (colored) porter, 520 Kearny, dwl 

16 Freelon 
Burroughs Charles, (Burroughs & Scott) dwl 318 

Lombard 
Burroughs William, packer with Haynes & Law- 
ton, dwl 628 Jessie 
Burroughs & Scott, /Charles Burroughs and Na- 
poleon B Scott) club rooms, 127 Montgomery 
BURROWES GEORGE REV., president Uni- 
versity Mound College, dwl 
Burrows James, cook N.P. Trans. Co. S.S. Orizaba 
Burrows John, laborer, dwl Mission nr Thirty -first 
Burrows Richard, shoemaker, dwl 423 Bush 
Barry James, hackman Lick House 
Burscongh Henry, clerk, dwl -157 Bryant 
Burson James N., clerk, dwl NW cor McAllister 

and Leavenworth 
Burt Charles, blacksmith Risdon Iron Works, dwl 

219 Main, rear 
Burt George, cook, dwl 015 Davis 
Burt J. Gus., bookkeeoer, dwl 528 Pine 
Burt Joseph H., carpenter, dwl 630 Minna 
Burt Philip, dwl W s Folsom bet Twenty-first aud 

Twenty-second 
Burt Samuel, compositor Morning Call, dwl 809 

Stockton 
Burt Silas S., annealer U. S. B. Mint, dwl 325 

Lombard 
Burt William J., house moving and raising, dwl 

1130 Mission 
Unit — see Bert 
Burton Augustus A., clerk, 217 Battery, dwl 915 

Howard 
BURTON CHARLES H., merchant, oflice 405 

Front, dwl 1024 Washington 
Burton Ebenezer, seaman, dwl 409 Drumm 
Burton Edward, capitalist, dwl 1110 Montgomery 
Burton Henry, cigarmaker with H. Oehlert, dwl 

140 Fourth 
Burton John, ranchman, dwl 21 Fulton 
Burton Lizzie Miss, teacher music, dwl 206 Fourth 
Burton William, carpenter H. C. League, 128 

Kearny 
Burtseil John M., salesman, 102 Sansom, dwl 1205 

Howard 
Burtt William W., tinsmith with Brittan, Holbrook 

& Co., 1 13 California 
Burwell Lelia W. Miss, teacher Powell Street Pri- 
mary School, dwl 1107 Stockton 
Burwell Thomas E., machinist with Jonathan Kit- 

tredge, dwl 150 Tehama 
Bury John, clerk with Dean R. Avery, dwl S s 

Francisco nr Hyde 
Busby Joseph, gardener, dwl 316 Fourth 
Buscelle G. R., collector, dwl 27^ Fourth 
Buseh Frederick, laborer S. F. Glass Works, dwl 

SW cor Brannan and Ritcb 
Busch Hermann, porter, dwl 1023 Kearny 
Busch Louis, collector, dwl 1015 Stockton 
Buschell Adam, maltster Bavaria Brewery malt 
house, dwl E s Dupont bet Bdwy and Vallejo 
Busehmann John, (Drucker & B.) dwl 226 Third 
Busco Otto, physician, office and dwl 61 Second 
Bush Alonzo, driver Wells, Fargo & Co., dwl 331 

Montgomery 
Bush Charles J.*, woodcarver with George O. Whit- 
ney & Co., dwl E s Potrero Avenue bet Twen- 
ty-third and Twenty -fourth 
Bush Charles P., laborer Custom House, dwl 523 
Post 



Bush C. W., paperhauger, dwl NE cor Polk and 

Austin 
BUSH DAVID, importer and jobber gas fixtures, 

gas pipes, etc., 29 New Montgomery, dwl SE 

cor Bush and Broderick 
Bush Dearden, physician, office and dwl 722 Mont- 
gomery 
Bush E.. driver Omnibus R. R. 
Bush George, carpenter with P. M. S. S. Co. 
Bush Georgiana Mrs., dwl 510 Howard 
Bush H., surgeon with P. M. S. S. Co. 
Bush Henry, photographer, 704 Market 
Bush Henry, seaman, dwl 32 Steuart 
Bush Hyman P.. clerk, 27 Merchants' Exchange, 

dwl"ll4 Mason 
Bush James S. Rev., rector Grace Church, dwl 814 

California 
Bush John, boilermaker Miners' Foundry, dwl 

1234 Vallejo 
Bush John, laborer with George Hearst, dwl 732 

Filbert 
Bush John, laborer, dwl N s Bryant bet Seventh 

aud Eighth 
Bush Louis, (Bush & McAllister) dwl 47 Clem 
Bush Nathan, furniture and bedding, 114 and 116 

Fourth 
Bush Richard J., secretary Montgomery Avenue 

Commissioners, office 3 Montgomery Block, dwl 

723 Pine 
BUSH STREET HOUSE, Dederky& Russ proprie- 
tors, 333 Bush 
Bush William, yardman Cent. P. R, R., dwl 43SA_ 

Brannan 
Bush William B., paperhanger with George W. 

Clark 
Bush & McAllister, (Louis Bush and William B. 

McAllister) dentists, office 704 Market 
Bushen A. D., drayman with Hanson & Moore, dwl 

cor Eleventh and Folsom 
Bushman George, calker with Middlemas & Boole, 

SE cor Spear and Harrison 
Bushman William, millwright with Amos & Davis, 

dwl Clementina nr Fourth 
Bushnell Amasa, laborer Custom House 
Busbnell D. E. Rev., (Berry & Bushnell) res 

Suisuu 
Bushnell Waters A., clerk with A. F. Patton. dwl 

223 Minna 
Bushnell William E., captain steamer El Capitan, 

dwl 952 Howard 
Buskirk Howard, asphaltum roofer, dwl SW cor 

Harrison aud Seventh 
Buss Henry, cabinetmaker, dwl 34 Hayes 
Buss Jacob, driver Philadelphia Brewery, dwl 107 

Tehama 
Buss Philip, cook, 416 Kearny 

Busse Christian C, f Busse & Jacobs) dwl 265 Min 
Busse & Jacobs, (Christian C. Busse and Jacob 

Jacobs) hairdressing saloon, 433 Pine 
Bussey William C, locksmith, 237 Sutter, dwl In- 
ternational Hotel 
Bussick Antonio, boilermaker, dwl 1014 Stockton 
Bussing John, laborer. 201 Mission 
Bnssinger Frederick, molder Union Brass Foundry, 

dwl 20 Minna 
Bust William, carpenter H. C. League, 128 Kearny 
Bustamaute Rosa, (widow) dwl 1302 Powell 
Bustelli Carlo, waiter, 518 Market, dwl cor Bush 

and Dupont '• 

Buster Hiram C, blacksmith, dwl 131 Montgomery 
Buster Mary Mrs., furnished rooms, 131 Mont 
Bustillos Rafael, marblecutter with L. R. Myers 

& Co., dwl 278 Jessie 
Bustus Louis, handcart, dwl 231 Pacific 
BUSWELL ALEXANDER, bookbinder and blank 

book manufacturer, 509 Clay, dwl SE cor Jones 

and Union 
Bii8well William F., pattern and modelmaker, 20 

Fremont, dwl 12 Guv Place 



HrjJMTINGTON, HOPKINS & CO., Importers Hardware and Iron, Cor. Bush and Market. 



C. P. VAN ^CHA<\CK & CO., 708, 732, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Fancy Goods. 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY 



135 



Butchell Samuel, laborer Laborer's Pro. and Ben. 

Association, 81-1 Howard 
Butcher Charles, cook, dwl 32 Steuart 
Butcher Charles, seaman, dwl 26 Sacramento 
Butcher Charles, seaman, dwl 32 Steuart 
Batcher James L., butcher with M. Brandeustein, 

dwl Seventh Avenue bet M and N, South F. S. 
Butcher John H., butcher, dwl cor Eleventh and O 
Butenop Henry, groceries and liquors, 625 Pacific, 

dwl 606 Filbert 
Buthe Christian L., ( Schumaker & B.J dwl SE cor 

Filbert and Battery 
Butler Alfred, matchmaker, dwl 139 Fifth 
Butler B. F., (widow) dwl S B Tehama nr Ninth 
Butler Charles, (colored J porter, 417 Montgomery, 

dwl N s Pacific bet Powell and Stockton 
Butler Charles, retoucher with C. E Watkius, 26 

Montgomery 
Butler Charles C., real estate, dwl NE cor Steiner 

and Sutter 
Butler D., driver City R. R. 
Butler Edward, barkeeper, 720 Market 
Butler Frank, stevedore, dwl 318 Pine 
Butler Frederick S., clerk, dwl W s Guerrero bet 

Sixteenth and Seventeenth 
Butler George E., cashier Union Ins. Co., dwl 910 

Taylor 
Butler George F., conductor Front Street M. & O. R. 

R., dwl Rail Road House 
Butler George W., milkman, San Bruno road, 7 

miles from Citv Hall 
Butler Harry, cook with P. F. Tripp,, dwl 206 

Fourth 
Butler Henry, (colored) hairdresser with W. C. 

Patrick, dwl 535 Green 
Butler Henry, cook, dwl 30 Everett 
Butler Henry, mate brig Wiliimantic, pier 9 Steuart 
Butler Henry C, carpenter, dwl 10 Wetmore Place 
Butler Henry W., clerk S. F. post office, dwl 1024 

Montgomery 
Butler James, bootmaker U. W. M. Boot and Shoe 

Manufacturing Co., dwl 535 Clementina 
Butler James, laborer, dwl E s Minna bet Four- 
teenth and Fifteenth 
Butler James, laundryman, dwl 612 Ellis 
Butler James, printer, dwl 15 Sutter 
Butler James, seaman, dwl 48 Sacramento 
Butler Jesse H., clocks and jewelry, 830 Market, 

dwl 734 Folsom 
Butler John, barkeeper, 37 Sutter, dwl 224 Minna 
Butler John, inspector C. H., dwl 72] Howard 
Butler John, laborer, dwl 134 Folsom, rear 
Butler John, seaman bark Samoset, pier 11 Steuart 
Butler John W., printer with Edward Bosqui & 

Co., dwl cor Haight and Webster 
Butler Joseph D., armorer, dwl E s Webster nr 

Haight 
Butler Joseph J., porter, 5 Battery, dwl 10 Wet- 
more Place 
Butler Joseph R., currier, dwl W s Bryant bet 

Twentv-fifth and Twenty-sixth 
BUTLER "M. A. Mrs., milliner and millinery, 28 

Montgomery, dwl 937 Howard 
Butler Margaret", (widow) dwl 521 Vallejo 
Butler Margaret J., (widow) lodgings, SW cor 

Second and Tehama 
Butler Mary, (widow) dwl 521 Vallejo 
Butler Mary H., (widow) dressmaker, dwl 809 

Jackson 
Butler Matthew, laborer, dwl S s Filbert bet 

Montgomery and Kearny 
Butler Matthew, (Hoogs 8? IJJdwl 1604 Bush 
Butler M. F., (widow) dwl W s Guerrero nr 

Sixteenth 
Butler Michael, calker Spring Valley Water Works, 

dwl Kearny nr Filbert 
Butler Michael," storekeeper Union Club, dwl 403 

Montgomery 
Butler Michael Mrs., dwl 122 Shipley, rear 



BUTLER PATRTOK F., merchant, office 28 Mont- 
gomery, dwl 937 Howard 

Butler Patrick T., (Hogan # Co. J dwl 20 Folsom 
Avenue 

Butler Robert, painter with John F. Kennedy, dwl 
SW cor Second and Tehama 

Butler Samuel S., proprietor Pacific Lodging House, 
NW cor Kearny and Pacific, res Petaluma 

Butler Sarah E. Miss, governess, dwl 839 California 

Butler Theodore A., wood engraver with Warren 
C. Butler, dwl 10 Wetmore Place 

Butler Thomas, bricklayer, dwl 21 Russell 

Butler Thomas, carpenter, dwl 179 Mi nna 

Butler Thomas, laborer S. F. Glass Works, dwl Te- 
hama nr Norwich, Bernal Hights 

Butler Thomas, laborer with Whitney &c Freese, 
SE cor Steuart and Mission 

Butler Thomas, stitcher with Charles Donovan, dwl 
915 Market 

Butler Thomas J., (Adams & B.J dwl 309 Third 

Butler Walter A., drayman with Meeker, James & 
Co., dwl N s Fell bet Steiner and Pierce 

BUTLER WARREN C, wood engraver,611 Clay, 
dwl 10 Wetmore Place 

Butler William, laborer, dwl 41 Minna 

Butler William, laborer, dwl S s Fourteenth bet 
Howard and Folsom 

BUTLER WILLIAM J., salesman, 125 Kearnv 

BUTLER W. J. Mrs., millinery goods, 125 Kearny 

BUTLER'S HEALTH LIFT AND CURE, J. 
H. Swain, proprietor, 24 Post 

Butt Chris. C, groceries and liquors, SW cor Bush 
and Stockton 

Butt Peter N., (Butt & Kuehmeister and Peter N. 
Butt & Co.) dwl 1336 Broadway 

Butt Peter N. & Co., (Henry W. Kuehmeister J 
groceries and liquors, SE cor Kearny and Pae 

Butt & Kuehmeister, (P. N. Butt and H.W. Kueh- 
meister J groceries and liquors, NE cor Hyde 
and Broadway 

Butterfield Edwin, (H. R. Josselyn & Co. J res De- 
troit, Michigan 

Butters Charles, letter department Wells, Fargo & 
Co.,dwl220OFarrell 

Butters Henry A., salesman with A. L. Bancroft 
&Co., dwl 220 O'Farrell 

Butters Henry A. Jr., clerk, dwl 220 O'Farrell 

Butters John "S., mariner, dwl 1420 Washington 

Butterworth Edward, carpenter H. C. League, 128 
Kearny 

Butterworth Isaac, laborer, dwl 107 Leidesdorff 

Butterworth James, tinsmith with W. W. Walmsley, 
dwl 262 Eighth 

Butterwoi'th Richard, spinner Pioneer Woolen 
Mills, dwl N s North Point nr Larkin 

BUTTERWORTH SAM F., president California 
Mutual Life Ins. Co., office 320 California, dwl 
SW cor Pine and Leavenworth 

Buttner Henry, drayman with J. S. Wall & Co. 
dwl 228 Second 

Buttner John, patternmaker, dwl 32 Clementina 

Buttner John, laborer with Kimball Manufacturing 
Co., dwl 223 Perry 

Button Charles, photographer with Thomas House- 
worth & Co., dwl 938 Folsom 

Butts Harvey D., stevedore with Hey wood &. 
Harmon, dwl pier 13 Steuart 

Buxbaum Moses, clerk with H. A. Van Praag & 
Co., dwl 30 Kearny 

Buxton Frank, bricklayer, dwl 722 Green. 

Buxton George, machinist Union Iron Works, dwl 
847 Howard 

Buya Nicholas, coffee and liquor saloon, 605 Davis 

Buyer Charles, (Buyer, Reich <$• Co. J dwl 1028 
* Clay 

Buyer, Reich & Co. (Charles Buyer, Leopold Huh 
and Leopold Diamantj fancy goods, 129 Kear- 
ny, and 1015 Stockton 

Buzzano Pasquale. steward Italian Hospital 



JONES, PULLMAN" & CO., 116 Sansom Street. Braids of all kinds. 



W ATKINS' YO-SEMITE ART GALLERY, 26 Montg. St., opp. Lick House Entrance. 



136 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY. 



Buzzi S., frescopainter, 625 Merchant, dwl'1434| 

Stockton 
Byam Samuel L. porter with E. Martin & Co., dwl 
E s Shotwell bet Twenty-third and Twenty- 
fourth 
By el Robert, drayman, dwl 427 Hayes 
Byers George, stoker, dwl 103 Sacramento 
Byers John P. wharfinger Pacific Street Wharf, 

dwl 1205 Montgomery 
Bvers Joseph M., clerk Evening Bulletin, dwl 819 

Filbert 
BYINGTON HORACE W., proprietor City Sta- 
bles, 332 Bush, dwl 525 Post 
By Ian Bernard, porter, dwl 8 Auburn 
Byles George, real estate agent, office 305 Mont- 
gomery, dwl 1008 Clay 
By ring Ole H., repacker and contractor, 224 Jack 
Byrne Alonzo A., oiler with Goodwin & Co., dwl 

359 Minna 
Byrne Charles, sailmaker, 7 Clay, dwl 527 Seven- 
teenth 
Byrne Daniel, carpenter, dwl 12^ Harriet 
Byrne Daniel, collector La Rue's Wharf, dwl 2 

Elizabeth 
Byrne Daniel, cooper, dwl 2 Elizabeth 
Byrne Delia Miss, dressmaker, dwl 33 Garden 
Byrne Dennis, waiter George'8 Restaurant, dwl 3 

Clay Avenue 
Byrne Edward Francis, seaman, dwl 645 Com 
Byrne Felix, carpenter, dwl 7 Park Avenue 
Byrne Francis, clerk with John C. Moody, 200 

Kearny 
Byrne Frank, second assistant engineer Moses Tay- 
lor, Australia S. S. Line 
Byrne Garrett J., (Kerby,B. & Go.) dwl 1108 Bush 
Byrne Henry H., attorney at law, office 729 Mont, 

dwl N s Howard bet Tenth and Eleventh 
Byrne Henry L., collector, dwl 533 Sutter 
Byrne James, plumber with Francis P. O'Keeffe, 

dwl 119 Welsh 
Byrne James, pressman with Joseph Winterburn 

&. Co., dwl Vallejonr Kearny 
Byrne James, (Byrne 4* Go.) dwl 139 Minna 
Byrne James F., teamster, dwl N s Octavia nr 

Grove 
Byrne Jane Mi6S, dressmaker, dwl 33 Garden 
Byrne Joanna, (widow) dwl 547 Bryant 
Bvrne John, cooper with L. N. Handy & Co., dwl 

49 Clay 
Byrne John, laborer with F. William Kamps, NE 

cor California and Davis 
Bvrne John E., bookkeeper with Pascal, Dubedat 

& Co., dwl 533 Sutter 
Byrne John M., importer, office 533 Kearny, dwl 533 

Sutter 
Byrne Kate Miss, dressmaker, dwl 33 Garden 
Byrne Margaret, (widow) dwl 33 Garden 
Byrne Matthew Jno. , teacher and agriculturist, dwl 

SE cor Second and Natoma 
Byrne Maurice, cooper with James Boothman, dwl 

2 Elizabeth 
Byrne Michael, (Byrne & McHugh) dwl 416 Sixth 
Byrne Michael, (Byrne 8? Murphy) dwl 19 Na- 
toma 
Byrne Michael, (Landers, B. &. Go.) dwl 1517 

Leavenworth 
Byrne Michael, machinist S. P. R. R., dwl Es Har- 
rison nr Sixteenth 
Byrne Nicholas, miner, dwl 247 Stevenson 
Byrne Owen, hostler N. B. & M. R. R., dwl 266 

Clementina 
Byrne Patrick, clerk with John M. Ahern, dwl NW 

cor Larkin and Ash 
Byrne Patrick, cooper with Thomas F. Neagle, dwl 

2 Elizabeth 
Byrne Patrick, salesman, 7 Montgomery, dwl 127 

Kearny 
Byrne Patrick, sexton Trinity Church, dwl 401 
Powell 



Byrne Patrick, teamster with George W. Drake, 
dwl Hinckley nr Kearny 

Byrne Patrick, wood and coal, SW cor Fourth and 
Perry, dwl 324 Tehama 

Bvrne Robert, laborer, dwl 110 Dora 

BYRNE THOMAS, commercial broker, office 210 
Battery, dwl 340 Seventeenth 

Byrne Thomas, contractor, dwl N s Fourteenth Ave- 
nue nr Q, South S. F. 

Byrne Thomas, cooper with James Boothman, dwl 
2 Elizabeth 

Byrne Thomas, special policeman, dwl 226 Pacific 

Byrne Thomas, teamster, dwl 1031 Pacific 

Byrne Thomas S., apothecary with James Curtis & 
Co.. dwl SE cor Howard and Hubbard 

Byrne William, dwl 22 Turk- 
Byrne William, bricklayer, Bricklayer's Protective 
Association, 234 Sutter 

Byrne William, longshoreman, dwl Ns Filbert bet 
Montgomery and Sansom 

Byrne William J., laborer Gibb's Bonded Ware- 
house, dwl 228 Minna 

BYRNE WILLIAM S., secretary Tide Land Com- 
missioners, office room 12, SW cor Clay and 
Kearny, dwl 921 1 Howard 

Byrne &. Co., (James Byrne and Dennis Coyne) 
liquor saloon, SW cor Minna and Fourth 

Byrne & McHugh, (Michael Byrne and Michael 
McHugh) wood and coal, 416 Sixth 

Byrne & Murphy, (Michael Byrne and Patrick 
Murphy) poultry and game, 12 Metropolitan 
Market 

Byrne — see Burn 

Byrnes D., teamster with R. & J. Morton 

Byrnes David, laborer, dwl 615 Commercial 

Byrnes Edward, nurseryman, dwl 166 Perry 

Byrnes Harriet S. Mrs., millinerv and dressmaking, 
342 Third 

Byrnes James, longshoreman, dwl NW cor Union 
and Calhoun 

Byrnes James, (James Byrnes 4" Co.) res San 
Mateo 

BYRNES JAMES & CO., (Martin Waterman) 
proprietors Beale St. Warehouse, NE cor Bry- 
ant and Beale 

Byrnes John, baker, dwl 1313 Sacramento, rear 

Byrnes John, carpenter, dwl 314 Townseud 

Byrnes John, second engineer Steamer Capitol, dwl 
S s Monlton Place nr Montgomery 

Bvrnes M. F. Miss, teacher Silver Street Primary 
School, dwl 166 Perry 

Byrnes Michael, laborer, dwl 214 Broadway 

Byrnes Patrick, liquors, NW cor O'Farrell and 
Devisadero 

Byrnes Peter, cartman, dwl 11 Haggin 

Byrnes Thomas, expresswagon, Broadway Wharf, 
dwl NW cor Franklin and Linden Avenue 

Byrnes William A., (Sanborn & B.) dwl 342 Third 

Byrnes William J., special policeuian, dwl 252 
Minna 

Byrnes. — See Burnes and Burns 

Byron Adonis, editor, office 611 Clay, dwl 1016 Stock- 
tou nr Washington 

Byron John, bricklayer Bricklayers' Protective As- 
sociation, 234 Sutter 

Byron John, contractor and real estate agent, dwl 
S s Ninteenth nr Shotwell 

Byron Michael, expresswagon, SW cor Bush and 
Sanson), dwl N s Pacific bet Jones and Leav 

Byron Michael, bricklayer, dwl E s Minna bet 
Fourteenth and Fifteenth 

Byron Patrick, hostler Omnibus R. R., dwl 241 
Tehama 

Byxbee John F., agent Duncan's Mills, Russian 
River, office 101 Howard, dwl S s Ellis nr 
Octavia 

Byxbee Robert G., (N. B. Tichenor & Go.) dwl 
408 Eddy 

Byxbee — See Bixby 



HUNTINGTON, HOPKINS & CO., Agents Jessop & Sons' Steel, Cor. Bush and Market. 



C P. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708,712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Paper and Envelopes. 



SAN FRANCISCO " Q ' DIRECTORY 



187 



O 

Cabanes & Co., (Chinese) cigar manufacturers, 

dwl 323 Clay 
Cabet Leon.wigmaker with Mrs. B. Spitz, 316 Kearny 
Cables Alfred H., barkeeper, 718 Montgomery, dwl 

108 Silver 
Cables Charles H., barkeeper, 718 Montgomery, 

dwl 108 Silver 
Cabot Elias R., cabinetmaker with Field & Frei, 

dwl 342 Tehama 
Cabrera Jose, tailor, dwl 536 Broadway 
Cachmeyer Chris., carpenter with Hancock &. 

Kelso 
Cachot M. A., physician and surgeon, office and dwl 

18 Third 
Cacioppo Mariano, (Cacioppo & Bonaldi) dwl 515 

Merchant 
Cacioppo & Bonaldi, {Mariano Cacioppo and G. 

B. Bonaldi J fish, 27 Washington Market 
Cacciotto Luigi, barber, cupping and leeching, 633 

Pacific 
Cadenasso Giuseppe (Cadenasso & Tubino) dwl 

515 Merchant 
Cadenasso & Tubino, (Giuseppe Cadenasso and 

Domcnico Tubino) restaurant, 515 Merchant 
Cadigan William, laborer with Whitney & Freese 
Cadiz Joseph G., translator and accountant, dwl 

909 Jackson 
Cadogan James, laborer S. F. & P.Sugar Refinery, 

dwl W s Dora nr Harrison 
Cadogan James, bookkeeper with E. Chielovich & 

Co., res Oakland 
Cadogan Timothy, blacksmith S. F. & P. Sugar 

Refinery, dwl W s Dora nr Harrison 
CADUC PHILIP, president Benicia Cement Co., 

and general superintendent City Paving Co., 

office 619 Montgomery, dwl 722 Sutter 
Cady Delia Mrs., dressmaker, 772^ Folsom 
Cady Edwin A., watchman U. S. B. Mint 
Cady E. H, millwright, dwl Brooklyn Hotel 
Cady Fannie Miss, teacher music, dwl 140 Sutter 
Cady George B., photographer with Edouart & 

Cobb, dwl 772J Folsom 
Cady John, boilerniaker Union Iron Works, dwl 36 

Moss 
Cady Josephine (widow) dwl 140 Sutter 
Cady William Jr., bodymaker with Kimball Manu- 
facturing Co., dwl 36 Moss 
CADY WILLIAM J., wines and liquors, SE cor 

Montgomery and California, dwl Ws Howard 

bet Twenty-third and Twenty-fourth 
Cady W. P., dwl 411 Sausom 
Caeus William, sailmaker with Ware Branson, 52 

Clay 
Caetano Antonio, laborer, dwl 116 Jackson 
Caetauo Jose, seaman, dwl SW cor Drumm and 

Oregon 
Caferato Antonia & Co., (Pietro Ginochio) wood 

and coal, NE cor Taylor and Lombard 
Caffall George, stevedore, dwl 104^ Alta Place 
Caftey Edward, storekeeper Occidental Hotel, dwl 

S s Eighteenth nr Hartford 
Caflfrey Frank, waiter Russ House 
Caffrey James, woodcarver, dwl 1610 Mason 
Catfrey Michael, waiter, 105 California Market 
Caffrey Philip, molder Union Iron Works, dwl 551 

Mission 
Caffrey Thomas, seaman, dwl 307 Folsom 
Caglie'ri George, bookkeeper with Favre & Jaus- 

saud, dwl S s Vallejo bet Mont and Kearny 
Cagney Martin, teamster, dwl 1 McDermott Place 
Can Lok Hen, (Chinese) restaurant, 629 Jackson 
Cahalau J. L., carpenter H. C. League, 128 

Kearny 
Cahalan John, bootmaker, W s Valencia nr Twenty- 
sixth 
Cahalin John, salesman with Einstein Brothers &. 

Co., dwl 271 Stevenson 



Cahen Adolph, peddler, dwl 914 Jackson 
Cahen Louis, dwl 637 Vallejo 

Cahill Andrew, expresswagon, 38Cal, dwl 214 First 
Cahill Dennis, laborer with Graves & Co., W s 

Long Bridge 
Cahill Edward, (Cahill & Fox) 406 Montgomery 
Cahill Edward, waiter Grand Hotel, dwl E s South 

Park Avenue 
Cahill E. J., civil engineer, dwl Brooklyn Hotel 
Cahill James, carpenter H. C. League, 128 Kearny 
Cahill James, clerk with Cahill & Fox, 406 Mont 
Cahill James, laborer, Laborers' Pro. and Ben. Ass., 

814 Howard 
Cahill James, liquors, dwl 232 Turk 
Cahill James, porter, 9 Montgomery, dwl SE cor 

Fell and Webster 
Cahill James H., carpenter, dwl 510 Linden 
Cahill John, porter, 31 Battery, dwl 405 Union 
Cahill John J., painter, dwl 1208 Union 
Cahill John L.. marblecutter, dwl 1208 Union 
Cahill Mary, (widow) dwl 311 O 'Farrell, rear 
Cahill Patrick, drayman with Armes & Dallam, dwl 

1004 Leavenworth 
Cahill Patrick, laborer S. F. and P. Sugar Refinery, 

dwl 12 Chesley 
Cahill Patrick, laborer, dwl 211 Tehama, rear 
Cahill Patrick, molder Union Iron Works, dwl 526 

Howard 
Cahill Patrick, porter, dwl 175 Minna 
Cahill William, shipwright, dwl 732 Clementina 
CAHILL & FOX, (Edward Cahill and Charles 

W. Fox) stockbrokers, office 406 Montgomery 
Calm David, with Lazard Freres, dwl Clay nr 

Van Ness Avenue 
Calm E., real estate, dwl 1109 Post 
Cahn Hyppolite, clerk with Weil & Co., dwl 911 

Clay 
Cahn Israel, ( Uhlfelder, Cahn & Co.) dwl 1120 

Post 
Cahn Jerome, dry goods, 304 Seventh 
Cahn Lambert M., merchant, office 209 Sansom, dwl 

1319 Sutter 
Cahn Lazarus, real estate, dwl 1109 Post 
Cahn Leon, clerk with Jacob Bek, dwl 726 Vallejo 
CAHN LEOPOLD, agent S. F. & P. Woolen Fac- 
tory, office 115 Battery, dwl NE cor Post and 

Van Ness Aveuue 
Cahn Leopold, clerk with Jacob Bek, dwl 726 

Vallejo 
Cahn Maier A., clerk with Marcus C. Hawlev&Co., 

dwl S s Sutter bet Van Ness Av and Franklin 
Cahn Morris, (./. Herzo% S? Co.) dwl 305 Kearny 
CahnR., (widow) dwl 1219 Sutter 
Calm William, sailmaker, dwl 110 Virginia 
Cahn — See Kahu 
Cahoon Frederick G., bookkeeper with G. & W. 

Snook, dwl 210 Stockton 
Cain Dennis, laborer, dwl 214 Broadway 
Cain Edward, laborer Golden Gate Park 
Cain Edward, pressman with Frank Eastman, dwl 

20 Clara 
Cain James, molder Union Iron Works, dwl 8 Lick 
Cain James, sailmaker, dwl Van Ness Avenue nr 

Francisco 
Cain John, bricklayer, dwl 214 Broadway 
Cain John J., molder Union Iron Works, dwl 314 

Filbert 
Cain Michael, laborer with E. Grisar & Co., dwl 9 

Gavin 
Cain Patrick, molder Union Iron Works, dwl 8 

Lick 
Cain Rufus, bricklayer Bricklayers' Pro. Associa- 
tion, 234 Sutter 
Cain Thomas, junk dealer, dwl cor Gilbert and 

Brannau 
Cain Thomas, shoemaker with Charles Donovan, 

dwl 3 Sherwood Place 
Cain — See Cane, Kain and Kane 
Cainen William, barkeeper, dwl 522 Green 



JONE3, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street, Porte Monnaies and Eeticules. 



WATKINS' YO-SEMITE ART GALLERY, 26 Montg. St., opp. Lick House Entrance. 



138 



SAN FRANCISCO [ Q [ DIRECTORY. 



Caire Jules E., clerk with James De Fremery & 

Co., dwl NW cor Stockton and Bush 
Caire Justinian, hardware and crockery, 530 Wash- 
ington and 1028 Dupont, dwl 313 Green 
Cairn .lames, laborer, dwl 26 Main 
CairncrosB James, traveling- agent Glasgow Iron 

and Metal Manufacturing Co., dwl 737 How 
Cairns Charles, blacksmith Pacific Rolling Mill, dwl 

Potrero Point 
Cairns Francis, barber, dwl 21 Stevenson 
Cairns John, foreman Golden City Chemical 

Works, dwl NW cor Seventh and Townseud 
Cairns John, physician, dwl 1008 Jones 
Cairns John T., machinist Risdon Iron Works, dwl 

•2(19 Harrison 
Cairns Patrick, blacksmith Pacific Rolling Mill, dwl 

Potrero Point 
Cairns Robert, salesman, dwl 30 Hawthorne 
Cairns William, barber, dwl 21 Stevenson 
Cairns William, laborer Golden City Chemical 

Works, dwl NW cor Seventh and Towneend 
Caizac Paul, salesman City of Paris, dwl N s Taylor 

bet Union and Green 
Calabotu Sylvester, coffee staud, 521 East 
Calaere George, clerk, dwl S s Hinckley bet 

Kearny and Montgomery 
Calanan Timothy, cabinetmaker with George O. 

Whitney & Co., dwl 44 Minna 
Calaveras Gold Mining Compauy, ( Calaveras Co., 

Gal.) office 3 IS California 
Calback Henry, carriage trimmer with Kimball 

Manufacturing Co., dwl NW cor Broadway 

and Maxwell 
Calbo Francis R., cigars and tobacco, 800 Market, 

dwl 7?r Market 
Calcler William C, cabinetmaker with Wheeler & 

Wilson S. M. Co. 
Calderon Andres, (P. Baca $• Go.) res Mountain 

View, Santa Clara Co. 
Calderwood David, real estate agent, dwl 519 Sac 
Caldemvood Solomon, ironer Occidental Laundry, 

dwl N s Filbert bet Gough and Octavia 
Caldwell David, porter, 538 Cal, dwl 9 Florence 
Caldwell Eugene, baggage in aster S. P. R. R. 
Caldwell Frank, machinist Union Iron Works 
Caldwell Hugh M., machinist Miners' Foundry, 

dwl 858 Mission 
Caldwell James, baggagemaster, dwl N s Miuna 

bet Eleventh and Lafayette 
Caldwell James, lamplighter S. F. Gas Co., dwl 1716 

Leavenworth 
Caldwell John A., machinist with Raffertv & Cald- 
well, dwl Shotwell nr Twenty-fourth 
Caldwell John E., dwl 1418 Powell 
Caldwell M. E. Mrs., teacher Shotwell Street Pri- 
mary School, dwl Dorland bet Church and San- 
chez 
Caldwell Robert, teamster, dwl W s Juniper bet 

Folsom and Harrison 
Caldwell Samuel, carpenter H. C. League, 128 

Kearny 
Caldwell William, machinist Cyclops Engine and 

Machine Works, 113 Beale,'dwl E s Shotwell 

bet Twenty-third and Twenty-fourth 
Caledonia Club rooms, Mozart Hall, N s Post nr 

Montgomery 
Caledonia ' S. M. Co., (Gold Hill, Nev.) office 414 

California 
Calef John H., lieutenant U. S. A., dwl Presidio 
Calenasso Giuseppe, waiter Campi's Restauraut, 

dwl 519 Clay 
Caler Edward, printer with A. L. Bancroft & Co., 

dwl First Avenue bet Fifteenth and Sixteenth 
Calevi Emileo, driver, dwl 831 Vallejo. rear 
Caley Isabella, (widow) housekeeper, dwl E s First 

Avenue bet Fifteenth and Sixteenth 
Calhoun Charles A., job printer, 540 Market, dwl 

N s Sutter bet Buchanan and Laguua 
Calhoun J. P., (widow) dwl 411 Fourth 



Calhoun Richard, laborer, dwl 11 Pacific 

Calhoun William, laborer, dwl 1184 Harrison, rear 

CALIFORNIA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, rms 
623 Clay 

California Acclimatizing Society, rooms 622 Clay 

California and Oregon Stage Line, office 208 Mont 

CALIFORNIA ASSAY OFFICE, James A. Mars 
proprietor, 512 California 

California Barrel Company, D. A. McDonald presi- 
dent, W. LeRoy secretary, 483 Brannan 

CALIFORNIA BEET SUGAR CO., (works Al- 
varado) office 338 Montgomery 

California Bellows Manufacturing Co., Walter W. 
Arey manager, 32 Fremont 

California Bible Society, Rev. Frederick Buel agent, 
757 Market 

CALIFORNIA BLOCK, SE cor Cal and Batterv 

CALIFORNIA BORAX CO., (Lake County, Gal'.) 
office 320 California 

CALIFORNIA BRASS WORKS, Weed & King- 
well proprietors, 125 First 

California Broom Factory, 115 Sacramento 

CALIFORNIA CHEMICAL PAINT CO., Healy 
& Jewell agents, office and works, NW cor 
Fourth and Townseud 

CALIFORNIA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE, office 
711 Mission 

CALIFORNIA CONDENSED COAL CO.,(N C. 
Walton and Ezra Coleman) office 119 and 121 
Main 

CALIFORNIA COTTON GROWERS' AND 
MANUFACTURERS' ASSOCIATION, office 
107 Sansom 

CALIFORNIA CRACKER CO., (Frederick Clays 
Alvin andAdolpk Weske) 803 Batterv 

CALIFORNIA DEMOKRAT, (German, daily) 
Frederick Hess & Co. proprietors, office NW 
cor Kearny and Sacramento 

CALIFORNIA DRY DOCK CO., Hunter's Point, 
offices 28 Merchants' Exchange and 41H Cal 

CALIFORNIA EVANGELIST, (monthly"), T. 
Weldon Trench editor, office 3 New Montgomery 

CALIFORNIA FARMER, (weekly) Warren & 
Co. editors and proprietors, office 320 Clay 

California File Manufacturing Co., Solano nr' Min- 
nesota 

California Glove Company (Piatt and Frank G. 
Conklin) 419 Battery 

CALIFORNIA HIDE DEPOT, Alois Brandt pro- 
prietor, 11 and 13 Broadway 

CALIFORNIA HORTICULTURALIST AND 
FLORAL MAGAZINE, (monthly) V. A. Mil- 
ler & Co. editors and proprietors, office 622 Clay 

CALIFORNIA HOTEL, Joseph Chapuis proprie- 
tor, 712 Dupont 

California House, G. Bernis proprietor, 624 Cal 

CALIFORNIA ILLUSTRATED HOLIDAY 
JOURNAL, (annual) J. P. H. Wentworth & 
Co. publishers and proprietors, office 302 Mont 

CALIFORNIA IMMIGRANT UNION, C. T. 
Hopkins president, W. H. Martin, general 
agent, C. S. Capp manager, office 316 Cal 

CALIFORNIA INSURANCE CO., (Fire and Ma- 
rine) C. T. Hopkins president, Zenas Crowell 
secretary, office 318 California 

CALIFORNIA JEWELRY CO., John T. Bone- 
stell manager, 134 Sutter 

CALIFORNIA JOURNAL, Wentzel, Huefner, 
Golly & Co. proprietors, office 522 Clav 

CALIFORNIA LABOR EMPLOYMENT EX- 
CHANGE, office 637 Clay and 630 Commercial, 
A. Zeehandelaar secretary 

CALIFORNIA LINE PACKETS from New York, 
Piatt & Newton agents, office SWcor California 
and Front 

CALIFORNIA MAIL BAG, (monthly) Frederick 
Marriott editor and proprietor, office 623 Mont 

CALIFORNIA MARKET, S s California to Pine 
bet Montgomery and Kearny 



HUNTINGTON, HOPKINS & CO., Wholesale Hardware and Iron, Cor. Bush and Market. 



C. P. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Smokers' Articles. 

139 



SAN FRANCISCO \ C \ DIRECTORY 



California Mutual Benefit and Protective Associa- 
tion, office 23 Exchange Building 

CALIFORNIA MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE 
CO., S. F. Butterworth president, William R. 
Wheaton actuary ,John Crockett secretary, office 
323 California 

CALIFORNIA OLYMPIC CLUB, rooms NE cor 
New Montgomery and Howard 

CALIFORNIA PACIFIC RAILROAD CO., Le- 
fand Stanford president, E. H. Miller Jr., sec- 
retary, office 641 Market, steamer and freight 
depot", Broadway Wharf, office NE cor Front 
and BroadVay 

CALIFORNIA PAVING CO., works N s Berry 
bet Fourth and Fifth, office 338 Montgomery 

California Pharmaceutical Society, 226 Sutter, rm 3 

CALIFORNIA PIONEERS, ("Society of) rooms 
808 Montgomery 

CALIFORNIA PLANING MILLS/ Adams, Btinn 
& Co. and Charles J. Prescott, Josiah D. 
Taney and James Taney) proprietors, NW cor 
Howard and Spear 

CALIFORNIA POLICE GAZETTE, (weekly) 
F. S. Harlow proprietor, office NE cor Mont- 
gomery and Jackson 

CALIFORNIA POWDER WORKS, {SantaCruz) 
John F. Lohse secretary, office 314 California 

California Prison Commission, Rev. James Wood- 
worth secretary, office 302 Montgomery 

California Publishing Company, 31 Kearny 

CALIFORNIA RECTIFYING CO., (Conrad M. 
Gerichten and Charles JostJ office 320 Com- 
mercial and 319 Clay 

California Shoe Factory, Calisher & Jacobs pro- 
. prietors, 515 Market 

California Silk Manufacturing Co., Brown & Pea- 
body agents, factory South San Francisco, office 
and salesroom 569 Market 

California Soap Company, office 520 Front, factory 
W s Sansorn nr Greenwich 

CALIFORNIA STAATS ZEITUNG, (German 
weekly) Frederick Hess & Co., proprietors, 
office NW cor Kearnv and Sacramento 

CALIFORNIA STATE TELEGRAPH CO., office 
522 California 

California-State Woman's Hospital,NW cor Twelfth 
and Howard 

CALIFORNIA STOCK AND POULTRY ASSO 
CIATION, Thomas E. Findley manager, yard 
NW cor Wash and Laguna, office 113 Leid 

California Street Railroad Homestead Association, 
office 220 Montgomery 

California Stock Exchange Board, John Middleton 
president, W. W. Law ton secretary, rooms — . 
See Supplementary Names. 

CALIFORNIA SUGAR REFINERY, SW cor 
Eighth and Biaunan, Eggers & Co. agents, 
210 California 

CALIFORNIA TEACHER, (monthly) Henry N. 
Bolauder editor, office 637 Kearny 

CALIFORNIA THEATER, John McCullough les- 
see and manager, N s Bush bet Kearny and Dup 

CALIFORNIA TOOL WORKS, John Weichart 
proprietor, 143 Beale 

CALIFORNIA TRUST CO., Henry L. Davis 
president, D. W. C. Thompson cashier, office 
421 California 

CALIFORNIA TYPE FOUNDRY CO., George 

L. Faulkner agent, 407 Sansorn 
California Water Co., office 409 California 
California White Pine Mining Co., (White Pine 

District, Nev.j office 411 California 
California Wine Cooperage Co., depot SW cor 

Diutnm and Commercial 
Calish John, hairdresser with Jacob Hyman, dwl 

1411 Sacramento 
Calish R. S., expressman, dwl 1411 Sacramento 
Calisher Julius, (Calisher & Jacobs j dwl 215 
Seventh 



Calisher & Jacobs, (Julius Calisher and Gnstavus 
Jacobs) proprietors California Shoe Factory, 
515 Market 
Calixte Godfroy, clerk, 414 Market, dwl 1510 Dup 
CALL, (morning, daily) S. F. Call Publishing Co. 
publishers and proprietors, office 525 Montgom- 
ery, editorial rooms 517 Clay 
Call William W., milkranch, San Bruno Road nr 

Twenty-eighth 
Callaghan Ann, dwl 1143 Howard 
Callaghau Cal., laborer Laurel Hill Cemetery 
Callaghan Charles, wharfinger Vallejo St Wharf, 

dwl 608 Ellis 
CALLAGHAN DANIEL, manufacturer Donnolly 
& Co.'s Yeast Powder, 121 Front, dwl NW cor 
Howard and Fourteenth 
Callaghan Dennis, carpenter, dwl E s Octavia nr 

McAllister 
Callaghan Eugene, carpenter, dwl 67 Clementina 
Callaghan James, bootmaker, dwl 134 First 
Callaghan James, foreman North Point Warehouse, 

dwl N s Filbert bet Montgomery and Sansorn 
Callaghan John, conductor Omnibus R. R., dwl 5 

Howard Court 
Callaghan John, hostler N. B. & M. R. R., dwl 7 

Bernard 
Callaghau John, saloonkeeper, dwl 921 Washington 
Callaghan John L., carpenteiylwl 369 Natoina 
Callaghau Patrick, laborer, dwl 542 Linden 
Callaghan Sherwood, receiving teller First National 

Gold Bank, dwl Occidental Hotel 
Callaghan T. O., carpenter H. C. League, 128 

Kearny 
CALLAGHAN'S BUILDING, Ws Dupont bet 

Clay and Washington 
Callahan Bernard, chief engineer S. F. & P. Sugar 

Refinery, dwl 16 Russ 
Callahan Cornelius, butcher with William K. Die- 
trich, dwl SW cor Utah and Amador 
Callahan Cornelius, laborer, dwl 708Brannan 
Callal^m Cornelius, laborer Pioneer Woolen Fact- 
ory, dwl E s White bet Green and Vallejo 
Callahan Cornelius, teamster with Whitney & 

Freese 
Callahan Daniel, waiter, dwl 79 Clementina 
Callahan David, wood and coal, 233 Fourth, dwl 

170 Minna 
Callahan Dennis J., tanner with C. O'Donnell, dwl 

SE cor Seventh and Brannan 
Callahan Felix, laborer, dwl 207 Clara 
Callahan Frank, cooper with Flint, Peabody & Co. 
Callahan James, dwl What Cheer House 
Callahan James, gasfitter with Thomas Day, dwl 

NE cor Sixth and Brannan 
Callahan James, laundryman with S. F. Laundry 
Association, dwl NW cor Fillmore and Turk 
Callahan John, coachman Cosmopolitan Hotel, dwl 

508 Market 
Callahan John, conductor Omnibus R. R. 
Callahan John, laborer, dwl 44 Ritch 
Callahan John, laundryman with S. F. Laundry 

Association, dwl NW cor Fillmore and Turk 
Callahan John, liquor saloon, NE cor Sixth and 

Brannan 
Callahan Mathias B., merchant, dwl 431 Sixth 
Callahan Michael, laborer, dwl 4 Lick 
Callahan Owen, baker, dwl N 8 Cortland Avenue 

nr Wool, Bernal Hights 
Callahan Patrick, fireman Cent. P. R. R. Co.'s 

steamer Alameda, dwl 119 Silver 
Callahan Patrick, shoemaker with Buckingham & 

Hecht, dwl 737 Minna 
Callahan Patrick G., fruits and vegetables, N s Six- 
teenth nr Guerrero 
Callahan Patrick J., expresswagon, cor Front and 
Market, dwl E s Chattanooga bet Twenty first 
and Twenty-second 
Callaghan Patrick J., mariner, dwl NE cor Laslne 
and Mission 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 11Q Sansorn Street, Perfumery and Pancy Soaps. 



WATKINS* YO-SEMITE ART GALLERY, 26 Montg. St., opp. Lick House Entrance 



140 



SAN FEANCISCO [ Q j DIRECTORY 



Callahan Peter, backman Plaza 

Callahan Peter, laborer with Whitney & Freese 

Callahan Philip, molderiEtna Iron Works, dwl 236 

Clara 
Callahan Richard O., shoemaker with Mason & 

Taylor, dwlE s Columbia nr Twenty-fourth 
Callahan Thomas, with U. Taylor, SW cor Dolores 

and Seventeenth 
Callahan Timothy, laborer, dwl S s Vallejo nr Pierce 
Callahan William, engineer steamer Santa Cruz, 

Washington Street Wharf 
Callahan William, grainer, dwl Bartol nr Bdwy 
Callahan William, hostler with Bouton & Sou, dwl 

2 Jasper Place 
Callahan William, painter, dwl 78 Everett 
Callahan William Jr., shoemaker with S. W. Ros- 

enstock & Co., dwl 2 Jasper Place 
Callaher Thomas, laborer, Golden Gate Park 
Callan Christopher, miner, dwl 9 Leroy Place 
Callan Mary Mrs., janitress Spring Valley Gram- 
mar School 
Callan Thomas, (Mitchell & C.J dwl 1 Harlan 

Place 
Callard Edward, seaman, dwl 32 Steuart 
Callender Henry A., manufacturing jeweler, 62 

Second 
CALLENDER JOHN T., (colored) boarding and 

lodging, 5 Broadway 
Callender Peter, farmer, dwl 228 Folsom 
Calligan Andrew, laborer, dwl E s Kate bet Bryant 

and Brannan 
Callinan John, journeyman with J. F. Campbell, 

dwl 21 Clementina 
Callingham Edward, agent, dwl 11 13 Sutter 
Callingham William J., adjuster North British and 

Mercantile Ins. Co., dwl 1113 Sutter 
Callsen Peter, carpenter, dwl 1435 Pacific 
Callundan Christian, special policeman, dwl 211 

Tyler 
Calmo Joseph, pantryman N. P. Trans. Co.'s S. S. 

Orillamme ^ 

Calnan Daniel, cartman, dwl 753 Mission, rear 
Calnan Daniel, laborer, dwl 271 First 
Calnan Daniel, laborer with Robert Bell, dwl 120 

Shipley 
Calnan John, fireman Cent. P. R. R. Co.'s steamer 

El Capitan, dwl 67 Minna 
Calnan John J., saddle and harnessmaker, 271 First 
Calnan Patrick, clerk, dwl 143 Natoma 
Calnan Timothy, cabinetmaker, dwl 44 Minna 
Calnan Timothy, laborer New U. S. B. Mint, dwl 

271 First 
Calsing Martin, machinist, dwl 16 Louisa 
Calver Samuel, carpenter H. C. League, 128 Kearny 
Calverley Robert, saloon N W cor Folsom and Third, 

dwl 726 Harrison 
Calvert Henry W., dentist, office and dwl 209 

Geary 
Calvert John, (Painter Sf C.) dwl 724 Wash 
Calvert John, builder, dwl 706 Sutter 
Calvert John T, bricklayer, dwl 1302 Taylor 
Calvert William, dentist,' office and dwl 209 Geary 
Calvin James, seaman, dwl 112 Steuart 
Camacho Antonio, laborer, dwl 116 Jackson 
Cauihernous Alexander, cooper with Leopold 

Juzix, dwl 616 Battery 
Cambers Thomas, shoemaker with Buckingham & 

Hecht, dwl 418| Grove 
Cambrian House, Jenkins & Evans propietors, 403 

Broadway 
Cameuetti Roco, laborer, dwl W s Laguna nr 

Union 
Camerden Michael, dwl Central Road, Byfield 

Ranch 
Camerden M., janitor Laguna Honda School 
Cameron Daniel, shipcarpenter, dwl 318 Beale 
Cameron Elizabeth, (widow) boarding, 312 Beale 
Cameron Elizabeth S. Miss, teacher City Female 

Seminary, dwl 428 Post 



Cameron Hugh, brassfinisher with W. T. Garratt 

&Co. 
Cameron James, bakery, 1780 Folsom 
Cameron James, woodturner with Cameron & Hull, 

dwl 111 Freelon 
Cameron John, shipcarpenter, dwl 1136 Pacific 
Cameron John, seaman, dwl Ss Oregon bet Drumm 

and Davis 
Cameron John, seaman, dwl 26 Steuart 
Cameron John A., bookkeeper with Fordham & 

Jennings, dwl 318 Beale 
Cameron John W., salesman with P. D. Code & 

Co., dwl 146 Tehama 
Cameron J. R., carpenter with P. M. S. S. Co. 
Cameron Julia A., (widow) dwl 10 Powell 
Cameron Mary A., (widow) cigars and tobacco, 

214 Mission 
Camerou Nathan, broker, dwl 258 Jessie 
Cameron Peter A, carpenter H. C. L., 128 Kearny 
Cameron Robert, mate barkentine Melancthou, 1 

Howard 
Cameron William, clerk, dwl 312 Beale 
Cameron William, clerk, dwl 308 Bush 
Cameron William, watchman Cal. P. R. R. Co.'s 

Steamer New World, dwl 661 Front 
Camerou & Hull, (Angus Gamcron and George L. 

Hull) wood turners and bcroll sawyers, 218' 

Steuart and 407 Mission 
Carnes Madame, laundry, dwl 25 Dupont 
Camfield Charles, second assistant-engineer P. M. 

S.S. Co. 
Camlate Frederick, waiter, dwl 164 Clara 
C AMMAN A. & CO., (John W. McAllep) dealers: 

anchors, chains, etc , pier 12 Steuart 
Cammau August, (A. Camman & Go.) dwl 261 

Clara 
Camman Augustus W., freight clerk, dwl 140 Na- 
toma 
Carumet John W., surveyor Odd Fellows' Savings! 

Bank, dwl NE cor Thirteenth and Howard 
Camouz Andre, locksmith, 237 Sutter 
Camp , (widow) dressmaker, dwl W s Dolores 

bet Twenty-third and Twenty-fourth 
Camp Charles, grocer, dwl 75 Clementina 
Camp James M., clerk with Cyrus S. Wright, dwl 

737 Howard 
Camp William, laborer with Whitney & Freese 
Camp William, seaman, dwl 26 Steuart 
Camp. — See Kamp and Kemp 
Campe Frederick, ( Seekamp 4' G.J dwl 218 Second 
Campe Henry, groceries and liquors, SW cor 

Twelfth and Howard 
Campe Henry, seaman, dwl 32 Steuart 
Campbell A. Miss, teacher North Cosmopolitan 

Grammar School, dwl 1220 Jackson 
Campbell Alexauder, (Campbell, Fox & Campbell) 

res Oakland 
Campbell Alexauder, attorney at-law, office 26 Ex- 
change Building, dwl 313 Stockton 
Campbell Alexander, carpenter H. C. League, 128 

Kearny 
Campbell Alexander, laborer, dwl SW cor Battery 

and Green 
Campbell Alexander, oysterstand, 617 Montgomery, 

dwl 18 First 
Campbell Alexander, salesman, dwl 1126 Market 
Campbell Alfred, cook with William Moore, 9 Bdwy 
Campbell Amie Miss, teacher North Cosmopolitan 

School, dwl 1220 Jackson 
Campbell Andrew, hostler with DeVries & Chase, 

dwl 109 Vallejo, rear 
Campbell Annie, (widow) fruits, dwl 1426 Stockton 
Campbell Bernard, fireman, dwl 228 Folsom 
Campbell Bernard, miner, dwl 111 Silver 
Campbell Bernard, miner, dwl 233 Third 
Campbell Catharine Miss, furnished rooms, 233 

Third 

Campbell Catharine, laundry, SW cor Clara Av- 
enue and Alms House Road 



HUNTINGTON, HOPKINS & CO., Agents Jessop & Sons' Steel, Cor. Bush and Marke 



P VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714= and 716 Kearny Street, Jewelry and Albums. 



SAN FRANCISCO ~ C ] DIRECTORY 



141 



Campbell C. E. Miss, teacher Greenwich Street 

Cosmopolitan School, dwl 763 Howard 
Campbell C. E. R., printer, dwl 4:24 Sausom 
Empbell Charles, compositor, dwl 537 Sacramento 
Campbell Charles, teamster with Timothy Ellsworth, 

bds518 Branuan 
fcmpbell Charles P., clerk 316 Montgomery, dwl 

1220 Jackson 
Campbell Charles S., money broker, 607 Clay, dwl 

6 Thompson Avenue 
Campbell Daniel, seaman, dwl NW cor Drumrn 

ami Commercial 
Campbell Daniel W., fitter with T. Curtis & Co., 

res Oakland . 

Campbell Donald, seaman bark Dublin, pier 17 

Steuart 
Campbell Duncan, rigger and stevedore, dwl l<JUb 

Montgomery 
Campbell Duncan P., coalweigher with P. M. b. h. 

Co., dwl Seymour Avenue nr Turk 
Campbell Edward, laborer S. F. & P. Lead Pipe 

and Shot Works 
Campbell Eliza, (widow) dwl 9 Clarence Place 
Campbell Ellen, (widow) dwl 922 Washington 
Campbell Felix, laborer, dwl S s Turk bet Scott and 

Pierce ' 

CAMPBELL, FOX & CAMPBELL, f Alexander 
Campbell, Charles N. Fox and Henry C.Camp- 
bell) attorueys-at-law, olfice 528 California 
Campbell Francis, bookkeeper, dwl 32 Steuart 
Campbell Frank F., laborer, dwl S s Twentieth nr 

Dolores 
Campbell George, (Dickson, De Wolf & Co.) res 

London 
Campbell George, janitor, dwl 114 Stockton 
Campbell George, laborer, dwl W s Potrero nr 

Tweutv-third 
Campbell George, mate Cent. P.R.R. Co.'s steamer 

El Capitan, dwl 3111 Jessie 
Campbell George J., boilermaker Union Ironworks, 

dwl 264 Clementina 
Campbell George K., boilermaker, dwl 2b4 Glem 
Campbell G. W., draymau, dwl cor Buchanan and 

Moulton 
Campbell Harry, collector with Wheeler &. Wilson 

S. M. Co., dwl Codman Place 
Campbell H. D., dwl 411 Sansoui 
Campbell Henry, dwl 320 Sixth 
Campbell Henry, carpenter, dwl 909 Washington 
Campbell Henry C,( Campbell, Fox S>- C.) attor- 
ney at-law, office 5^8 California, res Oakland 
Campbell Isaac, bookstand, N s Washington bet 

Battery and Sansom, dwl 923 Market 
Campbell Isaac W., carriage trimmer with Pollard 
& Carvill Manufacturing Co., dwl 923 Market 
Campbell J., foreman with Charles E. Haseltine 
Campbell J. A., foreman with Massey & Yung, 

dwl 911 Hvde 
Bimpbell James, (Dunn, C. & Co.) dwl 40 Minna 
Campbell James, bookkeeper, dwl 807 Mission 
Campbell James, bootiitter with Bucknigliam & 

Hecht, dwl cor Gondii and Hickory 
Campbell James, clerk 317 Cal, dwl 3 Clarence PI 
Campbell James, conductor N. B. &. M. R.R., 

dwl 316 Fourth 
Campbell James, currier, dwl N s Quinn bet Val- 
encia and Guerrero 
Campbell James A., calker, dwl 75 Minna 
Campbell James A., seaman, dwl 32 Steuart 
Campbell James B., carpenter with Gracier & John- 
son, dwl 113 Ellis 
CAMPBELL JAMES W. H., proprietor Cunning- 
ham's Warehouse, office NW cor Front and 
Green, dwl 1117 Montgomery 
Campbell John, bookkeeper with Pope & lalbot, 

dwl 312 Brannan 
Campbell John, collector, dwl 108 Minna ^ 
Campbell John, expresswagon, dwl W s Kansas bet 
Twenty-second and Twenty-third 



Campbell John, laborer, dwl 147 Third 
Campbell John, poster, dwl International Hotel 
Campbell John, tanner with C O'Donnell, dwl 268 

Brannan 
Campbell John, watchmaker, dwl 705 Greenwich 
Campbell John A., clerk with Tubbs & Co., dwl 

312 Brannan 
Campbell John A., operator Western Union Tele- 
graph Co., dwl 1306 Montgomery 
Campbell John J., porter, 119 Montgomery, dwl 16 

Sutter 
Campbell John P., salesman, 323 Kearny, dwl 743 

Pine 
Campbell John S., carriagemaker, dwl Columbia 

Hotel 
Campbell John W., carpenter H. C. League, 128 

Kearny 
Campbell Joseph F., hairdressing saloon, 266 First 

dwl 21 Clementina 
Campbell Louisa, (widow) seamstress, dwl 230 

Third 
Campbell Louisa A., (widow) dwl 111 Fifth 
Campbell Mary A. , ( widow)laundress,dwl 903 Bdwy 
Campbell Michael, groceries and liquors, SE cor 

Tehama and Fourth 
Campbell Morris S., assay department, U. S. B. 

Mint, res Oakland 
Campbell Murdoch, hardware, 5 Steuart, dwl 1j6 

Third 
Campbell Patrick, dwl N s Twentieth nr Shotwell 
Campbell Patterson A., (Starr Bros., & C.) dwl 

Lick House 
Campbell Peter, laborer with Thomas Braden, dwl 

SW cor Pierce and Eddy 
Campbell Peter, laborer, dwl Ws Geneva bet Bran- 
nan and Townsend 
Campbell Peter, blacksmith with P. M. S. S. Co. 
Campbell Peter, shoemaker, dwl SE cor Harrison 

and Dora 
Campbell Peter H., foreman coiniug department, U. 

S. B. Mint, dwl 1220 Jackson 
Campbell Philip, laborer with S. F. Gas Co., dwl 

513 Minna, rear 
Campbell R. Miss, teacher Silver Street Primary 

School, dwl 1220 Jackson 
Campbell Ralph, type founder with Hagar & Co. 
Campbell Robert, carpenter, dwl 46 Second 
Campbell Robert, carpenter S. F. & P. Sugar Re- 
finery, dwl Rausch nr Folsom 
Campbell Robert, carpenter with P. M. S. S. Co. 
Campbell Robert, J., laborer, dwl 351 First 
Campbell Ruth Miss, teacher Silver Street Primary 

School, dwl 1220 Jackson 
Campbell R. W., mason, dwl Twenty-sixth Avenue 

bet A andB, South S. F. 
Campbell Sophia, (widow) dwl 363 Jessie 
Campbell Thomas, blacksmith Fulton Foundry, dwl 

270 Brannan 
Campbell Thomas, calker with P. M. S. S. Co. 
Campbell Walter C, patternmaker, dwl 872 Miss 
Campbell Warren, clerk with Tyler Curtis & Co., 

dwl 202 Second 
Campbell Will, attorney-at-law, dwl Occidental 

Hotel „ _ , 

Campbell William, calker with Middlemas & Boole 
Campbell William, carpenter, dwl 214 Minna 
Campbell William, carpenter ship Isaac Jeanes, 

pier 17 Steuart 
Campbell William, machinist, dwl 214 First 
Campbell William, paperhanger with George W. 

Clark, dwl 625 Sutter 
Campbell William, piledriver, dwl33Natonia 
Campbell William, shoemaker, dwl 227 Second 
Campbell William, seaman, dwl 26 Steuart 
Campbell William, shipcarpenter, dwl 238 Steuart 
Campbell William, waiter Moses Taylor, Australia 

Campbeil William H., receiver Market Street R.R., 
dwl 1 Willow 



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JOIfES, PULLMAN & CO., 118 Sanborn Street, Silk and Velvet Eibbons. 



WA.TKINS' YO-SEMITE ART GALLERY, 26 Montg. St., opp. Lick House Entrance. 



142 



SAN FRANCISCO ' Q ' DIRECTORY 



Campbell William H., wireworker with J. M. 
Eekfeldt & Co., dwl SW cor Jones and Bay 

Cam] bell William J., agent Goodyear's Dental 
vulcanite Co., office 428 California, dwl 534 Bush 

Campbell William S, office 45 and 46 Montgomery 
Block, dwl 427 Bryant 

Campion Edward, driver with Mary Bennett, dwl 
443 Clementina 

Campion Edward, laborer with Wood Preserving 
Co., dwl 912^ Folsom 

Campion Henry E., laundryman La Grande Laun- 
dry 

Campion Howard, portrait painter, studio and dwl 
240 Montgomery 

Campion Michael, laundryman, dwl 443 Clementina 

Campion Thomas, draymau with California Cracker 
Co., dwl 556 Stevenson 

Campion Thomas, varnisher with N. P. Cole & Co., 
dwl 4 Haywood 

Campioni Emil, pressman with Francis & Valen- 
tine, dwl 315 Montgomery 

Campioni Eugene, dairyman with Hall & Hutchin- 
son, dwl Greenwich ur Scott 

Campner Philip, dwl 17 Sonora 

Campodonico Pasqual, (Campodonico 4" Go.) dwl 
331 Broadway 

Campodonico Stephen, marble works, 1130 Market, 
dwl 1540 Jessie 

CAMPODONICO & CO., (Pasqual Campodonico 
and Charles Cnneo) liquor saloon, 533 Wash 

Camroux & Co., ( Murray 0. CamroHxJm.eTcha.nts 
and commission agents, office 502 Montgomery 

Camroux Murray O., (Camroux 4' Co.)\veB Oak- 
land 

Cafias Manuel, porter with H. T. Holmes & Co., 
dwl cor Valiejo and Montgomery 

Can ivagh Frank, laborer, dwl 432 Broadway 

Canavan Bartholomew, cabinetmaker with P. 
Lei sen f eld, dwl 721 Natoma 

Canavan James, laborer with P. M. S. S. Co. 

Canavan John, foreman with Whitney & Freese 

Canavan Matthew, carriage painter with H. M. 
Black & Co., dwl 15 Ritch 

Canavan Matthew, deputy assessor city and county 
and commissioner Lagnna Survey, dwl 913 Capp 

Canavan Michael, auctioneer, W s Kearny bet 
Washington ami Jackson, dwl W s Kearny bet 
Lombard and Chestnut 

Canavan Michael, hostler with P. Canavan, dwl 
1627 Howard 

CAN vVAN P. H., importer wines and liquors, NW 
cor Front ami California, and City Hall Com- 
missioner, office cor McAllister and Leaven- 
worth, dwl 2103 Hyde 

Canavan Patrick, livery stable, 1629 Howard, dwl 
1627 Howard 

Canavan — See Cannavan and Kennovan 

Candace W. P., sawver with Hobbs, Gilmore & 
Co., dwl 570 Howard 

Candeze Pierre, waiter with Boutinon & Bulland, 
530 Merchant, dwl 7| Tav 

Cam- Alfred, dentist, dwl 14 Herrick 

Cane Gustavus, hairdresser, dwl 37 5 Langton 

Cant- .Fames, firmer, dwl 320 Sansom 

Cane John, pressman, dwl 10 Harlan Place 

Cane Michael, janitor Shotwell Street Primary 
School 

Cane Thomas, waiter Occidental Hotel, dwl 326 
Mason 

Cane William, teamster with Richards & Har- 
rison, dwl 136 Seventh 

Cane — See Cain, Kain and Kane 

Oanepa Augustiuo, barkeeper, 118 Leidesdorff, dwl 
3 Margaret PJace 

Canetto Laurent, wagoumaker with John Dupuy, 
dwl 528 Broadway 

Canetto Martin, wagonmaker, 528 Broadway 

Canfell Morris, teamster, dwl Bluxome ur Fourth 

Can field Charles, farmer, dwl 507 Pacific 



Canfield Hobart, second-assistant engineer P. M. 

S. S. Co. 
Canfield Rufus J., clerk, dwl 827 Broadway, rear 
Canfield William, jeweler, dwl 1411 Stockton, rear 
Cangina Auguste, baker with Charles Youngworth, 

dwl 521 Seventh 
Canham Charles, cook, dwl SW cor Dupont and 

Broadway 
Canham Thomas, teamster with Dana & Codington, 

dwl 1307 Green 
Canham William P., painter, dwl 1712 Pacific 
Caninitte IL, laborer, dwl S s Union nr Laguna 
Canley James Jr., painter, dwl 449 Jessie 
Canley John, fireman steamer Shubrick, dwl 151 

Tehama 
Cannavan Elizabeth Mrs., Beehive Auction, 811 

Kearny, and furnishing tjoods, 510 Montgomery, 

dwl N s Lombard nr Kearny 
Cannavan James, milkman, dwl 16 Clara 
Cannavan James, longshoreman, dwl 47 Ritch 
Cannavan John, longshoreman, dwl 626J Jessie 
Cannavan Maggie Miss, seamstress, dwl 228 Bush 
Cannavan Martin D.. printer with Edward Bosqui 

& Co., dwi 1823 Leavenworth 
Cannavan Michael, dry goods, 811 Kearny, dwl 

N s Lombard nr Kearny 
Cannavan — See Canavan and Kennovan 
Cannes William, sail maker with Thomas Reynolds 
Canuey Christopher C, cutter with I. M. Went- 

* worth «fc Co., dwl 34 Hayes 
Canniff William, conductor Front Street M.&. O.R. 

R., d\v\ 35 Austin 
Canning William, longshoreman with Charles E. 

Haseltine 
Cannon Andrew J., packer with Cutting & Co., 

dwl 57 Stevenson 
Cannon Anton, seaman, dwl 32 Steuart 
Cannon Barnev, laborer California Brass Works, 

dwl 22 Minna 
Cannon Daniel, traveling tobacco agent, dwl 1006 

Clay 
Cannon Edward, filegrinder, dwl 567 Bryant, rear 
Cannon Francis, plasterer, dwl 11 Perry 
Cannon James, bootfitter with Buckingham &, 

Heebt, dwl 4 Lafayette 
Cannon James, foreman with Charles Harley & 

Co., dwl 618 Lombard, rear 
Cannon James, laborer, bds 29 First 
Cannon James, laborer, dwl 216 Mission 
Cannon James, molder City Iron Works, dwl 40 

Minna 
Cannon James, molder Union Iron Works, dwl 148 

Minna, rear 
Cannon James, plasterer, dwl 11 Perry 
Cannon James, wheelwright, dwl 140 Shipley 
Cannon James A., pickler with Cutting &, Co., dwl 

51 Stevenson 
Cannon John, groceries and liquors, 18 Natoma 
Cannon Michael, seaman bark Samoset, pier 11 

Steuart 
Cannon Patrick, fireman, dwl 115 Clark 
Cannon Patrick, laborer, dwl 22 Minna 
Cannon Patrick, niattressmaker with N. P. Cole & 

Co., dwl 1061 Market 
Cannou S., (widow) dwl SE cor Shotwell and 

Twentieth 
Cannon William, dwl E s Boardman Place nrBran 
Cannon William, longshoreman, dwl NE cor Bat- 
tery and Green 
Cannon' William S., steward La Grande Laundry 
Cannopy Jacob, laborer with John G. lis, dwl 

Hinckley ur Kearny 
Canoe Janus, waiter, dwl 515 Pine 
Canon John S., wheelwright, dwl '2l~h Clara 
Canon Robert P., carriagepainter with Kimball 

Manufacturing Co., dwl 217| Clara 
Cantin Joseph, shipcarpenter, dwl SE cor Beale 

and Howard 
Cantin Joseph P., (Cantin & Everett) res Oakland 



HUNTINGTON, HOPKINS & CO., Wholesale Hardware and Iron, Cor. Bush and Market. 



» p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 & 716 Kearny St., Rubber Goods and Umbrellas, 



SAN FRANCISCO f Q ' DIRECTORY 



143 



CANTIN & EVERETT, (Joseph P. Cantin and 
Augustus F. Everett) stockbrokers, 506 Mont 
Cant ler Richard, laborer, dwl 266 Jessie 
Cantley Joseph, laborer S. F. & P. Lead Pipe and 

Shot Works 
bantling Richard, laborer Laborers' Pro. and Ben. 

Ass'n, 814 Howard 
Canton Joseph, calker with P. M. S. S. Co. 
Cantor Jncob, druggist, dwl 233 Sixth 
Cautrell Martha, (widow) dwl S s Willow Avenue 

nr Buchanan 
Cantrell Joseph B., tinsmith with Brittan, Holbrook 

& Co., dwl 1206 Eddy 
Cantrell Thomas G., (Hawkins # C.) dwl 1216 

Laikin 
Cantrovich Julius, porter, 101 Bat, dwl 151 Clara 
Cantrowitz M., merchant, dwl 621 Commercial 
pantos George, (Cantus 8f HnssJ dwl 316 Jessie 
Cantus & Hoss, (George (Jaittus and John HossJ 
groceries and liquors, SW cor Stockton and 
O'Farrell 
Cantwell Marv, dwl 633 California 
Canty Daniel; (Canty % Wagner) dwl 114| Turk 
Canty Daniel, stevedore with Whitney & Freese 
Canty Michael, fruitpeddler, dwl 28 Louisa 
Canty Patrick, shipsmith with Isidore Burns, dwl 

21 Ritch, rear 
Canty Thomas, confectioner, dwl 328 Third 
Canty Thomas F., harnessmaker with Main & Win- 
chester, dwl 28 Louisa 
Cauty Timothy, merchant tailor, 37 Sutter, dwl 16 

Sutter 
Canty William, boilermaker, dwl 26 Minna 
CANTY & WAGNER, (Daniel C 'a nty and Wil- 
liam Wasrner) manufacturers and wholesale 
and retail confectioners, 107 Montgomery 
Cany Charles E., clerk with Samuel J. Clarke, Jr., 

"dwl 552 Mission 
Cany Mary A., Mrs., dwl 552 Mission 
Capett S., pork butcher Metropolitan Market, dwl 

589 Market 
Capitain Francisco, fisherman, dwl Oregon nr 

Davis 
Capital Building, NW cor Pine and Kearny 
CAPITOL MILLS, Deming, Palmer & Co., pro- 
prietors, 115 Commercial and 116 Sac 
Caplice Jacob, malster with Matthew Nunan, dwl 

S s Folsom bet Seventh and Eighth 
Capliss John, brewer, dwl 728 Natoma 
Capp A. J., dwl 906 Market 

CAPP CHARLES S., manager California Immi- 
grant Union, office 316 California, dwl SE cor 
Buchanan and McAllister 
Capp L., weaver Pioneer Woolen Mills 
papprise Joseph, carpenter, dwl NE cor Chestnut 

and Dupont 
Capprise Lizzie Miss, teacher Union Primai'y 

School, dwl NE cor Chestnut and Dupont 
paprini Antonio, ranch hand, dwl NW cor Filbert 

and Franklin 
Capuro Augustiiio, porter, 116 Battery, dwl 6 

Lafayette Place 
Capuro Giuseppe, engineer with Domingo Ghir- 

ardelli, dwl 6 Lafayette Place 
Carabine John, plasterer, dwl 41 Commercial 
Caraffa D. &. Co., bakers, 1309 Dupont 
Caraffa Domenico, (D. Caraffa «£■ Co.) dwl 1305 

Dupont 
Caraher Michael, shoemaker with Charles Donovan, 

dwl 644 Jessie 
Carasco Inez Mrs., dwl 845 Dupont 
Carber George, waiter Lick House 
Carberry Cormick, carpenter, dwl 347 Minna 
Carberry Edward, carpenter with P. M. S. S. Co. 
Carberry James, bootmaker, 573 How, dwl 207 Sec 
Carberry John, carpenter, dwl 17^ Garden 
Carberry Nicholas, laborer, dwl 545 Mission 
Carberry Patrick, carpenter, dwl 257 Octavia 
Carbis John, storekeeper P. M. S. S. Sacramento 



Carbot James, laundryman with S. F. Laundry 
Association, dwl NW cor Fillmore and Turk 

Carcano Robert, porter with Suich ifc Co. 

Curd Duane W., sawyer with W. H. Wing, dwl 
69 Minna 

Card Elisha, plow manufacturer, 304 Market, dwl 
29 First 

Card George, watchman, dwl 405 Main 

Card Russell, (Card & Arnold) dwl Stock Place 

Card & Arnold, (Russell Card and Cyrus Arnold) 
poultry and game, 67 California Market 

Card Stephen, captain, dwl 18 Eddy 

Carder Albert, saloon, W s Kearny bet Jackson aud 
Pacific, dwl 3 St. Charles Place 

Cardiff Miles, shoemaker, dwl 530 Sixth 

Cardiff Richard, plumber, dwl 963 Folsom 

Cardinell John A., collector, dwl 430 Valencia 

Cardinell W. H., Imp. Calkers' Ass'n., 713 Mission 

Cardinet Emile, baker, 722 Lombard 

Cardo Louis, laundryman, dwl cor Greenwich and 
Franklin 

Cardoso John, (John Cardoso & Co.) dwl 116 
Jackson 

Cardoso John & Co., (Francisco Braga) proprie- 
tors Lisbon House, 116 Jackson 

Careta Joseph, cook, 135 Sansom, dwl 815 Pacific 

Carew Charles, conductor N. B.& M. R. R., dwl 
300 Fourth 

Carew John, clerk, dwl 328 Fell 

Carew Thomas, drayman, 115 Battery, dwl 328 
Fell 

Carew Thomas Jr., clerk, dwl 328 Fell 

Carew William, carriagepainter, dwl 328 Fell 

Carey Charles, housekeeper Occidental Hotel, dwl 
Raphael Place 

Carey Cornelius, drayman Golden City Chemical 
Works, dwl NW cor Seventh aud Townseml 

Carey Edward, bootmaker with Buckingham & 
Hecht, dwl cor Gough and Fell 

Carey Eugene W., foreman upholsterer with Good- 
win & Co., dwl cor Sixth and Mission 

Carey James, longshoreman with Charles E. Hasel- 
tiue 

Carey James, seaman barkentine Occident, 1 How- 
ard 

Carey James A., stovemouuter with Brittan, Hol- 
brook & Co., dwl 42 Ecker 

Carey John, shoemaker, dwl 9 Minna 

Carey John H., teacher, dwl 1609 Washington 

Carey Joseph, miner, dwl 814 Sansom 

Carey Maurice, shoemaker with Henry Hinders, 
dwl St. Mary nr Pine 

Carev Michael, conductor Central R. R., dwl 421 
Sixth 

Carey Michael, laborer, dwl 248 Perry 

Carey Michael, waterman, dwl 368 Natoma 

Carey Michael C, bookbinder with Battling & Kim- 
ball, dwl E s Columbia bet Twenty second aud 
Twenty-third 

Carey Patrick, junkdealer, dwl Ws Ellen nr Har 

Carey Simon, laborer with Graves & Co., dwl 161 
Jessie 

Carev Thomas, bricklayer Bricklayers' Pro. Ass'n, 
234 Sutler 

Carey Thomas, laborer, dwl 21 Anna Lane 

Carey Thomas, laborer New U. S. B. Mint, dwl 
14 Boardman Place 

Carey William, laborer with Hancock & Kelso 

Carey — see Cary 

Cargill Andrew, hempworker S. F. Cordage Fac- 
tory, dwl Indiana nr Sierra 

Carl Andrew, groceries and liquors, NW cor Fifth 
and Folsom 

Carl Henry, vegetableman with Saulmann & Lauen- 
stein 

Carle J. A., carpenter H. C. Lengue, 128 Kearny 

Carlen John W., clerk with R. G. Dun & Co., dwl 
1107 Union 

Caiiess Charles, seaman, dwl 112 Steuart 



JONES, PULLMAN &• CO., 116 Sansom Street, Yankee Notions. 



WATKINS' ¥0-SEMITE AKT GALLEKY, 26 Montg. St., opp. Lick House Entrance. 



144 



SAN FKANCISCO [ C DIRECTORY 



Carleton Charles A., driver with Larking Catania. 

dwl 3 St. Mary 
Oarletoo Henry, journalist, dwl 933 Sutter 
Carleton Howard, printer with Dewev ft Co., dwl 

14 Hampton Place 
Carleton John K., bookkeeper with H. H. Noble, 

re.- Oakland 
t Sannders C, night contractor with I. Rich- 

ards, dwl Ss Francisco bet Leav and Hyde 
Carl< ton— Bee Carlton 

Carletti Peter, piledrivei with E. C. Boobai A Co. 
Carlev Edward, molder Empire Foundry 
Carli George, bootmaker, dwl 1235 Dnpont 
Carlin Annie Miss, chambermaid Occidental Hotel 
Carlin Bernard, laborer, dwl S s Eddy bet Scott and 

Devis aiero 
Carlin John, laborer, dwl 32 Ritcb 
Carlin John W., bookkeeper, dwl 620 Post 
Carliu Patrick, blacksmith with William Carlon, 

dwl W s Sansom bet Broadway and Vallejo 
Carlin Boger, teamster, 438 Jackson, dwl 15 Fifth 

Avenue 
Carliu Thomas, painter, dwl W s Guerrero nr 

Twenty-sixth 
Carlin William. f Carlin & Breslin) dwl 2IT Beale 
Carlin William, dwl N s Silver Avenue nr St. Mary's 

College 
Carliu William, horseshoer. 722 Broadwav dwl 733 

Vallejo 
Carlin William, molder Fulton Foundry 
Carliu William, porter with Phillips. Taber Sl Co., 

dwl 532 Turk 
Carliu William H., civil engineer, office 710 Mont 
Carliu & Breslin, (Darnel Carlin and William 
I ooor saloon. "J17 Beale 
E. M. .Mrs., teacher Shotwell Street Pri- 
mary School, dwl 1412 Pine 
Carlisli - special policeman, dwl XE cor 

- nnt and Dnpont 
Carlisle S. H., real estate, dwl 1406 Piue 
Carlisle Thomas S.. liquor saloon, SE cor Mission 

and Fourteenth, dwl 28 Koudel Place 
Carlisle W. E.. steward N. P. Trans. Cos S.S. John 

i. Stephens 
Carlon & Brother, (William and Patrick) black- 
smiths, iis Pacific 
Carlon i trio* 4> Bro.J dwl 418 Pacific 

Carlon William. ( Carlon & B t>. dwl W a - 

bet Broadway and Vallejo 
Carlos Thomas F. restaurant, 103 Washington 
CARLOS TD3DBCIO, saddler, 527 Pacific, dwl 

Clay 
Carlson Andrew, cabinetmaker with X. G. Xorden, 

dwl 627 Branuau 
Carlson C. E.. seaman, dwl 22 Washington 
Carlson Charles, carpenter Mechanics' Mill, dwl 553 

Bryant 
Carlson Charles B., conductor X. B. & M. R. R., 

dwl 327 Fourth 
Carlson Huns H., laborer, dwl 606 Third 
Carlson John, fireman steamer Reform, Jackson 

Street Wharf, dwl -109 Drnmm 
Carlson Lars, cabinetmaker, dwl 670 Mission 
Carlson Martin, laborer Pacific Rolling Mill, dwl 

Potrero Point 
Carlson Olof C. bottler with Eberhardt & Lach- 

man, dwl 322 Second 
Carlson Ulrick, shipcarpenter. dwl 22 Washington 
Carlton Charles reporter S. F. Chronicle," dwl 

Sutrer nr Hvde 
CABLTON CHARLES C. proprietor Empire 

Warehonse, 10 and 22 Beale. dwl >>I1 Foteom 
Carlton Cornelius, laborer, dwl 417 Howard 
Carlton George A., purser Cal. P. R. R. Co.'s 

mer Julia 
Carlton Harriet C, : widow dwl 2022 Bush 
CARLTON HEXRY Jr., igent -E :,a Ins. Co.. 

office 14 Merchants' Exchange, dwl 701 Post 
Carlton Mav Mrs., dwl 212 Kearny 



Carlton Oliver B., fisbdealer Metropolitan Market. 

dwl 24 Oak Avenue, rear 
Carlton Silas M.. contractor uiirhtwork, office SE 

cor Kearny and California, dwl W s Joues bet 

Bay and Francis 
Carlton" Thomas T., tanner, dwl S s Page bet Buch- 
anan and Lagnna 
Carlton William, piledriver with E. C. Boobar & 

Co. 
Carlton William B., purser steamship Kalorama, 

dwl 2022 Push 
Carlyle Irving B.. presideut House Carpenters' 

Eight Hour League Xo 1., 128 Kearny, dwl 14 

Virginia 
Carman William, physician and surgeon, office and 

dwl 047 Howard 
Cannany Cyrus, merchant, dwl 923 Jackson 
Carmauy Cyrus W.. cashier Savings and Loan So- 
ciety, dwl 923 Jackson 
Carmanv John H., (John H. Carman!/ J* '. 

923 "Jackson 
CARMANT JOHN H. A- CO.. publishers Overland 

Monthly. Commercial Herald. Market Review, 

etc.. ofiice 409 Washington 
Carmauy Ringgold, bookkeeper Savings and Loan 

Society, dwl 923 Jackson 
Carmatz Adolph, watchmaker and jeweler. 527 

Sansom. dwl 111 Montgomery Block 
Caruielich Georue. saddle and harnessmaker, 613 

Sansom. dwl 137 Fifth 
Carmell Margaret, [widow] dwl 179 Jessie 
CABMEN ISLAXD SALT WORKS, Holladay 

A- Brenham. ageuts, mill 249 Steuart, office 423 

Front 
Carmichael Daniel, marblecutter. dwl 309 Eighth 
Caruiicbael Xeil, carpenter with Middlemas A 

Boole 
Carmody Edmond, carpenter H. C. League, 123 

Kearny 
Carmody James, stevedore with Whitney A" Fieese. 

dwl' 24 Howard Court 
Carmody John, laborer with Whitney A Freese 
Carmody Mary, | widow) dwl 310 Fourth 
Carmody Martin, solicitor Franklin Hotel 
Carmody Patrick, laborer Cal. Brass Works, dwl 

olSF'lsom 
Carmona Priciliano. carriagemaker with Kimball 

Manufacturing Co.. dwl 10-5 Silver 
Carneby James, clerk with Isaac W. W. Brown, 

dwl SW cor Clementina and Eighth 
Carnegie Andrew, calker with P. M. S. S. Co.. dwl 

Harrison 
Carnell Richard. (Richard Cornell it Co.) dwl cor 

Geary and Brook 
Carnell Richard A Co.. (Simon Zimmcrmann) 

foreign and domestic fruits. 754 Market 
Carnes Frederick A., teacher music, dwl 776 

Howard 
CARNES GEORGE A., librarian Odd Fellows 

Library. 325 Montgomery, dwl 312 Posl 
Carnes John, machinist, dwl 823 Folsoni 
Carney Edward, shoemaker, dwl 27 Rausch 
Carney John, seaman, dwl 12 Steuart 
Carney Peter, longshoremau. dwl 1131 Folsom 
Carney William, "bootmaker U. W. M. B >ot and 

Shoe Manufacturing Co. 
Carney William, currier, dwl E s Harrison bet Six- 
teenth and Seventeenth 
Carney. — St-e Kearney 
Carnogouez Crista, barkeeper with Xicholas Antu- 

novieh. SW cor East and Commercial 
Caro L oois, gents' tarnishing goods. 230 Fifth 
Caro Morris, clothing, 30fi Pa 
Caro Saninel. clothing. 40 Third, dwl 1032 
Caro Wolf, furniture. -323 Dupont. dwl S3 Everett 
Carolau Charles A., barkeeper, dwl 17 9 
Carolau Isabella, (widow - - ..vlor 

CAROLIX JAMES. liquor saloon, SE cor Third 

and Bran nan 



HUNTINGTON, HOPKINS & CO., Agents Jessop & Sons' Steel, Cor. Bush and Market. 



C. P. ViW SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Furnishing Gooda, 



SAN FRANCISCO [ Q ] DIRECTORY 



145 



Carolina Co, (Chinese) cigar manufacturers, 617 

Commercial 
Caronte Joseph, umbrella and parasolmaker, 13 

Geary 
Carpenter Alexander, laborer S.F. Chemical Works, 

dwl E s Dolores nr Eighteenth 
Carpenter Alvin, calker with P. M. S. S. Co. 
Carpenter Augustine D., secretary Bay District Ag- 

ricultural Ass'n,37 Merch Exch, dwl 433 Geary 
Carpenter Charles A., (H. B. Martin $• Co.) dwl 

838 Mission 
Carpenter Daniel, milkranch, S s Filbert nr Octavia 
Carpenter Daniel, physician, dwl 317 Sutter 
Carpenter Dyer A., bookkeeper London & S. F. 

Bank, dwl 433 Geary 
Carpenter Edwin P., jeweler, dwl 442 Green 
Carpenter George, seaman, dwl 32 Steuart 
Carpenter George W., brassfinisher with W. T. 

Garratt & Co., dwl 14 Prospect Place 
Carpenter H. L., carpenter H. C. League, 128 

Kearny 
Carpenter Hugh S. Rev., pastor Howard Presby- 
terian Church, S s Mission bet Third and Fourth 
CARPENTER JOHN, attorney at law, office 29 

Court Block, 636 Clay, dwl 641 Sacramento 
Carpenter John H., teamster with Kershaw & 

Twiug, dwl 926 Harrison 
Carpenter L. B., carpenter H. C. League, 128 

Kea ray 
Carpenter Louis, broommaker, dwl 334 Vallejo 
Carpenter Mary L., (widow) dwl 926 Harrison 
Carpenter Patrick, laborer, dwl E s Mission nr 

Twenty-ninth . 
Carpenter Robert C, machinist, dwl Hayes nr Oc- 
tavia 
Carpenter Thomas, expresswagon, dwl SE cor 

Twenty-second and Church 
Carpenter William, gasfitter, dwl 307 Folsom 
Carpenter William H., dwl What Cheer House 
Carpenter William L., policeman City Hall, dwl 

819 Filbert 
Carpentier Delia Mrs., dwl Virginia bet Jackson 

and Pacific 
Carpentier Edward R., (Clarke & C.J attorney at 

law, office 606 Washington, dwl 33 Kearny 
Carpentier Horace W., attorney at law, office 606 

Washington, res Oakland 
Carpy Charles, expresswagon, 623 Sansom, dwl 12 

Houston 
Carpy Jeanne, (widow) dwl 12 Houston 
Carquillot Jules, laborer with Lemoine, Gambert & 

Co., dwl cor Montgomery and Pacific 
Carr A. L. Mrs., physician, office and dwl 759 Clay 
Carr Bridget, (widow) dwl N s Francisco bet Dn- 

pont and Kearny 
Carr Charles W., debenture clerk Surveyor's Office, 

Custom House, dwl 20 Ellis 
Carr Edward, hostler with Josiah H. Swain, dwl 

6 Zoe Place 
Carr James, boarding and lodging, 112 Steuart 
Carr James, laborer, dwl 11 William 
Carr James, waiter with Donovan & O'Donnell, 

dwl 29 Jessie 
Carr John, gasfitter, dwl 921 Washington 
Carr John Irving, laud agent, office 33 Fourth 
Carr John S., ( William B. Hooper & Co.) res Ar- 
izona City, Arizona Ter 
Carr Joseph, "plumber with P. R. O'Brieu, 646 Mkt 
Carr J. Tyler, (Littlefeld, Webb & Co.) dwl 515 

Bush 
Carr Mark, laborer, dwl 814 Sansom 
Carr Matthew D., (M. D. Carr & Co.) dwl 1016 

Piue 
CARR M. D. & CO., (Charles A. Murdoch and 

Charles L. Crackbon) printers, 532 Clay 
Carr Michael, fireman steamer Louisa, Bdwy Whf 
Carr Michael, seaman, dwl 132 Steuart 
Carr Nicholas E., tailor, dwl N s Twenty-fourth bet 

Bartlett and Mission 



Carr Owen, laborer, dwl 19 Frederick 

Carr Patrick, laborer, dwl 133 Dora 

Carr Peter J., expresswagon, cor Market and Sixth, 

dwl E s Twenty -fifth nr Castro 
Can- Samuel, junkdenler, dwl Ss Ash ur Octavia 
Carr B. N., (widow) dwl 1039 Howard 
Carr Thomas, furniture repairer, dwl 734 Broadway 
Carr Thomas S., freight clerk N. P. Trans. Co's &. 

S. Oritlamme, dwl 112 Natoma 
Carr Thomas W., laborer with Charles Harley &. 

Co., dwl 20 Mission 
Carr William, merchant, dwl 715| Bush 
Carr William B., contractor, office 338 Montgomery, 

dwl NW cor Valencia and Twenty-fifth 
Carr William H., clerk S. F. Post Office, dwl 609 

Folsom 
Carr — -see Karr 

Carradine Sarah Mrs., dwl 234 Folsom 
Carraher Michael, laborer, dwl Fort, Point 
Carraher Patrick, hackmau with James H. Vary, 

dwl Missiou bet First and Second 
Carrau Jean, (Carrau 8f Baratyjt dwl 1235 Miss 
Carrau Joseph, butcher, dwl 1235 Mission 
Carrau Patrick, assistant engineer P. M. S. S. Co. 
Carrau Laurence, (widow) furnished rooms, 540 

Washington 
Carrau & Baraty, (Jean Carrau and Francis 

Baraty) butchers, 1 Clay Street Market 
Carre George, teacher French, Hayes Valley Gram- 
mar School, dwl 540 Howard 
Carreau C. R. Miss, teacher Valencia Street Gram- 
mar School 
Carrere J. Arrowy, real estate, dwl 917 Jackson, 

rear 
Carrick Daniel, engineer, dwl 150 Dora 
Carrick David, engineer steamer Monterey, Wash- 
ington Street Wharf 
Carrick George N., bookkeeper S. F. & P. Sugar 

Co., dwl 715 Ellis 
Carrick James R., milkman, 195 Stevenson 
Carrick Richard, fireman P. M. S. S. Constitution, 

dwl 340 Shipley 
Carrick W., carpenter H. C. League, 128 Kearuy 
Carriere G. H., saloonkeeper, dwl 1024 Powell 
Carriere Jean, laborer, dwl 734 Vallejo 
Carrigan Andrew, salesman with Conroy & O'Con- 
nor, 111 Front 
Carrigan James, shoemaker with S. W. Rosenstock 

& Co. 
Carrigan Joseph, laborer with Dohrmann & Co. 
Carrigan Patrick, fireman with P. M. S. S. Co. 
Carrigan Patrick, hackinan, dwl 553 Mission 
Carrigan Patrick, shoemaker with S. W. Rosenstock 

& Co., dwl 219 Minna 
Carrigan Peter, pantryman N. P. Trans. Co's S. S. 

Pelican 
Carrigan William, laborer Cai. P. R. R. Co's 

steamer Amador 
Carrigg Harry I., pressman with Edward Bosqui 

& Co., dwl 28 Moss, rear 
Carrington Henry, dwl 502 Sixth 
Carringtou Jane Mrs., dwl 836 Sutter 
Carrion M., (widow) laundress, dwl 414 Vallejo 
Carrique John, cellarman with I. Landsberger & 

Co., dwl 322 Union 
Carroll Andrew, laborer, dwl Ss Twenty -fourth bet 

San Jose Avenue and Valencia 
Carroll Anna G. Mrs., milliner and millinery, 107 

Third, dwl SW cor Pacific and Webster 
CARROLL, BRAINARD & CO., (Richard T. 

Carroll, Richard Brainard and William B. 

Carroll) importers, and wholesale wines aud 

liquors, 305 aud 307 Front 
Carroll Brothers, (Patrick and Thomas) groceries 

and liquors, 123 Third • 
Carroll Charles, laborer with Cutting & Co., dwl 

916 Montgomery 
Carroll Daniel, clerk with Daniel Cronin, dwl SE 
cor Turk and Fillmore 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street, Pocket Cutlery and Scissor3. 
10 



WATKINS' YO-SEMITE ART GALLEEY, 20 Montg. 8t., opp. Lick House Entrance. 



146 



SAN FRANCISCO " C " DIRECTORY 



Carroll Daniel, molder Golden State Iron Works, 

dwl 12J Zoe 
Carroll David, grocer, dwl 427 Shipley- 
Carroll David, peddler, dwl SW cor Jessie and 

Ninth 
Carroll Edward, laborer, dwl 538 How T ard 
Carroll Ellen Miss, dressmaker, dwl 210 Pacific 
Carroll Francis P., clerk with Charles Wittram, dwl 

564 Tehama 
Carroll George, seaman, dwl 30 Stenart 
Carroll George, 6eaman, dwl 238 Stenart 
Carroll Heury, poster with Keyt & Co., dwl Oregon 

nr Battery 
Carroll James, (S. F. Laundry Association) dwl 

N W cor Turk and Fillmore 
Carroll James, bootcutter U. W. M. Boot and Shoe 

Manufacturing Co. 
Carroll James, carpenter, dwl 1121 Mission 
Carroll James, captain S. S. Pelican, dwl 34 Te- 
hama 
Carroll James, machinist City Iron Works, dwl 335 

Ritch, rear 
Carroll James, molder Union Iron Works 
Carroll James, salesman with Jones & Co., dwl 964 

Mission 
Carroll James, teamster 'with R. & J. Morton, dwl 

6 O'Farrell Alley 
Carroll James E., (Heathjield, Bog-el <& Co.) res 

Menlo Park 
Carroll James L., salesman, 102 Sausom, dwl 21 

Perry 
Carroll Jeremiah, boilermaker Portland Boiler 

Works, dwl cor Ninth and Mission 
Carroll Jeremiah, cook What Cheer House 
Carroll John, ( Carroll & Deery ) dwl 216 

Minna 
Carroll John,. boilermaker, dwl 81 Clementina 
Carroll John, bootmaker U. W. M. Boot and Shoe 

Manufacturing Co,, dwl 233 Jessie 
Carroll John, drayman with Cutting &, Co., dwl 

210 Pacific 
Carroll John, tilecutter, dwl 53 Beale 
Carroll John. gasfitter with J. K. Prior 
Carroll John, laborer, dwl 45 Everett 
Carroll John, laborer, dwl 115 First 
Carroll John, laborer with P. M. S. S. Co. 
Carroll John, laborer with Larseneur & Sheerin 
Carroll John, lamplighter S. F. Gas Co., dwl 509 

H' iward 
Carroll John, miner, dwl W s Gilbert bet Brannan 

and Townsend 
Carroll John, molder Pacific Iron Works, dwl 212 

Tehama 
Carroll John, plasterer, dwl E s Cook nr Point Lo- 

bos Road 
Carroll John, porter with Carroll, Brainard & Co., 

dwl Jessie nr Second 
Carroll John, shoemaker, dwl 468 Jessie 
Carroll John, teamster with R. & J. Morton 
Carroll John, wood and coal, dwl SW cor Folsom 

and Eleventh 
Carroll John B., boilermaker S. F. Boiler Works, 

dwl 81 Clementina 
Carroll John C, blacksmith N. B. & M. R. R., dwl 

829 Folsom 
Carroll John C, Eureka Bakerv, 108 First 
Carroll John F., barkeeper, 236 Montgomery, dwl 

524 Tehama 
Carroll John F., driver Engine Co. No. 5, S.F.F.D., 

dwl W s Stockton bet Pacific and Broadway 
Carroll John J., porter U. S. A. Medical Purveyors' 

Store, dwl 129 Sixth 
Carroll Luke, stonecutter, dwl W s Lyons bet Post 

and Geary 
Carroll Martin, drayman with Brittan, Holbrook & 
Co.. dwl N s Liberty bet Guerrero and Dolores 
Carroll Mathew, fireman, dwl 214 First 
Carroll Mathew, laborer S. F. Boiler Works, dwl 
St. Nicholas Hotel 



Carroll Michael, boatman, dwl NW cor Francisco 

and Powell 
Carroll Michael, bootmaker, 646 Commercial, dwl 

2 Varenne 
Carroll Michael, drayman, dwl S s O'Farrell bet 

Octavia and Laguna 
Carroll Michael, teamster Golden Gate Park, dwl 

SE cor Buchanan and Tyler 
Carroll Michael T., stonecutter, dwl W s Devisadero 

nr Ellis 
Carroll Owen, machinist, dwl 127 Dora 
Carroll Patrick, f Carroll Brothers) dwl 268 Minna 
Carroll Patrick, blacksmith Bay View & Potrero 

R. R., dwl Potrero 
Carroll Patrick, bookkeeper, dwl 564 Tehama 
Carroll Patrick, laborer, dwl 127 Pacific 
Carroll Patrick, laborer with Hancock & Kelso 
Carroll Patrick, marblecutter witli Larseneur <fe 

Sheerin, dwl cor Bush and Lyons 
Carroll Patrick, porter Mission and Pacific Woolen 

Mills, dwl 157 Minna 
Carroll Patrick, watchman Union Box Factory 
Carroll Peter, laborer, dwl 214 Broadway 
Carroll Peter J., laborer, dwl 4 Beale Place 
Carroll Richard, groceries and liquors, SW cor 

Harrison and Garden 
Carroll Richard, laborer, dwl 214 Broadway 
Carroll Richard T., (Carroll, Brainard & Co. J 

dwl 724 Turk 
Carroll Robert, fireman, dwl 509 Davis 
Carroll Robert, fireman steamer Chin Dn Wan, 

foot Vallejo 
Carroll Sarah, waiter, dwl 304 Third 
Carroll Thomas, f Carroll <& RyauJ dwl 177 Miuna 
Carroll Thomas, (Carroll Brothers) dwl 268 Minna 
Carroll Thomas, dwl 633 California 
Carroll Thomas, bootfitter with Buckingham & 

Hecht, dwl 4 Valencia 
Carroll Thomas, seaman, dwl 106 Steuart 
Carroll Thomas J., compositor Evening Bulletin, 

dwl 335 Broadway 
Carroll Thomas P., auditing department Wells, Far- 
go & Co.'s Fast Freight office, dwl 518 Lomb 
Carroll William, brassfinisher Eagle Brass Foun- 
dry, dwl cor Drumm and Washington 
Carroll William, conductor Omnibus R. R., dwl 

215 Tehama 
Carroll William, driver with Frank G. Edwards, 
Carroll William, gas titter with David Bush, dwl 

cor Greenwich and 'Montgomery 
Carroll William, housemover, dwl 335 Broadway 
Carroll William, porter with William J. Heney & 

Co., 725 Market 
Carroll William, serviceman S. F. Gas Co., dwl 

851 Folsom 
Carroll William B., (Carroll, Brainard & Co.) dwl 

104 Eighth 
Carroll William II., clerk with McDonald & Gavan, 

dwl 120 Perry 
Carroll & Deery (John Carroll and Francis 

Deery) poultiy and game, 14 Metropolitan Mkt 
Carroll & Ryan, { Thomas Carroll and Lons J. 

Ryan) liquor saloon, 41 Third 
Canon William D., clerk, 304 Cal, dwl 927 Folsom 
Carruth James, laborer N.P. Trans. Co.'s S.S. Idaho 
Carrutheis Christopher, laborer N. P. Trans. Co.'s 

S.S. Orizaba 
Carnithers George, carpenter and builder, 217 

Kearny, rear, dwl 5 Yerba Buena 
Carrutheis I. Miss, teacher Taylor and Mason Street 

Cosmopolitan Schools, dwl 5 Yerba Buena 
Carrutheis John, driver with Marden & Myrick, 

dwl — Wetmore Place 
Carruthers Samuel G,, bookkeeper with Marden 

& Myrick, dwl 5 Yerba Buena 
Carry William, laborer with Whitney & Freese 
Carson August, seaman ship Lookout, Rincon Wharf 
Carson Bernard, engraver with J. W. Tucker & Co., 

dwl 238 Jessie 



HUNTINGTON, HOPKINS & CO., Wholesale Hardware and Iron, Cor. Bush and Market 



C. P. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Yankee Notions. 



SAN FRANCISCO \ £J " DIRECTORY 



147 



Carson Charles D., assistant engineer with P. M. S. 

S. Co., dwl 30$ Zoe 
Carson George, flourpacker with Edward Kennedy, 

dwl 1208 Powell 
Carson Henry, drayman with J. Everding &. Co., 

dwl S s Water bet Mason and Taylor 
Carson James G., notary public, office 9 Court 

Block, 636 Clay, dwl" 507 Bryant 
Carson John, liquor saloon, Ocean House and San 

Jose' Roads 
Carson John B., clerk with Edward J. Pringle, 

dwl '238 Jessie 
Carson John K., special policeman, dwl 80 Clem 
Carson Lizzie Miss, fringemaker with William 

Englander, dwl 607 Greenwich 
Carson Matthias N., builder, dwl 1520 Broadway 
Carson Olrick, seaman bark Oregon, pier 17 Steuart 
Carson William, (Dolbeer & C .) res Eureka, Hum- 
boldt County 
Carson William, machinist Union Iron Works, dwl 

18 First 
Carson William O., bookkeeper with Titcomb &. 

Williams, dwl 623 Ellis 
Carss Robert, butcher with Richard O'Neill, dwl 

51 Louisa 
Carstens Fred., groceries and liquors, NW cor Bush 

and Dupont, dwl 629 Bush 
Carstens Charles, (Juhn Il/isshage?i & Go. J dwl NE 

cor Jackson and Sansom 
Carstens Frederick, (Lunit8f C.) dwl 728 Market 
Carstens Frederick, porter with J. W. H. Camp- 
bell, dwl N s Union bet Sansom and Battery 
Carstens John H., clerk with John C. Blakwadel, 

dwl SW cor Montgomery and Union 
Carsten P., laborer, dwl NW cor Eighth and Bryant 
Carstensen Julius, with John Horstman, dwl 700 

Bush 
Carstensen P. A., laborer California Sugar Refinery, 

dwl cor Eighth and Bryant 
Carswell George W., drayman, dwl 428 Hayes 
Carten Francis, bookkeeper with E. Commins & Co. 
Carter A. B., lieutenant U. S. Naval Rendezvous, 

Government House, dwl Grand Hotel 
Carter Abraham j bookkeeper S. F. Gas Co., dwl 

445 Bryant 
Carter Benjamin, (colored) housecleaner, dwl E s 

Washington Avenue nr Howard 
Carter C. Miss, teacher Powell Street Primary 

School, dwl 1915 Sacramento 
Carter Charles, paperhauger, dwl 13 Langton 
Carter Charles D., clerk with Daly &. Hawkins, 

dwl 1103 Jackson 
Carter Charles H., plasterer, office 326 Montgomery, 

dwl 120 Olive Avenue 
Carter Clementina Madame, clairvoyant physician, 

4 John 
Carter C. N., clerk Cosmopolitan Hotel 
Carter Cornelius, laborer, dwl 6 Williams 
Carter David, seaman, dwl 411 Drumm 
Carter Edward, bootfitter with Buckingham & 

Hecht, dwl 512 Stevenson 
Carter Edward W., hostler, 331 Pine, dwl SE cor 

Harrison and Seventh 
Carter Frank, driver with B. D. Bowers, dwl 761 

Mission 
Carter Frederick S., clerk, 415 Cal, dwl 1915 Sac 
Carter George, laborer with P. M. S. S. Co. 
Carter George, longshoreman, dwl S s Union bet 

Sausom and Battery 
Carter George B., (colored) porter, dwl 4 John 
CARTER GEORGE R., exchange, 206 Montgom- 
ery, dwl Union Club 
Carter Gilbert, mate brig Hesperian, foot Fremont, 

dwl 238 Steuart 
Carter J. Heneage, show manager, dwl 433 Shipley 
Carter James, seaman steamer Kalorama, Washing- 
ton Street Wharf 
Carter John, clerk, cor|0'Farrell and,Dupont, dwl 8 

Natoma 



Carter John C, foreman New York Livery Stable 

dwl 712 Mission 
Carter John F., carpenter Eureka Foundry, dwl 

212 Post 
Carter John T., secretary Land Mortgage Union, 

dwl 1915 Sacramento 
Carter John W., ( Foot.e & C.J attorney at law, 

office 25 and 26 Montgomery Block, dwl 202 

Second 
Carter John Warren, bookkeeper with R. & J. 

Morton, dwl 508 O'Farrell 
Carter Lizzie Miss, milliner and millinery, 147 Third, 

dwl American Exchange 
Carter Michael, laborer, dwl W s York nr Butte 
Carter Myron H., drayman with Armes & Dallam 
Carter Nicholas, teamster, dwl W s Boyce nr Point 

Lobos Road 
Carter Peter, wharfinger Broadway Wharf, dwl 

1213 Kearny 
Carter Rebecca T., (widow) teacher South Cosmo- 
politan School, dwl 407 Folsom 
Carter Richard W., porter Arlington House, dwl 

717 Howard 
Carter Robert W., real estate broker, office 304 

Montgomery 
Carter Samuel J., salesman with Hooker & Co., 

dwl 525 Folsom 
Carter Sarah, (widow) dwl 13 Langton 
Carter Thomas S., carpenter and shipjoiner, dwl 

426 Shotwell 
Carter T. J. Miss, teacher Spring Valley Grammar 

School, dwl 924 Pine 
Carter Walter, clerk with Brittan, Holbrook & 

Co., dwl 611 Folsom 
Carter William, (colored) carpetcleaner, 326 Third 
Carter William, seaman, dw) 37 Pacific 
Carter William H., (colored) porter with George 

H. Howard, dwl 11 Bernard 
Carter William H., stevedore with Charles E. Has- 

eltine, dwl Sansom bet Bdwy and Vallejo, rear 
Carter William W., bookkeeper, 512 Market, dwl 

741 Howard 
Cartier Charles, lapidary, dwl 531 Broadway 
Cartier Victor, jeweler with California Jewelry 

Co., dwl 317 Broadway 
Carthcart James L., ( L. N. Handy & Co. J dwl 27 

Stone 
Carthy Stephen, lab New U. S. B. Mint, dwl 8 Zoe 
Carto Benjamin, carpenter, dwl 431 Grove 
Carton Joseph, laborer with Spence & Johnson, 

93 California Market 
Carton Peter S., dwl 801 Filbert 
Cartmen's Association, rooms 824 Howard 
Cartwright A. D., clerk Cent. P.R.R., res Oakland 
Cartwright David, teamster with George B. 

Knowles, dwl 26 Howard 
Cartwright James, (Scott & C. J dwl 509 Wash 
Cartwright Thomas, with Marden &. Myrick, dwl 

SE cor Greeuwich and Powell 
Cartwright Thomas, captain schooner Charlotte, dwl 

1335 Pacific 
Carty James, blacksmith Cal. P. R. R., dwl Broad 

way bet Mont and Kearny 
Carty Luke, groceries and liquors, 420 Union 
Carty Martin, laborer, dwl cor Francisco and Jones 
Carty Paul, special policeman, dwl 402 Greenwich 
Carty William S., carriagemaker with R. M. Hiller, 

dwl 19 Ritch 
Carvalho Alexander, porter Savings' and Loan So- 
ciety, dwl 621 Clay 
Carvalho Elizabeth, ,' widow) dwl SWcor Columbia 

and Twenty-fourth 
Carver John, seaman, dwl 106 Jackson 
Carver Benjamin, deputy U. S. Marshal, dwl 13 

Anthony 
Carviglia Agostino, laborer with Brignardello, 

Macchiavello & Co,, dwl Garibaldi House 
Carvill Almon D., clerk with Pollard & Carvill 

Manufacturing Co., dwl 5 Stockton 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street, "White Goods. 



WATKINS' YO-SEMITE ART GALLERY, 26 Montg. St., opp. Lick House Entrance. 



148 



SAN FRANCISCO " Q " DIRECTORY. 



Carvill Orrin S., president Pollard & Carvill Manu- 
facturing Co., dwl N s Jessie bet Third aud 
Fourth 

Carwan Hugh, laborer with R. & J. Morton 

Cary Brothers, (Hugh, Thomas and Edward) 
farmers, bet Lake Merced and Ocean 

Cary Edward, (Gary Brothers) dwl nr Lake 
Merced 

Cary Edward, laborer, dwl Sierra Nevada Lodgings 

Cary Hugh, (Car.y Bros.) dwl nr Lake Merced 

Cary Isaac 6., (colored) hairdresser, 640 Clay, dwl 
"924 Washington 

Cary James, rigger, dwl 412 Folsoru 

Cary James, seaman, dwl 112 Steuart 

CARY JAMES C, attorney-at-law, office 507 Mont- 
gomery, dwl 810 Chestnut 

Cary Lawrence, molder Union Iron Works, dwl 57 
Shipley 

CARY LUTHER H., collector U.S. Internal Reve- 
nue, office U. S. Court Building, res Oakland 

Cary Michael, laborer, dwl 308 Fremont 

Cary Peter, bricklayer, dwl N s Jersey bet Church 
and Yicksburg 

Cary Silas D., real estate, dwl NE cor Hayes and 
Grove 

Cary Thomas, (Cary Brothers) dwl nr Lake 
"Merced 

Cary Thomas, butcher with Smith & Mann, dwl 
First Avenue nr Railroad Avenue 

Casaliui Salvatore, cook, dwl 834 Vallejo, rear 

Casamavou Auguste, cook with Milton S. Latham, 
638 Folsom 

Casanova Giuseppe, laborer with Cadenasso & Tu- 
bino, 515 Merchant 

Casanova Henry, (F. Daneri & Co.) dwl 1007 
Union 

Casco Joseph, furniture, 353 Third 

Case Elijah, real estate, dwl W s Fifteenth Avenue 
nr Eighteenth Avenue, South S. F. 

Case George, drayman with U. S. Drayman, dwl 10 
Antonio 

Case George, driver Central R.R, 

Case George A., jobwagon, NE cor Pine and Mont- 
gomery, dwl 1606 Larkin 

Case George F., newspaper carrier, dwl 925 Sutter 

Case Joseph D., wharfinger Alameda Ferry Wharf, 
dwl S s Twenty-fifth bet Castro and Diamond 

Case Josiah, hostler, dwl 1810 Powell 

CASEBOLT HENRY, president Front Street, 
Mission and Ocean Railroad, office 1336 Bush, 
(and J. D. Casebolt & Co., and Casebolt & 
Kerr) dwl 1108 Pierce 

Casebolt Jacob D., (J. D. Casebolt & Co.) dwl 220 
Third 

CASEBOLT J. D. & CO.. (Henry Casebolt and 
Thomas G. Taylor) importers and dealers car- 
riage hardware, lumber and wagon materials. 
24 and 26 Beale 

Casebolt Majry A. Miss, teacher Washington Gram- 
mar School, dwl 335 Jessie 

CASEBOLT & KERR, (Henry Casebolt and 
David Kerr) car and carriage manufactory, 
SW cor Market and Fifth 

Caselli Alexander, with Pioche & Bayerque, dwl 
754 Washington 

Casemayou Victor, waiter, dwl 16 Sutter 

Casement William K., conductor Citv R. R. dwl 
S s Sixteenth bet Valencia aud Mission 

Casey Annie Miss teacher, dwl 225 Minna 

Casey Daniel, laborer, dwl N s Hinckley nr Mont 

Casey Daniel, laborer with Woodhams & Ludlum, 
dwl SE cor Montgomery and Broadway 

Casey Daniel, piledriver with E. C. Boob a r & Co. 

Casey Daniel, woodturner California Plauiug Mill, 
dwl cor Eddy aud Van Ness Avenue 

Casey Daniel J., blacksmith with H. M. Black & 
Co., dwl W s Wash Av bet Mission and Howard 

Casey Edward W., U. S. district officer, dwl 1208 
Sutter 



Casev Eugene M., gasfitter with E. T. Boyd, dwl 

441 Natoma 
Casey Frank, bootmaker, dwl 5 Oak 
Casey Frank, porter with A. C. Nichols & Co., dwl 

JNE cor Eighteenth and Harrison 
Casev Henry, clerk County Recorder's office, dwl 

435 Eddy 
Casey James, (Casey & Barthrop) dwl 6 Antonio 
Casey James, boarding stable, S s Fourteenth nr 

Mission 
Casey James, expresswagon, cor Mission and Third 
Casey James, hostler, dwl 33 Jessie 
Casey James, laborer Cent. P.R.R., dwl 411 Bryant 
Casey James, laborer Pacific Rolling Mill, dwl Pot- 

rero Point 
Casey James B., carpenter, dwl 202 Fifth 
Casey Jeremiah, laborer, dwl S s Fourteenth bet 

Mission aud Howard 
Casey John, coppersmith with Thomas Reynolds, 

dwl W s Salmon bet Pacific and Broadway 
Casey John, laborer, dwl 90 Stevenson, rear 
Casey John, laborer S. F. Gas Co., dwl 50 Baldwin 

Court 
Casey John, policeman City Hall, dwl 531 Howard 
Casey John, porter Lick House 
Casey John, shoemaker with S. W. Rosenstock & 

Co., dwl 606 Stevenson 
Casey John, teamster with George B. Knowles, dwl 

214 Austin 
Casey John C, tanner and currier with Main &. 

Winchester, dwl NE cor Gough and Union 
Casey Joseph, clerk with Thomas N. Cazueau, dwl 

cor Twenty -fourth aud Capp 
Casey Joseph, tailor, dwl 207 Tehama 
Casey Kate Miss, teacher Pine and Larkin Street 

Primary School, dwl 1901 Polk 
Casey Maggie Miss, domestic Occidental Hotel 
Casey Matthew, clerk, dwl SW cor Hyde and Rus- 

sell 
Casey Michael, carpenter, dwl 1596 Bush 
Casey Michael, carpenter and builder, 1212 Larkin 
Casey Michael, jigsawyer with Chr. Schreiber & 

Co., dwl 504 Ellis 
Casey Michael, laborer with Hancock & Kelso 
Casey Michael, teamster with Kershaw & Twing, 

dwl 17 Spear 
Casev Michael F., bootmaker with Buckingham &. 

Hecht 
Casey Owen, carpenter, dwl S s Harrison bet 

Eighth and Chesley 
Casey Owen, expresswagon, cor Third and Harrison, 

dwl N s Bryant nr Dora 
Casey Patrick, laborer Golden Gate Park, dwl E s 

Nevada bet Folsom and Harrison 
Casey Patrick, painter, dwl 314 Tyler 
Casey Patrick, seaman, dwl 32 Steuart 
Casey Richard, carpenter, dwl 561 Bryant 
Casey Thomas, bricklayer Bricklayers' Protective 

Association, 234 Sutter 
Casey Thomas, wharfinger Front Street Wharf, 

dwl 217 Third 
Casey Thomas, woodsawyer, dwl 117 Bernard 
Casey Thomas F., steward Hose Co. No. 2, S. F. F. 

D., dwl S s Folsom nr Beale 
Casey William, laborer, dwl N s Natoma nr Tenth 
Casey William, porter Cosmopolitan Hotel, dwl 1 J 6 

William 
Casey William, special policeman, dwl cor Chestnut 

and Dupont 
Casey & Barthrop, (James Casey and Edward 

Barthrop) butchers, 432 Geary 
Cash Francis, cook Sander's Hotel 
Cash George A., butcher, dwl 220 Sixth 
Cash George A. Mrs., dressmaker, 220 Sixth 
Cash Patrick, carpenter, dwl 514 Howard 
Cash Rose, (widow) dressmaker, 22 Second 
Cashan Richard, laborer with Earl Kerr, dwl 903 

Battery 
Cashell Frank, longshoreman with C. E. Haseltine 



HUNTINGTON, HOPKINS & CO., Agents Jessop & Sons' Steel, Cor. Bush and Market. 



C. P. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Clothing, etc. 



SAN FRANCISCO " Q ] DIRECTORY 



149 



Casbin Benjamin, laborer with John Henderson Jr., 

dwl S s Vallejo ur Montgomery 
Cashin Catherine, bookfolder, dwl 510 Minna 
Cashin Richard, bootcutter, dwl 1028 Market 
Cash man Daniel, conductor Otnuibus R.R., dwl 721 

Howard 
Cashman Dennis, laborer, dwl 8 Silver 
Cashman James, calker, dwl 409 Folsom, rear 
Cashman John, laborer with Charles E. Haseltine 
Cashman John, molder Risdon Iron Works, dwl 

cor Broderick and Fulton 
Cashman Maurice, carpenter with Middlenias & 

Boole, dwl 2ti Rincon Court 
Cashman William, shipcarpenter with Middlemas 

& Boole, dwl 26 Rincon Place 
Cashni R., bootmaker with I. M. Wentworth & 

Co., dwl 34 Hayes 
Caskel S. & Co., ( William Wolf 'sohnj importers 

clothing, 225 Sansom 
Caskel Samuel, (S. Caskel dp Go.) res New York 
Caskin Dennis, laborer S.F. Gas Co., dwl cor Third 

and King 
Caslon James, carpenter with Middlemas & Boole 
Cason Csesar, (Dubois & C.J dwl E s Washington 

nr Brenham Place 
Cason Isaac, salesman with Adams, Biinn & Co., 
dwl W s Washington Avenue nr Twenty- 
eighth, Bernal Heights 
Caspar Jacques, polisher with Whittier, Fuller & 

Co., dwl 536 Broadway 
Caspari Otto, (Rodgers, Meyer & Co.) res Liver- 
pool, England 
Casper Augustus, laborer, dwl 77 Stevenson, rear 
Casperson Martin, upholsterer, dwl 137 Third 
Cass Richard, driver Central R. R., dwl E s Stev- 
enson bet Nineteenth and Twentieth 
Cass Robert, wool sorter, dwl E s First Avenue nr 

Fifteenth 
Cass William, carpenter City R.R., dwl 26 Louisa 
Cassara Peter, game, poultry and eggs, 503 Sausom 
Cassebohni William, (Bluxome <& C.J dwl 804 

Jones 
Cassell James, teamster, dwl E s Mission nr Gody 
Cassell Joseph, brickmasou, dwl 227 Eighth 
Casselman J. R., saloonkeeper, dwl Seeger's House 
Cassens Henry, express, cor Market and Geary, dwl 

607 Greenwich 
CASSERLY EUGENE, attorney-at-law and U. S. 

Senator, office 507 Montgomery 
Casserly F., waiter Cosmopolitan Hotel 
Casserly John, bookkeeper with Patrick Casserly, 

dwi NE cor Sansom ind Broadwav 
CASSERLY PATRICK, proprietor Railroad 

House, NE cor Sausom and Pacific 
Cassidy Charles, machiiiehand with L. & E. Eman- 
uel, dwl NW cor Berry and Fourth 
Cassidy Edward, butcher with Watson D. Litch- 
field, dwl 614 Bush 
Cassidy Ellen, (widow) private school, E s Hyde 

bet Pacific and Broadway 
Cassidy Francis, shipcarpenter, dwl S s Serpentine 

Avenue nr Twenty-Sixth 
Cassidy Frank, laborer Cal. P. R. R. Co.'s steamer 

Sacramento 
Cassidy Hugh, peddler, dwl W s Natoma bet Four- 
teenth and Fifteenth 
Cassidy J. Henry, laborer with P. M. S. S. Co. 
Cassidy John, expresswagou, cor Market and 

Fourth, dwl 233 Jackson 
Cassidy John, expresswagon, cor Third and Everett, 

dwl 25 Everett 
Cassidy John, horsetrainer, dwl N s Pt. Lobos Road 
Cassidy John, laundrymau Cosmopolitan Hotel 
Cassidy John C, assistant steward Pacific Club, dwl 

548 Jessie 
Cassidy John H., engineer, dwl NW cor First and 

Bryant 
Cassidy John J., steward, dwl Crescent Avenue nr 
Porter, Bernal Hights 



Cassidy John T., (Kennedy # C.J dwl 733 Market 
Cassidy Mary, (widow) furnished rooms, 30 Post 
Cassidy Michael, mariner, dwl 21 Frederick 
Cassidy Michael, seaman N. P. Traus. Co.'s S. S. 

California 
Cassidy Patrick, laborer, dwl 1184 Harrison 
Cassidy Philip, dwl E s Gilbert bet Brannan and 

Townsend 
Cassidy Thomas, shipcarpenter with P. M. S. S. Co., 

dwl Serpentine Avenue nr Twenty-sixth 
Cassidy William, laborer Pacific Rolling Mill, dwl 

Potrero Point 
Cassidy William, shipcarpenter, dwl 17 Minna 
Cassie William, engineer with Eisen Brothers, dwl 

cor Haight and Lyon 
Cassie William, silversmith with Schultz, Fischer & 

Mohrig, dwl cor Haight and Lyon 
Cassin Anthony, dwl What Cheer House 
Cassiu Dennis, "laborer, dwl 720 Third 
Cassin F. & P. J., wholesale wines and liquors and 

rectifiers, 523 Front 
Cassiu Francis, (F. $■ P.J. CassinJ dwl 554 Jessie 
Cassin Francis Jr., clerk with F. & P. J. Cassin, 

dwl 544 Jessie 
Cassin Henry J., clerk, dwl 537 Sacramento 
Cassin James, teamster, dwl cor Twenty-niuth and 

Mission 
Cassin John, teamster, dwl cor Twenty-ninth and 

Mission 
Cassiu Joseph, merchant, dwl 284 Minna 
Cassin Martin, boottitter, dwl 245 Clementina 
Cassiu Mary F. Miss, teacher music and languages, 

dwl 544 Jessie 
Cassin Patrick, liquor saloon, San Jose Road nr 

Six Mile House 
Cassin Patrick J., (F. &P.J. CassinJ dwl 32 Har- 
riet 
Cassin Peter, shoemaker, dwl E s Valencia bet Fif- 
teenth and Sixteenth 
Cassin William, machinist, dwl Berry House 
Cassou Peter, milkianch, cor Silver Av and Girard 
Cassou Peter, real estate agent, office 328 Montgom- 
ery, dwl 835 Clay 
Cast Fred, grocer, dwl 629 Bush 
Castagnet Dominic, groceries and liquors, 1115 

Dupont 
Castagnetto Peter, groceries and liquors, 1132 Dup 
Castagnino Emanuele, builder and contractor, NW 

cor Taylor and Greenwich 
Castanas Bartolo, real estate, office 535 Clay, dwl 

526 Sutter 
Castel Francis, furniture, 809 Clay 
Castelhun Frederick J., attorney-at-law, office 607 

Kearny, dwl 12}0 Larkin, rear 
Castell George C, engineer U. S. A. Q. M. steamer 

McPherson, dwl 111 Silver 
Castellano Mary Mrs., laundress, 928 Pacific 
Castello Henry C, deputy superintendent Indus- 
trial School, dwl 26 Stone 
Castello James, calker with P. M. S. S. Co. 
Castera Charles, (Castera & Constant) dwl 724 

Washington 
Castera & Constant, (Charles Castera and Gillet 

Constant) hairdressers and wigmakers, 724 

Washington 
Castice Nicholas, restaurant, 119 Third 
CASTLE BROTHERS, (Frederick L. Castle) 

wholesale groceries and provisions, 213 and 215 

Front 
Castle Charles H, engineer with Steiger & Bolaud, 

dwl 18 Freelon 
Castle Frederick L., (Castle Bros.) dwl 1112 Bush 
Castle John, baker, dwl 20 Hinckley 
Castle John, cartman superintendent streets, dwl 

SE cor Twenty-ninth and Mission 
Castle Michael, capitalist, office 213 Front, dwl 621 

O'Farrell 
Castle Stephen, laborer, dwl NW cor Francisco and 

Powell 



JOJNES, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street, Suspenders and Neck Ties. 



WATKINS' YO-SEMITB AET GALLERY, 26 Montg. St., opp. Lick House Entrance. 



150 



SAN FRANCISCO \ Q ' DIRECTORY 



Castle Stephen W., (Castle % Denannyj dwl 709 

Montgomery 
Castle Walter M., clerk with Castle Brothers, dwl 

ill-' Bush 
Castle William, laborer with John Reagen, dwl 616 

Kearny 
Castle & Denauny, (Stephen IF. Castle, and John 

Denanny) drygoods, 709 Montgomery 
Caetner Charles A., (Strang & C.J dwl SW cor 

Napa and Illinois 
Castor Joseph, brewer Philadelphia Brewery, dwl 

228 Second 
Castorena Jesus, billiard tablemaker with Drouil- 

hat & Cavan, dwl 1302 Powell 
Castro Manuel, dwl Portsmouth House 
Castro Stefana Miss, seamstress, dwl SW cor Du- 

pont and Broadway 
CastyJohn, seaman, dwl 133 Folsom 
Caswell E. E. Mrs., millinery, 10 Montgomery, dwl 

337 Jessie 
Caswell George E., bookkeeper, 10 Montgomery, 

dwl 337 Jessie 
Caswell Harvey, merchant, dwl 535 Post 
Caswell Joseph, seaman, dwl -111 Drnmro 
Caswell Wiliam, chophouse, NE cor Folsom and 

Steuart, dwl -1-19 First 
Cataline Alice Madame, dwl 536 Broadway 
Catania Joseph, (Larkins & C.J dwl E s Haven 

Place 
Cater Antoine, longehoreman with Charles E. Ha- 

seltine 
Cater Frank, longshoreman, dwl SW cor Pacific 

and Front 
Cates A. B., carpenter H. C. League, 128 Kearny 
dates Joseph B., cabinetmaker with W. G. Weir, 

dwl 219 Ninth 
Cath arena Manuel, dwl 5 St. Marv's Place 
Cathcart A. B., clerk with Edward F. Hall & Co., 

dwl 3 Twelfth 
Cathcart Charles L., clerk, 418 Market, dwl W s 

Twelfth nr Market 
Cathcart James, cooper with John H. Schuman, dwl 

639 Minna 
Cathcart Maurice, porter Grand Hotel, dwl 137 Na- 

toma 
Cathcart William, master mariner, dwl 6 Twelfth 
Cathcart William S. Mrs., dwl 921 Pacific 
Cathel George, longshoreman with C. E. Haseltine 
Catherwood Edwin C, commission merchant, office 

431 California, dwl 832 O'Farrell 
CATHOLIC GUARDIAN, (weekly) F. Dillon 

Eagan editor. office 407 Sansom 
Cathrie William, carpenter with P. M. S. S. Co. 
Catlin B. T., messenger naval office, Custom House, 

dwl 249 Ritch 
Catlin Percival H., (Catlin & WoodsJ dwl 367 

Jessie 
Catlin & Woods, (Percival H. Catlin and Preston 

Wooilsj fruits, 13 Fourth 
Catlow Joseph, (Cation- & Ham) dwl 310! Tehama 
Catlow & Ham, (Joseph Catlow and Richard Ham) 

meat market, E s Sixth bet Howard and Tehauia 
Catoir Johanna, (widow) nurse, dwl 157 Perry 
Catoir Julius, butcher with Flynu & Co., dwl 1217 

Kearny, rear 
Caton Francis, longshoreman with C. E. Haseltine 
Caton George R., tailor, dwl E 6 White Place bet 

Green and Vallejo 
Caton John, deck hand steamer Cora, dwl 23 

Vallejo 
Catondal George, waiter with Jacques & Mortier, 

dw 7 l 805 Montgomery 
Cattarina Emanuel J.," (Valentine Jj- C.J dwl 7 

St. Mary's Place 
Cattarina Matthew M., salesman with B. C. Horn 

& Co., dwl 7 St. Mary's Place 
Catter Cornelius, laborer with Charles E. Haseltine 
Catterall Thomas, carpenter, dwl E s Cook nr Point 

Lobos road 



Catton Charles H., clerk with William N. Olmsted, 

dwl 1417 Taylor 
Catton Frederick R., clerk Imperial Fire Insurance 

Co.. dwl 1417 Tavlor 
Catton John C, broker, dwl 1417 Taylor 
Catton Walter D., clerk with Charles McC. Delany, 

dwl 1417 Tavlor 
Catton William M., clerk with Dickson, De Wolf 

& Co., dwl 1417 Taylor 
Canghlin Daniel, stableman, dwl 33 Tehama 
Cauldwell Charles H., (colored) steward, dwl Ss 

Bernard bet Taylor and Jones 
Cauldwell John, pantryman N. P. Trans. Co., dwl 

N s Brannan nr Second 
Cauldwell John J., steward P. M. S. S. Co., dwl 

N s Brannan nr Second 
Caullield Henry, boilermaker Union Iron Works, 

dwl 228 Ritch 
Caullield Michael, shoemaker with John Sullivan, 

dwl NE cor Jackson and Battery 
Caulfield Patrick, boilermaker Union Iron Works, 

dwl 228 Ritch 
Caulis W. G., shoemaker with Orrin Jones, dwl 

Folsom nr Sixteenth 
Caulker John, cook, dwl Es Clinton bet Brannan 

and Towneend 
Cauly John, laborer, dwl 30 Natoma 
Causman Henry, steward steamer Chin du Wan, 

dwl Jackson bet Front and Davis 
Cautley Gilbert, laborer, dwl 559 Bryant 
Cavagnaro Felice, marbleworker, dwl 14 Union 

Place 
Cavagnaro Frank, bootmaker, 1516 Stockton 
Cavalletti Charles D., fish, 12 Pacific Fruit Market, 

res Oakland 
Cavalli Andrea, machinist, 620 Commercial, dwl 

Hush nr Van Ness Avenue 
CAVALL1ER J. B E., stockbroker, office 509 

California, dwl 220 Turk 
Cavallier Jules P., clerk with J. B. E. Cavallier, 

dwl 220 Turk 
Cavan George, ( Drouilhat & C.J dwl 913 Union 
Cavan James D, machine hand California Planing 

Mill, dwl 630 Mission 
Cavanagh Edward, shipsmith with A. Muii & Co., 

dwF615 Vallejo 
Cavanagh Frank, porter with Taylor & Co., dwl 37 

•Natoma 
Cavanagh James, laborer, dwl Sierra Nevada Lodg- 
ings 
Cavanagh James, packer with Cutting & Co., dwl 

636 Commercial 
Cavanagh John, machinist, dwl Berry House 
Cavanagh John, woodcarver, dwl 37 Natoma 
Cavanagh John D., bricklayer, dwl 417 Stev- 
enson 
Cavanagh Matthew, miner, dwl 37 Natoma